One of America’s Favorites – Chips and Dip

February 19, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Chips and dip – crab dip and potato chips

Chips and dip are a food of chips or crisps served with dips. Chips used include potato chips, tortilla chips, corn chips, bean chips, vegetable chips, pita chips, plantain chips and others. Crackers are also sometimes used, as are crudités, which are whole or sliced raw vegetables. Various types of dips are used to accompany various types of chips.

Chips and dip gained significant popularity in the United States during the 1950s, in part due to a Lipton advertising campaign for their French onion dip recipe, sometimes referred to as “California dip”. Specialized trays and serving dishes designed to hold both chips and dip were created during this time. Chips and dip are frequently served during the Super Bowl American football game in the United States. National Chip and Dip Day occurs annually in the U.S. on March 23.

 

 

 

The popularity of chips and dip significantly increased in the United States during the 1950s, beginning circa 1954, due to changes in styles of entertaining in the suburbs and also due to a Lipton advertising campaign based upon using Lipton’s instant dehydrated onion soup mix to prepare dip. The advertising campaign occurred on television and in supermarket display advertising, and promoted mixing the soup mix with sour cream or cream cheese to create a dip, to be served with potato chips or crudités. This dip began to be called California Dip. The advertising campaign realized significant success, and new, similar dip products were quickly developed thereafter. During this time, unique platters designed for chips and dip service were created that allowed for the containment of several types of chips, and service variations were devised that included serving the dip in a bread bowl or hollowed-out fruit.

Chips and dip are a popular food during the annual Super Bowl game in the United States. Eighty-five percent of Americans eat potato chips.

 

 

A bowl of chile con queso served with tortilla chips as an appetizer

Chips and salsa, typically served using tortilla or corn chips, is a common type of chips and dip dish that gained significant popularity in the United States in the late 1980s. Chips and guacamole, also typically served with corn-based chips is another type, as well as chips and bean dip. Seven-layer dip and tortilla chips is another corn-based chip combination, as is chile con queso, an appetizer or side dish of melted cheese and chili pepper typically served in Tex-Mex restaurants as a sauce for nachos.

 

 

Double-dipping involves taking a bite of a chip and then re-dipping it into a dip, which some people disapprove, while others are indifferent. Double-dipping transfers bacteria from a person’s mouth into a dip, which can then be transferred to other consumer’s mouths.

The behavior of double-dipping involves consuming chips and dip, taking a bite of the chip, and then re-dipping it into a dip. In March 2013, Tostitos, a U.S. brand of tortilla chips and dips, hired the Ketchum communications agency to perform a survey concerning double dipping that polled over 1,000 Americans. The survey found that 46% of male participants double-dip at a party, compared to 32% of females. 54% stated that they would not consume dip after seeing another person double-dip, and 22% stated that they did not care. 25% stated that they would verbally object to a person caught double-dipping.

A study performed by the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Clemson University found that three to six instances of double-dipping “would transfer about 10,000 bacteria from the eater’s mouth to the remaining dip,” which corresponds with “about 50-100 bacteria from one mouth to another, in every bite.” The study concluded with the recommendation that double-dipping should be curtailed, along with tips to prevent it from occurring.

A segment on MythBusters in 2009 tested how much bacteria is transferred during the process of double-dipping, finding that there is a transfer but that it “adds only a few more microbes”.

 

 

Tortilla chips and several salsas

National Chip and Dip Day occurs in the United States annually on March 23. Tostitos-brand tortilla chips, a major U.S. brand, observed the day in 2015 by providing coupons for free dip for interested customers named “Chip”.

 

Advertisements

One of America’s Favorites – King Cake MONDAY

February 12, 2018 at 6:11 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Louisiana-style king cake. The baby figurine is seen in the middle of the roll.

A king cake (sometimes shown as kingcake, kings’ cake, king’s cake, or three kings cake) is a type of cake associated in a number of countries with the festival of Epiphany at the end of the Christmas season; in other places, it is associated with the pre-Lenten celebrations of Mardi Gras/Carnival.

What started out roughly 300 years ago as a dry French bread–type dough with sugar on top and a bean inside now comes in many varieties depending on the country. Some king cakes are made of a sweet brioche dough in the shape of a hollow circle with a glazed topping sprinkled with colored sugar. Hundreds of thousands of King Cakes are eaten in New Orleans during the Carnival season. In other countries, king cakes are made with a puff pastry, filled with one of several fillings (e.g., almond, apple, chocolate/pear, etc.), and have a small figurine hidden inside. The figurine changes from bakery to bakery and often represents a hit movie or other cultural icon.

The cake often has a small plastic baby (to represent the Baby Jesus) inside or underneath; and the person who gets the piece of cake with the trinket has various privileges and obligations.

 

In the southern United States, the tradition was brought to the area by Basque settlers in 1718. Originally, it was a cinnamon-filled bready cake eaten to celebrate Epiphany, but it is now associated with Carnival (also known as Mardi Gras). Celebrated across the Gulf Coast region from the Florida Panhandle to East Texas, King cake parties are documented back to the 18th century.

The king cake of the Louisiana tradition comes in a number of styles. The most simple, said to be the most traditional, is a ring of twisted cinnamon roll-style dough. It may be topped with icing or sugar, which may be colored to show the traditional Mardi Gras colors of green, yellow, and purple. King cakes may also be filled with additional foodstuffs, the most common being cream cheese, praline, cinnamon, or strawberry. A so-called “Zulu King Cake” has chocolate icing with a coconut filling, because the Krewe of Zulu parade’s most celebrated throw is a coconut. Some bakers now offer king cakes for other holidays that immediately surround the Mardi Gras season, such as king cakes with green and red icing for Christmas, cakes with pink and red icing for Valentine’s Day, and cakes with green and white icing for St. Patrick’s Day. Others have gone a step further and produce specialty king cakes from the beginning of football season for Louisiana State University and New Orleans Saints tailgate parties, then for Halloween, then Thanksgiving—and do not cease until after Mardi Gras season, when they produce an Easter holiday king cake.

In the Southern culture, whoever finds the trinket must provide the next king cake or host the next Mardi Gras party.

 

Starting on Epiphany on January 6, residents begin holding parties especially dedicated to King Cake. King Cake parties bring families and community members together to celebrate the season of Mardi Gras, with its krewe parades and festivals. King Cake is so symbolic of the Mardi Gras celebration for residents it is believed that consuming King Cake outside of the Carnival season will result in rain on Mardi Gras day. The dessert’s “search for the baby,” the small figurine located inside the cake, is a fun way for residents of New Orleans to celebrate their Christian faith.

The dessert’s significance to the city was evident in the first Mardi Gras season (2006) after Hurricane Katrina: thousands of King Cake orders flooded bakeries both inside and outside of Louisiana, an example of how significant the dessert’s tradition is both inside and outside of the region.

Some sports teams around the area have also infused the tradition of the king cake baby into their teams. The Miami Marlins AAA minor league baseball affiliate, formerly known as the New Orleans Zephyrs, changed their name to the New Orleans Baby Cakes, starting in the 2017 season. The New Orleans Pelicans introduced the King Cake Baby as a second mascot during games around Mardi Gras, to accompany their main mascot, Pelican Pierre.

 

Traditional king cake baby

Traditionally, a small plastic or porcelain baby is hidden in the king cake. Originally, the baby was placed in the cake to symbolize baby Jesus. Fava beans were also used to represent Jesus.

Today, the baby symbolizes luck and prosperity to whoever finds it in his/her slice of cake. In some traditions, the finder of the baby is designated “king” or “queen” for the evening. That person is also responsible for purchasing next year’s cake, or for throwing the next Mardi Gras party.

Many bakers have recently been placing the baby outside of the cake, and leaving the hiding to the customer because there is a potential of customers choking on or swallowing the baby, and bakers want to stay clear of this liability.

 

 

There are many different recipes for king cake. However, the most common ones include: milk, butter, yeast, water, brown and white sugar, eggs, salt, nutmeg, flour and cinnamon. The frosting is typically made from confectioner’s sugar, water, lemon juice, and colored sugar crystals.

The colors of the king cake originally came from the Christian religion. The purple symbolizes justice, the green symbolizes faith, and the gold symbolizes power. The three colors honor the three kings who visited the Christ child (Jesus) on Epiphany, the 12th day after Christmas.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Goeta

February 5, 2018 at 7:32 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Goetta sandwich

Goetta is a meat-and-grain sausage or mush of German inspiration that is popular in the greater Cincinnati area. It is primarily composed of ground meat (pork, or pork and beef), pin-head oats and spices. Pronounced gétt-aa, ged-da or get-uh in Americanized pronunciation, and gutta in the Low German pronunciation, this dish probably originated with German settlers from the northwestern regions of Oldenburg, Hannover, and Westphalia who emigrated to the Cincinnati and Dayton area in the 19th century. The word “Goetta” comes from the Low German word Grötte. North of Cincinnati, specifically in the region surrounding Darke, Mercer, Shelby, and Auglaize counties, goetta is often known by the term “grits”, not to be confused with hominy grits. This usage of the word “grits” stems from the High German word “Grütze,” which is an equivalent of the Low German Grötte.

Goetta was originally a peasant dish, meant to stretch out servings of meat over several meals to conserve money.

Glier’s Goetta, the largest commercial producer of goetta, produces more than 1,000,000 lb annually, around 99 percent of which is consumed locally in Greater Cincinnati.

 

A conventional log of Goetta

While goetta comes in a variety of forms, all goetta is based around ground meat combined with pin-head or steel-cut oats, the “traditional Low German cook’s way of stretching a minimum amount of meat to feed a maximum number of people.”Usually goetta is made from pork shoulder or “Cali”, but occasionally contains equal parts pork and beef. Goetta is typically flavored with bay leaves, rosemary, salt, pepper, and thyme. It contains onions and sometimes other vegetables.

While similar to scrapple in that it uses a grain product for the purpose of stretching out meat to feed more people, goetta looks very different. Scrapple is made with cornmeal while goetta uses steel-cut or chopped oats. The oats in goetta are much coarser than the fine powder used in scrapple and add texture to the dish.

 

 

Goetta is typically formed into small loaves, and then cut into slices and fried, often in butter. Traditionally goetta is served as a breakfast food.

 

A number of commercial distributors produce and sell Goetta in the parts of Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana near Cincinnati. Glier’s is the largest producer of goetta in the world. Glier’s Goetta, established in 1946, is based in Covington, Kentucky, part of the greater Cincinnati area. Queen City Sausage is the next largest producer, while multiple small and artisanal producers also make Goetta in and around Cincinnati.

 

“Glier’s Goettafest” is an annual culinary festival held in August near Newport, Kentucky’s “Newport on the Levee”(an entertainment, shopping and restaurant complex) on the Ohio River waterfront. The festival celebrates both the dish and Greater Cincinnati’s German American heritage. While the main focus of the festival is goetta served in many different ways, it also typically includes music, dancing, and other public entertainment.

 

Goetta is usually sold in logs but links are also available.

Glier’s markets goetta as the “German Breakfast Sausage,” which may create the impression that it is something commonly eaten for breakfast in Germany. In fact, the vast majority of Germans have never heard of goetta. However, a similar product known as Knipp can be found in the present day in Bremen and surrounding areas. This can be spread onto bread or pan fried like goetta. It is also often served with apple sauce, paralleling the apple butter which is served alongside goetta. Although in modern times in most parts of Germany, eating warm sausage for breakfast or a hot breakfast in general is not common, historically Knipp was eaten for breakfast, often in the winter.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Lobster Roll

January 29, 2018 at 6:09 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Lobster roll

A lobster roll is a fast-food sandwich native to New England made of lobster meat served on a grilled hot dog-style bun with the opening on the top rather than the side. The filling may also contain butter, lemon juice, salt and black pepper, with variants made in other parts of New England replacing the butter with mayonnaise. Others contain diced celery or scallion. Potato chips or french fries are the typical sides.

 

 

According to the “Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink” the lobster roll originated as a hot dish at a restaurant named Perry’s in Milford, Connecticut, as early as 1929. Its popularity then spread up and down the Connecticut coast, but not far beyond it. In Connecticut, the sandwich served warm is a “lobster roll”, cold a “lobster salad roll”.

As far back as 1970, chopped lobster meat heated in drawn butter was served on a hot dog bun at road side stands such as Red’s Eats in Maine. Lobster rolls in the U.S. are associated with the state of Maine, but are also commonly available at seafood restaurants in the other New England states and on Eastern Long Island, where lobster fishing is common.

Lobster rolls in Maine are characteristically served on a New England-style hot dog bun, which is split on the top

A lobster-salad style roll

instead of the side and has flat sides for grilling. The lobster meat is usually served cold, rather than warm or hot, and mayonnaise is typically spread inside the bun or tossed with the meat. The filling consists of chunked knuckle, claw, and lobster tail, and only lightly seasoned if at all, and is otherwise plain. Four ounces is a standard serving size.

Lobster rolls are a staple summer meal throughout the Maritime provinces in Canada, particularly Nova Scotia where they may also appear on hamburger buns, baguettes, or other types of bread rolls and even pita pockets. The traditional sides are potato chips and dill pickles.

McDonald’s restaurants in Canadian provinces, such as Nova Scotia and Ontario, as well as in New England, offer lobster rolls as a limited edition item in the summer.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Chowder

January 22, 2018 at 6:39 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A seafood chowder prepared with shrimp and corn

Chowder is a type of soup or stew often prepared with milk or cream and thickened with broken crackers, crushed ship biscuit, or a roux. Variations of chowder can be seafood or vegetable. Crackers such as oyster crackers or saltines may accompany chowders as a side item, and cracker pieces may be dropped atop the dish. New England clam chowder is typically made with chopped clams and diced potatoes, in a mixed cream and milk base, often with a small amount of butter. Other common chowders include seafood chowder, which includes fish, clams, and many other types of shellfish; corn chowder, which uses corn instead of clams; a wide variety of fish chowders; and potato chowder, which is often made with cheese. Fish chowder, corn chowder, and clam chowder are especially popular in the North American regions of New England and Atlantic Canada.

Some people include Manhattan clam chowder as a type of chowder. Others dispute this classification, as it is tomato based rather than milk or cream based.

 

Potato and corn chowder

Chowder as it is known today originated as a shipboard dish, and was thickened with the use of hardtack. Chowder was brought to North America with immigrants from England and France and seafarers more than 250 years ago and became popular as a delicious dish, and is now a widely used dish as it is simple to prepare.

In 1890, in the magazine American Notes and Queries, it was said that the dish was of French origin. Among French settlers in Canada it was a custom to stew clams and fish laid in courses with bacon, sea biscuits, and other ingredients in a bucket called a “chaudière”, and it thus came to be invented. Then the Native Americans adopted it as “chawder”, which was then corrupted as “chowder” by the Yankees.

In the United States, early chowder making is traced to New England. It was a bowl of simmering chowder by the sea side that provided in its basic form “sustenance of body and mind – a marker of hearth and home, community, family and culture”. It is a food which evolved along the coastal shoreline of New England as a “congerie” of simple things, very basic and cooked simply. It is a simple dish of salt and pepper, potatoes and onion, pork and fish, cream and hard crackers, and not a sophisticated dish of the elite. Its simplicity made it attractive and it became a regional dish of the New Englanders, and their favorite recipe was “chowder master”. “Symbolically, functionally, mnemonically or dynamically” chowder has become a powerful means for New Englanders to define themselves as a community, a rich community with a deep past and value that distinguishes their region from all others. The dish has been made there for a long time and is imbibed into the community culture. Etta M. Madden and Martha L. Finch observe that chowder provides “visceral memories that provided feelings of familiarity, comfort and continuity”.

A recipe formulated and published in 1894 by Charles Ranhofer, a famous chef of Delmonico’s restaurant, was called “Chowder de Lucines” and had ingredients of pork, clams, potato (sliced to a seven sixteenths-inch size), onion, parsley, tomato, crackers garnished by thyme, salt and pepper. Others in the same family, totally different from the New England clam chowder, are: “Fulton Market style”, introduced in 1904 and made from clams, tomatoes, allspice, cloves, red pepper, and Worcester sauce; a “Vegetable Clam Chowder” introduced in 1929 and made of clams, chopped onions, diced carrots, stewed tomatoes, and thyme; “Coney Island Clam Chowder”; “New York Clam Chowder”; and “Manhattan Clam Chowder”, a late entry after 1930.

 

Corn chowder with crab

Chowder is a soup with cream or milk mixed with ingredients such as potatoes, sweet corn, smoked haddock, clams and prawns, etc. Some cream-style chowders do not use cream, and are instead prepared using milk and a roux to thicken them. Some of the popular variations are clam chowder and potatoes; seafood chowder; spiced haddock chowder; Irish fish chowder with soda bread; crayfish chowder; clam chowder with cod; British seaside chowder with saffron; thick smoked-haddock chowder; Raymond Blanc’s light shellfish chowder;[citation needed] New England-style clam chowder with crunchy thyme breadcrumbs; smoked haddock chowder with leeks and sweetcorn; clam, broad bean and salami chowder; and many more. Chowder can be a comfort food, especially during the winter months.

 

Bermuda fish chowder

Bermuda fish chowder
Considered a national dish of Bermuda, the primary ingredients in Bermuda fish chowder include fish, tomato, and onion that is seasoned with black rum and a Sherry pepper sauce. The dish is of British origin, and was brought to the New World by the colonists.

Clam chowder
Clam chowder is prepared with clams, diced potato, onion, and celery. It may be prepared as a cream-style or broth-style soup. Several variations of clam chowder exist, including New England clam chowder, which is a cream-style soup; Manhattan clam chowder, a broth-style soup prepared using tomato, vegetables and clams; Rhode Island clam chowder, a simple broth-style soup; New Jersey clam chowder; Delaware clam chowder; Hatteras clam chowder; and Minorcan clam chowder. In Connecticut clam chowder, milk is used instead of cream. New England clam chowder is made in a diverse variety of styles.

New England clam chowder

Clam chowder may be prepared with fresh, steamed clams or canned clams. The “clam liquor” from steamed or canned clams may be retained for use in the soup, and fresh or bottled clam juice may be used. January 21 is the National New England Clam Chowder Day. In the late 1800s clam chowder was introduced in New Zealand as an “American” dish and has become integral to New Zealand cuisine. Despite strong historical ties between New Zealand and Australia clam chowder is virtually unheard of in Australia and absent from Australian restaurant menus.

Corn chowder
Corn chowder is similar in consistency to New England clam chowder, with corn being used instead of clams. Additional vegetables that may be used in its preparation include potatoes, celery and onion. Some are prepared using bacon as an ingredient. Corn chowder may be prepared with fresh, frozen, or canned corn.

Fish chowder
Fish chowder is prepared with fish such as salmon or cod, and is similar to clam chowder in ingredients and texture. Ingredients used in fish chowder may include potato, onion, celery, carrot, corn and bacon.

Southern Illinois chowder
Southern Illinois Chowder, also referred to as “downtown chowder”, is a thick stew or soup that is very different from the New England and Manhattan chowders. The main ingredients are beef, chicken, tomatoes, cabbage, lima beans, and green beans. Traditionally, squirrel meat was a common addition. Southern Illinois chowder is a hearty dish that has been described as being closer in style to burgoo and Brunswick stew than coastal chowders.

Seafood chowder

A cream-style seafood chowder

Seafood chowder is prepared with various types of seafood as a primary ingredient, and may be prepared as a broth- or cream-style chowder. It is a popular menu item in New Zealand restaurants.

Spiced haddock chowder
Spiced haddock chowder is made with haddock fillets, carrot, potato, plain flour, bay leaves, peppercorns, mustard, and spices added to milk and cooked in a pot with butter.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Shortcake

January 15, 2018 at 7:24 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Strawberry Shortcake

Shortcake is a sweet cake or biscuit (in the American sense: that is, a crumbly bread that has been leavened with baking powder or baking soda). The earliest recipe for shortcake is in an English cookbook from 1588. In 1602, William Shakespeare used it as a character’s name in The Merry Wives of Windsor, Alice Shortcake.

Shortcake is typically made with flour, sugar, baking powder or soda, salt, butter, milk or cream, and sometimes eggs. The dry ingredients are blended, and then the butter is cut in until the mixture resembles cornmeal. The liquid ingredients are then mixed in just until moistened, resulting in a shortened dough. The dough is then dropped in spoonfuls onto a baking sheet, rolled and cut like baking powder biscuits, or poured into a cake pan, depending on how wet the dough is and the baker’s preferences. Then it is baked at a relatively high temperature until set.

 

The most famous dessert made with shortcake is strawberry shortcake. Sliced strawberries are mixed with sugar and allowed to sit an hour or so, until the strawberries have surrendered a great deal of their juices (macerated). The shortcakes are split and the bottoms are covered with a layer of strawberries, juice, and whipped cream, typically flavored with sugar and vanilla. The top is replaced, and more strawberries and whipped cream are added onto the top. Some convenience versions of shortcake are not made with a shortcake (i.e. biscuit) at all, but instead use a base of sponge cake or sometimes a corn muffin. Japanese-style strawberry shortcakes use a sponge cake base, and are a popular Christmas treat in Japan.

The largest strawberry shortcake ever made was in the town of La Trinidad, Benguet in the Philippines on March 20, 2004. It weighed 21,213.40 lb.

Though strawberry is the most widely known shortcake dessert, peach shortcake, blueberry shortcake, chocolate shortcake and other similar desserts are made along similar lines. It is also common to see recipes where the shortcake itself is flavored; coconut is a common addition.

 

Though today’s shortcakes are usually of the biscuit or sponge-cake variety, earlier American recipes called for pie crust in rounds or broken-up pieces, which was a variety still being enjoyed in the 21st century, particularly in the South.

The first strawberry shortcake recipe appeared in an English cookbook as early as 1588, according to Driscoll’s berry growers. By 1850, strawberry shortcake was a well-known biscuit and fruit dessert served hot with butter and sweetened cream. In the United States, strawberry shortcake parties were held as celebrations of the summer fruit harvest. This tradition is upheld in some parts of the United States on June 14, which is Strawberry Shortcake Day. It wasn’t until 1910 that French pastry chefs replaced the topping with heavy whipped cream.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Chicken Soup

January 8, 2018 at 6:20 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

A classic preparation of chicken noodle soup made with a stewing hen and flavored with thyme and black pepper

What better to have on a cold Winter’s Day than – Chicken Soup!

Chicken soup is a soup made from chicken, simmered in water, usually with various other ingredients. The classic chicken soup consists of a clear chicken broth, often with pieces of chicken or vegetables; common additions are pasta, dumplings, or grains such as rice and barley. Chicken soup has acquired the reputation of a folk remedy for colds and influenza, and in many countries is considered a comfort food.

 

 

 

Variations on the flavor are gained by adding root vegetables such as parsnip, potato, sweet potato and celery root, herbs such as parsley, dill, other vegetables such as zucchini, whole garlic cloves or tomatoes and black pepper. The soup should be brought slowly to a boil and then simmered in a covered pot on a very low flame for one to three hours, adding water if necessary. A clearer broth is achieved by skimming the drops of fat off the top of the soup as it is cooking, first bringing the chicken to boil from a pot of cold water and discarding the water before continuing, or straining it through a strainer or cheesecloth. Saffron or turmeric are sometimes added as a yellow colorant. Then, the chicken can be shredded by hand and stored in the refrigerator until ready for use in the soup.

 

Chicken soup can be a relatively low fat food: fat can be removed by chilling the soup after cooking and skimming the layer of congealed fat from the top. A study determined that “prolonged cooking of a bone in soup increases the calcium content of the soup when cooked at an acidic, but not at a neutral pH”.

 

 

Homemade chicken noodle soup cooking

Strictly speaking, chicken soup, unless qualified, implies that the soup is served as a thin broth, with pieces of meat, and possibly vegetables, and either noodles, rice, barley, or dumplings.

Cream of chicken soup is a thick, creamy, soup made with chicken stock and pieces, combined with milk (or cream) and flour, which might contain vegetable pieces, depending on the recipe.

Several terms are used when referring to chicken soups:

* Chicken broth is the liquid part of chicken soup. Broth can be served as is, or used as stock, or served as soup with noodles. Broth can be milder than stock, does not need to be boiled as long, and can be made with meatier chicken parts.
* Chicken bouillon or bouillon de poulet is the French term for chicken broth.
* Chicken consommé is a more refined chicken broth. It is usually strained to perfect clarity, and reduced to concentrate it.
* Chicken stew is a more substantial dish with a higher ratio of solids to broth. The broth may also be thickened toward a gravy-like consistency with a roux or by adding flour-based dumplings (matzah balls do not have the same thickening effect).
* Chicken stock is a liquid in which chicken bones and vegetables have been simmered for the purpose of serving as an ingredient in more complex dishes. Chicken stock is not usually served as is. Stock can be made with less palatable parts of the chicken, such as feet, necks or bones: the higher bone content in these parts contributes more gelatin to the liquid, making it a better base for sauces. Stock can be reboiled and reused as the basis for a new stock. Bouillon cubes or soup base are often used instead of chicken stock prepared from scratch.

Chicken soup has long been touted as a form of folk medicine to treat symptoms of the common cold and related conditions. In 2000, scientists at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha studied the effect of chicken soup on the inflammatory response in vitro. They found that some components of the chicken soup inhibit neutrophil migration, which may have an anti-inflammatory effect that could hypothetically lead to temporary ease from symptoms of illness. However, since these results have been obtained from purified cells (and directly applied), the diluted soup in vivo effect is debatable. The New York Times reviewed the University of Nebraska study, among others, in 2007 and concluded that “none of the research is conclusive, and it is not known whether the changes measured in the laboratory really have a meaningful effect on people with cold symptoms.”

It has also been shown that chicken soup contains the Amino acid cysteine, which is very similar to acetylcysteine, which is used by doctors for patients with bronchitis and other respiratory infections to help clear them.

 

Cream of Chicken Soup

In the United States and Canada, chicken soup often has noodles or rice in it, thus giving it its common name of “chicken noodle soup”. The term may have been coined in a commercial for the Campbell Soup Company in the 1930s. The original 21 varieties of Campbell’s condensed soup featured a “chicken soup with noodles”, but when it was advertised on the Amos ‘n’ Andy radio show in the 1930s by a slip of the tongue the soup was referred to as “chicken noodle soup”. Traditionally, American chicken soup was prepared using old hens too tough and stringy to be roasted or cooked for a short time. In modern times, these fowl are difficult to come by, and broiler chickens (young chickens suitable for roasting or broiling) are often used to make soup.

Typically sold as a condensed soup, canned chicken soup, such as Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup, is notable for its high sodium content, 890 mg per 1/2 cup serving, giving a 1 1/2 cup bowl of soup about 2,500 mg, a full days allowance in the case of the mainstream brand, Campbell’s. Other condensed chicken soups such as Chicken with Rice or Chicken & Stars Soup produced by Campbell have similar amounts, as do generic versions of the product. Canned chicken soup with much less sodium than the traditional formulation is available, including many varieties produced by Campbell’s, some with at little as 100 mg of sodium. Campbell’s claims production of a chicken noodle soup that will find broad consumer acceptance, in short, that will sell, is very difficult.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Molten Chocolate Cake

January 1, 2018 at 7:23 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Molten chocolate cake

Molten chocolate cake is a popular dessert that combines the elements of a flourless chocolate cake and a soufflé. The name derives from the dessert’s liquid chocolate center. Some other names used are chocolate fondant, chocolate moelleux and chocolate lava cake.

 

 

 

The United States-based chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten claims to have invented molten chocolate cake in New York City in 1987, but the French chef and chocolatier Jacques Torres disputes this, arguing that such a dish already existed in France. According to Vongerichten, he pulled a chocolate sponge cake from the oven before it was done and found that the center was still runny, but was warm and had both a good taste and texture. Regardless of who invented the dish, Vongerichten has been credited with popularizing it in the United States, and it became almost a de rigueur inclusion on high-end restaurant dessert menus.

 

 

Chocolate lava cake smothered in chocolate sauce

Molten chocolate cakes characteristically contain five ingredients: butter, eggs, sugar, chocolate, and flour. The butter and chocolate are melted together, while the eggs are either whisked with the sugar to form a thick paste, producing a denser pastry, or separated, with the white whipped into an meringue to provide more lift and a lighter result. A tablespoon of strong coffee is sometimes added to enhance the chocolate flavor.

The cakes are typically baked in individual portions in ramekins.

 

 

Fresh raspberries, a drizzling of raspberry and/or chocolate sauce, and dustings of powdered sugar are typical enhancements. Also, a sprig of mint is sometimes used as a garnish.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Cheeseburger

December 25, 2017 at 7:03 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cheeseburger

A cheeseburger is a hamburger topped with cheese. Traditionally, the slice of cheese is placed on top of the meat patty, but the burger can include many variations in structure, ingredients, and composition. The cheese is normally added to the cooking hamburger patty shortly before serving, which allows the cheese to melt. As with other hamburgers, a cheeseburger may include toppings, such as lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, mustard, mayonnaise, ketchup, or bacon.

In fast food restaurants, the cheese used is normally processed cheese, but other cheeses may be used instead, such as cheddar, Swiss, mozzarella, blue cheese, and pepper jack. Also, in rare cases, spinach and olives are added.

 

By the late nineteenth century, the opening of the vast grasslands of the Great Plains to cattle ranching had made it possible for every American to enjoy beef almost daily. Hamburger was one of the cheapest way for even the poorest of Americans to eat beef.

Adding cheese to hamburgers became popular in the late-1920s to mid-1930s, and there are several competing

A cheddar-stuffed cheeseburger

claims as to who created the first cheeseburger. Lionel Sternberger is reputed to have introduced the cheeseburger in 1926 at the age of 16 when he was working as a fry cook at his father’s Pasadena, California sandwich shop, “The Rite Spot”, and “experimentally dropped a slab of American cheese on a sizzling hamburger.”

An early example of the cheeseburger appearing on a menu is a 1928 menu for the Los Angeles restaurant O’Dell’s which listed a cheeseburger smothered with chili for 25 cents.

Other restaurants also claim to have invented the cheeseburger. For example, Kaelin’s Restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky, said it invented the cheeseburger in 1934. One year later, a trademark for the name “cheeseburger” was awarded to Louis Ballast of the Humpty Dumpty Drive-In in Denver, Colorado. According to Steak ‘n Shake archives, the restaurant’s founder, Gus Belt, applied for a trademark on the word in the 1930s. Another example of the hamburger invention. “The history of the hamburger appears to be divided into two aspects: the American-type hamburger, with which most people are familiar, and the idea of the hamburger from Hamburg, Germany. The essential difference is in the name and sandwich. Hamburgers may have been inspired in the German city with the profusion of beef from cows in the country terrain. Given the lack of refrigeration, the meat had to be cooked immediately, and the Hamburg beef patties became popular.

The largest cheeseburger ever made in the world weighed 2,014 pounds, “60 pounds of bacon, 50 pounds of lettuce, 50 pounds of sliced onions, 40 pounds of pickles, and 40 pounds of cheese.” The record was broken by Minnesota’s Black Bear Casino breaking the previous Cheeseburger record 881 pounds.

In the United States, National Cheeseburger Day is celebrated annually on 18 September.

 

The ingredients used to create cheeseburgers follow similar patterns found in the regional variations of hamburgers. First start with the beef ground chuck would make the best tasting burger to make it even better and healthier use grass fed grass finish beef. Popular regional toppings include bacon, avocado or guacamole, sliced sautéed mushrooms or onions, cheese sauce and/or chili. Less common ingredients include egg, feta cheese, salsa, jalapeños, and other kinds of chili peppers, anchovies, slices of ham, mustard, gyros meat, or bologna, horseradish, sauerkraut, pastrami or teriyaki-seasoned beef, tartar sauce, french fries, onion rings, potato chips, a pat of butter, pineapple, and tofu.

A cheeseburger may have more than one hamburger patty and more than one slice of cheese. A stack of two patties is called a double cheeseburger; a triple cheeseburger has three, and a quadruple has four. Some cheeseburgers are prepared with the cheese enclosed within the ground beef, rather than on top. This is sometimes known as a Jucy Lucy.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Breakfast Burrito

December 18, 2017 at 6:32 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A breakfast burrito prepared with cheese, bacon, kale and other ingredients

The breakfast burrito, sometimes referred to as a breakfast wrap, is a variety of American breakfast composed of breakfast items wrapped inside a flour tortilla burrito. This style was invented and popularized in several regional American cuisines, most notably New Mexican cuisine, Southwestern cuisine, and Tex-Mex. Southwestern breakfast burritos may include scrambled eggs, potatoes, onions, chorizo, or bacon.

 

 

Some fast food restaurants such as Burger King, Dunkin’ Donuts, McDonald’s and Taco Bell sell breakfast burritos. The breakfast burrito is also a street food.

The breakfast burrito was invented in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Little William Harm’s Burrito Shack, claims to have invented the original breakfast burrito in 1975, filling a rolled tortilla with bacon and potatoes, served wet with chile and cheese. Fast food giant McDonald’s introduced their version in the late 1980s, and by the 1990s, more fast food restaurants caught on to the style, with Sonic Drive-In, Hardee’s, and Carl’s Jr. offering breakfast burritos on their menus. In 2014, Taco Bell launched their breakfast menu, which included breakfast burritos.

 

A chorizo and egg breakfast burrito with salsa

 

The breakfast burrito can be prepared with myriad filling ingredients, such as eggs, ham, cheese, onion, peppers, bacon, Canadian bacon, potatoes, sausage, avocado, tomato, spinach, beans, olives and other ingredients.

 

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Blonde Girl Food

Everything is better with Sprinkles

joypassiondesire

From no self-esteem to total self-empowerment

The Cooking Diaries

simple recipes | big flavors

Santé Bon Viveur

[Sonn-Tay Bonn Vee-Ver] Healthy Good Living: a blog about food, travel and nutrition science.

Dining with Donald

Donald on dining in and out

Truth in Palmyra

By Wally Fry

Northern Girl Kitchen

A Place Where Variety Meets The Kitchen...

Railroad Wife

...in Texas

The Pathless Woods

Pursuing life, untamed

Live to 110

with Wendy Myers

Leels Cooks

Nom Nom Nom

SIMPLY SERENE

Healthy & Happy Living

luxlifefinn

All things food - home cooking recipes and fine dining reviews

olivesandfeta

Fresh and vibrant Mediterranean and Australian Inspired Cuisine.

Goddess Cooks

....unearthly delights to feed your soul!

Recipes by chefkreso

Cooking with imagination