National Cheese Lover’s Day

January 20, 2020 at 12:22 PM | Posted in cheese | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

January 20, 2020 is National Cheese Lover’s Day

Today is National Cheese Lover’s Day! Did you know that the average American consumes about 31 pounds of cheese each year? If you are a self-proclaimed cheese lover, indulge in your favorite type of cheese today!

Cheese is a very popular food across the world. There are more than 900 cheese types, classified by taste and texture. Here are the primary classifications and some examples: fresh cheese (ricotta); soft cheese (feta); semi-soft cheese (Fontina); semi-hard cheese (Gouda); hard cheese (Cheddar); double or triple crème cheese (Brillat-Savarin); blue cheese (Gorgonzola); washed rind cheese (Limburger); and bloomy rind cheese (Brie).

Visit your local grocery store and pick up your favorite kind of artisan cheese or cook a cheesy dish for dinner tonight in honor of National Cheese Lover’s Day!
https://www.punchbowl.com/holidays/national-cheese-lovers-day

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 6, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

I knew I loved Cheese so much for a reason……….

Cheese is a great source of calcium, fat, and protein. It also contains high amounts of vitamins A and B-12, along with zinc, phosphorus, and riboflavin. Cheese made from the milk of 100 percent grass-fed animals is the highest in nutrients and also contains omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin K-2.

To store Cheese – Ideally, cheese should be kept between 35 and 45 degrees Fahrenheit. Freezing can cause the texture to degrade, so the best place to store cheese is as far from the freezer as possible. Keep it in the vegetable drawer or on a bottom shelf where the temperature is consistent but not too cold.

Baked Chicken Thigh Recipes

December 29, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Baked Chicken Thigh Recipes. I love Chicken Thighs, and here’s some Delicious and Healthy Baked Chicken Thigh Recipes. Find recipes like Easy Chicken Enchilada Casserole, Southern-Style Oven-Fried Chicken, and Huli Huli Chicken with Pineapple-Ginger Sauce. Find these recipes and many more all at the EatingWell website. Plus don’t forget you can subscribe to the EatingWell Magazine, one of my favorites! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Baked Chicken Thigh Recipes
Find healthy, delicious baked chicken thigh recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Easy Chicken Enchilada Casserole
Casseroles make perfect meal-prep dinners–this enchilada version is so easy to prep ahead. The whole casserole can be built and left to hang out in the refrigerator for up to three days. Then all you have to do is bake it off on a busy night and you have a healthy dinner on the table in a jiff. The quick homemade enchilada sauce in this recipe is great when you don’t have any of the canned sauce on hand–just season crushed tomatoes with spices and salt for an instant enchilada sauce…………………

Southern-Style Oven-Fried Chicken
A blend of dried spices gives the crispy panko coating on these oven-fried chicken thighs plenty of flavor, and marinating the chicken in buttermilk makes it moist and juicy. If you don’t have an oven-safe skillet, you can roast the chicken in a baking dish in Step 5. Serve with your favorite vegetables (bake them alongside the chicken to make it easy) for a healthy comfort food dinner that requires just 20 minutes of active prep time……………………………….

Huli Huli Chicken with Pineapple-Ginger Sauce
“Huli” is a Hawaiian word that means to turn over. Traditional versions of this dish are grilled, constantly turning the chicken back and forth as a rotisserie would. This easy recipe is made in the oven to save you time and elbow grease. Recipe adapted from Chef Greg Harrison, Pacific’O Restaurant……………………….

* Click the link below to get all the Baked Chicken Thigh Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/20651/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/thighs/baked/

Slow Cooker Spinach Dip

December 6, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

I have a 2nd Jennie – O Turkey Appetizer Recipe to pass along, Slow Cooker Spinach Dip. What’s more perfect for a snack or appetizer than a Creamy and Delicious Spinach Dip! Plus it’s made using your Slow Cooker. You’ll be using the JENNIE-O® Lower Sodium Turkey Bacon made with Sea Salt to help make this one. You’ll also need two different kinds of Cheese, Spinach, and Artichoke Hearts. You can this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

Slow Cooker Spinach Dip
Your can always judge a good spinach dip by the speed in which it disappears. And though this one is cooked in a slow cooker, it moves lightning fast! This creamy and delicious Spinach Dip has two different kinds of cheese, turkey bacon and artichoke hearts for a special, tangy zing. And because it’s in a slow cooker, you can set it and forget it!

INGREDIENTS
1 (10-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained
½ cup chopped green onions
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 (15-ounce) can quartered artichoke hearts, rinsed and drained
1½ cups shredded white Cheddar cheese
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 cup low-sodium vegetable broth
½ cup sour cream
½ cup mayonnaise
1½ teaspoons seasoned pepper
6 slices JENNIE-O® Lower Sodium Turkey Bacon made with Sea Salt
assorted sliced vegetables and crackers, if desired

DIRECTIONS
1) In lightly greased slow cooker, stir together spinach, green onions, garlic, artichoke, cheeses, vegetable broth, sour cream, mayonnaise and seasoned pepper. Cook on HIGH 4 hours.
2) Cook turkey bacon as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Finely chop bacon. Place bacon on top of spinach dip. Serve with sliced vegetables or crackers, if desired.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 140
Protein 10g
Carbohydrates 11g
Fiber 2g
Sugars 2g
Fat 7g
Cholesterol 25mg
Sodium 410mg
Saturated Fat 3g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1201-slow-cooker-spinach-dip

It’s Pizza Tonight from Domino’s

November 16, 2019 at 6:49 PM | Posted in pizza | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Kitchen Closed – It’s Pizza Tonight from Domino’s

 

 

Just a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea for Breakfast. 41 degrees and sunny out today. Well most of our snow is gone except for a few spots. Cleaned the house today and that was about it as my sinuses are going crazy today. Settled back and watched College Football for the afternoon. Mom wanted Pizza tonight so, Pizza it is!

 

 

 

 

 

 

I ordered Mom’s favorite, Domino’s Hand Tossed Pizza Large with Cheese, Sauce, Pepperoni, Italian Sausage, Mushrooms, and Black Olives, Green Olives. First Pizza in a while, and it was over due! As always the Pizza arrived on time, hot and delicious! For Dessert/Snack later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn with a Coke Zero to drink. The Kitchen reopens tomorrow! Take care all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Domino’s Medium (12″) Hand Tossed Pizza
Whole: Cheese, Pepperoni, Italian Sausage, Green Olives, Black Olives, Mushrooms, Robust Inspired Tomato Sauce.
https://www.dominos.com/en/index.jsp

It’s all about the Chili in Cincinnati………..

November 11, 2019 at 3:20 PM | Posted in chili | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Very good article in the Sunday Edition of the Cincinnati Enquirer, click the link at the bottom of the post to read the entire article. It’s Chili Time!

 

It came in at No. 52 on Deadspin’s ranked list of foods by state. (51 was being hit by a car.) The New York Times was horrified by it. A lot of people who aren’t from Cincinnati –food bloggers, commentators, Yelpers from out of town – don’t like Cincinnati chili. Some of them can be condescending, dismissive and downright mean.

And we don’t care! Although Cincinnati basks in positive attention like being seventh best place for recent college grads, we don’t give a single coney with mustard what they say about our chili. That brick-colored splash that won’t come out of your blouse? That’s a badge of honor. It declares membership in an exclusive club.

Exclusive because Cincinnati is not blind to the weirdness of our chili. It’s not obvious like Buffalo wings or New Orleans gumbo. Anyone can like those! But if anyone can join, it’s not a club. Three-ways, tiny coneys, four-way with onion? Those you have to be born to love or make a conscious effort to see the light.

Chili pulls us together against the world. Anytime you’re eating chili, you know many of your city mates are eating it, too, though you may have nothing else in common with them. At one of my favorite places for a Greek salad and a couple of coneys, the Skyline at Fourth and Sycamore, there are businessmen in suits, ties flung over their shoulder, grabbing lunch. There are also guys who do building maintenance.

From time to time, I’ve thought about proclaiming the best Cincinnati chili. But I’m more interested in the variety: how chili is the same but different all over town. And how each Cincinnatian makes the experience their own. So I spent a few weeks just going to get chili with people at lunch or dinner or later in the evening. We talked about a lot of things. Including chili………
https://www.cincinnati.com/story/entertainment/dining/2019/11/08/skyline-gold-star-empress-dixie-camp-washington-blue-ash-pleasant-ridge-identities-cincinnati-chili/3929488002/

One of America’s Favorites – Hamburger

November 4, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Hamburger with french fries and a beer

A hamburger (short: burger) is a sandwich consisting of one or more cooked patties of ground meat, usually beef, placed inside a sliced bread roll or bun. The patty may be pan fried, grilled, smoked or flame broiled. Hamburgers are often served with cheese, lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, bacon, or chiles; condiments such as ketchup, mayonnaise, mustard, relish, or “special sauce”; and are frequently placed on sesame seed buns. A hamburger topped with cheese is called a cheeseburger.

The term “burger” can also be applied to the meat patty on its own, especially in the United Kingdom, where the term “patty” is rarely used, or the term can even refer simply to ground beef. Since the term hamburger usually implies beef, for clarity “burger” may be prefixed with the type of meat or meat substitute used, as in beef burger, turkey burger, bison burger, or veggie burger.

Hamburgers are sold at fast-food restaurants, diners, and specialty and high-end restaurants (where burgers may sell for several times the cost of a fast-food burger, but may be one of the cheaper options on the menu). There are many international and regional variations of the hamburger.

Hamburg steak has been known as “Frikadelle” in Germany since the 17th century.

The term hamburger originally derives from Hamburg, Germany’s second-largest city. In German, Burg means “castle”, “fortified settlement” or “fortified refuge” and is a widespread component of place names. The first element of the name is perhaps from Old High German hamma, referring to a bend in a river, or Middle High German hamme, referring to an enclosed area of pastureland. Hamburger in German is the demonym of Hamburg, similar to frankfurter and wiener, names for other meat-based foods and demonyms of the cities of Frankfurt and Vienna respectively.

The term “burger” eventually became a suffix back-formation that is associated with many different types of sandwiches, similar to a (ground meat) hamburger, but made of different meats such as buffalo in the buffalo burger, venison, kangaroo, turkey, elk, lamb or fish like salmon in the salmon burger, but even with meatless sandwiches as is the case of the veggie burger.

There have been many claims about the origin of the hamburger, but the origins remain unclear. The popular book “The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy” by Hannah Glasse included a recipe in 1758 as “Hamburgh sausage”, which suggested to serve it “roasted with toasted bread under it”. A similar snack was also popular in Hamburg by the name “Rundstück warm” (“bread roll warm”) in 1869 or earlier, and supposedly eaten by many emigrants on their way to America, but may have contained roasted beefsteak rather than Frikadeller. Hamburg steak is reported to have been served between two pieces of bread on the Hamburg America Line, which began operations in 1847. Each of these may mark the invention of the Hamburger, and explain the name.

There is a reference to a “Hamburg steak” as early as 1884 in the Boston Journal. On July 5, 1896, the Chicago Daily Tribune made a highly specific claim regarding a “hamburger sandwich” in an article about a “Sandwich Car”: “A distinguished favorite, only five cents, is Hamburger steak sandwich, the meat for which is kept ready in small patties and ‘cooked while you wait’ on the gasoline range.”

A bacon cheeseburger, from a New York City diner

According to Connecticut Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro, the hamburger, a ground meat patty between two slices of bread, was first created in America in 1900 by Louis Lassen, a Danish immigrant, owner of Louis’ Lunch in New Haven. There have been rival claims by Charlie Nagreen, Frank and Charles Menches, Oscar Weber Bilby, and Fletcher Davis. White Castle traces the origin of the hamburger to Hamburg, Germany with its invention by Otto Kuase. However, it gained national recognition at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair when the New York Tribune referred to the hamburger as “the innovation of a food vendor on the pike”. No conclusive argument has ever ended the dispute over invention. An article from ABC News sums up: “One problem is that there is little written history. Another issue is that the spread of the burger happened largely at the World’s Fair, from tiny vendors that came and went in an instant. And it is entirely possible that more than one person came up with the idea at the same time in different parts of the country.”

Hamburgers are usually a feature of fast food restaurants. The hamburgers served in major fast food establishments are usually mass-produced in factories and frozen for delivery to the site. These hamburgers are thin and of uniform thickness, differing from the traditional American hamburger prepared in homes and conventional restaurants, which is thicker and prepared by hand from ground beef. Most American hamburgers are round, but some fast-food chains, such as Wendy’s, sell square-cut hamburgers. Hamburgers in fast food restaurants are usually grilled on a flat-top, but some firms, such as Burger King, use a gas flame grilling process. At conventional American restaurants, hamburgers may be ordered “rare”, but normally are served medium-well or well-done for food safety reasons. Fast food restaurants do not usually offer this option.

Hamburger preparation in a fast food establishment

The McDonald’s fast-food chain sells the Big Mac, one of the world’s top selling hamburgers, with an estimated 550 million sold annually in the United States. Other major fast-food chains, including Burger King (also known as Hungry Jack’s in Australia), A&W, Culver’s, Whataburger, Carl’s Jr./Hardee’s chain, Wendy’s (known for their square patties), Jack in the Box, Cook Out, Harvey’s, Shake Shack, In-N-Out Burger, Five Guys, Fatburger, Vera’s, Burgerville, Back Yard Burgers, Lick’s Homeburger, Roy Rogers, Smashburger, and Sonic also rely heavily on hamburger sales. Fuddruckers and Red Robin are hamburger chains that specialize in the mid-tier “restaurant-style” variety of hamburgers.

Some restaurants offer elaborate hamburgers using expensive cuts of meat and various cheeses, toppings, and sauces. One example is the Bobby’s Burger Palace chain founded by well-known chef and Food Network star Bobby Flay.

Hamburgers are often served as a fast dinner, picnic or party food and are often cooked outdoors on barbecue grills.

A high-quality hamburger patty is made entirely of ground (minced) beef and seasonings; these may be described as “all-beef hamburger” or “all-beef patties” to distinguish them from inexpensive hamburgers made with cost-savers like added flour, textured vegetable protein, ammonia treated defatted beef trimmings (which the company Beef Products Inc, calls “lean finely textured beef”), advanced meat recovery, or other fillers. In the 1930s ground liver was sometimes added. Some cooks prepare their patties with binders like eggs or breadcrumbs. Seasonings may include salt and pepper and others like as parsley, onions, soy sauce, Thousand Island dressing, onion soup mix, or Worcestershire sauce. Many name brand seasoned salt products are also used.

* Safety
Raw hamburger may contain harmful bacteria that can produce food-borne illness such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, due to the occasional initial improper preparation of the meat, so caution is needed during handling and cooking. Because of the potential for food-borne illness, the USDA recommends hamburgers be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 °F (71 °C). If cooked to this temperature, they are considered well-done.

Burgers can also be made with patties made from ingredients other than beef. For example, a turkey burger uses ground turkey meat, a chicken burger uses ground chicken meat. A buffalo burger uses ground meat from a bison, and an ostrich burger is made from ground seasoned ostrich meat. A deer burger uses ground venison from deer.

A veggie burger, black bean burger, garden burger, or tofu burger uses a meat analogue, a meat substitute such as tofu, TVP, seitan (wheat gluten), quorn, beans, grains or an assortment of vegetables, ground up and mashed into patties.

A steak burger is marketing term for a hamburger claimed to be of superior quality. or, in Australia, a sandwich containing a steak.

Steak burgers are first mentioned in the 1920s. Like other hamburgers, they may be prepared with various accompaniments and toppings.

Use of the term “steakburger” dates to the 1920s in the United States. In the U.S. in 1934, A.H. “Gus” Belt, the founder of Steak ‘n Shake, devised a higher-quality hamburger and offered it as a “steakburger” to customers at the company’s first location in Normal, Illinois. This burger used a combination of ground meat from the strip portion of T-bone steak and sirloin steak in its preparation. Steak burgers are a primary menu item at Steak ‘n Shake restaurants, and the company’s registered trademarks included “original steakburger” and “famous for steakburgers”. Steak ‘n Shake’s “Prime Steakburgers” are now made of choice grade brisket and chuck.

A steak burger with cheese and onion rings

Beef is typical, although other meats such as lamb and pork may also be used. The meat is ground or chopped.

In Australia, a steak burger is a steak sandwich which contains a whole steak, not ground meat.

Steak burgers may be cooked to various degrees of doneness.

Steak burgers may be served with standard hamburger toppings such as lettuce, onion, and tomato. Some may have additional various toppings such as cheese, bacon, fried egg, mushrooms, additional meats, and others.

Various fast food outlets and restaurants ‍—‌ such as Burger King, Carl’s Jr., Hardee’s, IHOP, Steak ‘n Shake, Mr. Steak, and Freddy’s ‍—‌ market steak burgers. Some restaurants offer high-end burgers prepared from aged beef. Additionally, many restaurants have used the term “steak burger” at various times.

Some baseball parks concessions in the United States call their hamburgers steak burgers, such as Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska.

Burger King introduced the Sirloin Steak sandwich in 1979 as part of a menu expansion that in turn was part of a corporate restructuring effort for the company. It was a single oblong patty made of chopped steak served on a sub-style, sesame seed roll. Additional steak burgers that Burger King has offered are the Angus Bacon Cheddar Ranch Steak Burger, the Angus Bacon & Cheese Steak Burger, and a limited edition Stuffed Steakhouse Burger.

In 2004 Steak ‘n Shake sued Burger King over the latter’s use of term Steak Burger in conjunction with one of its menu items, claiming that such use infringed on trademark rights. (According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Burger King’s attorneys “grilled” Steak ‘n Shake’s CEO in court about the precise content of Steak ‘n Shake’s steakburger offering.)

In the United States and Canada, burgers may be classified as two main types: fast food hamburgers and individually prepared burgers made in homes and restaurants. The latter are often prepared with a variety of toppings, including lettuce, tomato, onion, and often sliced pickles (or pickle relish). French fries often accompany the burger. Cheese (usually processed cheese slices but often Cheddar, Swiss, pepper jack, or blue), either melted directly on the meat patty or crumbled on top, is generally an option.

Condiments might be added to a hamburger or may be offered separately on the side including mustard, mayonnaise, ketchup, salad dressings and barbecue sauce.

Other toppings can include bacon, avocado or guacamole, sliced sautéed mushrooms, cheese sauce, chili (usually without beans), fried egg, scrambled egg, feta cheese, blue cheese, salsa, pineapple, jalapeños and other kinds of chili peppers, anchovies, slices of ham or bologna, pastrami or teriyaki-seasoned beef, tartar sauce, french fries, onion rings or potato chips.

Miniature hamburgers (“sliders”)

* Standard toppings on hamburgers may depend upon location, particularly at restaurants that are not national or regional franchises.
* Restaurants may offer hamburgers with multiple meat patties. The most common variants are double and triple hamburgers, but California-based burger chain In-N-Out once sold a sandwich with one hundred patties, called a “100×100.”
* Pastrami burgers may be served in Salt Lake City, Utah.
* A patty melt consists of a patty, sautéed onions and cheese between two slices of rye bread. The sandwich is then buttered and fried.
* A slider is a very small square hamburger patty sprinkled with diced onions and served on an equally small bun. According to the earliest citations, the name originated aboard U.S. Navy ships, due to the manner in which greasy burgers slid across the galley grill as the ship pitched and rolled. Other versions claim the term “slider” originated from the hamburgers served by flight line galleys at military airfields, which were so greasy they slid right through you; or because their small size allows them to “slide” right down your throat in one or two bites.
* In Alberta, Canada a “kubie burger” is a hamburger made with a pressed Ukrainian sausage (kubasa).
* In Minnesota, a “Juicy Lucy” (also spelled “Jucy Lucy”), is a hamburger having cheese inside the meat patty rather than on top. A piece of cheese is surrounded by raw meat and cooked until it melts, resulting in a molten core of cheese within the patty. This scalding hot cheese tends to gush out at the first bite, so servers frequently instruct customers to let the sandwich cool for a few minutes before consumption.
* A low carb burger is a hamburger served without a bun and replaced with large slices of lettuce with mayonnaise or mustard being the sauces primarily used.
* A ramen burger, invented by Keizo Shimamoto, is a hamburger patty sandwiched between two discs of compressed ramen noodles in lieu of a traditional bun.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Week!

October 25, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Cheesy…………………..

Cheese is a great source of calcium, fat, and protein. It also contains high amounts of vitamins A and B-12, along with zinc, phosphorus, and riboflavin. Cheese made from the milk of 100 percent grass-fed animals is the highest in nutrients and also contains omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin K-2.

Healthy Macaroni and Cheese Recipes

October 24, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Macaroni and Cheese Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Macaroni and Cheese Recipes with recipes including Skillet Chili Mac, Jalapeño Popper Mac and Cheese Bites, and Four-Cheese Macaroni and Cheese. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Macaroni and Cheese Recipes
Find healthy, delicious macaroni and cheese recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Skillet Chili Mac
Poblanos add a kick of heat to this chili mac recipe. If that’s not your thing, swap in green bell peppers to tone down the heat in this easy pasta dish, which mashes up mac and cheese and chili into a seriously satisfying skillet dinner…………..

Jalapeño Popper Mac and Cheese Bites
When you’re craving jalapeño poppers and mac and cheese and you want to eat with your hands, these easy cheesy bites—which are baked in a mini muffin tin—are just the ticket. Serve them as part of a family-friendly dinner or put out a platter for a casual party. A crispy breadcrumb topping provides a wonderful contrast to the creamy mac & cheese, while the optional fresh parsley and pickled jalapeño garnishes add a nice color contrast and bright flavor………..

Four-Cheese Macaroni and Cheese
The more cheese the merrier in this baked macaroni recipe, which also features butternut squash and whole-grain pasta……………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Macaroni and Cheese Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/20698/ingredients/pasta-noodle/pasta-by-shape/macaroni/macaroni-and-cheese/

Healthy Winter Squash Recipes

October 15, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Winter Squash Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Winter Squash Recipes with recipes like; Pizza-Stuffed Spaghetti Squash, Curried Butternut Squash and Apple Soup, and Baked Spiralized Butternut Squash Fries. Find these recipes and so much more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Winter Squash Recipes
Find healthy, delicious winter squash recipes including butternut, acorn and spaghetti. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Pizza-Stuffed Spaghetti Squash
Skip the dough and stuff all of your favorite pizza toppings into spaghetti squash boats for a fun and healthy dinner that’ll please the whole family. We love the combination of mushrooms, bell peppers, pepperoni and mozzarella, but feel free to mix it up with your favorite pizza ingredients. You could throw in a bit of chopped cooked broccoli, for example, or add some olives or chopped artichoke hearts. And of course feel free to omit the pepperoni to make the dish vegetarian. Round out the meal with a simple salad……………..

Curried Butternut Squash and Apple Soup
This butternut squash and apple soup recipe is brimming with warm and cozy flavors of fall (thanks to a delightful kick from the curry). It also delivers 25 percent of your daily fiber and is chock-full of potassium, a nutrient that many of us fall short on regularly. Streamline the prep for this recipe and pick up pre-cut butternut squash: you’ll need 7 to 8 cups. Round out your meal by serving this easy soup alongside a salad or sandwich………….

Baked Spiralized Butternut Squash Fries
Sweet spiralized butternut squash is encased in a salty, extra-crunchy exterior for a serving of slightly sweet curly fries. You can pair these baked butternut squash shoestring fries with any protein of your choice, but we’re partial to grilled fish or chicken. Look for pre-spiralized squash in the refrigerated produce section……………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Winter Squash Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/21679/ingredients/vegetables/squash/winter/

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Cathryn's Kitchen

A Plant Powered Gluten-Free Kitchen

heidicooksplants.wordpress.com/

Making everyday food delicious!

Rita's Kitchen Remedies

Easy vegan food remedies to cure your hunger

Foodzesty

Simple, Scrumptious, Delicious Recipes

Crazy Rice Kitchen

Indian recipes, restaurant reviews, and the occasional helpful guide to the culinary arts.

Jono & Jules do food & wine

Two foodies and lovers of wine in Dublin.

rosauerskitchen.wordpress.com/

Spread a little aloha around the inland northwest

Life With A Baker

our journey to discovering living a healthy lifestyle

Erin, Get Your Pen

Writing, Teaching, and Life in Stitches

The Tipsy Housewife

Inspiration for Domestication

Gitta's Kitchen

Simple and delicious recipes for your family!

The Rose Table

Savoring life's pleasures.

Blood, Fire and the Pillars of Smoke

Live Fire Cooking & More

To all the meals I've cooked before

An open love letter to all the meals I've lovingly prepared and enjoyed

midwestsimple

Just another WordPress.com site

SouthernVegan

Recipes and tips to help fellow vegans survive and thrive in the South.

It's Thyme to Eat!

A Poor PhD Student's Guide to Making Delicious Food