Grilled Ham and Swiss on Sour Dough Bread w/ Baked Fries

January 17, 2020 at 6:48 PM | Posted in Boar's Head, Ore - Ida, Sargento's Cheese | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Grilled Ham and Swiss on Sour Dough Bread w/ Baked Fries

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I had my morning cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. 36 degrees and partly cloudy outside today. After I had the Tea I headed to Meijer for a few items. Stopped by the Bank ATM and then by McDonald’s to pick up Breakfast for Mom. Back home did laundry and cleaned and straightened the Pantry. For Dinner tonight I prepared a Grilled Ham and Swiss on Sour Dough Bread w/ Baked Fries.

 

 

I picked up a loaf the Goldminer California Sourdough Bread at Meijer. I love this Bread especially grilled! But don’t have too often because of the calories and carbs. To prepare the Sandwich I’ll need; Boar’s Head Sweet Slice Ham, Sargento Reduced Fat Swiss Cheese, French’s Yellow Mustard, Kraft Reduced Fat Mayo w/ Olive Oil, and Goldminer California Sourdough Bread. I used the flat top Griddle to grill it with. I sprayed the griddle with a very light coat of Pam Cooking Spray and spread about 1/2 tablespoon of Blue Bonnet Light Butter on it. Heated it on medium heat. I also turned the oven on at 425 degrees, for the Fries.

 

While the griddle was heating I got the Sandwich ready to grill. Took a slice of the Sour Dough Bread and topped it with some of the Kraft Mayo, the Boar’s Head Ham, the Sargento Swiss, French’s Mustard, and added the top slice of the Sour Dough Bread. I then Buttered the bottom and top halves of the Bread with Blue Bonnet Butter. With the griddle heated I grilled my Sandwich. Grilled the bottom half just over 3 minutes, then flipped it over and grilled the other side about 3 minutes. Until both sides were golden brown! I love Grilled Sandwiches!

 

I also baked some Ore Ida Crinkle Cut Fries, served with a side of Hunt’s Ketchup. For Dessert/Snack later a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Snyder’s of Hanover Stick Pretzels with a Diet Peach Snapple to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boar’s Head Sweet Slice Boneless Smoked Ham
With natural juices.

Enjoy the exceptional flavor of a traditional bone-in ham without the bone. Available in the Deli retail case as a center of the plate item or at the Service Deli sliced by the pound for a sandwich of note.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 2 oz (56g)
Servings Per Container Varied
Amount Per Serving
Calories 60 Calories from Fat 20
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 2.5g 4%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Trans Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.5g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 20mg 7%
Sodium 520mg 22%
Potassium 160mg 5%
Total Carbohydrate 1g 0%
Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Sugars 0g
Protein 10g 20%
http://boarshead.com/products/detail/11018-sweet-slice-brand-boneless-smoked-ham

 

 

 

Goldminer California Sourdough Bread – non-gmo square

Take your sandwich or favorite toast to the next level or use our squares as the base of breakfast casseroles or get crafty and try your hand at sandwich sushi!

Ingredients
ENRICHED WHEAT FLOUR (WHEAT FLOUR, MALTED BARLEY FLOUR, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, THIAMIN MONONITRATE,

RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WATER, SALT, YEAST.
Allergens
CONTAINS: WHEAT. MAY CONTAIN SOYBEAN, EGGS AND TREE NUTS.

https://californiagoldminer.com/sourdough-breads

Diabetic Lunch Recipes

January 7, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Diabetic Lunch Recipes. Healthy and Delicious Diabetic Lunch Recipes with recipes including Make-Ahead Spinach and Black Bean Burritos, Mixed Greens and Citrus Salad, and Instant Pot Chicken Soup with Root Vegetables and Barley. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Diabetic Lunch Recipes
Find healthy, delicious diabetic lunch recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Make-Ahead Spinach and Black Bean Burritos
These egg, bean and cheese burritos are designed to be made ahead and frozen. They are perfect for busy days and make a satisfying breakfast or lunch…………….

Mixed Greens and Citrus Salad
Any assortment of fresh oranges and grapefruit will work well in this easy salad recipe. If you can’t find one of each variety listed, you can use all navel oranges, or 3 navel oranges and 1 grapefruit………………

Instant Pot Chicken Soup with Root Vegetables and Barley
Be sure to use bone-in chicken here–it enhances the flavor of the broth, and the bones are easy to remove after cooking. This healthy chicken soup can be made in an Instant Pot or pressure cooker…………………

* Click the link below to get all the Diabetic Lunch Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18346/health-condition/diabetic/lunch/

Leftovers: Turkey and Swiss Melt w/ Green Beans and Deviled Eggs

December 26, 2019 at 6:38 PM | Posted in Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products, leftovers | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu – Leftovers: Turkey and Swiss Melt w/ Green Beans and Deviled Eggs

 

 

For Breakfast this Morning I prepared a packet of Pioneer Peppered White Gravy, toasted 2 slices of Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread, heated 2 Johnsonville Turkey Breakfast Sausage Links, and a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Another warm Winter Day out today. Partly Sunny and 63 degrees! Not too bad for this time of year. Spent most of the day helping Mom take down and store the Christmas Decorations. Later grabbed a broom and the leaf blower and swept the driveway off and the deck. For Dinner tonight its Leftovers: Turkey and Swiss Melt w/ Green Beans and Deviled Eggs.

 

 

I used the leftovers from Christmas Dinner for Dinner tonight. For the Turkey and Cheddar I had already sliced the Leftover Turkey and for the Cheese I used a slice of Boar’s Head Swiss Cheese. To prepare it I used a small skillet that I sprayed with Pam Non Stick Spray and added a 1/2 tablespoon of Extra Light Olive Oil. Heated it on medium. Added my sliced Turkey, flipping it over several times. Then as it was finishing I added a slice of the Swiss and continued cooking for about 2 minutes. Served it on a Healthy Life Wheat Hamburger Bun. I’ve switched back to using Healthy Life Buns. We can no longer purchase or find Aunt Millie’s Reduced Calorie Buns anywhere. The Healthy Life Buns are only 80 calories and 15 carbs per bun. Anyway, I love these leftovers it made one delicious Sandwich!

 

 


I also heated up the Leftover Green Beans. Mom had opened up a Mason Jar of our Canned Green Beans. Just as delicious as the first time around! Then I had a couple of Deviled Eggs. Leftovers make one delicious Dinner! For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding topped with a dab of Cool Whip Light.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Roast Turkey………..

Its protein content makes turkey a healthy meat choice. A little-known health benefit of turkey is that it contains trace minerals thought to aid in cancer prevention. Turkey contains selenium, which is essential for the healthy function of the thyroid and immune system.

Turkey meat is loaded with vitamins and minerals that your body needs. Turkey is a source of iron, zinc, potassium and phosphorus. It’s a good source of B vitamins, including B12 which helps prevent the buildup of homocysteine, an amino acid that could potentially decrease cognitive function.

Quick and Easy Chicken Dinner Recipes

December 1, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine, Quick and Easy Chicken Dinner Recipes. Delicious, Healthy, Quick and Easy Chicken Dinner Recipes. Find recipes like; Spaghetti and Chicken Meatballs with No-Cook Tomato Sauce, Quick King Ranch Chicken Casserole, and Open-Face Philly-Style Chicken Sandwiches. Find these recipes and more all at the eatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Quick and Easy Chicken Dinner Recipes
Find quick and easy chicken recipes for dinner, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Spaghetti and Chicken Meatballs with No-Cook Tomato Sauce
This crowd-pleasing and easy dinner recipe takes just 20 minutes to make, start to finish, so it’s perfect for weeknights! When tomatoes are at their in-season best, just a quick chop and a few ingredients are all you need to make a spaghetti sauce in minutes. Store-bought chicken meatballs keep the low-effort theme going all the way to the table…………….

Quick King Ranch Chicken Casserole
Usually made by layering creamy chicken and tortillas (lasagna-style), this classic Tex-Mex chicken casserole gets speedier for an easy weeknight dinner when we mix everything together in a skillet, then pop the whole pan under the broiler to make the cheese topping gooey……….

Open-Face Philly-Style Chicken Sandwiches
Next time you’re in Philadelphia, don’t miss out on sampling the city’s famous cheesesteak sandwiches, but in the meantime, satisfy yourself at home with this makeover chicken version. Open-faced on whole-grain bread, loaded with sautéed peppers and onions, and topped with melty Provolone cheese, this 30-minute broiled sandwich is easy and delicious!………………..

* Click the Link below to get all the Quick and Easy Chicken Dinner Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/20540/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/quick-easy-dinner/

Ham and Swiss Sandwich w/ Mashed Potatoes and Deviled Egg

November 29, 2019 at 6:47 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, Ham, leftovers | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Ham and Swiss Sandwich w/ Mashed Potatoes and Deviled Egg

 

 

I toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin and topped it with Smucker’s Sugarless Blackberry Jam. Also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Cloudy and 41 degrees outside today. Had a delicious Thanksgiving Dinner! Everything was so good. Mom even made a Apple Pie made with Splenda and it was just incredible! But shortly after Dinner I had to deal with some extremely painful Phantom Pains! They continued through out the night into the morning. The finally let up around noon today and I was drained. These took about everything out of me. So I tried to catch up on some sleep and relaxation. Still hoping for a cure to Phantom Pains! On some good news I went for my exam and blood work to my Oncologist Wednesday. Everything came back completely clean! So now I just have to go for a yearly exam instead of twice and no more scans and x-rays! Really pleased over that. For Dinner it’s Thanksgiving Dinner Leftovers. I made a Ham and Swiss Sandwich w/ Mashed Potatoes and Deviled Egg.

 

Plenty of leftovers from the Thanksgiving Dinner Feast! And thank goodness for leftovers because after my night and I really didn’t feel like cooking. We almost always use Cook’s Ham when we bake a Ham. So with the Ham we baked yesterday, we made some into Ham Sandwiches. Just took a few slices and serving it on Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. The Ham is so delicious and moist. And as always with Cook’s Ham, perfect seasoning! We’ll have quite a few Breakfasts and Lunches out of this. To make the Sandwich I used Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. Topped it with a bit Kraft Light Mayo with Olive Oil, French’s Yellow Mustard, and a slice of Boar’s Head Swiss Cheese. Love this Sandwich!

 

For a side I heated up the leftover Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes and I had a leftover Deviled Eggs. Just love these leftovers! It’s sometimes better the second time around! For Dessert/Snack a bowl of Chex Mix with a Coke Zero to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Cook’s Hams

Semi-Boneless Hams
Classic Reduced Sodium Half (Serves: 15-20)
Half (Serves: 15-20)
Whole (Serves: 30-40)
Semi-Boneless Hams
Cook’s Semi-Boneless Hams are now fully cooked! This means they may be eaten cold or heated. The ham only needs to be heated through if serving warm.
With fewer bones and less fat, Cook’s Semi-Boneless Hams are a great value. With two of the three bones removed, carving and serving are much easier. With only the center bone remaining, your family can still can enjoy the great taste and flavor that only a Cook’s bone-in ham can offer, plus the added value of more lean meat and the convenience of less bone.

Ingredients
CURED WITH: Water, Dextrose, Salt, Sodium Phosphate, Sodium Nitrite.
http://www.mycooksham.com/product/bone-in-premium-semi-boneless

Healthy Pork Roast Recipes

November 24, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Pork Roast Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Pork Roast Recipes with recipes like Chili-Glazed Pork Roast, Pork Primavera Sandwiches, and Pork Tenderloin Stuffed with Porcini Mushrooms. Take your Pork Roasts to another flavor level with these recipes! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/


Healthy Pork Roast Recipes
Find healthy, delicious pork roast recipes including boneless, shoulder and crockpot pork roast. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Chili-Glazed Pork Roast
A simple brown sugar and spice rub gives this pork dinner an intense flavor. The sugar caramelizes during roasting to create a delicious glaze……….

Pork Primavera Sandwiches
To keep this slow cooker pork sandwich recipe heart-healthy, look for a barbecue sauce that’s low in fat and sodium……………..

Pork Tenderloin Stuffed with Porcini Mushrooms
Stuffing this lean pork with mushrooms adds not only elegance but also flavor and juiciness………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Pork Roast Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19278/ingredients/meat-poultry/pork/roast/

One of America’s Favorites – Ham

November 18, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Ham, One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Half ham

Ham is pork from a leg cut that has been preserved by wet or dry curing, with or without smoking. As a processed meat, the term “ham” includes both whole cuts of meat and ones that have been mechanically formed.

Ham is made around the world, including a number of regional specialties, such as Westphalian ham and some varieties of Spanish jamón. In addition, numerous ham products have specific geographical naming protection, such as prosciutto di Parma in Europe, and Smithfield ham in the US.

The preserving of pork leg as ham has a long history, with Cato the Elder writing about the “salting of hams” in his De Agri Cultura tome around 160 BC.

There are claims that the Chinese were the first people to mention the production of cured ham. Larousse Gastronomique claims an origin from Gaul. It was certainly well established by the Roman period, as evidenced by an import trade from Gaul mentioned by Marcus Terentius Varro in his writings.

Typical slice of ham

The modern word “ham” is derived from the Old English ham or hom meaning the hollow or bend of the knee, from a Germanic base where it meant “crooked”. It began to refer to the cut of pork derived from the hind leg of a pig around the 15th century.

Because of the preservation process, ham is a compound foodstuff or ingredient, being made up of the original meat, as well as the remnants of the preserving agent(s), such as salt, but it is still recognised as a food in its own right.

 

Methods
Ham is produced by curing raw pork by salting, also known as dry curing, or brining, also known as wet curing. Additionally, smoking may be employed.

Besides salt, several ingredients may be used to obtain flavoring and preservation, from black pepper (e.g. Prosciutto Toscano) to saffron (e.g. the “Zafferano di San Gimignano.

Dry-cured

Sea salt being added to raw pork leg as part of a dry cure process

Traditional dry cure hams may use only salt as the curative agent, such as with San Daniele or Parma hams, although this is comparatively rare. This process involves cleaning the raw meat, covering it in salt while it is gradually pressed draining all the blood. Specific herbs and spices may be used to add flavour during this step. The hams are then washed and hung in a dark, temperature-regulated place until dry. It is then hung to air for another period of time.

The duration of the curing process varies by the type of ham, with, for example, Serrano ham curing in 9–12 months, Parma hams taking more than 12 months, and Iberian ham taking up to 2 years to reach the desired flavour characteristics. Some dry cured hams, such as the Jinhua ham, take approximately 8 to 10 months to complete.

Most modern dry cure hams also use nitrites (either sodium nitrite or potassium nitrate), which are added along with the salt. Nitrates are used because they prevent bacterial growth and, in a reaction with the meat’s myoglobin, give the product a desirable dark red color. The amount and mixture of salt and nitrites used have an effect on the shrinkage of the meat. Because of the toxicity of nitrite (the lethal dose of nitrite for humans is about 22 mg per kg body weight), some areas specify a maximum allowable content of nitrite in the final product. Under certain conditions, especially during cooking, nitrites in meat can react with degradation products of amino acids, forming nitrosamines, which are known carcinogens.

The dry curing of ham involves a number of enzymatic reactions. The enzymes involved are proteinases (cathepsins – B, D, H & L, and calpains) and exopeptidases (peptidase and aminopeptidase). These enzymes cause proteolysis of muscle tissue, which creates large numbers of small peptides and free amino acids, while the adipose tissue undergoes lipolysis to create free fatty acids. Salt and phosphates act as strong inhibitors of proteolytic activity. Animal factors influencing enzymatic activity include age, weight, and breed. During the process itself, conditions such as temperature, duration, water content, redox potential, and salt content all have an effect.

The salt content in dry-cured ham varies throughout a piece of meat, with gradients determinable through sampling and testing or non-invasively through CT scanning.

Wet-cured
Wet-cured hams are brined, which involves the immersion of the meat in a brine, sometimes with other ingredients such as sugar also added for flavour. Meat is typically kept in the brine for around 3 to 14 days. Wet curing also has the effect of increasing volume and weight of the finished product, by about 4%.

The wet curing process can also be achieved by pumping the curing solution into the meat. This can be quicker, increase the weight of the finished product by more than immersion, and ensure a more even distribution of salt through the meat. This process is quicker than traditional brining, normally being completed in a few days.

Smoking
Ham can also be additionally preserved through smoking, in which the meat is placed in a smokehouse (or equivalent) to be cured by the action of smoke.

The main flavor compounds of smoked ham are guaiacol, and its 4-, 5-, and 6-methyl derivatives as well as 2,6-dimethylphenol. These compounds are produced by combustion of lignin, a major constituent of wood used in the smokehouse.

Labeling

A platter of ham and cheese sliced for sandwiches

In many countries the term is now protected by statute, with a specific definition. For instance, in the United States, the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) says that “the word ‘ham’, without any prefix indicating the species of animal from which derived, shall be used in labeling only in connection with the hind legs of swine”.

In addition to the main categories, some processing choices can affect legal labeling. For instance, in the United States, a “smoked” ham must have been smoked by hanging over burning wood chips in a smokehouse or an atomized spray of liquid smoke such that the product appearance is equivalent; a “hickory-smoked” ham must have been smoked using only hickory. However, injecting “smoke flavor” is not legal grounds for claiming the ham was “smoked”; these are labeled “smoke flavor added”. Hams can only be labeled “honey-cured” if honey was at least 50% of the sweetener used, is at least 3% of the formula, and has a discernible effect on flavor. So-called “lean” and “extra lean” hams must adhere to maximum levels of fat and cholesterol per 100 grams of product.

Whole fresh pork leg can be labeled as fresh ham in the United States.

Protected designations
A number of hams worldwide have some level of protection of their unique characteristics, usually relating to their method of preservation or location of production or processing. Dependent on jurisdiction, rules may prevent any other product being sold with the particular appellation, such as through the European protected geographical indication.

 

Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes

November 16, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes with recipes including Slow-Cooker Italian Turkey Sausage and Squash Lasagna, Make-and-Take Breakfast Sausage Sandwich, and Slow-Cooker Jambalaya. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes
Find healthy, delicious turkey sausage recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Slow-Cooker Italian Turkey Sausage and Squash Lasagna
Kids will love this lasagna made with turkey sausage in the Crock Pot—and parents will love that it’s packed with vitamin-rich zucchini and squash! The veggies also add moisture to the slow-cooker lasagna, which keeps it from drying out. Serve with garlic toast, if desired……………

Make-and-Take Breakfast Sausage Sandwich
Skip the fast-food take-out sandwich and pack your own the next time you’re in a hurry! This scrumptious cheesy breakfast sandwich mixes savory turkey sausage with sweet chutney and takes just minutes to make………………….

Slow-Cooker Jambalaya
This hearty jambalaya is bursting with chicken, smoked turkey sausage, and shrimp. It takes just 25 minutes to prep in the morning and then your slow cooker will work its magic and deliver a tasty meal at the end of the day……………………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19059/ingredients/meat-poultry/sausage/turkey/

One of America’s Favorites -Chicken Sandwich

October 28, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A chicken salad sandwich

A chicken sandwich is a sandwich that typically consists of boneless, skinless chicken breast served between slices of bread, on a bun, or on a roll. Variations on the “chicken sandwich” include the chicken burger or chicken on a bun, hot chicken, and chicken salad sandwich.

In North America, the sandwich usually consists of a chicken filet or patty, toppings and bread. The chicken meat can be deep fried, grilled, roasted or boiled, served hot or cold, and white or dark meat chicken can be used. Shredded chicken in one form or another, such as chicken salad, can also be used in chicken sandwiches. Wrap versions of the sandwich can also be made, in which the ingredients are rolled up inside a flatbread, such as a tortilla.

Open-faced versions of the sandwich, which feature hot chicken served with gravy on top of bread, are also common variations.

Varieties
Chicken burger

Some establishments serving hamburgers also serve chicken sandwiches, giving customers an alternative to beef. Such a sandwich may also be called “chicken on a bun” or “chicken burger” in Australia or the UK, and is served on a hamburger bun with similar condiments and toppings as found on hamburgers. While most chicken sandwiches in this context usually use fried or grilled chicken breasts, a chicken burger may also be made of a grilled or fried patty of ground chicken.

History
Chick-fil-A claims that it invented the fried chicken sandwich in the 1940s. This claim is unsubstantiated, though the Chick-fil-A southern-style chicken sandwich (served with pickles on a steamed roll), introduced on March 21, 1964, was most likely the first chicken sandwich introduced by a fast food restaurant chain. Other notable vendors of chicken sandwiches include KFC and Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen. Today, most major fast food, fast casual and casual dining chains feature some sort of chicken sandwich, even at restaurants where chicken is not a specialty.

Chicken salad sandwich
Chicken salad served between slices of bread is a chicken sandwich variation seen both in North America and elsewhere.

Chicken fillet roll
In Ireland, the popular chicken fillet roll is a baguette filled with a spicy or plain breaded chicken fillet and a mayonnaise and/or butter spread.

“Hot chicken” sandwich

Prince’s hot chicken

The hot chicken sandwich or simply “hot chicken” (Quebec French: sandwich chaud au poulet) is a type of chicken sandwich consisting of chicken, sliced bread, and gravy (which is generally poutine sauce). The sandwich is usually served with green peas and commonly found in Eastern Canadian cuisine. It’s especially popular in Quebec and is often considered one of the province’s staple dishes. Since it is so commonly found in eateries of Quebec (Rôtisserie St-Hubert, Valentine, e.g.) and less seen outside the province, many Québécois regard it as a part of Quebec cuisine and believe it to have originated in the province. This combination of chicken, gravy, and peas is known by its own term: galvaude, seen in poutine galvaude.
Although less featured in other areas of North America, the sandwich is also found in small diners from the Canadian Maritimes and throughout the Southeastern United States.

The sandwich was a working-class dish already common and well established in North American cuisine by the early 1900s and featured on the food menus of pharmacists and druggists of the time. Due to its ease of preparation and its minimal costs, the sandwich was also widely served in the mess halls and cafeterias of the mid-1900s.
This style of sandwich often makes use of leftovers from a previous meal. Substituting turkey for the chicken would make a hot turkey sandwich and substituting roast beef makes a variety of the roast beef sandwich.

Pepito

A pepito prepared with chicken meat

The pepito is a sandwich that is prepared with chicken or beef, beans or refried beans and a roll or bun as primary ingredients. It is a common street food in Mexico and Venezuela.

Shredded chicken sandwich
Found in Ohio is the shredded chicken sandwich. The sandwich is also referred to as a hot chicken sandwich in rural Ohio. The sandwich consists of shredded chicken, one or more types of condensed soup, seasoning and crushed crackers to help thicken and bind the sauce. This dish can be heated on a stove top or slow cooker. Invented as a way to use leftover chicken, these sandwiches became popular for covered dish dinners, potlucks, church dinners and tailgate parties. They are also sold in small-town restaurants, drive-ins and bars. The sandwich can also be found at “Ohio” community dinners on the Gulf Coast of Florida held by retirees or snowbirds from Ohio.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Po’ boy

October 21, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A po’ boy (also po-boy, po boy) is a traditional sandwich from Louisiana. It almost always consists of meat, which is usually roast beef or fried seafood, often shrimp, crawfish, fish, oysters or crab. The meat is served on baguette-like New Orleans French bread, known for its crisp crust and fluffy center.

Roast beef was New Orleans’ most popular po’boy filler up to the 1970s and fried oyster po’boys are popular enough that they are sometimes called an oyster loaf, but the fillings can be almost anything, according to Sarah Rohan who in her book Gumbo Tales mentions fried shrimp, catfish, crawfish, Louisiana hot sausage, fried chicken, baked ham, duck, and rabbit.

A “dressed” po’ boy has lettuce, tomato, pickles, and mayonnaise. Fried seafood po’ boys are often dressed by default with melted butter and sliced pickle rounds. A Louisiana style hot sauce is optional. Non-seafood po’ boys will also often have Creole mustard.

The New Orleans sloppy roast beef po’ boy is generally served hot with gravy and resembles a Chicago Italian beef sandwich in appearance and method of preparation, although the size, bread, and toppings differ. To make it, a cut of beef (usually chuck or shoulder) is typically simmered in beef stock with seasonings such as garlic, pepper, thyme, and bay for several hours. The beef can be processed into “debris” by cutting it to shreds when done (folklore says that a po’ boy roast is done when it “falls apart with a hard stare”) and simmering the shredded beef in the pot for a longer time to absorb more of the juice and seasoning.

A roast beef po' boy

A roast beef po’ boy

In the late 1800s fried oyster sandwiches on French loaves were known in New Orleans as “oyster loaves”, a term still in use. A sandwich containing both fried shrimp and fried oysters is often called a “peacemaker” or La Médiatrice.

The origin of the name is unknown. A popular local theory claims that “po’ boy”, as specifically referring to a type of sandwich, was coined in a New Orleans restaurant owned by Benny and Clovis Martin (originally from Raceland, Louisiana), former streetcar conductors. In 1929, during a four-month strike against the streetcar company, the Martin brothers served their former colleagues free sandwiches. The Martins’ restaurant workers jokingly referred to the strikers as “poor boys”, and soon the sandwiches themselves took on the name. In Louisiana dialect, this is naturally shortened to “po’ boy”.

One New Orleans historian finds the Martin claim suspicious for several reasons, starting with the fact that it wasn’t described by the local press until 40 years after the strike, and that prior to 1969 the story from the Martin brothers themselves was that they had created the po-boy for farmers, dock workers and other “poor boys” who frequented their original location near the French Market. (The Martin brothers did write a letter, reprinted in local newspapers in 1929, promising to feed the streetcar workers, but it referenced “our meal” and made no mention of sandwiches.)

Fried shrimp po' boy at Middendorf's

Fried shrimp po’ boy at Middendorf’s

New Orleans
New Orleans is known for its grand restaurants (see Louisiana Creole cuisine), but more humble fare like the po’ boy is very popular. Po’ boys may be made at home, sold pre-packaged in convenience stores, available at deli counters and most neighborhood restaurants. One of the most basic New Orleans restaurants is the po’ boy shop, and these shops often offer seafood platters, red beans and rice, jambalaya, and other basic Creole dishes.

The two primary sources of po’boy bread are the Leidenheimer Baking Company and Alois J. Binder. There is fierce competition between po’ boy shops, and resident opinions of the best po’ boy shop varies widely.

Each year there is a festival in New Orleans dedicated to the po’ boy, the Oak Street Po’Boy Festival. It is a one-day festival that features live music, arts, and food vendors with multiple types of po’ boys. It is held in mid-November along a commercial strip of Oak Street in the city’s Carrollton neighborhood. The festival gives “best-of” awards, which gives the chefs an incentive to invent some of the most creative po’ boys.

Authentic versions of Louisiana-style po’ boys can be found along the Gulf Coast, from Houston through the Florida Panhandle. The term “po’ boy” has spread further and can be found in the South Atlantic States and in California, where it may instead refer to local variations on the submarine sandwich.

 

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Real food, real flavor, real bacon

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sweets & sass from a baking brooklynite.

Healthy Little Vittles

Gluten-Free + Vegan + Plant-Based Recipes

WoWzer Kitchen

Let's Get Healthy TOGETHER in 2020!

Tampa Cake Girl

This WordPress.com site is the bee's knees

kitchenhabitsdotcom.wordpress.com/

Cooking, food photography & styling

Our Lustron Home

DIY, Recipes, Food, Life, Inspiration, Musings

Back Porch Paleo

paleo family comfort foods

The Cast Iron Chef

Kitchen basics, restaurant hacks, and Cajun & Creole traditions with a little humor and a whole lot of love. And maybe some weight loss.

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Bringing the heat to Midwestern eats, served with a slice of Minnesota nice.

The Butcher's Wife

The Butcher's Wife