Healthy Asian Recipes

April 21, 2017 at 5:08 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Asian Recipes. Delicious and healthy Asian inspired recipes like; Moo Shu Vegetables, Vietnamese-Style Beef and Noodle Broth, and Sichuan-Style Chicken with Peanuts. Find these and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 
Healthy Asian Recipes
Find healthy, delicious Asian recipes including Asian soup, dumpling, rice and noodle recipes. Healthier Recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

 

 

 

Moo Shu Vegetables
This vegetarian version of the classic Chinese stir-fry, Moo Shu, uses already-shredded vegetables to cut down on the prep time. Serve with warm whole-wheat tortillas, Asian hot sauce and extra hoisin if desired…….

 
Vietnamese-Style Beef and Noodle Broth
Inspired by pho—a traditional Vietnamese soup—this one-pot meal is garnished with crunchy mung bean sprouts and chopped fresh basil. You could also serve it with lime wedges and a bottle of Asian chile sauce, such as sriracha, on the side…..

 
Sichuan-Style Chicken with Peanuts
The piquant Sichuan Sauce (which doubles easily) works well with almost any stir-fry but particularly enhances dishes with meat, fish and poultry. When stir-frying chicken, always spread the pieces in the wok and let them cook undisturbed for 1 minute before stirring. This allows the chicken to sear and prevents sticking. To smash the ginger, use the side of a cleaver or chef’s knife……..

 

 
* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Asian Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/17905/cuisines-regions/asian-food/

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Asian Style Vegetable Stir Fry

April 17, 2017 at 5:32 AM | Posted in Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is – Asian Style Vegetable Stir Fry. Makes a great side dish or main dish. It’s from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a great selection of recipes to please all tastes! Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 
Asian Style Vegetable Stir Fry

Serve as a vegetable side dish or over steamed rice or noodles for a main dish.

 

Recipe Ingredients:

1/4 cup honey
1/4 cup prepared stir fry sauce
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
4 teaspoons peanut oil or vegetable oil
2 cups small broccoli florets
2 cups small mushrooms
1 small onion, cut into wedges, separate in 1-inch piecesFry
1 medium carrot, cut diagonally into 1/3-inch slices

 

Cooking Directions:

1 – In small bowl, combine honey, stir fry sauce and crushed red pepper flakes; set aside.
2 – In wok or large skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat; add vegetables and toss while cooking, about 2 to 3 minutes.
3 – Add honey sauce, stir until all vegetables are glazed and sauce is bubbly hot, about 1 minute.
Makes 4 servings.

 

Note: Honey should not be fed to infants under one year of age. Honey is a safe and wholesome food for children and adults.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/4 of recipe): Calories: 157; Total Fat: 5g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Total Carbs: 28g; Fiber: 3g; Protein: 3g; Sodium: 549mg.
http://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/asian_style_vegetable_stir_fry_recipe.html

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 2, 2017 at 5:29 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Bell for passing this hint along…..

 
Rice – Add one teaspoon of lemon juice to each quart of water when cooking rice, this will keep rice fluffy.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 30, 2017 at 5:24 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Low Carb Cooking hint……

 
Replace rice with grated cauliflower! It cooks in a lot less time, has almost no carbs, and serves well to replace rice in 95% of recipes.

Yummy Chicken Casserole Recipes

March 24, 2017 at 5:36 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its Yummy Chicken Casserole Recipes. Diabetic Friendly Chicken Casseroles Recipes including; Chicken and Wild Rice Casserole, Chicken Pot Pie, and Hearty Chicken and Bean Casserole. Find these and more all at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Yummy Chicken Casserole Recipes

Chicken casseroles are classic, comforting, and convenient. These tasty casserole recipes use lean chicken and fresh ingredients, making dinner healthful as well as flavorful.

 

 

Chicken and Wild Rice Casserole

This isn’t that same old-fashioned chicken casserole. Reduced-fat soup and cheese as well as fat-free milk make it up-to-date for today’s concerns about fat and calories…..

 
Chicken Pot Pie

We made chicken potpie more healthful by stir-frying the vegetables with nonstick cooking spray instead of butter or margarine and using chicken breast rather than dark meat……

 
Hearty Chicken and Bean Casserole

Surprisingly low in carbohydrate and calories, this chicken-and-bean casserole will warm you up without the extra worry of what it will do to your blood sugar……..

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Yummy Chicken Casserole Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/chicken/yummy-chicken-casserole-recipes

One of America’s Favorites – Loco Moco

March 13, 2017 at 5:22 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A loco moco plate lunch, with soba noodles (left) and macaroni salad (right)

Loco moco is a meal in the contemporary cuisine of Hawaii. There are many variations, but the traditional loco moco consists of white rice, topped with a hamburger patty, a fried egg, and brown gravy. Variations may include chili, bacon, ham, Spam, kalua pork, linguiça, teriyaki beef, teriyaki chicken, mahi-mahi, shrimp, oysters, and other meats. Loco Moco is also the name of a Hawaiian-based restaurant chain that serves Hawaiian rice bowl dishes.

 

 

 

 

Hamburger loco moco at Aqua Cafe, Honolulu

The dish was reportedly created at the Lincoln Grill restaurants in Hilo, Hawaii, in 1949 by its proprietors, Richard Inouye and his wife Nancy, at the request of teenagers from the Lincoln Wreckers Sports club seeking something that differed from a sandwich, was inexpensive yet quickly prepared and served. They asked Nancy to put some rice in a bowl, a hamburger patty over the rice and then topped with brown gravy. The egg came later. The teenagers named the dish Loco Moco after one of their members, George Okimoto, whose nickname was “Crazy”. George Takahashi, who was studying Spanish at Hilo High School, suggested using Loco, which is Spanish for crazy. They tacked on “moco” which “rhymed with loco and sounded good”. However, to Spanish-speakers, this may sound odd, considering that moco means “booger” in Spanish.

 

 
The dish is widely popular in Hawaii and now on the menu at many Hawaiian restaurants in the mainland United States. In keeping with the standards of Japanese cuisine, rice is used as a staple starch, finished off with the hamburger, gravy, and fried eggs to create a dish that does not require the preparation time of bento. Loco moco can be found in various forms on many Pacific islands from Hawaii to Samoa to Guam and Saipan, and is also popular in Japan.

Fish loco moco

This dish was featured on the “Taste of Hawai’i” episode of Girl Meets Hawai’i, a Travel Channel show hosted by Samantha Brown. The episode features the dish being served at the popular restaurant, Hawaiian Style Cafe, in Waimea together with the plate lunch, another Hawaiian specialty dish.

The loco moco was also featured on a Honolulu-based episode of the Travel Channel show Man v. Food (this episode aired in the show’s second season). The host, Adam Richman, tried this dish at the Hukilau Café, located in nearby Laie. Richman also tried an off-the-menu loco moco at a San Francisco eatery called Namu Gaji on his 2014 show, Man Finds Food.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 2, 2017 at 6:05 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Ami J. for passing this hint along….

 
Replace rice with grated cauliflower! It cooks in a lot less time, has almost no carbs, and serves well to replace rice in 95% of recipes.

Heart-Healthy Recipes

February 19, 2017 at 6:14 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its Heart-Healthy Recipes. Heart Healthy and Diabetic Friendly recipes including; Red Beans and Rice with Chicken, Penne with Walnuts and Peppers, and Beef with Mushrooms and Pearl Onions in Red Wine Reduction. Find these and recipes and more all on the Diabetic Living Online website! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Heart-Healthy RecipesDiabetic living logo

From must-try dinners to diabetes-friendly desserts, these heart-healthy recipes are packed with power foods that boast cholesterol- and blood pressure-lowering benefits. Each heart-smart recipe has been tuned to keep fat, cholesterol, and sodium in check without sacrificing substance or flavor. Eating healthfully never tasted so good!

 

 

Red Beans and Rice with Chicken

This main-dish favorite gets its substance from brown rice, which is filled with heart-healthy vitamins B1 and B6 and is a good source of fiber and niacin. Reduced-sodium chicken broth makes this meal a heart-smart option for dinner tonight…..

 
Penne with Walnuts and Peppers

Just a sprinkling of walnuts lends crunch and flavor to this low-fat, low-sodium pasta dish. Walnuts contain a large percentage of polyunsaturated (good) fats and are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, which help improve HDL cholesterol.

 
Beef with Mushrooms and Pearl Onions in Red Wine Reduction

This heart-smart dinner features lean beef and a sauce made with red wine, which can increase HDL (good) cholesterol. Here’s to keeping your heart healthy!…..

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Heart-Healthy Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/main-dishes/heart-healthy-recipes

One of America’s Favorites – Gumbo

February 6, 2017 at 6:17 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A bowl of shrimp, chicken and bacon gumbo, served over rice

A bowl of shrimp, chicken and bacon gumbo, served over rice

Gumbo is a stew that originated in southern Louisiana during the 18th century. It consists primarily of a strongly-flavored stock, meat or shellfish, a thickener, and what Louisianians call the “Holy Trinity” of vegetables, namely celery, bell peppers, and onions. Gumbo is often categorized by the type of thickener used, the vegetable okra, the Choctaw spice filé powder (dried and ground sassafras leaves), or roux, the French base made of flour and fat. The dish likely derived its name from either a word from a Bantu language for okra (ki ngombo) or the Choctaw word for filé (kombo).

Several different varieties exist. Creole gumbo generally contains shellfish, tomatoes, and a dark roux, file, or both. Cajun gumbo is generally based on a dark roux and is made with shellfish or fowl. Sausage or ham is often added to gumbos of either variety. After the base is prepared, vegetables are cooked down, and then meat is added. The dish simmers for a minimum of three hours, with shellfish and some spices added near the end. If desired, filé powder is added after the pot is removed from heat. Gumbo is traditionally served over rice. A third, lesser-known variety, the meatless gumbo z’herbes, is essentially a gumbo of slow-cooked greens sometimes thickened with roux, with rice served on the side.

The dish combines ingredients and culinary practices of several cultures, including French, Spanish, German, West African, and Choctaw. Gumbo may have been based on traditional West African or native dishes, or may be a derivation of the French dish bouillabaisse. It was first described in 1802, and was listed in various cookbooks in the latter half of the 19th century. The dish gained more widespread popularity in the 1970s, after the United States Senate cafeteria added it to the menu in honor of Louisiana Senator Allen Ellender. The popularity of chef Paul Prudhomme in the 1980s spurred further interest in gumbo. The dish is the official cuisine of the state of Louisiana.
Gumbo is a heavily seasoned soup or stew that combines several varieties of meat or seafood with a sauce or gravy. Any combination of meat or seafood can be used. Meat-based gumbo may consist of chicken, duck, squirrel, or rabbit, with oysters occasionally added. Seafood-based gumbo generally has shrimp, crabmeat, and sometimes oysters. Andouille sausage is often added to both meat and seafood gumbos to provide “piquancy, substance, and an additional layer of flavor” to the dish. With the exception of sausage and ham, beef and pork are almost never used. Most varieties of gumbo are seasoned with onions, parsley, bell pepper, and celery. Tomatoes are sometimes used in seafood gumbo, but traditionally few other vegetables are included.

 

Thickeners
Gumbo broth or gravy derives from three primary thickeners: okra, filé powder, and roux. Traditionally, okra and filé powder are not used in the same dish, although this rule is sometimes broken. Roux can be used alone or in conjunction with either of the other thickeners.

Okra is more often used as a thickener in seafood gumbos than those with meat. This mucilaginous vegetable is

Okra pods

Okra pods

usually cooked first, and other ingredients added once the desired consistency is reached. According to The Oxford Companion to Food, okra-based gumbos are becoming less popular, as changing tastes have made the okra texture less palatable.

Ground sassafras leaf, known as filé, is generally not added to the gravy until after the vegetables and meats or seafood have finished cooking and have been removed from the heat source. If added during the boiling process, filé makes the gumbo too ropey; when added at the end, the gumbo gains a slightly stringy texture.

Roux has become the most popular thickener, made from cooking together a roughly equal proportion of flour and fat (traditionally hog lard, although increasingly made with butter since the mid-20th century. The length of cooking time determines the final flavor and texture, since the longer the roux is cooked before being added to the gumbo, the darker it becomes and the less thickening power it retains. A very dark roux provides a much thinner sauce with a more intense flavor than a light roux.
Cajun vs. Creole gumbo

Creole seafood gumbo

Creole seafood gumbo

Gumbo is typically divided into two varieties. Combinations traditionally common in New Orleans and southeastern Louisiana are known as “Creole” after the Louisiana Creole people, descendants of French and Spanish settlers, who lived in those areas. “Cajun” combinations were common in southwestern Louisiana, which was populated primarily by Cajuns, descendants of the French-speaking settlers expelled from Acadia (located within the modern-day Canadian provinces of Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island) in the mid-18th century.

Gumbo is usually identified by its dark roux, cooked until it is a color “a few shades from burning”. The roux is used with okra or filé powder. Seafood is popular in gumbo the closer to the water the people are, but the southwestern areas of Louisiana often use fowl, such as chicken or duck, and sausage.[8][9] The fowl is generally not deboned, and onions, celery, and bell pepper are not strained out of the dish. Cajun gumbo is usually topped with parsley and green onions.

Creole gumbo most often consists of seafood, tomatoes, and a thickener. Before the latter half of the 20th century, celery was rarely used in Creole gumbo.
Gumbo is cooked for a minimum of three hours, and often simmers all day. Meat (but not seafood) is often browned beforehand and removed from the heat. Okra and roux are cooked before other vegetables and seafood. Okra is removed from heat when it reaches the desired consistency, while roux remains in the pot. Seasoning vegetables are then added to the sauce. When these have turned to mush (more commonly called cooked down), the meat and okra are added to the pot along with water and/or stock, then boiled uncovered until the desired tenderness of the meat is reached. Seasonings, including red, black, and white pepper, bay leaves, thyme, hot sauce, and salt, are added to taste. According to Nobles, “proper seasoning of gumbo is essential, and in Louisiana adding just the right zing is considered an art”. Because seafood cooks fairly quickly, it is not added to the pot until the end of the process. As the gumbo finishes cooking, green onions and parsley are sometimes sprinkled on it. When desired, filé powder is added last.

Creole and Cajun gumbos are served over hot rice, which helps the dish to feed a larger number of people. Gumbo

Cajun seafood gumbo

Cajun seafood gumbo

z’herbes is served with rice on the side. Gumbo is almost always served directly from the pot on the stove, although in wealthier or fancier homes the dish might be transferred to a tureen on the table. Often, gumbo and bread are the sole courses in a meal, although many Cajun families provide a side dish of potato salad. Occasionally, gumbo is served as part of a larger menu.

Soniat gives examples of the main types of creole gumbos, along with descriptions of family traditions about them.

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Gangnam Style Buffalo Flank Steak

February 1, 2017 at 6:13 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Wild Idea

This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is – Gangnam Style Buffalo Flank Steak. Passing along 2 Wild Idea Buffalo Recipes this week; Gangnam Style Buffalo Flank Steak/Gangnam Style Lettuce Wraps and Gangnam Style Buffalo Stew. The Stew is prepared the same way as the Gangnam Style Lettuce Wraps but you’ll be adding some additional items to it. You can purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Flank Steak and check out all the Wild Idea Buffalo Healthy and Delicious Recipes all on the Wild Idea Buffalo website. http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

 

Gangnam Style Buffalo Flank Steak

This recipe was inspired by my new addiction to the “Gangnam Style” dance.

The Korean word gangnam, stands for the south side of Seoul, were there are many fancy restaurants and shops. My recipe is a rendition of Bulgogi (Korean B.B.Q.), which can be served a variety of ways. Here are two of my favorite renditions.

Note: Traditionally the Koreans use high-end cuts, but I find that this is not necessary. The flank steak becomes very tender in the marinade. You are going to love this recipe. Get your gangnam on!

Gangnam Style Lettuce Wraps
Ingredients:Wild Idea Buffalo Gangnam Style Lettuce Wraps

2 lbs. Buffalo Flank Steak
1/2 cup Braggs Amino Liquids
2 Tb. Sesame Oil
6 cloves garlic
1 Asian pear, or pear, peeled & cored
4 green onions, chopped
1 tsp. black pepper
2 Tb. sugar
1 Tb. red pepper flake
Gangnam Style Lettuce Wraps (serves 8)

Instructions:

* Rinse flank steaks, pat dry and remove any exterior fat. Place flank steaks on cutting board, using sharp knife cut flank steak on the bias into ¼ “ slices. To cut steaks on the bias, tilt your knife to a 45* angle (the top of your knife blade should be at the 10:00 position). Place sliced flank steaks into a non-reactive bowl.
* Place remaining ingredients in blender and puree.
* Pour marinade over meat and massage into meat. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
* Heat a wok to high heat or place a large sauté pan over high heat. Brush pan with a little sesame oil, once hot add marinated meat to pan. Stir meat in a tossing manner while cooking, for 3 to 4 minutes.
To Serve:

Place meat on platter with leaf lettuce or iceberg lettuce, accompany with warm rice or rice noodles and julienned vegetables of your choice, along with sesame seeds, fresh garlic, grated ginger and red pepper flake.

 

 
Gangnam Style Buffalo Stew

Additional ingredients:Wild Idea Buffalo Gangnam Style Buffalo Stew

1 quart buffalo broth, (or vegetable or beef broth)
4 cups variety vegetables, chopped (I used, peppers, squash, mushrooms and green onion.)
4 cups cooked rice
Instructions:

* Prepare as above through #4. Pile meat in center of the wok or pan.
* Add vegetables to pan, circling around meat.
* Add broth and bring to a boil. Push meat down into broth, cover and simmer for 5 minutes.
To Serve: Place ½ cup of rice into bowls and ladle with hot stew. Pass with sesame seeds, grated garlic, fresh ginger and red chili flake.
http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/gangnam-style-buffalo-flank-steak

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