One of America’s Favorites – Gyros

June 14, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Gyros sandwiches wraps in Greece, with meat, onions, tomato, lettuce, fries, and tzatziki rolled in a pita

A gyro or gyros pronounced [ˈʝiros]) is a Greek dish made from meat cooked on a vertical rotisserie. Like shawarma and al pastor meat, it is derived from the lamb-based doner kebab. In Greece and Cyprus it is prepared most often with pork or chicken, whilst beef, chicken, and lamb are common in other countries. It is typically served wrapped or stuffed in a pita, along with ingredients such as tomato, onion, and tzatziki sauce.

Grilling a vertical spit of stacked meat slices and cutting it off as it cooks was developed in Bursa in the 19th century Ottoman Empire, and called doner kebab (Turkish: döner kebap). Following World War II, doner kebab made with lamb was present in Athens, introduced by immigrants from Anatolia and the Middle East. A distinct Greek variation developed, often made with pork and served with tzatziki sauce, which later became known as gyros.

By 1970, gyros wrapped sandwiches were already a popular fast food in Athens, as well as in Chicago and New York City. At that time, although vertical rotisseries were starting to be mass-produced in the US by Gyros Inc. of Chicago, the stacks of meat were still hand-made.

Gyros plate

According to Margaret Garlic, it was she who first came up with the idea to mass-produce gyros meat cones, after watching a demonstration by a Greek restaurant owner carving gyros on the What’s My Line? television show. She convinced her husband John Garlic, a Jewish former Marine and then Cadillac salesman, of the idea. After obtaining a recipe from a Greek chef in Chicago, the couple rented a space in a sausage plant in Milwaukee and began operating the world’s first assembly line producing gyros meat from beef and lamb trimmings, in the early 1970s. The Garlics later sold their business to Gyros Inc., which along with Central Gyros Wholesale, and Kronos Foods, Inc, also of Chicago, began large-scale production in the mid-1970s.

 

The name comes from the Greek γύρος (gyros, ‘circle’ or ‘turn’), and is a calque of the Turkish word döner, from dönmek, also meaning “turn”. It was originally called ντονέρ (pronounced [doˈner]) in Greece. The word ντονέρ was criticized in mid-1970s Greece for being Turkish. The word gyro or gyros was already in use in English by at least 1970, and along with γύρος in Greek, eventually came to replace doner kebab for the Greek version of the dish. Some Greek restaurants in the US, such as the Syntagma Square in New York City—which can be seen briefly in the 1976 film Taxi Driver—continued to use both doner kebab and gyros to refer to the same dish, in the 1970s.

 

In Greece, gyros is normally made with pork, though other meats are also used. Chicken is common, and lamb or beef may be found more rarely. Typical American mass-produced gyros are made with finely ground beef mixed with lamb.

Gyros preparation

For hand-made gyros, meat is cut into approximately round, thin, flat slices, which are then stacked on a spit and seasoned. Fat trimmings are usually interspersed. Spices may include cumin, oregano, thyme, rosemary, and others. The pieces of meat, in the shape of an inverted cone, are placed on a tall vertical rotisserie, which turns slowly in front of a source of heat or broiler. As the cone cooks, lower parts are basted with the juices running off the upper parts. The outside of the meat is sliced vertically in thin, crisp shavings when done.

The rate of roasting can be adjusted by varying the intensity of the heat, the distance between the heat and the meat, and the speed of spit rotation, thus allowing the cook to adjust for varying rates of consumption.

In Greece it is customarily served in an oiled, lightly grilled piece of pita, rolled up with sliced tomatoes, chopped onions, lettuce, and french fries, topped with tzatziki sauce or, sometimes in northern Greece, ketchup or mustard.

One of America’s Favorites – Taquito

June 7, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A taquito (Spanish pronunciation: [taˈkito], Spanish for “small taco”), tacos dorados, rolled taco, or flauta (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈflawta], Spanish for “flute”) is a Mexican food dish

5 rolled beef tacos with guacamole, lettuce, and cheese

that typically consists of a small rolled-up tortilla that contains filling, including beef, cheese or chicken. The filled tortilla is then crisp-fried or deep-fried. The dish is often topped with condiments such as sour cream and guacamole. Corn tortillas are generally used to make taquitos. The dish is more commonly known as flautas when they are larger than their taquito counterparts, and can be made with either flour or corn tortillas.

The taquito or small taco was referred to in the 1917 Preliminary Glossary of New Mexico Spanish, with the word noted as a “Mexicanism” used in New Mexico. The modern definition of a taquito as a rolled-tortilla dish was given in 1929 in a book of stories of Mexican people in the United States aimed at a youth audience, where the dish was noted as a particularly popular offering of railroad station vendors. Taquitos were referred to, without definition, in a 1932 issue of the Los Angeles School Journal.

Two Southern California restaurants are often given credit for their roles in the early development of the taquito. Cielito Lindo was founded by Aurora Guerrero in 1934 and located on Olvera Street in Los Angeles. Guerrero’s daughter used her taquito recipe in opening chain restaurants in Los Angeles, and soon competitors were selling similar dishes. In San Diego, what would become El Indio Mexican Restaurant began selling taquitos during World War II, when tortilla factory owner Ralph Pesqueria, Sr., was asked by workers at the Consolidated Aircraft Company factory across the street for a portable lunch item. Pesqueria, who used a recipe developed by his Mexican grandmother, has claimed credit for introducing the word “taquito” for the dish.

Carnitas flautas with jack cheese, guacamole, salsa fresca, and cotija cheese

Taquitos were among the early Mexican food items developed as a frozen food, with Van de Kamp introducing a successful frozen taquito offering by 1976. The United States government has determined that taquitos must contain at least 15% meat.

Crispy fried taquitos sold in Mexico are often called tacos dorados (“golden tacos”) or flautas. Typical toppings and sides include cabbage, crema (Mexican sour cream), guacamole, green chili or red chili salsa and crumbled Mexican cheese such as queso fresco. “Taquitos” in the Mexican border cities of Tijuana and Mexicali refer to small tacos sold in stands, rather than the rolled taco dish.

One of America’s Favorites – Chili Mac

May 31, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 

A plate of chili mac prepared with macaroni noodles, chili, cheese, onion and green onion

Chili mac is a dish prepared using chili and macaroni as primary ingredients, which is often topped or intermingled with cheese. Some versions are made using prepared or homemade macaroni and cheese. It is a common dish in the cuisine of the Midwestern United States, and is also popular in other areas of the United States.

Several variations of the dish exist, and prepared canned and boxed versions also exist. It can be a relatively inexpensive dish to prepare, and has been described as a comfort food.

Preparation
Several preparation methods exist. Basic versions may be prepared using chopped meat, tomato, spices, and elbow macaroni. Another basic preparation method incorporates boxed, prepared macaroni and cheese and canned chili. Some recipes incorporate all of the ingredients together, while others are prepared with the ingredients separately layered. Those that use cheese may use grated cheese atop the dish, while others mix the cheese throughout the dish. Sometimes, onions or beans are added. Some diners in St. Louis, Missouri serve a version called “chili mac a la mode”, in which the dish is served topped with fried eggs.

The dish may be prepared on a range top in a skillet, in a slow cooker, or baked as a casserole. Vegetarian and vegan versions of the dish are sometimes prepared.

Versions
Chili mac has been a staple dish at American military dining facilities for years. It was introduced into the Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE) field ration menu in 1995 and is one of only three of the twelve MRE meals offered in 1995 that has remained on the MRE menu to date. A variation called “taco chili mac” has been consumed by NASA astronauts in space. It is processed by NASA as a freeze-dried product.

One of America’s Favorites – Red Slaw

May 24, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Lexington (North Carolina) style barbecue (pulled pork) served with hushpuppies, baked beans and red slaw (lower right)

Red slaw (sometimes called barbecue slaw) is a condiment commonly served on hot dogs, on barbecue pork sandwiches, as a side dish for other types of barbecue, on hamburgers, or with other foods. It is an essential part of “Lexington style” North Carolina barbecue.

Red slaw is different from traditional coleslaw in that it does not use mayonnaise as an ingredient, allowing it to be stored for longer periods without refrigeration and making it more suitable for outdoor serving. It is made with green cabbage, vinegar, water and ketchup, giving it the characteristic color. In addition to being a staple part of Lexington style barbecue, it is also common in other portions of the Southeastern United States. In these regions, regular cole slaw may be called “white slaw” to differentiate it from red slaw.

Recipes vary widely and may include other ingredients, such as onion, sugar, black pepper, mustard seed and other spices, depending on the region in which it is being served.

In the late 1990s, Wendy’s sold the “Carolina Classic Burger” which was a traditional hamburger with red slaw, onions, chili and American cheese, going so far as to trademark the name.

One of America’s Favorites – Clam Chowder

May 17, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

 

New England clam chowder

Clam chowder is any of several chowder soups in American cuisine containing clams. In addition to clams, common ingredients include diced potatoes, salt pork, and onions. Other vegetables are not typically used. It is believed that clams were used in chowder because of the relative ease of harvesting them. Clam chowder is usually served with saltine crackers or small, hexagonal oyster crackers.

The dish originated in the Eastern United States, but is now commonly served in restaurants throughout the country. Many regional variations exist, but the three most prevalent are New England or “white” clam chowder, which includes milk or cream, Manhattan or “red” clam chowder, which includes tomatoes, and Rhode Island or “clear” clam chowder, which omits both.

 

The most popular variety of clam chowder, the milk-based New England clam chowder, which was influenced by French and Nova Scotian cuisine, became common in the 18th century. The first recipe for Manhattan clam chowder, with tomatoes and no milk, was published before 1919, and the current name is attested in 1934. In 1939, the legislature of the state of Maine considered outlawing the use of tomatoes in clam chowder, but this did not pass.

 

Manhattan clam chowder has a reddish color from tomatoes

As recipes for clam chowder spread throughout the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries, many regionally developed variants have arisen.

Manhattan clam chowder
Manhattan clam chowder has a red, tomato-based broth, initially introduced by Portuguese immigrants in Rhode Island, as tomato-based stews were already a traditional part of Portuguese cuisine. Thyme is often used as a seasoning.

In the 1890s, this chowder was called “Fulton Fish Market clam chowder” and “New York City clam chowder. Manhattan clam chowder is included in Victor Hirtzler’s Hotel St. Francis Cookbook (1919) as “clam chowder.” The “Manhattan” name is first attested in a 1934 cookbook.

Today, Manhattan-style chowder often contains other vegetables, such as adding celery and carrots to include a mirepoix.

New England clam chowder
New England clam chowder, occasionally referred to as Boston or Boston-style clam chowder, is a milk or cream-based chowder, and is often of a thicker consistency than other regional styles. It is commonly made with milk, butter, potatoes, salt pork, onion, and clams. Flour or, historically, crushed hard tack may be added as a thickener.

New England clam chowder is usually accompanied by oyster crackers. Crackers may be crushed and mixed into the soup for thickener, or used as a garnish.

Rhode Island clam chowder
Rhode Island clam chowder is made with clear broth, and contains no dairy or tomatoes. It is common in southeastern Rhode Island through eastern Connecticut. In Rhode Island, it is sometimes called “South County Style” referring to Washington County, where it apparently originated.

Long Island clam chowder
Long Island clam chowder is part New England-style and part Manhattan-style, making it a pinkish creamy tomato clam chowder. The name is a joke: Long Island is between Manhattan and New England. The two parent chowders are typically cooked separately before being poured in the same bowl. This variant is popular in many small restaurants across Suffolk County, New York.

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – Steak Sandwich

May 10, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 

A steak sandwich with shredded steak, cheese, mushrooms, onions, peppers and tomatoes

A steak sandwich is a sandwich that is prepared with steak that has been broiled, fried, grilled, barbecued or seared using steel grates or gridirons then served on bread or a roll. Steak sandwiches are sometimes served with toppings of cheese, onions, mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes, and in some instances fried eggs, coleslaw, and French fries.

According to the Library of Congress, the first steak sandwich sold in the United States was at Louis’ Lunch of New Haven, Connecticut.

Cheesesteak
A cheesesteak, or steak and cheese, is made from thinly sliced pieces of steak and melted cheese in a long roll. The cheesesteak is one of the favorite foods of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It can be found in most parts of the U.S. outside the Philadelphia area, often sold as a “Philadelphia” or “Philly Cheesesteak”, even when prepared in a manner different from that customary in the city. Variations include the type of condiments, including grilled onions and peppers, the type of cheese used, or the type of roll.

Italian beef
An Italian beef sandwich features thin slices of seasoned roast beef, dripping with meat juices, on a dense, long Italian-style roll, believed to have originated in Chicago, where its history dates back at least to the 1930s. The bread itself is often dipped (or double-dipped) into the jus the meat is cooked in, and the sandwich is typically topped off with Chicago-style giardiniera or sauteed, green Italian sweet peppers. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in Italy.

French dip
A French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip (especially in Canada), is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats such as pastrami or corned beef) on a French roll or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Though it can be found in many parts of the U.S. and Canada, the sandwich originated in Los Angeles, California, in the first decades of the twentieth century. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in France.

A cheesesteak sandwich with Cheez Whiz

Beef on weck
A beef on weck is a variety of sandwich found primarily in Western New York. It is made with roast beef on a kummelweck roll. The meat on the sandwich is traditionally served rare, thin cut, with the top bun getting a dip au jus. Accompaniments include horseradish, a dill pickle spear, and French fries.

Steak bomb
A steak bomb is a hot submarine sandwich consisting of shaved steak and melted provolone or mozzarella cheese with grilled onions, sautéed red and green bell peppers, mushrooms, and peppered shaved steak all on a submarine sandwich roll. It is a variation on the steak submarine sandwich, as is the cheese steak. It is most closely associated with the New England region of the United States, where steak sandwiches are made by quickly grilling shaved steak on a griddle and then adding either cheese, or grilling the steak together with peppers and onions or mushrooms. If all three are combined together it becomes a steak bomb. The addition of salami or other preserved meats or pickles is optional and exact recipes and proportions vary widely. Nearly every pizzeria and sub shop in New England has their own version of the various steak sandwiches and the steak bomb.

 

Other variations
In Australia a steak sandwich is made much like a traditional Australian hamburger, with a piece of grilled steak or fried minute steak, fried onions, lettuce, tomato, tinned beetroot and barbecue sauce or tomato ketchup (known as tomato sauce in Australia). Cheese, a fried egg, bacon or pineapple might also be added. In some establishments the sandwich will be constructed on slices of bread, which are toasted on only one side while other establishments serve it on the same roll (bun) as is used for hamburgers. Some establishments call this a steak burger.

One of America’s Favorites – Pig Pickin’

May 3, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 

A pig pickin’ (also known as rolling a pig, pig pull, pig roast or, among the Cajun, “cochon de lait”) is a type of party or gathering held primarily in the American South which involves the barbecuing of a whole hog (the castrated male pig or barrow, bred for consumption at about 12 weeks old). Females, or gilts, are used as well. Boars (full-grown intact males) and sows generally are too large.

Many Southern families have a pig roast for Thanksgiving or Christmas, graduations, weddings, or summer gatherings. Some communities hold cook-offs during festivals, where cooks compete against one another for prize money.

 

A pig, often around 80–120 pounds dressed weight, is split in half and spread onto a large charcoal or propane grill. Some practitioners use a separate stove filled with hardwood to produce coals which are then transferred under the charcoal grill by shovel; others use charcoal with chunks of either blackjack oak, hickory wood or some other hardwood added for flavor. The style of these grills are as varied as the methods of producing them, some being homemade while others are custom-made.

There is a long-running debate among barbecue enthusiasts over the merits of different fuels. Propane is said to maintain a consistent temperature, whereas charcoal or charwood are often touted as producing better-tasting meat.

The cooking process is communal and usually directed by an authority figure; the host is helped by friends or family. It usually takes four to eight hours to cook the pig completely; the pig is often started “meat-side” down, and then is flipped one time once the hog has stopped dripping rendered fat. Some practitioners clean ashes from the skin with paper towels or a small whisk broom before flipping the hog to help produce high quality cracklings from the skin.

Often the hog is basted while cooking, though the method and sauce used differs according to region. For instance, a typical South Carolina Piedmont-area baste would be a mustard based sauce, an Eastern North Carolina baste is usually a very light vinegar based sauce with red pepper flakes, and Western North Carolina barbecue uses sauce with a ketchup base similar to traditional barbecue sauce.

When the cooking is complete, the meat should ideally be tender to the point of falling off of the bone. The meat is then either chopped or pulled into traditional Carolina-style pork barbecue, or it is picked off the hog itself by the guests. It is from the latter that the gathering gains its name. The barbecue is sometimes eaten with hushpuppies (fried cornmeal, occasionally flavored with onions), coleslaw, baked beans or sometimes Brunswick stew. In South Carolina, it is common to serve pilaf or hash as a side dish. Hash is a blend of leftover pork mixed with barbecue sauce and usually served over rice.

Sweet tea, beer, and soft drinks are often served.

The pig pickin’ is a significant part of the culture of the South; the necessary work and time needed to cook the hog makes it ideal for church gatherings (“dinner on the grounds”) or family reunions, and they can be held virtually year-round thanks to the region’s mild winters. Pig pickin’s are popular amongst the most devoted tailgaters at college football games across the South. The pig pickin’ has been long associated with politics; many local political parties and politicians still use the pig pickin’ to attract people to meetings and campaign rallies.[citation needed] In 1983, Rufus Edmisten, running for Governor of North Carolina at the time, was overheard saying “I’ve eaten enough barbecue. I am not going to eat any more. I’m taking my stand and that is it.”

Culturally and culinarily different from traditional Deep South pig pickin’ events, pig roasts are a common occurrence in Cuba, as well as the non-mainland American state of Hawaii, with roasts being done in the traditions of those places.

One of America’s Favorites – Chimichanga

April 26, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Chimichanga

A chimichanga is a deep-fried burrito that is common in Tex-Mex and other Southwestern U.S. cuisine. The dish is typically prepared by filling a flour tortilla with various ingredients, most commonly rice, cheese, beans, and a meat such as machaca (dried meat), carne adobada (marinated meat), carne seca (dried beef), or shredded chicken, and folding it into a rectangular package. It is then deep-fried, and can be accompanied by salsa, guacamole, sour cream, or carne asada.

The origin of the chimichanga is uncertain. By some accounts, it originated in Mexico, in others, by accident in Arizona, United States. Given the variant chivichanga, specifically employed in Mexico, one derivation indicated that immigrants to the United States brought the dish with them, mainly through Sonora into Arizona. The words chimi and changa come from two Mexican Spanish terms: chamuscado (past participle of the verb chamuscar), which means seared or singed, and changa, related to chinga (third-person present tense form of the vulgar verb chingar, a rude expression for the unexpected or a small insult.

One of America’s Favorites – Chimichanga

A chimichanga is a deep-fried burrito that is common in Tex-Mex and other Southwestern U.S. cuisine. The dish is typically prepared by filling a flour tortilla with various ingredients, most commonly rice, cheese, beans, and a meat such as machaca (dried meat), carne adobada (marinated meat), carne seca (dried beef), or shredded chicken, and folding it into a rectangular package. It is then deep-fried, and can be accompanied by salsa, guacamole, sour cream, or carne asada.

Chimichanga from Amigos in Melbourne, Australia.

The origin of the chimichanga is uncertain. By some accounts, it originated in Mexico, in others, by accident in Arizona, United States. Given the variant chivichanga, specifically employed in Mexico, one derivation indicated that immigrants to the United States brought the dish with them, mainly through Sonora into Arizona. The words chimi and changa come from two Mexican Spanish terms: chamuscado (past participle of the verb chamuscar), which means seared or singed, and changa, related to chinga (third-person present tense form of the vulgar verb chingar), a rude expression for the unexpected or a small insult.

According to one source, Monica Flin, the founder of the Tucson, Arizona, restaurant El Charro, accidentally dropped a burrito into the deep-fat fryer in 1922. She immediately began to utter a Spanish profanity beginning “chi…” (chingada), but quickly stopped herself and instead exclaimed chimichanga, a Spanish equivalent of “thingamajig”. Knowledge and appreciation of the dish spread slowly outward from the Tucson area, with popularity elsewhere accelerating in recent decades. Though the chimichanga is now found as part of the Tex-Mex cuisine, its roots within the U.S. are mainly in Tucson, Arizona.

Woody Johnson, founder of Macayo’s Mexican Kitchen, claimed he had invented the chimichanga in 1946 when he put some burritos into a deep fryer as an experiment at his original restaurant Woody’s El Nido, in Phoenix, Arizona. These “fried burritos” became so popular that by 1952, when Woody’s El Nido became Macayo’s, the chimichanga was one of the restaurant’s main menu items. Johnson opened Macayo’s in 1952. Although no official records indicate when the dish first appeared, retired University of Arizona folklorist Jim Griffith recalls seeing chimichangas at the Yaqui Old Pascua Village in Tucson in the mid-1950s.

According to data presented by the United States Department of Agriculture, a typical 183-gram (6.5-ounce) serving of a beef and cheese chimichanga contains 443 calories, 20 grams protein, 39 grams carbohydrates, 23 grams total fat, 11 grams saturated fat, 51 milligrams cholesterol, and 957 milligrams of sodium.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Texas Toast

April 19, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A slice of Texas toast on top of a bagged loaf of bread.

Texas toast is a toasted bread with butter, and often garlic, that is often made from a type of packaged bread that has been sliced at double the average thickness of most sliced breads. The Texas toast loaf itself is often more squarish compared to most sliced breads which have a more curved side and top. While Texas toast bread can be used in the same manner as ordinary bread slices such as in sandwiches, it is especially useful for dishes involving liquids, such as barbecue sauce, or where extra thickness could improve the product, such as French toast. In addition, the often increased thickness of the slices of Texas toast lets it retain moisture and softness better than regular sliced bread. It is usually a white bread although there are whole wheat varieties. Producers of Texas toast in the United States include Franz Bakery, Mrs. Baird’s, and Safeway/Lucerne Foods.

Popular in Texas and its bordering states, Texas toast is often served as a side with southern-style dishes such as chicken fried steak, fried catfish, or BBQ. Texas toast can also be used when making toasted sandwiches.

The actual toast itself is made by putting butter or margarine on both sides of the bread and broiling or grilling it until it is a lightly golden brown. Depending on the recipe, the spread may contain seasonings including garlic, yielding a form of garlic bread. The toast may include cheese on one or both sides, similar to an open-faced grilled cheese sandwich.

The best-selling varieties of Texas toast are frozen breads, sold with a garlic or garlic and cheese spread which is applied immediately after baking. The best selling brands are the New York Brand of the T. Marzetti Company, Pepperidge Farm, and Coles.

Mozzarella and Monterey Jack cheese Texas toasts

Some recipes suggest regular or thick-sliced bread be cooked in a frying pan alongside fried steak, bacon, or other meat product in order to absorb the grease from the meat (cf. fried bread).

One claimant to the invention of Texas toast is Kirby’s Pig Stand. The once-thriving chain, whose heyday in the 1940s saw over 100 locations across the United States, also claims to be the originator of the onion ring. Texas toast may have been first created in 1946 at the Pig Stand in Denton, Texas, after a bakery order for thicker slices of bread resulted in slices too thick for the toaster and a cook, Wiley W. W. Cross, suggested buttering and grilling them as a solution. Another Pig Stand cook in Beaumont, Texas claimed he created the idea of grilling the bread. W.W.W. Cross is also credited for combining the Texas toast with chicken fried steak to create Kirby’s Pig Stand’s famous Chicken Fried Steak Sandwich.

One of America’s Favorites – Chicago-Style Hot Dog

April 12, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Chicago-style hot dog

A Chicago-style hot dog, Chicago Dog, or Chicago Red Hot is an all-beef frankfurter on a poppy seed bun, originating from the city of Chicago, Illinois. The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard, chopped white onions, bright green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt. The complete assembly of a Chicago hot dog is said to be “dragged through the garden” due to the many toppings. The method for cooking the hot dog itself varies depending on the vendor’s preference. Most often they are steamed, water-simmered, or less often grilled over charcoal (in which case they are referred to as “char-dogs”).

The canonical recipe does not include ketchup, and there is a widely shared, strong opinion among many Chicagoans and aficionados that ketchup is unacceptable. A number of Chicago hot dog vendors do not offer ketchup as a condiment.

Many sources attribute the distinctive collection of toppings on a Chicago-style wiener to historic Maxwell Street and the “Depression Sandwich” reportedly originated by Fluky’s in 1929 The founders of Vienna Beef frankfurters—the most common brand served today, first sold at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago—and the proprietors of Fluky’s were both Jewish, which may account for the wieners’ pork-free, kosher-style character.

A char-dog with ends cut cervelat-style

The “dragged through the garden” style is heavily promoted by Vienna Beef and Red Hot Chicago, the two most prominent Chicago hot dog manufacturers, but exceptions are common, with vendors adding cucumber slices or lettuce, omitting poppyseeds or celery salt, or using plain relish or a skinless hot dog. Several popular hot dog stands serve a simpler version: a steamed natural-casing dog with only mustard, onions, plain relish and sport peppers, wrapped up with hand-cut french fries, while the historic Superdawg drive-ins notably substitute a pickled tomato for fresh. Many vendors, including Portillo’s, offer a Chicago-style dog with cheese sauce, known as a cheese-dog.

Chicago-style hot dogs are cooked in hot water or steamed before adding the toppings. A less common style is cooked on a charcoal grill and referred to as a “char-dog”. Char-dogs are easily identifiable because very often the ends of the dog are sliced in crisscross fashion before cooking, producing a distinctive cervelat-style “curled-x” shape as the dog cooks. Some hot dog stands, such as the Wieners Circle, only serve char-dogs.

The typical beef hot dog weighs 1/8 of a pound or 2 ounces (57 g) and the most traditional type features a natural casing, providing a distinctive “snap” when bitten.

The buns are a high-gluten variety made to hold up to steam warming, typically the S. Rosen’s Mary Ann brand from Alpha Baking Company.

Chicago-style hot dog at Portillo’s

The Chicago area has more hot dog restaurants than McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King restaurants combined. A “hot dog stand” in Chicago may serve many other items, including the Maxwell Street Polish, gyros, pork chop and Italian beef sandwiches, corn dogs, tamales, pizza puffs and Italian ice. The restaurants often have unique names, such as The Wieners Circle, Gene & Jude’s, Gold Coast Dogs or Mustard’s Last Stand; or architectural features, like Superdawg’s two giant rooftop hot dogs (Maurie and Flaurie, named for the husband-and-wife team who own the drive-in). One of the most popular vendors of the Chicago-style dog are Chicago’s professional sports teams; in fact, those sold at Wrigley Field are affectionately known as “Wrigley Dogs”.

Portillo’s is the top vendor of this variation of hot dog regionally. After Portillo’s, Boz Hot Dogs (aka Bozo’s) and Scooby’s Red Hots have the most locations and thus also are top vendors of Chicago Style Red Hots.

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Sam Cooks Kindness

whole-food, plant-based recipes

Living By Promise

God loving | Wife | Mother | Career. A lifestyle blog where all these titles meet

Tales from a 20-Something's Kitchen.

One girl's mission to take on Pinterest. And win. And eat some great food in the process.

A Bee Bakes

Making the world a sweeter place.

Cooking at Clark Towers

Home cook experiments with recipes and shares with you

Detoxinista

Healthy Comfort Food Recipes

Liv Free(ly) Vegan Recipes

vegan baking and cooking

Grill Nation - Recipes, Grills and Grilling Products

Grilling recipes, grilling techniques, grilling products

My Kitchen Little

A Home Cook's Handbook

Skiwampus

Sometimes your life isn't what you expected

Living Abundantly

A lifestyle blog sharing recipes, travel stories, book reviews, and the daily life of me.

The Crazy Peanut

Easy and healthy recipes

Be Healthy!

What you need to know to Be Healthy today!

Soup's On with Schallock

Enjoy cooking in your kitchen with less processed food.

Sportsloverann

Food, Travel