One of America’s Favorites – Cajun Cuisine

October 30, 2017 at 5:36 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Po’ boy sandwiches are associated with the cuisine of New Orleans.

Cajun cuisine (French: Cuisine cadienne, [kɥizin kadʒæ̃n]) is a style of cooking named for the French-speaking Acadian people deported by the British from Acadia in Canada to the Acadiana region of Louisiana. It is what could be called a rustic cuisine; locally available ingredients predominate and preparation is simple.

An authentic Cajun meal is usually a three-pot affair, with one pot dedicated to the main dish, one dedicated to steamed rice, special made sausages, or some seafood dish, and the third containing whatever vegetable is plentiful or available. Shrimp and pork sausage are staple meats used in a variety of dishes.

The aromatic vegetables green bell pepper (poivron), onion, and celery are called the holy trinity by Cajun chefs in Cajun and Louisiana Creole cuisines. Roughly diced and combined in cooking, the method is similar to the use of the mirepoix in traditional French cuisine which blends roughly diced onion, celery and carrot. Characteristic aromatics for the Creole version may also include parsley, bay leaf, green onions, dried cayenne pepper, and dried black pepper.

Around 1755, Acadians were forced out of their settlements by the British, and as a result, they migrated in 1755 in what was called le Grand Dérangement, eventually settling in Southern Louisiana. Due to the extreme change in climate, Acadians were unable to cook their original dishes. Soon, their former culinary traditions were lost, and so, these other meals developed to become what is now considered classic Cajun cuisine traditions (not to be confused with the more modern concept associated with Prudhomme’s style). Up through the 20th century, the meals were not elaborate but instead, rather basic. The public’s false perception of “Cajun” cuisine was based on Prudhomme’s style of Cajun cooking, which was spicy, flavorful, and not true to the classic form of the cuisine. Cajun and Creole label have been mistaken to be the same, but the origins of Creole cooking began in New Orleans, and Cajun cooking came 40 years after the establishment of New Orleans down south on the bayou. Today, most restaurants serve dishes that consist of Cajun styles, which Paul Prudhomme dubbed “Louisiana cooking”.In home-cooking, these individual styles are still kept separate. However, there are fewer and fewer people cooking the classic Cajun dishes that would have been eaten by the original settlers.

Boudin that has been smoked

Primary Cajun Dishes Favorites
Boudin is a type of sausage made from pork, pork liver, rice, garlic, green onions and other spices. It is widely available by the link or pound from butcher shops. Boudin is typically stuffed in a natural casing and has a softer consistency than other, better-known sausage varieties. It is usually served with side dishes such as rice dressing, maque choux or bread. Boudin balls are commonly served in southern Louisiana restaurants and are made by taking the boudin out of the case and frying it in spherical form.

Gumbo – High on the list of favorites of Cajun cooking are the soups called gumbos. Contrary to non-Cajun or

Seafood gumbo

Continental beliefs, gumbo does not mean simply “everything in the pot”. Gumbo exemplifies the influence of French, Spanish, African and Native American food cultures on Cajun cuisine. The name originally meant okra, a word brought to the region from western Africa. Okra which can be one of the principal ingredients in gumbo recipes is used as a thickening agent and for its distinct vegetable flavor. Many claim that Gumbo is a “Cajun” dish, but Gumbo was established long before the Acadian arrival. Its early existence came via the early French Creole culture In New Orleans, Louisiana, where French, Spanish and Africans frequented and also influenced by later waves of Italian, German and Irish settlers.

A filé gumbo is thickened with dried sassafras leaves after the stew has finished cooking, a practice borrowed from the Choctaw Indians. The backbone of a gumbo is roux of which there are two variations: Cajun, a golden brown roux, and Creole, a dark roux, which is made of flour, toasted until well-browned, and fat or oil. The classic gumbo is made with chicken and the Cajun sausage called andouille, pronounced {ahn-doo-wee}, but the ingredients vary according to what is available.

Jambalaya – Another classic Cajun dish is jambalaya. The only certain thing that can be said about a jambalaya is that it contains rice, some sort of meat (such as chicken or beef), seafood (such as shrimp or crawfish) or almost anything else. Usually, however, one will find green peppers, onions, celery, tomatoes and hot chili peppers. Anything else is optional. This is also a great pre-Acadian dish, established by the Spanish in Louisiana.

Rice and gravy – Rice and gravy dishes are a staple of Cajun cuisine and is usually a brown gravy based on pan drippings, which are deglazed and simmered with extra seasonings and served over steamed or boiled rice. The dish is traditionally made from cheaper cuts of meat and cooked in a cast iron pot, typically for an extended time period in order to let the tough cuts of meat become tender. Beef, pork, chicken or any of a large variety of game meats are used for its preparation. Popular local varieties include hamburger steak, smothered rabbit, turkey necks, and chicken fricassee.

Cajun Cuisine Food as an event
Crawfish boil

Louisiana-style crawfish boil

Louisiana-style crawfish boil

The crawfish boil is a celebratory event where Cajuns boil crawfish, potatoes, onions and corn in large pots over propane cookers. Lemons and small muslin bags containing a mixture of bay leaves, mustard seeds, cayenne pepper and other spices, commonly known as “crab boil” or “crawfish boil” are added to the water for seasoning. The results are then dumped onto large, newspaper-draped tables and in some areas covered in Creole / Cajun spice blends, such as REX, Zatarain’s, Louisiana Fish Fry or Tony Chachere’s. Also, Cocktail sauce, mayonnaise and hot sauce are sometimes used. The seafood is scooped onto large trays or plates and eaten by hand. During times when crawfish are not abundant, shrimp and crabs are prepared and served in the same manner.

Attendees are encouraged to “suck the head” of a crawfish by separating the abdomen of the crustacean and sucking out the abdominal fat/juices.

Often, newcomers to the crawfish boil or those unfamiliar with the traditions are jokingly warned “not to eat the dead ones”. This comes from the common belief that when live crawfish are boiled, their tails curl beneath themselves, but when dead crawfish are boiled, their tails are straight and limp. Seafood boils with crabs and shrimp are also popular.

Family Boucherie

Cornbread is a staple Cajun starch

A traditional “boucherie” near Eunice
The traditional Cajun outdoor food event hosted by a farmer in the rural areas of the Acadiana. Family and friends of the farmer gather to socialize, play games, dance, drink, and have a copious meal consisting of hog and other dishes. Men have the task of slaughtering a hog, cutting it into usable parts, and cooking the main pork dishes while women have the task of making boudin.

Cochon de Lait
Similar to a family boucherie, the cochon de lait is a food event that revolves around pork but does not need to be hosted by a farmer. Traditionally, a suckling pig was purchased for the event, but in modern cochon de laits, adult pigs are used. Unlike the family boucherie, a hog is not butchered by the hosts and there are generally not as many guests or activities. The host and male guests have the task of roasting the pig while female guests bring side dishes.

Rural Mardi Gras
The traditional Cajun Mardi Gras (see: Courir de Mardi Gras) is a Mardi Gras celebration in rural Cajun Parishes. The tradition originated in the 18th century with the Cajuns of Louisiana, but it was abandoned in the early 20th century because of unwelcome violence associated with the event. In the early 1950s the tradition was revived in Mamou in Evangeline Parish.

The event revolves around male maskers on horseback who ride into the countryside to collect food ingredients for the party later on. They entertain householders with Cajun music, dancing, and festive antics in return for the ingredients. The preferred ingredient is a live chicken in which the householder throws the chicken to allow the maskers to chase it down (symbolizing a hunt), but other ingredients include rice, sausage, vegetables, or frozen chicken. Unlike other Cajun events, men take no part in cooking the main course for the party, and women prepare the chicken and ingredients for the gumbo.

Once the festivities begin, the Cajun community members eat and dance to Cajun music until midnight, as the beginning of Lent.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Rice and Gravy

November 16, 2015 at 5:47 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Smothered turkey with rice and gravy

Smothered turkey with rice and gravy

Rice and gravy is a staple of Louisiana Creole and Cajun cuisine and is usually a brown gravy based on pan drippings, which are deglazed and simmered with extra seasonings and served over steamed or boiled rice.

 
Rice has been a major agricultural export crop in southwest Louisiana since the late 1800s and has become a staple of local cuisine in dishes such as boudin, gumbo and étouffée. Rice and gravy is traditionally made from cheaper cuts of meat and cooked in a cast iron pot, typically for an extended time period in order to let the tough cuts of meat become tender. Beef, pork, chicken or any other meat can be used in its preparation. Fattier meats such as fatty cuts of beef and pork, chicken, squirrel, rabbit, turkey necks, wild pig, and duck lend themselves more easily to the making of the gravy, while other leaner meats such as venison and lean cuts of beef and pork are more difficult. This problem is solved by the addition of sausage such as andouille or cured pork tasso to the dish during the browning or smothering process. Often the meat is cooked with the Cajun Holy trinity, a mirepoix variant of onions, bell peppers, and celery in roughly equal quantities, although other vegetables can also be used. Originally a dish favored by farmers and laborers, it is now often served in local plate lunch houses.

 

 

Raised on Rice and Gravy, a 2009 documentary film by Conni Castille and Allison Bohl, chronicles the prevalence of the dish at local plate lunch houses and its enduring popularity in Acadiana cuisine. Abbeville native Bobby Charles’ Rice ‘N’ Gravy Records is named for the popular dish. Acadian Village in Lafayette is home to the annual “Rice and Gravy Cook-Off” sponsored by the Louisiana Beef Council.

 

Cajun Sautéed Red Snapper

March 1, 2014 at 10:37 AM | Posted in fish | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Rikki – Doo for passing this one along!
Cajun Sautéed Red Snapper

Ingredients:

1 pound Red Snapper
1 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon crushed dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon crushed dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon crushed dried basil
1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
1 lemon, juiced
1 tablespoon white distilled vinegar
1/8 teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1 lime, cut into wedges

Cooking Directions:

Rinse fish, drain and set aside.
In a small bowl, combine paprika, pepper, cumin, cayenne, thyme, oregano and basil. Heat a 10-inch nonstick pan or skillet on medium heat. Add spice mixture and toast, stirring constantly, for 30 to 50 seconds or until fragrant.
Add garlic and cook, stirring constantly, 1 minute. Add fish, lemon juice, vinegar and sea salt. Cover, reduce heat to low, and cook 3 minutes. Turn fish over and cook for another 5 minutes or until fish is tender. Raise heat to reduce some of the liquid.
Transfer to a serving plate and spoon on spicy juices. Serve with parsley and lime wedges.
Makes 3 servings.

Seafood Gumbo and Cornbread

January 21, 2013 at 6:22 PM | Posted in scallops, Sea Salt, seafood, shrimp, spices and herbs | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Seafood Gumbo and CornbreadSeafod Gumbo 007

What a wild day outside today! We have a wind chill in the single digits along with snow squalls. There’s been two different major car pile – ups due to white out conditions. One pile up had about 50 cars and another between 70-80 cars! Great day to stay in and stay warm! For dinner I prepared Seafood Gumbo and Cornbread. I used my last frozen Gumbo I had so I’ll have to make a fresh batch soon! This Gumbo freezes up and reheats so good.
To make it I used Luzianne Gumbo Dinner Kit. It contains a packet that contains the Rice, Vegetables, Seasoning, and Roux Mix. I added Shrimp, Crawfish, Scallops, and Langostino Lobster Tail Meat Pieces. The Crawfish Tail was leftover from a previous order I had purchased from The Cajun Grocer and I purchase my bags of Lobster from Jungle Jim’s Market. The Seafood goes perfect with the Luzianne Roux! This is the second time I’ve added the Langostino Lobster Tail Meat Pieces. It fits in perfect, the sweetness of the Lobster Meat and the heat of the Red Pepper and Hot Sauce was a perfect match! Plus as always I have a lot leftover to freeze and have later. I left the recipe and Gumbo description at the end of the post. For a side I baked a small skillet of Martha White Cornbread of to go along with the Gumbo and soak up some of that wonderful Roux. For dessert later a slice of Pillsbury Nut Quick Bread topped with a scoop of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla ice Cream.

Seafood Gumbo

Ingredients:
Scallops, Shrimp, Lobster, Crawfish Tail
1 Pound of Shrimp, Crawfish, Lobster, and Sea Scallops

6 Cups of Water

2 Tablespoons of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Pepper, Sea Salt for seasoning

1 Box of Luzianne Gumbo Dinner Kit
Directions:

*In a 4-5 Quart pot,bring water and Olive Oil to a boil

*Add Luzianne Gumbo while stirring

*Empty half of the Red Pepper Packet into the Gumbo. Put remainder aside.

*Reduce Heat , Cover and simmer for 18 minutes. Meanwhile cut the Sea Scallops in half if their Jumbo size, peel the raw Shrimp, if needed.

*Taste, and if desired, add remaining Red Pepper from packet and Sea Salt. Add the Shrimp, Scallops, Crawfish, and Lobster. Cover and continue to simmer for 7 – 9 more minutes. Serve.
Luzianne Gumbo Dinner Kit

Description:
Gumbo is a thick Cajun “soup,” containing any combination of vegetables, meats, poultry or seafood and served over rice. Just add chicken, seafood or meat to complete a full meal for your entire family in less than 30 minutes.

Ingredients:
Rice, Red and Green Bell Peppers, Modified Food Starch, Flour, Onion, Natural Flavors, Hydrolyzed Soy Protein, Paprika, Salt, Monosodium Glutamate, Celery, Garlic Spices, Red Pepper, Sugar, Carmel Color, Sodium Sulfite As A Preservative.

Directions:
You can turn ordinary chicken, meat or seafood into exciting meals easily with Luzianne Cajun and Creole Dinners. Each Dinner is a blend of rice, authentic Cajun or Creole seasonings and chipped vegetables. All you do is add your own chicken, meat, or seafood, simmer for 25 minutes and serve. There’s a separate red pepper packet to add Cajun spice to suit your taste.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1/5 box (45.4 g)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 160Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1.0g2%
Saturated Fat 0.0g0%
Sodium 760mg32%
Total Carbohydrates 33.0g11%
Dietary Fiber 1.0g4%
Sugars 3.0g
Protein 4.0g

Seafood Gumbo and Cornbread

November 26, 2012 at 6:36 PM | Posted in gumbo, scallops, Sea Salt, seafood, shrimp | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Seafood Gumbo and Cornbread

 

 

I wanted Seafood and I wanted it in a hearty and healthy Gumbo. So I broke out the Luzianne Gumbo Dinner Kit. It contains a packet that contains the Rice, Vegetables, Seasoning, and Roux Mix. I cleared the freezer to make this grabbing anything Seafood! I added Shrimp, Crawfish, Scallops, and Langostino Lobster Tail Meat Pieces. The Crawfish Tail was leftover from a previous order I had purchased from The Cajun Grocer and I purchased the bag of Lobster from Jungle Jim’s market. The Seafood mixed in with the Roux, too good! This was the first time I added the Langostino Lobster Tail Meat Pieces. It fit in perfect the sweetness of the Lobster Meat and the heat of the Red Pepper and Hot Sauce was a perfect match! Plus a lot leftover to freeze and have later. I left the recipe and Gumbo description at the end of the post. For a side I baked a small skillet of Cornbread of to go along with the Gumbo and soak up some of that wonderful Roux. I used Martha White For dessert later a slice of fresh baked Pillsbury Nut Quick Bread.

 

Seafood Gumbo

Ingredients:

Scallops, Shrimp, Lobster, Crawfish Tail

1 Pound of Shrimp, Crawfish, Lobster, and Sea Scallops

6 Cups of Water

2 Tablespoons of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Pepper, Sea Salt for seasoning

1 Box of Luzianne Gumbo Dinner Kit
Directions:

*In a 4-5 Quart pot,bring water and Olive Oil to a boil

*Add Luzianne Gumbo while stirring

*Empty half of the Red Pepper Packet into the Gumbo. Put remainder aside.

*Reduce Heat , Cover and simmer for 18 minutes. Meanwhile cut the Sea Scallops in half if their Jumbo size, peel the raw Shrimp, if needed.

*Taste, and if desired, add remaining Red Pepper from packet and Sea Salt. Add the Shrimp, Scallops, Crawfish, and Lobsterand. Cover and continue to simmer for 7 – 9 more minutes. Serve.

 
Luzianne Gumbo Dinner Kit

Description:
Gumbo is a thick Cajun “soup,” containing any combination of vegetables, meats, poultry or seafood and served over rice. Just add chicken, seafood or meat to complete a full meal for your entire family in less than 30 minutes.

Ingredients:
Rice, Red and Green Bell Peppers, Modified Food Starch, Flour, Onion, Natural Flavors, Hydrolyzed Soy Protein, Paprika, Salt, Monosodium Glutamate, Celery, Garlic Spices, Red Pepper, Sugar, Carmel Color, Sodium Sulfite As A Preservative.

Directions:
You can turn ordinary chicken, meat or seafood into exciting meals easily with Luzianne Cajun and Creole Dinners. Each Dinner is a blend of rice, authentic Cajun or Creole seasonings and chipped vegetables. All you do is add your own chicken, meat, or seafood, simmer for 25 minutes and serve. There’s a separate red pepper packet to add Cajun spice to suit your taste.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1/5 box (45.4 g)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 160Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1.0g2%
Saturated Fat 0.0g0%
Sodium 760mg32%
Total Carbohydrates 33.0g11%
Dietary Fiber 1.0g4%
Sugars 3.0g
Protein 4.0g

Shrimp, Scallop, and Crawfish Gumbo

August 3, 2012 at 5:50 PM | Posted in gumbo, low calorie, low carb, scallops, seafood, shrimp | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Shrimp, Scallop, Crawfish Gumbo
Gumbo for dinner tonight! If you want a quick but yet delicious and thick Gumbo you’ll have to try Luzianne Gumbo Dinner Kit. It contains a packet that contains the Rice, Vegetables, Seasoning, and Roux Mix. I added Shrimp, Crawfish, Scallops, Potatoes, and Mini Carrots. It was the first time I used Crawfish. I purchased it when I ordered the Gator Meat from the Cajun Grocer on-line the other day. The Crawfish Tail fit right in with the Shrimp and Scallops. It came out delicious! The Seafood and the Roux too good! Plus a lot leftover to freeze and have later. I left the recipe and Gumbo description at the end of the post. We had a side of Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread to go along with the Gumbo and soak up some of that wonderful Roux. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

Ingredients

1 Pound of Shrimp, Crawfish, and Sea Scallops

2 Small Russet Potatoes (Diced)

10 or more Mini Carrots

6 Cups of Water

2 Tablespoons of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Pepper, Sea Salt for seasoning

1 Box of Luzianne Gumbo Dinner Kit

*Dice the Russet Potatoes and microwave for 4 minutes to soften

*In a 4-5 Quart pot,bring water and Olive Oil to a boil

*Add Luzianne Gumbo while stirring

*Empty half of the Red Pepper Packet into the Gumbo. Put remainder aside.

*Reduce Heat , Cover and simmer for 18 minutes. Meanwhile cut the Sea Scallops in half, peel the raw Shrimp.

*Taste, and if desired, add remaining Red Pepper from packet and Sea Salt. Add the Shrimp, Scallops, Crawfish, Mini carrots and Potatoes. Cover and continue to simmer for 7 more minutes.

 

Luzianne Gumbo Dinner Kit

Description:
Gumbo is a thick Cajun “soup,” containing any combination of vegetables, meats, poultry or seafood and served over rice. Just add chicken, seafood or meat to complete a full meal for your entire family in less than 30 minutes.

Ingredients:
Rice, Red and Green Bell Peppers, Modified Food Starch, Flour, Onion, Natural Flavors, Hydrolyzed Soy Protein, Paprika, Salt, Monosodium Glutamate, Celery, Garlic Spices, Red Pepper, Sugar, Carmel Color, Sodium Sulfite As A Preservative.

Directions:
You can turn ordinary chicken, meat or seafood into exciting meals easily with Luzianne Cajun and Creole Dinners. Each Dinner is a blend of rice, authentic Cajun or Creole seasonings and chipped vegetables. All you do is add your own chicken, meat, or seafood, simmer for 25 minutes and serve. There’s a separate red pepper packet to add Cajun spice to suit your taste.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1/5 box (45.4 g)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 160Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1.0g2%
Saturated Fat 0.0g0%
Sodium 760mg32%
Total Carbohydrates 33.0g11%
Dietary Fiber 1.0g4%
Sugars 3.0g
Protein 4.0g

The Great Gator Trial!

July 28, 2012 at 11:51 AM | Posted in cooking, Food | 1 Comment
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Well on this Saturday at noon I tried Gator Meat for thr first time and loved it! I had heard it tastes similar to Chicken and it does. I think the meat might be a bit tougher than Chicken but besides that it seemed pretty much the same.

I purchased the Gator on line from http://www.cajungrocer.com/ I purchased the Alligator Nuggets – BREADED 2 Pound bag. I fried the Gator in Extra Virgin Olive Oil about 4 minutes per side. The breading is fantastic! Thin breading and it fries up golden brown and the seasoning is perfect on it. It’s spicy with a hint of heat but not over powering. I served it with a Boar’s Head Savory Remoulade Sauce for dipping. I’m a Gator Meat fan as of today! i also purchased some Crawfish that I’m going to fix maybe later this week. plenty of the Gator left also. The Cajun Grocer web site is loaded with great Cajun food, sides, spices and recipes. A-1 servive also along with fair shipping rates. Here at the bottom of the post I’ll leave the Cajun Grocer info along with the Gator Meat info. You got to give this a try!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over 1,000 Authentic Cajun Food Products!

Here at Cajun Grocer we carry over 1,000 Authentic Cajun and Creole Food Products including Fresh Cajun Boudin, delicious Mardi Gras King Cakes, select Crawfish, and of course our world famous award winning Turducken – voted best Turducken by The Wall Street Journal. So enjoy your visit here at Cajun Grocer, where the food is fresh and the people are friendly.

Cajun Food

Most people think of Cajun food as being extremely spicy, blackened foods. This couldn’t be further from the truth. True Cajun style cooking utilizes fresh, quality ingredients paired to create complementary flavors without the need for lots of seasoning. Additionally, Cajun food should never be overcooked. However, some dishes should be thoroughly cooked, allowing the flavors to meld together over time.

If you want the freshest authentic Cajun food available, you’re going to want to start from scratch with the freshest ingredients. Our fresh Cajun food products are shipped from Louisiana in a custom-printed cooler packed with dry ice to ensure freshness when they arrive at your door.
Whether it’s standard Cajun delights like gulf shrimp, fresh sausage, gumbos or stuffed breads, or more adventurous dishes like alligator, jambalaya, boudin, crawfish etouffee and live crawfish, you won’t be disappointed in the quality of our fresh food products. All of our fresh Cajun food products are shipped in dry ice for the freshest delivery possible.

 

http://www.cajungrocer.com/

 
Alligator Nuggets – BREADED

Our farm raised alligator nuggets (a.k.a. alligator bites) are breaded or pre battered. Best prepared by deep frying. Enjoy!

Cooking instructions: Fry at 350 for 5-7 minutes until golden brown.

Fried Alligator

Ingredients:

1/2 pound alligator meat, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
Louisiana Fish Fry batter, for coating
Cooking oil, for frying Salt and freshly ground black pepper
Serving suggestions: remoulade, creole mustard, or cocktail sauce

Prepartion:

Fill a deep pot halfway full with oil. Heat to 360 degrees F. Coat the alligator meat with the fish batter. Fry for 2 to 3 minutes, until gator floats in oil. Remove and add salt and pepper to taste. Serve as an appetizer with remoulade sauce, mustard sauce, or cocktail sauce for dipping.

http://www.cajungrocer.com/alligator-nuggets-breaded-226.html

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