Apple of the Week – Red Delicious Apples

September 24, 2015 at 4:47 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | 1 Comment
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A pile of 'Red Delicious'

A pile of ‘Red Delicious’

The Red Delicious is a clone of apple cultigen, now comprising more than 50 cultivars, recognized in Madison County, Iowa, United States, in 1880. As new cultivars with improved color and earlier harvestability have replaced the original cultivar in commercial orchards, the taste and texture of the harvested commodity have deteriorated, and many customers have begun to reject the ‘Red Delicious’ as being a markedly inferior tasting variety at the food market. Roger Yepsen notes some of its less desirable qualities, “The skin is thick and bitter and has to be chewed vigorously… this apple ranks close to the bottom when cooked… sold year round, so shop with skepticism. Delicious retains its cheerful good looks long after its flavor has departed.” According to the US Apple Association website it is one of the fifteen most popular apple cultivars in the United States. They’re harvested in September and October and available throughout the year.

 

 

The ‘Red Delicious’ originated at an orchard in 1880 as “a round, blushed yellow fruit of surpassing sweetness”. Stark Nurseries held a competition in 1892 to find an apple to replace the ‘Ben Davis’ apple. The winner was a red and yellow striped apple sent by Jesse Hiatt, a farmer in Peru, Iowa, who called it “Hawkeye”. Stark Nurseries bought the rights from Hiatt, renamed the variety “Stark Delicious”, and began propagating it. Another apple tree, later named the ‘Golden Delicious’, was also marketed by Stark Nurseries after it was purchased from a farmer in Clay County, West Virginia, in 1914; the ‘Delicious’ became the ‘Red Delicious’ as a retronym.

 

 

In the 1980s, ‘Red Delicious’ represented three-quarters of the harvest in Washington state. A decade later, reliance on ‘Red Delicious’ had helped to push Washington state’s apple industry “to the edge” of collapse. In 2000, Congress approved and President Bill Clinton signed a bill to bail out the apple industry, after apple growers had lost $760 million since 1997. By 2000, this cultivar made up less than one half of the Washington state output, and in 2003, the crop had shrunk to 37 percent of the state’s harvest, which totaled 103 million boxes. Although Red Delicious still remained the single largest variety produced in the state in 2005, others were growing in popularity, notably the ‘Fuji’ and ‘Gala’ varieties.

 

 

Red Delicious apples offer a small amount of vitamin A and vitamin C and have only a trace of sodium. They contain pectin, a beneficial fiber that has been shown to help promote healthy cholesterol levels and slow glucose metabolism in diabetics. Red Delicious apples are also higher in antioxidants than many other apple varieties, most of which is contained in their skin.

 

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Apple of the Week – Pink Lady

September 17, 2015 at 4:58 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | 3 Comments
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Pink Lady apples

Pink Lady apples

‘Cripps Pink’ is a cultivar of apple, from which apples meeting quality standards can be sold under the trade mark name Pink Lady. ‘Cripps Pink’ was originally bred by John Cripps at the (then named) Western Australia Department of Agriculture by crossing the Australian apple ‘Lady Williams’ with a ‘Golden Delicious’ to combine the best features of both apples. Pink Lady Apples are a subset breed.

 

 

 

The apple shape is ellipsoid, it has a distinctive blush mixed with a green “background”, and taste is tart. ‘Cripps Pink’ requires a long, 200-day growth period and a hot climate, making them difficult to grow in more temperate latitudes or climates subjected to early winter freezes.

They are principally grown in Australia, but are also grown in New Zealand, Chile, Canada, Argentina, South Africa, Uruguay, Brazil, Japan, Italy, Spain, France, Serbia, Israel and in the United States since the late 1990s.

In the United Kingdom, the Pink Lady brand has increased in popularity in the 20 years since the first shipment of apples from Australia. In 2012, for the first time, Pink Lady brand apples replaced ‘Granny Smith’ apples from the number three spot by value in the United Kingdom.

 

 

Pink lady apples growing

Pink lady apples growing

Pink Lady brand apples must meet certain trade mark quality specifications. Criteria for the specifications include sugar content, firmness, blemishes and color. Inspections are regularly performed to ensure both the quality and traceability of the apple from the orchard to the shop.

‘Cripps Pink’ apples are the earliest to blossom (late March/early April in the Northern Hemisphere and late September/early October in the Southern Hemisphere), and some of the last to be harvested (end of October/early November in the Northern Hemisphere and late April/early May for the Southern Hemisphere). It is the significant change in temperature between night and day in the autumn that gives the apples their coloring. However, they must also be well exposed. Therefore, the trees must be carefully pruned and their fruit production well managed.

 

 

Stacked Pink Lady apples

Stacked Pink Lady apples

Several natural occurring mutations of the ‘Cripps Pink’ cultivar have been discovered, many of which have either achieved registration, or are seeking registration of plant breeders’ rights or Plant Patents in multiple countries.

* The high-colored variety ‘Rosy Glow’ is a spontaneous single limb mutation of ‘Cripps Pink’ discovered in Forest Range, South Australia in 1995. At the time of selection the fruit on the limb was 100% colored, while the surrounding fruit was less than 10% colored.
* The ‘Lady in Red’ cultivar is a chance limb mutation of ‘Cripps Pink’ discovered in Hawkes Bay, New Zealand in 1996. ‘Lady in Red’ colors earlier and exhibits more intense colouring over a greater percentage of the fruit surface than ‘Cripps Pink’.
* ‘PLMAS98’ (known as Maslin) is a limb sport mutation of ‘Cripps Pink’ and was discovered in 1999 in Manjimup, Western Australia. It is considered distinct from ‘Cripps Pink’ due to its early maturity – fruit is mature and ready for harvest at least 15 days earlier than fruit of ‘Cripps Pink’.
* ‘Ruby Pink’ was discovered in May 1999 in Main Ridge, Victoria, Australia as a limb sport growing among a uniform block of ‘Cripps Pink’. The variety is distinguished by the following unique combination of characteristics: the fruit is uniformly ellipsoid, as compared to the symmetrical ellipsoid shape of ‘Cripps Pink’; the fruit has a higher percentage of red color than ‘Cripps Pink’; the fruit matures later than ‘Cripps Pink’; and the fruit has a higher firmness rating than ‘Cripps Pink’.
* ‘PLBAR B1’ was discovered during the 1999-2000 growing season in Pemberton, Western Australia. It originated as a limb sport mutation of ‘Cripps Pink’ and is noted for its exceptional color and early maturity as compared to ‘Cripps Pink’. Fruit of the new variety is mature and ready for harvest about 14 to 18 days earlier than fruit of ‘Cripps Pink’.
* ‘PLFOG99’ (known as Pink Belle) was discovered in late 1999/early 2000 in Kirup, Western Australia and is a chance limb mutation/sport of ‘Cripps Pink’. The limb was observed to produce fruit up to two weeks earlier, and the tree exhibits a more compact growth habit than ‘Cripps Pink’.
* ‘Lady Laura’ is a spontaneous limb sport mutation of ‘Cripps Pink’ discovered in Borenore, New South Wales, Australia. It is distinguished from other apple varieties by the amount and intensity of over color of the fruit, and the earlier coloration of fruit in comparison to ‘Cripps Pink’.
Rosy Glow and Lady in Red have been accepted by APAL and Pink Lady America (following careful consideration) into the Pink Lady business model, allowing fruit of the improved variety, which meets the Pink Lady quality criteria, to be sold as Pink Lady brand apples. In general, the improved selections produce apples with a larger area of blush. The benefit of higher color is the potential of higher packouts, and better fruit color in hotter growing areas. The earlier-maturing strains also allow growing regions to expand, as crops can be grown without fear of losing the crop to winter freeze. Pink Lady America has also accepted the early clones listed as PLMAS98 (Maslin) and PLBAR B1 (Barnsby) as well as Ruby Pink and PLFOG99 into their business model for the Pink Lady brand.

 

Apple of the Week – White Transparent (also known as Yellow Transparent in the USA)

September 10, 2015 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | 3 Comments
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White Transparent (also known as Yellow Transparent in the USA) is an early-season cultivar of apple which is usually used for cooking due to its sharp taste. Well-known early summer apple, good for drying, freezing, sauce, juice and wine. Transparent pale yellow skin. Crisp, light-textured, juicy flesh. Very sweet flavor. Not a good storer (Use / keeping: 1 week).

 

 

 

White Transparent is a chance seedling which was found in the Wagner nursery in Riga around 1850. The cultivar was widely grown during the 19th century in Europe. It was introduced to France in 1852. It was introduced to North America in 1870 where it was grown commercially as an early dual purpose variety and picked up the name ‘Yellow Transparent’. The specimen is still widely grown in Poland, Russia and Sweden where it is sometimes referred to as the Baltic Sea apple. The cultivar was significant because it was an early-season apple in most places. Because of its harsh flavor and hard texture, the apples were often baked in ashes.

 

 

The tree is very hardy and the fruit has a good resistance to scabs, but is at risk of developing canker caused by the Nectria fungi and fireblight. The tree is known to be a good and regular cropper of a medium-sized fruit, which has a very pale green skin which turns to pale yellow with ripening. It is usually harvested while still greenish, since it tends to deteriorate fast while yellow.

It is named “transparent” because it is almost luminescent in colour and has a white flesh, that is very juicy and has a sharp, refreshing taste.

The fruit is good for cooking into a cream colored puree and is usually harvested for this purpose.

 

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

September 10, 2015 at 4:58 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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All about the Apple…..

 
* When buying apples, choose those without any bruises or soft, mushy spots.

* Look for fruit with shiny skin—dull skin hints at a lack of crispness and flavor.

* Apples quickly lose their crispness at room temperature. To keep apples in the fridge, place them in a perforated plastic bag in the crisper.

* Do not store bruised or cut apples since that will make the other stored apples spoil.

* If you’re slicing apples and don’t want the exposed pieces to turn brown, dunk the slices in a bowl of three parts water to one part lemon juice.

Orange Pippin

September 3, 2015 at 5:26 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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I wanted to pass along a website for all Apple Lovers out there! It’s a really informative site all about Apples. From the latest news, varieties, orchards and more! Check it out soon!

 

Welcome to Orange Pippin
If you are interested in apple varieties, pears, cherries or plums, or orchards where these fruits are grown, you have come to the right place.

* Information on over 600 apple varieties, with user reviews and a ‘vote’ feature.
* Listings for over 2,000 orchards, with easy to use search and mapping capabilities.
* Find orchards worldwide that grow an apple variety you may be looking for.
* Tree registry section with more than 4,000 individual trees registered, allowing growers to record their trees and log their blossom and harvest dates.
* Calendar of Apple Festivals and orchard events, if you are an event organisers send us details of your apple event.
* 800+ member forum board to discuss various topics surrounding orchards, apples and tree care.

Our website is named after England’s most famous apple variety – Cox’s Orange Pippin – widely regarded as the finest of all dessert apples.

‘Pippin’ is an old English word derived from the French word for ‘seedling’. The same word can be seen in the modern French for a plant nursery or garden centre – ‘pepiniere’. Like many old apple varieties Cox’s Orange Pippin was discovered as a chance seedling.
http://www.orangepippin.com/

Apple of the Week – McIntosh Apples

September 3, 2015 at 5:21 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | 3 Comments
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McIntosh apples on a tree

McIntosh apples on a tree

The McIntosh, McIntosh Red, or colloquially the Mac (pronunciation: /ˈmækɨntɒʃ/ mak-in-tosh – the same as Macintosh) is an apple cultivar. The fruit has red and green skin, a tart flavor, and tender white flesh, which ripens in late September. In the 20th century it was the most popular cultivar in Eastern Canada and New England, and is considered an all-purpose apple, suitable both for cooking and eating raw. Apple Inc. employee Jef Raskin named the Macintosh line of personal computers after the fruit.

John McIntosh discovered the original McIntosh sapling on his Dundela farm in Upper Canada in 1811. He and his wife bred it, and the family started grafting the tree and selling the fruit in 1835. In 1870, it entered commercial production, and became common in northeastern North America after 1900. While still important in production, the fruit’s popularity fell in the early 21st century in the face of competition from varieties such as the Gala. According to the US Apple Association website it is one of the fifteen most popular apple cultivars in the United States.

 

 

The McIntosh or McIntosh Red (nicknamed the “Mac”), is the most popular apple cultivar in eastern Canada and the northeastern United States. It also sells well in eastern Europe.

A spreading tree that is moderately vigorous, the McIntosh bears annually or in alternate years. The tree is hardy to at least USDA Hardiness zone 4a, or −34 °C (−29 °F). 50% or more of its flowers die at −3.1 °C (26.4 °F) or below.

The McIntosh apple is a small- to medium-sized round fruit with a short stem. It has a red and green skin that is thick, tender, and easy to peel. Its white flesh is sometime tinged with green or pink and is juicy, tender, and firm, soon becoming soft. The flesh is easily bruised.

The fruit is considered “all-purpose”, suitable both for eating raw and for cooking. It is used primarily for dessert, and requires less time to cook than most cultivars. It is usually blended when used for juice.

The fruit grows best in cool areas where nights are cold and autumn days are clear; otherwise, it suffers from poor color and soft flesh, and tends to fall from the tree before harvest. It stores for two to three months in air, but is prone to scald, flesh softening, chilling sensitivity, and coprinus rot. It can become mealy when stored at temperatures below 2 °C (36 °F). The fruit is optimally stored in a controlled atmosphere in which temperatures are between 1.7 and 3.0 °C (35.1 and 37.4 °F), and air content is 1.5–4.5% oxygen and 1–5% carbon dioxide; under such conditions, the McIntosh will keep for five to eight months.

 

A McIntosh illustrated in 1901

A McIntosh illustrated in 1901

The McIntosh is most commonly cultivated in Canada, the United States, and eastern Europe. The parentage of the McIntosh is unknown, but the Snow Apple (or Fameuse), Fall St Lawrence, and Alexander have been speculated. It is one of the top five apple cultivars used in cloning, and research indicates the McIntosh combines well for winter hardiness.

If unsprayed, the McIntosh succumbs easily to apple scab, which may lead to entire crops being unmarketable. It has generally low susceptibility to fire blight, powdery mildew, cedar-apple rust, quince rust, and hawthorn rust. It is susceptible to fungal diseases such as Nectria canker, brown rot, black rot, race 1 of apple rust (but resists race 2). It is moderately resistant to Pezicula bark rot and Alternaria leaf blotch, and resists brown leaf spot well.

The McIntosh is one of the most common cultivars used in cloning; a 1996 study found that the McIntosh was a parent in 101 of 439 cultivars selected, more than any other founding clone. It was used in over half of the Canadian cultivars selected, and was used extensively in the United States and Eastern Europe as well; rarely was it used elsewhere. Offsprings of the McIntosh include: the Jersey Black hybrid the Macoun, the Newtown Pippin hybrid the Spartan, the Cortland; the Empire; the Jonamac, the Jersey Mac, the Lobo, the Melba, the Summered, the Empire, the Tydeman’s Red, and possibly the Paula Red.

 

 

Apple trees were introduced to Canada at the Habitation at Port-Royal (modern Port Royal, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia) as early as 1606 by French settlers. Following its introduction, apple cultivation spread inland.

The McIntosh’s discoverer, John McIntosh (1777 – c. 1845–46), left his native Mohawk Valley home in New York State in 1796 to follow his love, Dolly Irwin, who had been taken to Upper Canada by her Loyalist parents. She had died by the time he found her, but he settled as a farmer in Upper Canada. He married Hannah Doran in 1801, and they farmed along the Saint Lawrence River until 1811, when McIntosh exchanged the land he had with his brother-in-law Edward Doran for a plot in Dundela.

While clearing the overgrown plot McIntosh discovered some wild apple seedlings on his farm. He transplanted the seedlings next to his house. One of the seedlings bore particularly good fruit. The McIntosh grandchildren dubbed the fruit it produced “Granny’s apple”, as they often saw their grandmother taking care of the tree in the orchard. McIntosh was selling seedlings from the tree by 1820, but they did not produce fruit of the quality of the original.

John McIntosh’s son Allan (1815–1899) learned grafting about 1835; with this cloning the McIntoshes could maintain the distinctive properties of the fruit of the original tree. Allan and brother Sandy (1825–1906), nicknamed “Sandy the Grafter”, increased production and promotion of the cultivar. Earliest sales were in 1835, and in 1836 the cultivar was renamed the “McIntosh Red”; it entered commercial production in 1870. The apple became popular after 1900, when the first sprays for apple scab were developed. A house fire damaged the original McIntosh tree in 1894; it last produced fruit in 1908, and died and fell over in 1910.

Horticulturist William Tyrrell Macoun of the Central Experimental Farm in Ottawa is credited with popularizing the McIntosh in Canada. He stated the McIntosh needed “no words of praise”, that it was “one of the finest appearing and best dessert apples grown”. The Macoun, a hybrid of the McIntosh and Jersey Black grown by the Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, NY, was named for him in 1923. In the northeastern United States the McIntosh replaced a large number of Baldwins that were killed in a severe winter in 1933–34. In the late 1940s, Canadian ambassador to the United Nations Andrew McNaughton told Soviet Minister for Foreign Affairs Andrei Gromyko that the McIntosh Red was Canada’s best apple.

The McIntosh made up 40% of the Canadian apple market by the 1960s; and at least thirty varieties of McIntosh hybrid were known by 1970.

 

 

An apple in a market.

An apple in a market.

Its popularity later waned in the face of competition from foreign imports; in the first decade of the 21st century, the Gala accounted for 33% of the apple market in Ontario to the McIntosh’s 12%, and the Northern Spy had become the preferred apple for pies. Production remained important to Ontario, however, as 30,000,000 kilograms (66,000,000 lb) of McIntoshes were produced in 2010.

The original tree discovered by John McIntosh bore fruit for more than ninety years, and died in 1910. Horticulturalists from the Upper Canada Village heritage park saved cuttings from the last known first-generation McIntosh graft before it died in 2011 for producing clones.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 3, 2015 at 5:19 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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An Apple a day…..

 

When buying apples, choose those without any bruises or soft, mushy spots. They should be firm for their specific variety (a McIntosh will not be as firm as a Granny Smith). Look for fruit with shiny skin—dull skin hints at a lack of crispness and flavor.

Apple of the Week – Granny Smith Apples

August 27, 2015 at 4:59 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | 3 Comments
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Malus 'Granny Smith'

Malus ‘Granny Smith’

The Granny Smith is a tip-bearing apple cultivar, which originated in Australia in 1868. It is named after Maria Ann Smith, who propagated the cultivar from a chance seedling. The tree is thought to be a hybrid of Malus sylvestris, the European Wild Apple, with the domestic apple M. domestica as the polleniser. The fruit has hard, light green skin and a crisp, juicy flesh.

Granny Smiths go from being completely green to turning yellow when overripe. The acidity mellows significantly on ripening, and it takes on a balanced flavor.

 

 

Maria Ann "Granny" Smith (1799–1870)

Maria Ann “Granny” Smith (1799–1870)

The Granny Smith cultivar originated in Eastwood, New South Wales, Australia (now a suburb of Sydney) in 1868. Its discoverer, Maria Ann Smith, had emigrated to the district from Beckley, East Sussex in 1839 with her husband Thomas. They purchased a small orchard in the area in 1855-1856 and began cultivating fruit, for which the area was a well known centre in colonial Australia. Smith bore numerous children and was a prominent figure in the district, earning the nickname “Granny” Smith in her advanced years.

The origin of the Granny Smith apple is definitively documented, and the first description was not published until 1924. In that year, Farmer and Settler published the account of a local historian who had interviewed two men who had known Maria. One of those interviewed recalled that in 1868 he (then twelve years old) and his father had been invited to Smith’s farm to inspect a chance seedling that had sprung near a creek. Smith had dumped there among the ferns the remains of French crab-apples that had been grown in Tasmania. Another story recounted that Smith had been testing French crab-apples for cooking, and throwing the apple cores out her window as she worked, found that the new cultivar sprung up underneath her kitchen windowsill. Whatever the case, Smith’s husband was an invalid and she took it upon herself to propagate the new cultivar on her property, finding the apples good for cooking and for general consumption. Having “all the appearances of a cooking apple”, they were not tart but instead were “sweet and crisp to eat”. She took a stall at Sydney’s George Street market, where the apples stored “exceptionally well and became popular” and “once a week sold her produce there.”

Smith died only a couple years after her discovery in 1870, but her work had been noticed by other local planters. Edward Gallard was one such planter, who extensively planted Granny Smith trees on his property and bought the Smith farm when Thomas died in 1876. Gallard was successful in marketing the apple locally, but it did not receive widespread attention until 1890. In that year, it was exhibited as “Smith’s Seedling” at the Castle Hill Agricultural and Horticultural Show, and the following year it won the prize for cooking apples under the name “Granny Smith’s Seedling”. The apple was successful and the following year many were exhibiting Granny Smith apples at horticultural shows.

In 1895 the New South Wales Department of Agriculture recognised the cultivar and had begun growing them at the Government Experimental Station in Bathurst, New South Wales, recommending the gazette its properties as a late-picking cooking apple for potential export. Over the following years the government actively promoted the apple, leading to its widespread adoption. Its worldwide fame grew from the fact that it could be picked from March and stored until November. Enterprising fruit merchants in 1890s and 1900s experimented with methods to transport the apples overseas in cold storage. Because of its excellent shelf life the Granny Smith could be exported long distances and most times of the year, at a time when Australian food exports were growing dramatically on the back of international demand. Granny Smiths were exported in enormous quantities after the First World War, and by 1975, 40 percent of Australia’s apple crop was Granny Smith.

By this time it was being grown intensely elsewhere in the Southern Hemisphere, as well as in France and the United States. However, apples are genetic hybrids that produce new genetic variations in their seedlings. Because the Granny Smith is a chance (and rare) mutation, the seeds of the apple, when grown, tend to produce a tart green apple with a much less appealing taste. To preserve the exact genetic variation cutting and grafting are required. Thus, like the navel orange and the Cavendish banana, all the Granny Smith apples grown today are cuttings from the original Smith tree in Sydney. The advent of the Granny Smith Apple is now celebrated annually in Eastwood with the Granny Smith Festival.

 

 

Granny Smith apples.

Granny Smith apples.

Granny Smith apples are light green in color. They are commonly used in pie baking, can be eaten raw, and at least one company (Woodchuck Hard Cider) makes Granny Smith varietal cider.

It is moderately susceptible to fire blight and is highly prone to scab, powdery mildew, and cedar apple rust.

Granny Smith is much more easily preserved in storage than other apples, a factor which has greatly contributed to its success in export markets. Its long storage life has been attributed to its fairly low levels of ethylene production, and in the right conditions Granny Smiths can be stored without loss of quality for as long as a year. This cultivar needs fewer winter chill hours and a longer season to mature the fruit, so it is favored for the milder areas of the apple growing regions. However, they are susceptible to superficial scald and bitter pit. Superficial scald may be controlled by treatment with diphenylamine before storage. It can also be controlled with low-oxygen storage. Pit can be controlled with calcium sprays during the growing season and with postharvest calcium dips.

 

 

Granny Smith is one of the several apple cultivars that are high in antioxidant activity, and they boast the highest concentration of phenols amongst the apple breeds. Some sources recommend Granny Smiths (among other apples) as a particularly efficient source of antioxidants, particularly the flavonoids cyanidin and epicatechin, especially if eaten with the skin intact. Granny Smiths are also naturally low in calories and high in dietary fiber and potassium, making them commonly recommended as a component of healthy and weight-loss diets.

According to the US Apple Association website it is one of the fifteen most popular apple cultivars in the United States.

 

Apple of the Week – Jonagold

August 20, 2015 at 5:22 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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Jonagold is a cultivar of apple which was developed in 1953 in New York State Agricultural Experiment Station of 'Jonagold'Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, a cross between the crisp Golden Delicious and the blush-crimson Jonathan. They form a large sweet fruit with a thin skin. Because of their large size they are now favoured by commercial growers in many parts of the world. Jonagold is triploid, with sterile pollen, and as such, requires a second type of apple for pollen and is incapable of pollenizing other cultivars. The Jonagored Apple, a sport mutation of Jonagold, was once covered under United States Patent PP05937, now expired.

Jonagold has a green-yellow basic color with crimson, brindled covering colour.

The apple has a fluffily crisp fruit. It is juicy and aromatic and has a sweet-sour taste.

The skin can also turn out fully red or green other than Golden-Red.

It is most popular in Belgium, and according to the US Apple Association website it is one of the fifteen most popular apple cultivars in the United States.

Apple of the Week – Golden Delicious

August 13, 2015 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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Golden Delicious

Golden Delicious

The Golden Delicious is a cultivar of apple with a yellow color, not closely related to the Red Delicious apple. According to the US Apple Association website it is one of the fifteen most popular apple cultivars in the United States.

 
Golden Delicious is a large, yellowish-green skinned cultivar and very sweet to the taste. It is prone to bruising and shriveling, so it needs careful handling and storage. It is a favorite for salads, apple sauce, and apple butter. The amount of acid in this apple increases, creating a sweeter flavor. In warmer growing areas, acid content is lower, creating a milder flavor.

 

Golden Delicious apples.

Golden Delicious apples.

This cultivar is a chance seedling possibly a hybrid of Grimes Golden and Golden Reinette. The original tree was found on the Mullins’ family farm in Clay County, West Virginia, United States and was locally known as Mullin’s Yellow Seedling and Annit apple. Anderson Mullins sold the tree and propagation rights to Stark Brothers Nurseries, which first marketed it as a companion of their Red Delicious in 1914.

 

 

The Golden Delicious was designated the official state fruit of West Virginia by a Senate resolution on February 20, 1995. Clay County has hosted an annual Golden Delicious Festival since 1972.

 

Harvested from autumn through winter.

West Virginia is the originator of many vegetable and fruit crops, including the apples Grimes Golden, and the Guyandotte, which is believed extinct.

 

Low in calories Golden Delicious apples are a good source of soluble fiber, which has been proven to help lower cholesterol, control weight and regulate blood sugar. They also contain vitamins A and C, as well as a trace amount of boron and potassium, most of which is located in the apples skin.

 

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