Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH TOMATOES

September 12, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH TOMATOES. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Brussels Sprouts, Hunt’s Fire Roasted Diced Tomatoes, Canola Oil, Garlic Powder, Salt, and Ground Black Pepper. There’s 75 calories and 5 net carbs per serving. So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

ROASTED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH TOMATOES
You can assemble this dish in the morning and slip them in the refrigerator, so all you have to do is slide them in the oven at dinner time. Recipe for Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Tomatoes from our Side Dishes recipe section.

Ingredients

1 pound small fresh Brussels sprouts, trimmed and cut in half lengthwise
1 can (14.5 ounces) Hunt’s Fire Roasted Diced Tomatoes, drained
2 tablespoons pure canola oil
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions

1 – Heat oven to 425F.
2 – In large bowl, toss together Brussels sprouts, drained tomatoes, oil, garlic powder, salt and pepper.
3 – Spread mixture in single layer on large shallow baking pan.
4 – Bake 20 minutes or until Brussels sprouts are tender and browned, stirring once halfway through.
NOTES:
You can assemble this dish in the morning and slip them in the refrigerator, so all you have to do is slide them in the oven at dinner time.

Recipe Yield: Yield: 6 servings.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 75
Fat: 5 grams
Fiber: 2 grams
Sodium: 217 milligrams
Protein: 2 grams
Carbohydrates: 7 grams
Sugars: 2 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/roasted-brussels-sprouts-with-tomatoes

Jennie- O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Turkey Taco Chili

September 10, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie- O Turkey Recipe of the Week is Turkey Taco Chili. Made using JENNIE-O® Lean Ground Turkey along with Onion, Garlic, Taco Seasoning, Ranch Dressing Mix, Tomatoes, Beans, and Corn. For a perfect side you could prepare some Corn Muffins. You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Stay Safe and Make the SWITCH in 2021! https://www.jennieo.com/

Turkey Taco Chili
What happens when you bring two favorites—chili and tacos—together? Taste for yourself. This simple and hearty chili recipe will have your kids running to the table. Make it a new go-to weeknight dinner recipe.
Total Time – 50 Minutes
Serving Size – 6 Servings

INGREDIENTS
1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Ground Turkey
½ small yellow onion, chopped
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 (1-ounce) low-sodium taco seasoning
1 (1-ounce) package ranch salad dressing and seasoning mix
4 cups water or low-sodium chicken broth
1 (10-ounce) can diced tomatoes and green chiles
1 (15.5-ounce) can black beans, drained and rinsed
1 (15.5-ounce) pinto beans, drained and rinsed
1 (14-ounce) can corn kernels, drained
corn muffins, if desired

DIRECTIONS
1) Spray a skillet with nonstick cooking spray. Preheat skillet over medium-high heat.

2) Add ground turkey to hot skillet. Stir to crumble, approximately 14 to 16 minutes. Always cook to well-done, 165°F. as measured by a meat thermometer.

3) Add onion, garlic, taco seasoning and ranch dressing; stir. Add water, tomatoes, beans and corn.

4) Heat 20 to 30 minutes or until hot.

5) Serve with corn muffins, if desired.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 360
Protein 26g
Carbohydrates 48g
Fiber 12g
Sugars 5g
Fat 8g
Cholesterol 55mg
Sodium 690mg
Saturated Fat 2.5g

Turkey Taco Chili

One of America’s Favorites – Chili Con Carne

August 30, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A bowl of chili con carne served with tortilla chips

Chili con carne (also spelled chilli con carne or chile con carne and shortened to chili or chilli; Spanish pronunciation: [ˈtʃili kon ˈkaɾne]), meaning “chili with meat”, is a spicy stew containing chili peppers (sometimes in the form of chili powder), meat (usually beef), tomatoes and optionally kidney beans. Other seasonings may include garlic, onions, and cumin. The dish originated in northern Mexico or southern Texas.

Geographic and personal tastes involve different types of meat and other ingredients. Recipes provoke disputes among aficionados, some of whom insist that the word chili applies only to the basic dish, without beans and tomatoes. Chili con carne is a common dish for cook-offs, and may be used as a side, garnish, or ingredient in other dishes, such as soups or salsas.

In writings from 1529, the Franciscan friar, Bernardino de Sahagún described chili pepper-seasoned stews being consumed in the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, now the location of Mexico City. The use of beef as the primary meat originated with Spanish colonizers. In Spanish, the term “chile con carne”, consisting of the word chile (from the Nahuatl chīlli) and carne, Spanish for ‘meat’, is first recorded in a book from 1857 about the Mexican-American War. A recipe dating back to the 1850s describes dried beef, suet, dried chili peppers and salt, which were pounded together, formed into bricks and left to dry, which could then be boiled in pots in an army encampment in Monterrey, of what is now Nuevo León, Mexico.

Chili became commonly prepared in northern Mexico and southern Texas. Unlike some other Texas foods, such as barbecued brisket, chili largely originated with working-class Tejana and Mexican women. The chili queens of San Antonio, Texas were particularly famous in previous decades for selling their inexpensive chili-flavored beef stew in their casual “chili joints”.

A pot of chili with whole green hot chilis, kidney beans, and tomatoes

 

The San Antonio Chili Stand, in operation at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, helped popularize chili by giving many Americans their first taste of it. San Antonio was a tourist destination and helped Texas-style chili con carne spread throughout the South and West. Chili con carne is the official dish of the U.S. state of Texas as designated by the House Concurrent Resolution Number 18 of the 65th Texas Legislature during its regular session in 1977.

Before World War II, hundreds of small, family-run chili parlors could be found throughout Texas and other states, particularly those in which émigré Texans had made new homes. Each establishment usually had a claim to some kind of secret recipe.

By 1904, chili parlors were opening outside of Texas, in part due to the availability of commercial versions of chili powder, first manufactured in Texas in the late 19th century. After working at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Charles Taylor opened a chili parlor in Carlinville, Illinois, serving Mexican Chili. Varallo’s, the oldest restaurant in Tennessee, opened as a chili parlor in 1907, competing with other chili parlors that had opened in Nashville during the 1890s. In the 1920s and 1930s, chains of diner-style chili parlors began opening in the Midwest.

Cincinnati chili, a dish developed by Macedonian and Greek immigrants deriving from their own culinary traditions, arguably represents the most vibrant continuation of the chili parlor tradition, with dozens of restaurants offering this style throughout the Cincinnati area. It can be traced back to at least 1922, when the original Empress Chili location opened.

In Green Bay, Wisconsin, the chili parlor Chili John’s has existed since 1913. As with Cincinnati chili, it is most commonly served over spaghetti with oyster crackers, but the recipe is less sweet with a higher proportion of fat. The original proprietor’s son opened a second location in Burbank, California in 1946, which is also still in existence.

Until the late 2000s, a chili parlor dating to 1904, O.T. Hodge, continued to operate in St. Louis. It featured a chili-topped dish called a slinger: two cheeseburger patties, hash browns, and two eggs, and smothered in chili. As of 2014 no O.T. Hodge-branded locations remain, though Tully’s Tap, a pub and restaurant in O’Fallon, Missouri, offers what it claims to be the original O.T. Hodge recipe on its menu.

Dispute over ingredients

Ingredients for chili con carne

Beans
Beans, a staple of Tex-Mex cuisine, have been associated with chili as far back as the early 20th century. The question of whether beans belong in chili has long been a matter of contention among chili cooks. While it is generally accepted that the earliest chilis did not include beans, proponents of their inclusion contend that chili with beans has a long enough history to be considered authentic. The Chili Appreciation Society International specified in 1999 that, among other things, cooks are forbidden to include beans in the preparation of chili for official competition—nor are they allowed to marinate any meats. Small red or pink common beans are commonly used for chili, as are black beans, black-eyed peas, kidney beans, pinto beans, great northern beans, or navy beans.

Most commercially prepared canned chili includes beans. Commercial chili prepared without beans is usually called “chili no beans” in the United States. Some U.S. manufacturers, notably Bush Brothers and Company and Eden Organic, also sell canned precooked beans (without meat) that are labeled “chili beans”; these beans are intended for consumers to add to a chili recipe and are often sold with spices added.

Tomatoes
Tomatoes are another ingredient on which opinions differ. Wick Fowler, a north Texas newspaperman and inventor of “Two-Alarm Chili” (which he later marketed as a kit of spices), insisted on adding tomato sauce to his chili in the ratio of one 15-ounce can per three pounds of meat. He also believed that chili should never be eaten freshly cooked, but refrigerated overnight to seal in the flavor. Matt Weinstock, a Los Angeles newspaper columnist, once remarked that Fowler’s chili “was reputed to open eighteen sinus cavities unknown to the medical profession”.

Variations

Vegetarian chili

A pot of vegetarian chili

Vegetarian chili (also known as chili sin carne, chili without meat, chili non carne, and chili sans carne) acquired wide popularity in the U.S. during the 1960s and 1970s with the rise of vegetarianism. It is also popular with those on a diet restricting the use of red meat. To make the chili vegetarian, the cook leaves out the meat or replaces it with a meat analogue, such as textured vegetable protein or tofu, quinoa, or a starchy vegetable, such as potatoes. These chilis nearly always include beans. Variants may contain corn, squash, sautéed mushrooms, pearl onions, shallots or beets.

Chili verde
Chili verde (‘green chili’) is a moderately to extremely spicy New Mexican stew or sauce usually made from chunks of pork that have been slow-cooked in chicken broth, garlic, green tomatillos, and roasted green chilis.] The spiciness of the chili is adjusted by the use of various peppers: poblano, jalapeño, serrano, and occasionally habanero. Chili verde is a common filling for the Mission burrito.

White chili

A bowl of Texas-style chili without beans

White chili is made using chicken or turkey meat and broth, white beans, and green chili peppers. The resulting dish appears white when cooked and is more of a soup rather than a thickened stew. A white cheese, such as Monterey Jack, or sour cream are often added when served.

The dish may be served with toppings or accompaniments; grated cheese, diced onions, and sour cream are common toppings, as are saltine crackers, tortilla chips or corn chips, cornbread, rolled-up corn or flour tortillas, and pork tamales. Chili can also be served over rice or pasta in dishes such as chili mac.

Pre-made chili
Canned chili
Willie Gebhardt, originally of New Braunfels, Texas, and later of San Antonio, produced the first canned chili in 1908. Rancher Lyman Davis near Corsicana, Texas, developed Wolf Brand Chili in 1895. He owned a meat market and was a particular fan of Texas-style chili. In the 1880s, in partnership with an experienced range cook, he began producing heavily spiced chili based on chunks of lean beef and rendered beef suet, which he sold by the pot to local cafés.

In 1921, Davis began canning his product, naming it for his pet wolf, Kaiser Bill. Wolf Brand canned chili was a favorite of Will Rogers, who always took along a case when traveling and performing in other regions of the world. Ernest Tubb, the country singer, was such a fan that one Texas hotel maintained a supply of Wolf Brand for his visits. Both the Gebhardt and Wolf brands are now owned by ConAgra Foods, Inc. Another major maker of canned chili, Hormel, sells chili available with or without beans, made with turkey or in vegetarian varieties, under their own name and other brands like Stagg.

Brick chili

Chili with garnishes and tortilla chips

Another method of marketing commercial chili in the days before widespread home refrigerators was “brick chili”. It was produced by pressing out nearly all of the moisture, leaving a solid substance roughly the size and shape of a half-brick. Wolf Brand was originally sold in this form. Commonly available in small towns and rural areas of the American Southwest in the first three-quarters of the 20th century, brick chili has largely been surpassed by canned chili, but can still be found in some stores.

Seasoning mix
Home cooks may also purchase seasoning mixes for chili, including packets of dry ingredients such as chili powder, masa flour, salt, and cayenne pepper, to flavor meat and other ingredients.

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Diabetic Greek Salad Recipe

August 16, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is a Diabetic Greek Salad Recipe. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Tomatoes, Cucumber, Onion, Kalamata Olives, Capers, Parsley, and Crumbled Reduced-Fat Feta Cheese. Also included is a recipe for the Dressing. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Diabetic Greek Salad Recipe
Crunchy and refreshing, this low-carb authentic Greek recipe is the perfect complement to any Mediterranean-themed meal.

Ingredients
Preparation time: 20 minutes

2 large tomatoes, thickly sliced
1 medium cucumber (about 7 inches long), thinly sliced
1 small onion, thinly sliced and separated into rings
1/3 cup Kalamata olives
2 teaspoons capers
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1/4 cup crumbled reduced-fat Feta cheese
Dressing:
1 clove garlic, crushed (or 1 teaspoon bottled garlic)
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Directions
Yield: 6 servings
Serving size: 1/6 of salad

1 – Combine tomato slices, cucumber slices, and onion rings on a large platter or in a large bowl. Top with olives, capers, parsley, and crumbled Feta.

2 – Place garlic, pepper, and lemon juice in a food processor or blender and pulse 4 times. With the food processor or blender running (hold lid partially over top of blender to keep ingredients from splashing out), carefully pour oil in a slow, steady stream, processing until smooth. Pour dressing over salad and serve (if salad is in a bowl, toss gently to coat).

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 130 calories, Carbohydrates: 8 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 10 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Sodium: 220 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/salads/greek-salad/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 20, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Storing Tomatoes………

Ripe tomatoes should be kept at on your counter, uncovered, if you are going to enjoy the tomato in the next day or two. But any longer than that – the recommendation is to refrigerate. A so-so tomato is much better than a rotten, moldy tomato. Refrigeration will slow down the decay.

Healthy Cherry Tomato Recipes

June 26, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Cherry Tomato Recipes`. Find some Delicious and Healthy Cherry Tomato Recipes with recipes like Caprese Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms, Marinated Cherry Tomato Salad, and 3-Ingredient Cheese Tortellini with Tomatoes and Basil. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Cherry Tomato Recipes
Find healthy, delicious cherry tomato recipes, including cherry tomato salads and roasted cherry tomatoes. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Caprese Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms
We’ve taken the key ingredients of the popular caprese salad–tomatoes, fresh mozzarella and basil–and piled them into portobello mushroom caps to make a delicious and satisfying vegetarian main dish…………….

Marinated Cherry Tomato Salad
In this easy cherry tomato salad, the fresh herbs and bright dressing highlight the natural sweetness of the summery tomatoes. Elevate the look of this easy salad by using multicolored tomatoes if you can find them…………..

3-Ingredient Cheese Tortellini with Tomatoes & Basil
This Italian-inspired dish is made with just three ingredients—roasted tomatoes, tortellini and fresh basil—to create a delicious, easy dinner. Roasting the cherry tomatoes coaxes out their natural sweetness. It’s worth the time—trust us!………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Cherry Tomato Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/7894372/3-ingredient-cheese-tortellini-with-tomatoes-and-basil/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 26, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Buying and storing tomatoes………..

Smell the tomato up by the stem; it should have a strong, sweet, earthy odor. The more fragrant a tomato is, the more flavorful it will be, so be wary of tomatoes that don’t smell like anything. Whenever possible, avoid buying tomatoes in plastic wrap or packaging.

Then to store tomatoes once your tomatoes are ripe, the fridge is usually your best bet. If you buy under ripe tomatoes, leave them out at room temperature until they’re fully ripened, then move them to a cooler spot for longer storage.

Healthy Turkey Burger Recipes

June 15, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well, ground turkey | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Turkey Burger Recipes. Find some always Delicious and Healthy Turkey Burger Recipes with recipes including Mushroom-Swiss Turkey Burgers, Cranberry and Herb Turkey Burgers, and Mozzarella-Stuffed Turkey Burgers. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Mushroom-Swiss Turkey Burgers
In this gluten-free turkey burger recipe, lean ground turkey stands in for ground beef, and portobello mushrooms produce a juicy, flavorful alternative to the traditional bun. Melted Swiss cheese, sliced tomato and arugula top off this delicious low-carb dinner!………

Cranberry and Herb Turkey Burgers
Our usual problem with turkey burgers is the dry, chewy texture of the cooked meat. The usual solution is to add fat, but a little sautéed onion, dried cranberries and soaked couscous work even better without larding down this healthy main course. With sage and thyme, call it a summery answer to Thanksgiving dinner. If you like, serve with homemade Blueberry Ketchup……..

Mozzarella-Stuffed Turkey Burgers
These tasty turkey burgers, served on toasted focaccia and dressed with marinara sauce, are reminiscent of a sausage pizza. Shredded mozzarella combined with fresh basil melts beautifully inside these gems………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Turkey Burger Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18906/ingredients/meat-poultry/turkey/main-dish/burger/

Appetizer of the Week -Sweet Potato Minestrone

June 12, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Appetizer of the Week, Appetizers, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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This week’s Appetizer of the Week is a Sweet Potato Minestrone. To make this week’s recipe some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are Onion, Celery, Sweet Potatoes, Great Northern Beans, Tomatoes, Spices, Kale, Grated Parmesan Cheese and more! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Sweet Potato Minestrone
The calendar is showing October, and that can only mean one thing — we’re in sweet potato season! Perfect for warming up on a crisp fall evening, this hearty soup is jam-packed with nutrients. And with its blend of sweet potatoes, Great Northern beans, tomatoes and kale, it’s as beautifully colored as the autumn leaves

Ingredients
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
3/4 cup diced onion
1/2 cup diced celery
2 cups diced peeled sweet potatoes
1 can (about 15 ounces) Great Northern beans, rinsed and drained
1 can (about 14 ounces) no-salt-added diced tomatoes
3 cups water
3/4 teaspoon dried rosemary
1/2 teaspoon salt (optional)
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
2 cups coarsely chopped kale leaves (lightly packed)
4 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese

Directions
Yield: 4 servings
Serving size: 1 1/2 cups

1 – Heat oil in large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add onion and celery; cook and stir 4 minutes or until onion is softened. Stir water, sweet potatoes, beans, tomatoes, rosemary, salt, if desired, and pepper into saucepan. Cover and bring to a simmer; reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes.

2 – Add kale; cover and cook 10 minutes or until tender.

3 – Ladle soup into bowls; sprinkle with cheese.

Note: Choose kale in small bunches with firm leaves and a rich, deep color. Avoid bunches with limp, wilted, or discolored leaves. To remove the tough stems, make a “V-shaped” cut where the stem joins the leaf. Stack the leaves and cut them into pieces.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 286 calories, Carbohydrates: 48 g, Protein: 13 g, Fat: 6 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Cholesterol: 4 mg, Sodium: 189 mg, Fiber: 11 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/sweet-potato-minestrone/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 5, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Buying Tomatoes……….

Look for plump, heavy tomatoes with smooth skins. They should be free of bruises, blemishes, or deep cracks, although fine cracks at the stem ends of ripe tomatoes do not affect flavor. Make sure the leaves of greenhouse tomatoes are fresh and green.

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