Vietnamese Oven-Baked Cornish Game Hens

July 1, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes | Leave a comment
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Here’s a recipe for a Vietnamese Oven-Baked Cornish Game Hens. Some of the ingredients you’ll be needing to make this dish are Cornish Game Hens, Spices, White Wine, Shallots, MAGGI Seasoning Sauce, Sugar, Chinese Five Spice, Honey, Rice, and more! The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Vietnamese Oven-Baked Cornish Game Hens
Cornish game hens seem so upscale. These require some effort in preparation, but the results are worth it.

Recipe Ingredients:
3 Cornish game hens
2 tablespoons salt
1 1/4 cups dry white wine
1 cup MAGGI Seasoning Sauce
1 cup peeled, finely chopped fresh ginger
2 shallots, finely chopped
8 cups water
1/2 cup granulated sugar
6 whole star anise pods
3 cinnamon sticks
3 tablespoons oyster sauce
1 tablespoon Chinese five spice
1 tablespoon ground black pepper
Juice from 1 lemon
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons MAGGI Seasoning Sauce
Hot cooked rice

Cooking Directions:
1 – Cut hens into quarters and sprinkle both sides with salt. Let stand for 10 minutes in a sieve. Rinse thoroughly.
2 – Combine wine, 1 cup seasoning sauce, ginger and shallots in large bowl. Place hens in marinade; mix well. Cover; refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight.
3 – Combine water, sugar, star anise, cinnamon sticks, oyster sauce, Chinese five spice and pepper in large stockpot or Dutch oven. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat.
4 – Add hens to spice mixture; discard marinade. Cover; return to a boil. Turn off heat; let hens stand in hot liquid for 20 minutes to poach.
5 – Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C). Line large baking pan with foil; grease thoroughly.
6 Remove hens from pot and air dry on paper towels.
7 – Mix lemon juice, honey and 2 tablespoons seasoning sauce in small bowl until well combined. Brush mixture on both sides of hens. Place hens skin-side-up in prepared baking pan.
8 – Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until golden brown and crispy.
9 – Serve with rice.
Makes 6 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/6 of recipe): Calories: 450 Calories from Fat: 210 Total Fat: 24 g Saturated Fat: 7 g Cholesterol: 170 mg Sodium: 1380 mg Carbohydrates: 27 g Dietary Fiber: 0 g Sugars: 10 g Protein: 30 g.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/game/vietnamese_oven-baked_cornish_game_hens_recipe.html

Smoked Turkey Sausage and Crawfish Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

June 29, 2020 at 7:12 PM | Posted in gumbo, leftovers, Zatarain's | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

 

 

 

Just a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea for Breakfast this morning. Not a nice day out there today! 90 degrees and extremely humid. So not a thing going on today outside. I took the trash out a couple of times, moved the garbage cans down to the street (Garbage Day tomorrow), and watered my Pepper Plants. Besides that I stayed in all day. For Dinner tonight the Delicious Leftovers from last night, Smoked Turkey Sausage and Crawfish Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread. Just reheated the Gumbo on low and served the Bread. I never let Leftover Gumbo go to waste! I’ve left last night’s post below for description and recipe. Enjoy and Stay Safe Everyone!

I love Gumbo and Cajun Cuisine, looking forward to this meal tonight! So for Dinner tonight I’m preparing a Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo. Using the Zatrain’s Gumbo Mix, Butterball Hardwood Smoked Turkey Sausage, and a bag of Crawfish Tails. Add all together and I’ve one Delicious Meal coming! I had purchased a couple of 1lb. packages of frozen Cooked Crawfish Tails from Jungle Jim’s International Market in Fairfield. I had them in the freezer and I took 1 of the packages and sat it in the fridge to thaw overnight. I love Crawfish Tails, just don’t use them often.

 

To prepare it I got a large saucepan and sprayed it with Pam Non Stick Cooking Spray. Then added 6 cups of Water, bite sized sliced 1 1/2 Sausages of the Butterball Smoked Turkey Sausage, and the Gumbo Mix. Mixed until well blended together. I brought it to a boil; covered and simmered for 25 minutes.

 

Next as the Gumbo was cooking I got the Crawfish Tails out of the fridge washed then and let then drain in a colander. Then with 5 minutes of cooking time left I added the Crawfish to the Gumbo, stirring again until well mixed. Continued for 15 minutes. Removed the pot from the heat and let it stand for 5 minutes before serving.

 

 

This made one excellent Gumbo Dish! The Mix itself was flavored perfect, spicy but not overpowering. Then with the added Sausage and Crawfish Tail, it just capped everything off! I added a few shakes of Frank’s Hot Sauce to the Dish also. Lots of delicious leftovers! Just a word on the Crawfish, it was delicious! I’ll have to use it more often, much more often! The added Crawfish Tails adds just a hint of sweetness to the dish. Also, and don’t get me wrong, I love Shrimp but the Crawfish maybe be a better fit for the Gumbo than Shrimp. Whether it’s made with Shrimp or Crawfish, It is flat out Delicious! Leftovers are coming soon!


Then I also baked a loaf of La Baguette Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. Perfect Bread for Gumbo. For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZATARAIN’S® GUMBO MIX WITH RICE
In New Orleans, there are as many different varieties of gumbo as there are people who make it. Zatarain’s Gumbo Mix with Rice is a flavorful foundation, making it easy to create classics like shrimp and okra or chicken and sausage gumbo – or to invent a new signature gumbo of your own!

Gumbo is the quintessential dish of New Orleans, a city of diverse influences that formed a new culture greater than the sum of its parts. Those same influences are reflected in every bowl of gumbo. The dish is a rich and flavorful melting pot, just like its hometown.

Gumbo can be prepared with your choice of 1 lb. of cooked chicken, smoked sausage or seafood, cut into bite-size pieces.

STOVE TOP DIRECTIONS
1. MIX 6 cups water and Gumbo Mix in 4-quart saucepan until well blended.
2. For Chicken or Sausage Gumbo: Stir in chicken or sausage. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 25 minutes or until rice is tender.
For Seafood Gumbo: Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in seafood. Cover and simmer 10 minutes longer or until rice is tender.

80 CALORIES
0g TOTAL FAT
0mg CHOLESTEROL
750mg SODIUM
18g CARBOHYDRATES
<1g FIBER
0g SUGAR
2g PROTEIN
https://www.mccormick.com/zatarains/products/dinner-and-side-mixes/rice-mixes-and-side-dishes/gumbo-mix-with-rice

 

 


Crawfish
Crawfish are usually less tough and more subtle compared to shrimp, and the taste can more accurately be described as a combination of crab and shrimp. Crawfish has a sweet taste with a little bit of salt and mineral flavor.
Crawfish also contain a good amount of B vitamins, as well as iron and selenium — important minerals that can be hard to get through your diet. The only drawback to crawfish is that they do contain some dietary cholesterol. But ultimately, crawfish are an overall healthy source of protein.

One of America’s Favorites – Red Beans and Rice

June 29, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Red beans and rice at a restaurant in California

Red beans and rice is an emblematic dish of Louisiana Creole cuisine (not originally of Cajun cuisine) traditionally made on Mondays with red beans, vegetables (bell pepper, onion, and celery), spices (thyme, cayenne pepper, and bay leaf) and pork bones as left over from Sunday dinner, cooked together slowly in a pot and served over rice. Meats such as ham, sausage (most commonly andouille), and tasso ham are also frequently used in the dish. The dish is customary – ham was traditionally a Sunday meal and Monday was washday. A pot of beans could sit on the stove and simmer while the women were busy scrubbing clothes. The dish is now fairly common throughout the Southeast. Similar dishes are common in Latin American cuisine, including moros y cristianos, gallo pinto and feijoada.

Red beans and rice is one of the few New Orleans style dishes to be commonly served both in people’s homes and in restaurants. Many neighborhood restaurants and even schools continue to serve it as a Monday lunch or dinner special, usually with a side order of cornbread and either smoked sausage or a pork chop. While Monday washdays are largely a thing of the past, red beans remain a staple for large gatherings such as Super Bowl and Mardi Gras parties. Indeed, red beans and rice is very much part of the New Orleans identity. New Orleanian Louis Armstrong’s favorite food was red beans and rice – the musician would sign letters “Red Beans and Ricely Yours, Louis Armstrong”. And in 1965, the R&B instrumental group Booker T. & the M.G.’s wrote and recorded a song titled “Red Beans and Rice” that was originally a B-side but later became popular in its own right.

The similar vegetarian dish Rajma chawal (which translates literally to red beans and rice) is popular in North India. Red beans and rice is also a dietary staple in Central America, where it is known as “arroz con habichuelas”. The dish is popular in Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican, Haitian and Jamaican cuisine as well.

A plate of red beans and rice with sausage from The Chimes restaurant in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Red kidney beans or small red beans are used and they are usually (but not always) soaked beforehand. Add celery, onion, and peppers to the pot along with a ham hock. Add water. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer for several hours or until the beans are soft.

The dish is highly nutritious. Rice is rich in starch, an excellent source of energy. Rice also has iron, vitamin B and protein. Beans also contain a good amount of iron and an even greater amount of protein than rice. Together they make up a complete protein, which provides each of the amino acids the body cannot make for itself.

In addition, rice and beans are common and affordable ingredients, often available in difficult economic times.

 

Smoked Turkey Sausage and Crawfish Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

June 28, 2020 at 6:58 PM | Posted in Zatarain's | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I Scrambled a Couple of Eggs, toasted a Healthy Life Whole Grain English Muffin, and had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. 81 degrees and rain on and off all day! Got up had Breakfast, did the dishes, worked out, got a shower, and BAM, I turned into a slug! I didn’t do a thing all day and it felt pretty good! Anyway for Dinner tonight I prepared Smoked Turkey Sausage and Crawfish Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread.

 

I love Gumbo and Cajun Cuisine, looking forward to this meal tonight! So for Dinner tonight I’m preparing a Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo. Using the Zatrain’s Gumbo Mix, Butterball Hardwood Smoked Turkey Sausage, and a bag of Crawfish Tails. Add all together and I’ve one Delicious Meal coming! I had purchased a couple of 1lb. packages of frozen Cooked Crawfish Tails from Jungle Jim’s International Market in Fairfield. I had them in the freezer and I took 1 of the packages and sat it in the fridge to thaw overnight. I love Crawfish Tails, just don’t use them often.

 

To prepare it I got a large saucepan and sprayed it with Pam Non Stick Cooking Spray. Then added 6 cups of Water, bite sized sliced 1 1/2 Sausages of the Butterball Smoked Turkey Sausage, and the Gumbo Mix. Mixed until well blended together. I brought it to a boil; covered and simmered for 25 minutes.

Next as the Gumbo was cooking I got the Crawfish Tails out of the fridge washed then and let then drain in a colander. Then with 5 minutes of cooking time left I added the Crawfish to the Gumbo, stirring again until well mixed. Continued for 15 minutes. Removed the pot from the heat and let it stand for 5 minutes before serving.

This made one excellent Gumbo Dish! The Mix itself was flavored perfect, spicy but not over powering. Then with the added Sausage and Crawfish Tail, it just capped everything off! I added a few shakes of Frank’s Hot Sauce to the Dish also. Lots of delicious leftovers! Just a word on the Crawfish, it was delicious! I’ll have to use it more often, much more often! The added Crawfish Tails add a just a hint of sweetness to the dish. Also, and don’t get me wrong, I love Shrimp but the Crawfish maybe be a better fit for the Gumbo than Shrimp. Wether it’s made with Shrimp or Crawfish, It is flat out Delicious! Leftovers are coming soon!

Then I also baked a loaf of La Baguette Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. Perfect Bread for Gumbo. For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZATARAIN’S® GUMBO MIX WITH RICE
In New Orleans, there are as many different varieties of gumbo as there are people who make it. Zatarain’s Gumbo Mix with Rice is a flavorful foundation, making it easy to create classics like shrimp and okra or chicken and sausage gumbo – or to invent a new signature gumbo of your own!

Gumbo is the quintessential dish of New Orleans, a city of diverse influences that formed a new culture greater than the sum of its parts. Those same influences are reflected in every bowl of gumbo. The dish is a rich and flavorful melting pot, just like its hometown.

Gumbo can be prepared with your choice of 1 lb. of cooked chicken, smoked sausage or seafood, cut into bite-size pieces.

STOVE TOP DIRECTIONS
1. MIX 6 cups water and Gumbo Mix in 4-quart saucepan until well blended.
2. For Chicken or Sausage Gumbo: Stir in chicken or sausage. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 25 minutes or until rice is tender.
For Seafood Gumbo: Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in seafood. Cover and simmer 10 minutes longer or until rice is tender.

80 CALORIES
0g TOTAL FAT
0mg CHOLESTEROL
750mg SODIUM
18g CARBOHYDRATES
<1g FIBER
0g SUGAR
2g PROTEIN
https://www.mccormick.com/zatarains/products/dinner-and-side-mixes/rice-mixes-and-side-dishes/gumbo-mix-with-rice

 

 

Crawfish
Crawfish are usually less tough and more subtle compared to shrimp, and the taste can more accurately be described as a combination of crab and shrimp. Crawfish has a sweet taste with a little bit of salt and mineral flavor.
Crawfish also contain a good amount of B vitamins, as well as iron and selenium — important minerals that can be hard to get through your diet. The only drawback to crawfish is that they do contain some dietary cholesterol. But ultimately, crawfish are an overall healthy source of protein.

Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes

June 20, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes. Here’s some Delicious and Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes with recipes including Make-and-Take Breakfast Sausage Sandwich, Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya, and Whole-Grain Spaghetti with Italian Turkey Sausage, Arugula and Balsamic Tomato Sauce. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes
Find healthy, delicious turkey sausage recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Make-and-Take Breakfast Sausage Sandwich
Skip the fast-food take-out sandwich and pack your own the next time you’re in a hurry! This scrumptious cheesy breakfast sandwich mixes savory turkey sausage with sweet chutney and takes just minutes to make……………………………….

Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya
This catfish and sausage jambalaya recipe is one you might find in a neighborhood eatery in Creole country. Turkey sausage links have fewer calories and less fat than traditional pork sausage, but still deliver amazing taste to this dish……………………………..

Whole-Grain Spaghetti with Italian Turkey Sausage, Arugula and Balsamic Tomato Sauce
Total happiness in a bowl: pasta, sausage, tomatoes and herbs. The tomatoes get sweet and tender and turn into sauce with the stock and the pasta. Without ever adding any butter, the spaghetti sauce is rich and silky. Adding the herbs at the end gives the dish a fresh pop of color and flavor. This is one healthy pasta recipe we can definitely get behind!……………………………….

* Click the link below to getall the Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19059/ingredients/meat-poultry/sausage/turkey/

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 6:49 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 2:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

Red Beans Turkey and Rice

June 5, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Another one from the Jennie – O Turkey website, Red Beans Turkey and Rice. Cajun Food made healthier! You’ll be using JENNIE-O® Lean Ground Turkey, Onion, Green Pepper, Celery, Hot Pepper Sauce, Tomatoes, Red Kidney Beans, White Rice, and more! A sure fire instant Dinner Favorite! You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the Switch in 2020! https://www.jennieo.com/

Red Beans Turkey and Rice
This recipe is the epitome of classic Cajun comfort food. Fill your house with the aroma of thyme, lean turkey and stewed tomatoes. This low-fat recipe is ready to eat in under 60 minutes!

 

INGREDIENTS

Red Beans Turkey and Rice

1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Ground Turkey
1 cup finely chopped onion
1 green pepper, finely chopped
½ cup sliced celery
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1½ teaspoons thyme
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
½ teaspoon salt
1 (14½-ounce) can cajun-style stewed tomatoes
1 (15-ounce) can red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
¼ cup tomato paste
4 cups cooked white or brown rice
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

DIRECTIONS
1) In large deep skillet, cook ground turkey as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Add onion, green pepper, celery and garlic; cook 5 minutes or until slightly softened; stirring occasionally.
2) Sprinkle with thyme, hot pepper sauce and salt; cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add cajun-style stewed tomatoes, kidney beans and tomato paste. Cook, uncovered, 10 minutes or until hot and flavors are blended, stirring occasionally.
3) Serve over cooked rice. Sprinkle with fresh parsley and serve with additional hot sauce, if desired.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 350
Protein 23g
Carbohydrates 50g
Fiber 8g
Sugars 8g
Fat 6g
Cholesterol 55mg
Sodium 790mg
Saturated Fat 2g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/77-red-beans-turkey-and-rice

It’s time for Gumbo! Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

May 30, 2020 at 7:14 PM | Posted in Butterball Smoked Turkey Sausage, shrimp, Zatarain's | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

 

 

For Breakfast on this Saturday Morning I toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin that I topped with Smucker’s Sugar Free Blackberry Jam. I also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. 72 degrees and mostly sunny, and no rain! After Breakfast I grabbed my mask and gloves and went to the local Kroger for a few items. They seem to be better stocked, that’s a good thing. Did some yard work, just enjoying the beautiful day out there! For Dinner tonight I prepared a Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread.

 

I love Gumbo and Cajun Cuisine, looking forward to this meal tonight! So for Dinner tonight I’m preparing a Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo. Using the Zatrain’s Gumbo Mix, Butterball Hardwood Smoked Turkey Sausage, and a bag of Meijer Frozen Shrimp (Large Size). Add all together and I’ve one Delicious Meal coming!

 

 

 

To prepare it I got a large saucepan and sprayed it with Pam Non Stick Cooking Spray. Then added 6 cups of Water, bite sized sliced 1 1/2 Sausages of the Butterball Smoked Turkey Sausage, and the Gumbo Mix. Mixed until well blended together. I brought it to a boil; covered and simmered for 25 minutes.

 

 

 

Next as the Gumbo was cooking I got the Shrimp out of the fridge washed then and let then drain in a colander. Then with 15 minutes of cooking time left I added the Shrimp to the Gumbo, stirring again until well mixed. Continued for 15 minutes. Removed the pot from the heat and let it stand for 5 minutes before serving.

 

 

 

 

This made one excellent Gumbo Dish! The Mix itself was flavored perfect, spicy but not over powering. Then with the added Sausage and Shrimp, it just capped everything off! I added a few shakes of Frank’s Hot Sauce to the Dish also. Lots of delicious leftovers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I also baked a loaf of La Baguette Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. Perfect Bread for Gumbo. For Dessert later a bowl of Breyer’s Carb Smart Chocolate Ice Cream.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZATARAIN’S® GUMBO MIX WITH RICE
In New Orleans, there are as many different varieties of gumbo as there are people who make it. Zatarain’s Gumbo Mix with Rice is a flavorful foundation, making it easy to create classics like shrimp and okra or chicken and sausage gumbo – or to invent a new signature gumbo of your own!

Gumbo is the quintessential dish of New Orleans, a city of diverse influences that formed a new culture greater than the sum of its parts. Those same influences are reflected in every bowl of gumbo. The dish is a rich and flavorful melting pot, just like its hometown.

Gumbo can be prepared with your choice of 1 lb. of cooked chicken, smoked sausage or seafood, cut into bite-size pieces.

STOVE TOP DIRECTIONS
1. MIX 6 cups water and Gumbo Mix in 4-quart saucepan until well blended.
2. For Chicken or Sausage Gumbo: Stir in chicken or sausage. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 25 minutes or until rice is tender.
For Seafood Gumbo: Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in seafood. Cover and simmer 10 minutes longer or until rice is tender.

MICROWAVE DIRECTIONS
1. MIX 6 cups water and Gumbo Mix in 4-quart microwavable bowl until well blended.
2. For Chicken or Sausage Gumbo: Stir in chicken or sausage. Cover. Microwave on HIGH 30 minutes or until rice is tender, stirring occasionally.
For Seafood Gumbo: Cover. Microwave on HIGH 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in seafood. Cover. Microwave on HIGH 10 minutes longer or until rice is tender, stirring occasionally. Let stand in microwave 5 minutes.

80 CALORIES
0g TOTAL FAT
0mg CHOLESTEROL
750mg SODIUM
18g CARBOHYDRATES
<1g FIBER
0g SUGAR
2g PROTEIN
https://www.mccormick.com/zatarains/products/dinner-and-side-mixes/rice-mixes-and-side-dishes/gumbo-mix-with-rice

Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe – Cider-and-Beer-Braised Pork with Chocolate Molé

May 17, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe | Leave a comment
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This week’s Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe is a Cider-and-Beer-Braised Pork with Chocolate Molé. Some of the ingredients you’ll be using are a Boneless Pork Shoulder Roast (Boston Butt Roast), Almonds, Jalapeño, Paprika, Ancho Chile Powder, Lager Beer, Apple Cider, Mexican Chocolate, Rice, and more! That is one kicked up Boneless Pork Shoulder Roast! The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Cider-and-Beer-Braised Pork with Chocolate Molé
Serve this incredibly delicious, fork-tender pork dish over a bowl hot rice. Make it a complete meal with a cool, green salad and warm flour tortillas.Recipe Ingredients:

2 1/4 pounds boneless pork shoulder roast (Boston Butt roast), exterior fat removed and cut into 1-inch cubes
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons canola or olive oil
1 small onion, finely chopped
1/2 cup slivered almonds
1 large jalapeño chile, seeds removed and minced
1 clove garlic, minced
2 teaspoons whole coriander seeds
2 teaspoons cumin seed
2 teaspoons smoked paprika
2 teaspoons ancho chile powder
16 ounces lager beer (2 cups)
2 cups apple cider, or juice, pure pressed, pasteurized (not from concentrate)
3 ounces Mexican chocolate, grated or very finely chopped
3 limes, juiced and zested
6 cups hot cooked rice for accompaniment

Cooking Directions:
1 – Pat pork cubes dry with paper towels; season with salt.
2 – Heat 2 tablespoons of oil over medium-high heat in 5 to 6-quart heavy Dutch oven. Add half of the pork. Cook 2 to 3 minutes or until browned, stirring occasionally. Using slotted spoon, transfer pork to bowl. Brown remaining pork in remaining 1 tablespoon vegetable oil. Add all pork back to Dutch oven.
3 – Stir in onion, almonds, jalapeño and garlic. Cook, uncovered, over medium-low heat for 5 to 7 minutes or until onion is crisp-tender and translucent. Stir in coriander seed, cumin seed, smoked paprika and ancho chile powder; cook for 1 minute. Add beer and apple cider and bring to a simmer. Cover and gently simmer over medium-low or low heat for 2 hours.
4 – If desired, cool mixture. Cover and refrigerate for up to 1 day. Spoon and discard fat from top of chilled mixture. Heat mixture over medium-high heat.
5 – Stir in lime juice and zest, and chocolate into hot mixture. Serve over rice.
6 – To Plate: Spoon rice into shallow bowls and top with pork in molé sauce.
Makes 8 servings.

Tip: If Mexican chocolate is unavailable, use 3 ounces bittersweet chocolate plus 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon and 3 drops almond extract.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/8 of recipe; 3/4 cup pork molé plus 3/4 cup rice): Calories: 530; Total Fat: 18g; Saturated Fat: 4g; Cholesterol: 75mg; Total Carbs: 57g; Fiber: 4g; Protein: 30g; Sodium: 250mg.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/pork/cider-and-beer-braised_pork_with_chocolate_mole_recipe.html

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