One of America’s Favorites – Tuna Fish Sandwich

March 1, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Tuna sandwich

A tuna sandwich, also known as a tuna fish sandwich, is a sandwich made from canned tuna—usually made into a tuna salad by adding mayonnaise, and sometimes other ingredients such as celery or onion—as well as other common fruits and vegetables used to flavor sandwiches. Common variations include the tuna boat (served on a bun or roll) and the tuna melt (served with melted cheese). The more general term of tuna sandwich may also refer to cuisine utilizing filet of raw or cooked tuna, rather than canned tuna.

In the United States, 52% of canned tuna is used for sandwiches. The tuna sandwich has been called “the mainstay of almost everyone’s American childhood.

A tuna fish sandwich is usually made with canned tuna mixed with mayonnaise and other additions, such as chopped celery, pickles or pickle relish, hard-boiled eggs, onion, cucumber, sweetcorn, and/or black olives. Other recipes may use olive oil, Miracle Whip, salad cream, mustard, or yogurt, instead of or in addition to mayonnaise. The sandwich may be topped with lettuce, tomato, cucumbers, bean sprouts, or avocado in any combination.

 

* A tuna melt has melted cheese on top of the tuna or on a tomato slice and is served on toasted bread.
* A tuna boat is a tuna fish sandwich served in a hot dog bun or long-split bread roll.

A tuna melt sandwich served with French fries

Tuna is a relatively high protein food and it is very high in omega-3 fatty acids. A sandwich made from 100 grams of tuna and two slices of toasted white bread has approximately 287 calories, 96 of which are from fat (10.5 grams fat). It also has 20 grams of protein and 27 grams of carbohydrates.

A larger, commercially prepared tuna fish sandwich has more calories than noted above, based on its serving size. A 6-inch Subway tuna sub of 238 grams has 480 calories, 210 of those from fat, 600 milligrams of sodium, and 20 grams of protein.

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – Danish Pastry

February 22, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A typical Spandauer-type Danish with apple filling and glazing

A Danish pastry or just Danish (especially in American English) is a multilayered, laminated sweet pastry in the viennoiserie tradition. The concept was brought to Denmark by Austrian bakers and has since developed into a Danish specialty. Like other viennoiserie pastries, such as croissants, they are a variant of puff pastry made of laminated yeast-leavened doughs, creating a layered texture.

Danish pastries were exported with immigrants to the United States, and are today popular around the world.

 

Danish pastry is made of yeast-leavened dough of wheat flour, milk, eggs, sugar and large amounts of butter or margarine.

A yeast dough is rolled out thinly, covered with thin slices of butter between the layers of dough, and then the dough is folded and rolled several times, creating 27 layers. If necessary, the dough is chilled between foldings to ease handling. The process of rolling, buttering, folding and chilling is repeated multiple times to create a multilayered dough that becomes airy and crispy on the outside, but also rich and buttery.

Butter is the traditional fat used in Danish pastry, but in industrial production, less expensive fats are often used, such as hydrogenated sunflower oil (known as “pastry fat” in the UK).

A common version of the pastry in Denmark, Norway, Finland, and Sweden.

In Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, the term for Danish pastry is wienerbrød/wienerbröd, “Viennese bread”. The same etymology is also the origin of the Finnish viineri. Danish pastry is referred to as facturas in some Spanish speaking countries. In Vienna, the Danish pastry, referring to Copenhagen, is called Kopenhagener Plunder or Dänischer Plunder.

 

The origin of the Danish pastry is often ascribed to a strike amongst bakery workers in Denmark in 1850. The strike forced bakery owners to hire workers from abroad, among them several Austrian bakers, who brought along new baking traditions and pastry recipes. The Austrian pastry of Plundergebäck soon became popular in Denmark and after the labour disputes ended, Danish bakers adopted the Austrian recipes, adjusting them to their own liking and traditions by increasing the amount of egg and fat for example. This development resulted in what is now known as the Danish pastry.

One of the baking techniques and traditions that the Austrian bakers brought with them was the Viennese lamination technique. Due to such novelties the Danes called the pastry technique “wienerbrød” and, as mentioned above, that name is still in use in Northern Europe today. At that time, almost all baked goods in Denmark were given exotic names.

 

 

Danish pastries as consumed in Denmark have different shapes and names. Some are topped with chocolate, pearl sugar, glacé icing and/or slivered nuts and they may be stuffed with a variety of ingredients such as jam or preserves (usually apple or prune), remonce, marzipan and/or custard. Shapes are numerous, including circles with filling in the middle (known in Denmark as “Spandauers”), figure-eights, spirals (known as snails), and the pretzel-like kringles.

 

A cinnamon Danish with chocolate and nuts from a bakery in Denmark

In Sweden, Danish pastry is typically made in the Spandauer-style, often with vanilla custard.

In the UK, various ingredients such as jam, custard, apricots, cherries, raisins, flaked almonds, pecans or caramelized toffee are placed on or within sections of divided dough, which is then baked. Cardamom is often added to increase the aromatic sense of sweetness.

In the US, Danishes are typically given a topping of fruit or sweet baker’s cheese prior to baking. Danishes with nuts on them are also popular there and in Sweden, where chocolate spritzing and powdered sugar are also often added.

In Argentina, they are usually filled with dulce de leche or dulce de membrillo.

 

A slice of an American apple crumb Danish

Danish pastry was brought to the United States by Danish immigrants. Lauritz C. Klitteng of Læsø popularized “Danish pastry” in the US around 1915–1920. According to Klitteng, he made Danish pastry for the wedding of President Woodrow Wilson in December 1915. Klitteng toured the world to promote his product and was featured in such 1920s periodicals as the National Baker, the Bakers’ Helper, and the Bakers’ Weekly. Klitteng briefly had his own Danish Culinary Studio at 146 Fifth Avenue in New York City.

Herman Gertner owned a chain of New York City restaurants and had brought Klitteng to New York to sell Danish pastry. Gertner’s obituary appeared in the January 23, 1962 New York Times:

“At one point during his career Mr. Gertner befriended a Danish baker who convinced him that Danish pastry might be well received in New York. Mr. Gertner began serving the pastry in his restaurant and it immediately was a success.”

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – Graham Crackers

February 15, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Modern mass-produced graham crackers

A graham cracker (pronounced /ˈɡreɪ.əm/ or /ˈɡræm/ in America) is a sweet flavored cracker made with graham flour that originated in the United States in the early 1880s. It is eaten as a snack food, usually honey- or cinnamon-flavored, and is used as an ingredient in some foods.

 

The graham cracker was inspired by the preaching of Sylvester Graham who was part of the 19th-century temperance movement. He believed that minimizing pleasure and stimulation of all kinds, coupled with a vegetarian diet anchored by bread made from wheat coarsely ground at home, was how God intended people to live, and that following this natural law would keep people healthy. His preaching was taken up widely in the midst of the 1829–51 cholera pandemic. His followers were called Grahamites and formed one of the first vegetarian movements in America; graham flour, graham crackers, and graham bread were created for them. Graham neither invented nor profited from these products.

A s’more

The main ingredients in its earlier preparations were graham flour, oil, shortening or lard, molasses and salt. Graham crackers have been a mass-produced food product in the United States since 1898, with the National Biscuit Company being the first to mass-produce it at that time. The Loose-Wiles Biscuit Company also began mass-producing the product beginning sometime in the early 1910s. The product continues to be mass-produced in the U.S. today. In earlier times, mass-produced graham crackers were typically prepared using yeast-leavened dough, which added flavor to the food via the process of fermentation, whereas contemporary mass-production of the product typically omits this process. The dough is sometimes chilled before being rolled out, which prevents blistering and breakage from occurring when the product is baked.

 

Graham cracker crumbs are used to create graham cracker crusts for pies and moon pies, and as a base, layer or topping for cheesecake. Graham cracker pie crusts are also mass-produced in the United States, and consumer versions of the product typically consist of a graham cracker crumb mixture pressed into an aluminum pie pan. The graham cracker is a main ingredient in the preparation of the s’more. Graham crackers are also commonly used in place of broas in the traditional Filipino icebox cake mango float.

One of America’s Favorites – Half-Smoke

February 8, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A half-smoke is a “local sausage delicacy” found in Washington, D.C., and the surrounding region. Similar to a hot dog, but usually larger, spicier, and with more coarsely-ground meat, the sausage is often half-pork and half-beef, smoked, and served with herbs, onion, and chili sauce.

Halfsmokes from Weenie Beenie

The etymology of “half-smoke” possibly comes from the original half-pork, half-beef composition, the ingredients and smoked method of preparation. Another possible explanation is that the texture and flavor is halfway between smoked sausage and a regular hot dog. Yet another explanation is that it refers to cooks cutting the sausage in half when grilling. Composition of the sausages varies by brand and some brands even make more than one kind. A half-smoke can be half pork, half beef, all beef, or anything in between. It can be steamed instead of smoked. The company thought to be the originator of the sausage, Briggs & Company, was sold by its owner, Raymond Briggs, in 1950 without clarifying the origin of the name. The products sold under the name generally have a genuine or artificial smoke flavoring and coarser texture than a regular hot dog; these are the key features that distinguish them.

The “original” half-smoke is considered to be the sausage distributed by D.C.’s Briggs and Co. meatpackers, originating in around 1950, though Raymond Briggs started selling his half-smokes in about 1930. Eventually, Briggs was sold to another meat distributor, where, by some accounts, the quality of the meat declined.

Numerous hot dog carts in Washington, D.C., sell steamed half-smokes, with those on Constitution Avenue catering to tourists and those on Pennsylvania Avenue and many other hot dog carts throughout the downtown area serving federal employees. Half-smokes are the “official dog” of the Washington Nationals. The most prominent location is often cited as Ben’s Chili Bowl in Washington’s U Street neighborhood, which has long been a center of Black Washington, and was an essential stop for President-elect Barack Obama in 2009.

Another popular location for half-smokes is the Weenie Beenie in South Arlington, Virginia, located near the Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park trail. Founded in 1950, it pre-dates Ben’s Chili Bowl. Among newer purveyors is Meats & Foods, on Florida Avenue just east of Ben’s Chili Bowl, which makes its own handmade version of the sausage.

One of America’s Favorites – Buffalo Burger

February 1, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in bison, Buffalo, One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A buffalo burger and sweet potato fries

Buffalo burgers are hamburgers made with meat from the water buffalo, beefalo or American bison (Bison bison).

 

 

 

 

 

Author Dan O’ Brien said that buffalo meat is sweet and tender and has a unique taste. He also said that it has to be prepared as carefully as fresh fish. The magazine Women’s Health said that the taste of beef burgers and buffalo burgers is almost indistinguishable, but that buffalo burgers are a bit sweeter and more tender. It normally costs more than beef.

Frozen buffalo burger patties

Buffalo burgers have less cholesterol, less fat, and less food energy than burgers made from beef or chicken. The American Heart Association recommended buffalo burgers in 1997 as more heart-healthy than chicken or beef. The burger is high in nutrients such as protein, zinc, and vitamin B12. Buffalo burgers are more healthy than beef because bison do not store as much fat as cattle. An 85-gram (3-ounce) serving of buffalo meat has 390 kilojoules (93 kilocalories) and 1.8 g of fat compared to 770 kJ (183 kcal) and 8.7 g of fat in the same serving as beef. A recipe for simple buffalo burgers was listed in Men’s Health Muscle Chow. The magazine EatingWell came up with a buffalo burger recipe that is low in cholesterol and high in calcium.

 

 

 

* I switched from Beef to Buffalo/Bison many years ago after I found out I had Diabetes 2. Buffalo is healthier and the tastes and flavors can’t compare. My favorite is from Wild Idea Buffalo, I’m a long time customer (https://wildideabuffalo.com/) .

 

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – Soup and Sandwich

January 25, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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A soup and sandwich meal, served with chips

The soup and sandwich combination meal consists of a soup accompanied by a sandwich. It has been a popular meal in the United States since the 1920s. Some U.S. restaurant chains specialize in the meal, and it has been mass-produced as a prepared frozen meal.

 

The soup and sandwich combination meal is common in the United States. Depending on the intended size of the meal, the sandwich might be either half or a whole sandwich, and the soup may be served in either a cup or bowl. The combination of a grilled cheese sandwich with tomato soup is a common example in American cuisine, and has been described as a comfort food.

 

A grilled cheese sandwich with tomato soup

The soup and sandwich combination became a popular lunch dish in the United States in the 1920s, and remains as a common dish at American luncheonettes and diners. It was also a common lunch dish in some earlier U.S. department stores that had dining rooms. In contemporary times, it is sometimes consumed as a light dinner. Some soup kitchens, outreach organizations and churches routinely provide the dish to the needy.

 

Some American restaurants specialize in soup and sandwich meals, such as the Panera Bread Company, Hale and Hearty, and Zoup! restaurant chains. In September 2016, the fast casual restaurant Panera Bread had a total of 2,024 stores at North American locations, some of which go by different company names. Panera plans to expand its product delivery availability, which began in early 2016, to include 35% to 40% of its store locations by the end of 2017. In October 2016, Zoup! has a total of 96 stores in the United States, with 93 franchise stores and three company-owned ones.

 

 

A Stouffer’s frozen prepared soup and sandwich meal after heating

The soup and sandwich combination has been mass-produced in the United States and purveyed to consumers on a national level, the Campbell’s Souper Combo frozen soup and sandwich meal being one example. Initially, the product realized promising sales revenues, but consumer interest later tapered off, with the initial high sales attributed to consumer curiosity about the new product and “one-off” purchases per this initial interest. The Souper Combo was a short-lived product, and was eventually discontinued.

The Corner Bistro is a line of mass-produced frozen prepared soup and sandwich meals marketed under the Stouffer’s brand. The sandwiches are manufactured as stuffed melt sandwiches.

One of America’s Favorites – BLT

January 18, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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BLT sandwich on toast

A BLT is a type of sandwich, named for the initials of its primary ingredients, bacon, lettuce and tomato. It can be made with varying recipes according to personal preference. Simple variants include using different types of lettuce, toasting or not, or adding mayonnaise. More pronounced variants can include using turkey bacon or tofu in place of bacon, or removing the lettuce entirely.

Variations on the BLT date to the early 1900s, but it did not achieve widespread popularity until after World War II, when the ingredients became more readily available year-round. Referencing the sandwich by its initials rather than naming the ingredients in full did not become common until the 1970s. Until 2019 the BLT has been ranked as the second most popular sandwich in the US and as the UK’s favourite sandwich, and is frequently referenced or depicted in media and culture. In 2019 the BLT dropped rank and was voted the sixth most popular sandwich in the US, with grilled cheese taking the lead as the most popular sandwich in the US.

 

Although the ingredients of the BLT have existed for many years, there is little evidence of BLT sandwich recipes prior to 1900. The 1903 Good Housekeeping Everyday Cook Book, a recipe by a Dr. Evan Mee for a club sandwich included bacon, lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise and a slice of turkey sandwiched between two slices of bread. While the 1929 book Seven Hundred Sandwiches does include a section on bacon sandwiches, the recipes often include pickles and none contain tomato.

A BLT sandwich preparation

The BLT became popular after World War II because of the rapid expansion of supermarkets, which allowed ingredients to be available year-round. The initials, representing “bacon, lettuce, tomato”, likely began in the U.S. restaurant industry as shorthand for the sandwich, but it is unclear when this transferred to the public consciousness. For example, a 1951 edition of the Saturday Evening Post makes reference to the sandwich, although it does not use its initials, describing a scene in which: “On the tray, invariably, are a bowl of soup, a toasted sandwich of bacon, lettuce and tomato, and a chocolate milk shake.”

A 1954 issue of Modern Hospital contains a meal suggestion that includes: “Bean Soup, Toasted Bacon Lettuce and Tomato Sandwich, Pickles, Jellied Banana Salad, Cream Dressing, and Pound Cake.” By 1958, Hellmann’s Mayonnaise advertised their product as “traditional on bacon, lettuce, and tomato sandwiches,” suggesting that the combination had been around for some time. However, there are several references to a “B.L.T” in the early 1970s, including in one review of Bruce Jay Friedman’s play entitled Steambath titled: “A B.L.T. for God – hold the mayo.”. The abbreviation used in title references a line of dialogue in the play in which God yells, “Send up a bacon and lettuce and tomato sandwich, hold the mayo. You burn the toast, I’ll smite you down with my terrible swift sword.” The coexistence of the shortened version and the full name suggests this was a period of transition as the abbreviation was popularized.

 

While there are variations on the BLT, the essential ingredients are bacon, tomatoes and lettuce between two slices of bread, often toasted. The quantity and quality of the ingredients are matters of personal preference. The bacon can be well cooked or tender, but as it “carries” the other flavors, chefs recommend using higher quality meat; in particular, chef Edward Lee states “Your general supermarket bacon is not going to cut the mustard.”

Iceberg lettuce is a common choice because it does not add too much flavor while adding crunch. Food writer Ed Levine has suggested that BLT does not require lettuce at all, as it is “superfluous”, a suggestion that Jon Bonné, lifestyle editor at MSNBC, described as “shocking”. Michele Anna Jordan, author of The BLT Cookbook, believes the tomato is the key ingredient and recommends the use of the beefsteak tomato as it has more flesh and fewer seeds. Similarly, chef and food writer J. Kenji Lopez-Alt believes that a BLT is not a well-dressed bacon sandwich; it’s a tomato sandwich, seasoned with bacon. For that reason, he argues that the BLT is a seasonal sandwich since it best made with high-quality summer tomatoes.

The sandwich is sometimes served with dressings, like mayonnaise. The bread can be of any variety, white or wholemeal, toasted or not, depending on personal preference.

 

BLT with avocado

The sandwich has a high sodium and fat content, and has been specifically targeted by UK café chains in an effort to reduce salt and fat. Due to this, low-fat mayonnaise is a common substitute along with low salt bread and less fatty bacon. A more visible solution is to use turkey bacon in lieu of normal bacon. One of the variations on the BLT is the club sandwich, a two-layered sandwich in which one layer is a BLT. The other layer can be almost any sort of sliced meat, normally chicken or turkey.

The BLT has been deconstructed into a number of forms; for example, Edna Lewis and Scott Peacock created a BLT salad in The Gift of Southern Cooking by cutting the ingredients into 1 inch pieces and tossing in mayonnaise. This variation was described by The New York Times writer Julia Reed as “even more perfect than a BLT”.

Vegans and vegetarians may replace bacon with tempeh or tofu as meat analogue instead. Alternatively they can use mock bacon.

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – Cheesesteak Sandwich

January 11, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A cheesesteak sandwich with Cheez Whiz

A cheesesteak (also known as a Philadelphia cheesesteak, Philly cheesesteak, cheesesteak sandwich, cheese steak, or steak and cheese) is a sandwich made from thinly sliced pieces of beefsteak and melted cheese in a long hoagie roll. A popular regional fast food, it has its roots in the U.S. city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The cheesesteak was developed in the early 20th century “by combining frizzled beef, onions, and cheese in a small loaf of bread”, according to a 1987 exhibition catalog published by the Library Company of Philadelphia and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

Philadelphians Pat and Harry Olivieri are often credited with inventing the sandwich by serving chopped steak on an Italian roll in the early 1930s. The exact story behind its creation is debated, but in some accounts, Pat and Harry Olivieri originally owned a hot dog stand, and on one occasion, decided to make a new sandwich using chopped beef and grilled onions. While Pat was eating the sandwich, a cab driver stopped by and was interested in it, so he requested one for himself. After eating it, the cab driver suggested that Olivieri quit making hot dogs and instead focus on the new sandwich. They began selling this variation of steak sandwiches at their hot dog stand near South Philadelphia’s Italian Market. They became so popular that Pat opened up his own restaurant which still operates today as Pat’s King of Steaks. The sandwich was originally prepared without cheese; Olivieri said provolone cheese was first added by Joe “Cocky Joe” Lorenza, a manager at the Ridge Avenue location.

Cheesesteaks have become popular at restaurants and food carts throughout the city with many locations being independently owned, family-run businesses. Variations of cheesesteaks are now common in several fast food chains. Versions of the sandwich can also be found at high-end restaurants. Many establishments outside of Philadelphia refer to the sandwich as a “Philly cheesesteak”.

Description
Meat

A cheesesteak from Pat’s King of Steaks with Cheez Whiz and onions

The meat traditionally used is thinly sliced rib-eye or top round, although other cuts of beef are also used. On a lightly oiled griddle at medium temperature, the steak slices are quickly browned and then scrambled into smaller pieces with a flat spatula. Slices of cheese are then placed over the meat, letting it melt, and then the roll is placed on top of the cheese. The mixture is then scooped up with a spatula and pressed into the roll, which is then cut in half.

Common additions include sautéed onions, ketchup, hot sauce, salt, and black pepper.

Bread

In Philadelphia, cheesesteaks are invariably served on hoagie rolls. Among several brands, perhaps the most famous are Amoroso rolls; these rolls are long, soft, and slightly salted. One source writes that “a proper cheesesteak consists of provolone or Cheez Whiz slathered on an Amoroso roll and stuffed with thinly shaved grilled meat,” while a reader’s letter to an Indianapolis magazine, lamenting the unavailability of good cheesesteaks, wrote that “the mention of the Amoroso roll brought tears to my eyes.” After commenting on the debates over types of cheese and “chopped steak or sliced”, Risk and Insurance magazine declared “The only thing nearly everybody can agree on is that it all has to be piled onto a fresh, locally baked Amoroso roll.”

Cheese

American cheese, Cheez Whiz, and provolone are the most commonly used cheeses or cheese products put on to the Philly cheesesteak.

White American cheese, along with provolone cheese, are the favorites due to their mild flavor and medium consistency. Some establishments melt the American cheese to achieve the creamy consistency, while others place slices over the meat, letting them melt slightly under the heat. Philadelphia Inquirer restaurant critic Craig LaBan says “Provolone is for aficionados, extra-sharp for the most discriminating among them.” Geno’s owner, Joey Vento, said, “We always recommend the provolone. That’s the real cheese.”

Cheez Whiz, first marketed in 1952, was not yet available for the original 1930 version, but has spread in popularity. A 1986 New York Times article called Cheez Whiz “the sine qua non of cheesesteak connoisseurs.” In a 1985 interview, Pat Olivieri’s nephew Frank Olivieri said that he uses “the processed cheese spread familiar to millions of parents who prize speed and ease in fixing the children’s lunch for the same reason, because it is fast.” Cheez Whiz is “overwhelmingly the favorite” at Pat’s, outselling runner-up American by a ratio of eight or ten to one, while Geno’s claims to go through eight to ten cases of Cheez Whiz a day.

In 2003, while running for President of the United States, John Kerry made what was considered a major faux pas when campaigning in Philadelphia and went to Pat’s King of Steaks and ordered a cheesesteak with Swiss.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Cioppino

January 4, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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Cioppino

Cioppino, Italian: from Ligurian: cioppin is a fish stew originating in San Francisco, California. It is an Italian-American dish and is related to various regional fish soups and stews of Italian cuisine.

Cioppino is traditionally made from the catch of the day, which in San Francisco is typically a combination of Dungeness crab, clams, shrimp, scallops, squid, mussels and fish, all sourced from salt-water ocean, in this case the Pacific. The seafood is then combined with fresh tomatoes in a wine sauce.

The dish can be served with toasted bread, either local sourdough or French bread. The bread acts as a starch, similar to a pasta, and is dipped into the sauce.

Cioppino was developed in the late 1800s by Italian immigrants who fished off Meiggs Wharf and lived in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco, many from the port city of Genoa. When a fisherman came back empty handed, they would walk around with a pot to the other fishermen asking them to chip in whatever they could. What ever ended up in the pot became their Cioppino. The fishermen that chipped in expected the same treatment if they came back empty handed in the future. It later became a staple as Italian restaurants proliferated in San Francisco.

The name comes from cioppin (also spelled ciopin) which is the name of a classic soup from the Italian region Liguria, similar in flavor to cioppino but with less tomato and using Mediterranean seafood cooked to the point that it falls apart.

The dish also shares its origin with other regional Italian variations of seafood stew similar to cioppin, including cacciucco from Tuscany, brodetto di pesce from Abruzzo and others. Similar dishes can be found in coastal regions throughout the Mediterranean, from Portugal to Greece. Examples of these include suquet de peix from Catalan-speaking regions and bouillabaisse from Provence.

Cioppino with bread

The earliest printed description of cioppino is from a 1901 recipe in The San Francisco Call, though the stew is called “chespini”. “Cioppino” first appears in 1906 in The Refugee’s Cookbook, a fundraising effort to benefit San Franciscans displaced by the 1906 earthquake and fire.

Generally the seafood is cooked in broth and served in the shell, including the crab, which is often served halved or quartered. It therefore requires special utensils, typically a crab fork and cracker. Depending on the restaurant, it may be accompanied by a bib to prevent food stains on clothing, a damp napkin and a second bowl for the shells. A variation, commonly called “lazy man’s cioppino”, is served with shells pre-cracked or removed.

One of America’s Favorites – Soufflé

December 28, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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A chocolate soufflé

A soufflé is a baked egg-based dish originating in France in the early eighteenth century. Combined with various other ingredients it can be served as a savory main dish or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé is the past participle of the French verb souffler which means “to blow”, “to breathe”, “to inflate” or “to puff”.

The earliest mention of the soufflé is attributed to French master cook Vincent La Chapelle, in the early eighteenth century. The development and popularization of the soufflé is usually traced to French chef Marie-Antoine Carême in the early nineteenth century.

 

Soufflés are typically prepared from two basic components:

1 – a flavored crème pâtissière, cream sauce or béchamel, or a purée as the base

Cheese soufflés

2 – egg whites beaten to a soft peak
The base provides the flavor and the egg whites provide the “lift”, or puffiness to the dish. Foods commonly used to flavor the base include herbs, cheese and vegetables for savory soufflés and jam, fruits, berries, chocolate, banana and lemon for dessert soufflés.

Soufflés are generally baked in individual ramekins of a few ounces or soufflé dishes of a few liters: these are typically glazed, flat-bottomed, round porcelain containers with unglazed bottoms, vertical or nearly vertical sides, and fluted exterior borders. The ramekin, or other baking vessel, may be coated with a thin film of butter to prevent the soufflé from sticking. Some preparations also include adding a coating of sugar, bread crumbs, or a grated hard cheese such as Parmesan inside the ramekin in addition to the butter; some cooks believe this allows the soufflé to rise more easily.

After being cooked, a soufflé is puffed up and fluffy, and it will generally fall after 5 or 10 minutes (as risen dough does). It may be served with a sauce atop the soufflé, such as a sweet dessert sauce, or with a sorbet or ice-cream on the side. When served, the top of a soufflé may be punctured with serving utensils to separate it into individual servings. This can also enable a sauce to integrate into the dish.

A chocolate soufflé with lava center served with ice cream

 

There are a number of both savory and sweet soufflé flavor variations. Savory soufflés often include cheese, and vegetables such as spinach, carrot and herbs, and may sometimes incorporate poultry, bacon, ham, or seafood for a more substantial dish. Sweet soufflés may be based on a chocolate or fruit sauce (lemon or raspberry, for example), and are often served with a dusting of powdered sugar. Frugal recipes sometimes emphasize the possibilities for making soufflés from leftovers.

A soufflé may be served alone or with ice cream, fruit, or a sauce.

Apple soufflé is made by lining a cake tin with pureed rice that has been boiled in sweetened milk and baking it in this until it sets. The rice “border” is filled with thickened apple marmalade and whipped egg whites and baked until it rises.

 

 

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I’m a Christian wife, mom, and entrepreneur serving up my favorite Gluten Free recipes and sharing my passion for wellness, crafting, and home decor!

Wren's World

The Journey of a Teacher Turned Stay at Home Mom. Raising a Family, Saving Money and Keeping the Faith.

Greg Nelson Cooks

Delicious food made easy

Butter and Bliss

Small Batch Baking Recipes for Baked Goods and Desserts

Life...Take 2

I hope that someone sees this page and decides not to give up...