One of America’s Favorites – French Toast

November 11, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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French toast served at a restaurant

French toast is a dish made of sliced bread soaked in eggs and milk, then fried. Alternative names and variants include eggy bread, Bombay toast, German toast, gypsy toast, poor knights (of Windsor), torrija and Arme Riddere.

The earliest known reference to French toast is in the Apicius, a collection of Latin recipes dating to the 4th or 5th century, where it is described as simply aliter dulcia (“another sweet dish”). The recipe says to “slice fine white bread, remove the crust, and break it into large pieces. Soak these pieces in milk and beaten egg, fry in oil, and cover with honey before serving.”

A fourteenth-century German recipe uses the name Arme Ritter (“poor knights”), a name also used in English and the Nordic languages. Also in the fourteenth century, Taillevent presented a recipe for “tostées dorées”. Italian 15th-century culinary expert Martino da Como offers a recipe.

The usual French name is pain perdu, “lost bread”, reflecting its use of stale or otherwise “lost” bread — which gave birth to the metaphoric term pain perdu for sunk costs. It may also be called pain doré, “golden bread”, in Canada. There are fifteenth-century English recipes for pain perdu

An Austrian and Bavarian term is pafese or pofese, from zuppa pavese, referring to Pavia, Italy. The word “soup” in the dish’s name refers to bread soaked in a liquid, a sop. In Hungary, it is commonly called bundáskenyér (lit. “furry bread”).

French toast topped with fruit, butter and cream, served with maple syrup.

Slices of bread are soaked or dipped in a mixture of beaten eggs, often whisked with milk or cream. Sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla may be variously added to the mixture. The bread is then fried in butter or olive oil until browned and cooked through. Day-old bread is often used, both for its thrift and because it will soak up more egg mixture without falling apart.

The cooked slices may be served with sugar or sweet toppings such as jam, honey, fruit, or maple syrup.

According to the Compleat Cook (1659) as quoted in the OED, the bread was dipped in milk only, with the egg mixture added afterwards.

Alternatively, the bread may be soaked in wine, rosewater, or orange juice, either before or after cooking.

French toast was popularly served in railroad dining cars of the early and mid-20th century. The Santa Fe was especially known for its French toast, and most of the railroads provided recipes of these and other dining car offerings to the public as a promotional feature.

 

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Cinnamon Sugared Pumpkin-Pecan Muffins for Diabetics

October 31, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | 4 Comments
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is Cinnamon Sugared Pumpkin-Pecan Muffins for Diabetics. This is just one of the many Diabetic Friendly Desserts that you can find at the Diabetes Self Management website. Along with all the Diabetic Friendly Recipes at the Diabetes Self Management website you’ll find Diabetes Management Tips, Diabetes News, and more! Plus you can subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine, one of my favorites. Each issue is packed with Diabetes Friendly Recipes and Diabetes News and Tips. I’ve left a link to subscribe to it at the end of the post. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Cinnamon Sugared Pumpkin-Pecan Muffins for Diabetics
Ingredients
8 tablespoons sugar, divided
2 1/2 to 3 teaspoons ground cinnamon, divided
1 cup 100% bran cereal
1 cup fat-free (skim) milk
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup solid-pack pumpkin
1 egg, beaten
1 tablespoon vanilla
1 package (2 ounces) pecan chips (1/2 cup)

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 400°F. Spray 12 standard (2 1/2-inch) nonstick muffin cups with nonstick cooking spray. Combine 2 tablespoons sugar and 1/2 to 1 teaspoon cinnamon in small bowl for topping; set aside.

2 – Combine cereal and milk in large bowl; set aside 5 minutes to soften. Meanwhile, combine flour, remaining 6 tablespoons sugar, remaining cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in large bowl; mix well.

3 – Whisk pumpkin, egg, and vanilla into cereal mixture. Gently fold in flour mixture just until blended. Do not overmix. Spoon equal amounts of batter into prepared muffin cups; sprinkle evenly with pecan chips. Sprinkle with cinnamon-sugar topping.

4 – Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until toothpick inserted into centers comes out clean. Cool on wire rack 3 minutes. Remove from pan to wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Yield: 12 servings.

Serving size: 1 muffin.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 141 calories, Carbohydrates: 24 g, Protein: 4 g, Fat: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 18 mg, Sodium: 335 mg, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/cinnamon-sugared-pumpkin-pecan-muffins/

 

 


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Breakfast Sausage Pizza

October 23, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in breakfast, CooksRecipes, pizza | Leave a comment
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It just seems like a Pizza type of day. So I’m passing along another Pizza recipe, Breakfast Sausage Pizza. I’ve always been a fan of cold leftover Pizza for Breakfast so why not have a real Pizza to start the day! This Pizza is made using; Pork Sausage, Thick Cut Bacon, Eggs, Pizza Crust, Shredded Colby Jack Cheese, Onion, Italian Parsley, and Salt and Pepper. Pizza, Pizza, Pizza! You can find this recipe at the CooksRecipes website along with all the other delicious recipes. Be sure to the CooksRecipes site out, they have a huge selection of recipes to please all tastes! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Breakfast Sausage Pizza
Breakfast Sausage PizzaThe sausage in this breakfast pizza can be replaced with ground pork, diced ham, or chorizo. Serve with fresh seasonal fruit to complete this family-pleasing breakfast.

Recipe Ingredients:
6 ounces pork sausage, bulk
4 slices bacon, thick cut, cut in half
8 large eggs, beaten
1 (10-inch) pizza crust
1 cup colby Jack cheese, shredded
1/2 cup onion, thinly sliced
1/4 cup Italian (flat-leaf) parsley, snipped
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

Cooking Directions:
1 – In a large skillet cook sausage, bacon, and onions over medium-high heat until browned and cooked through (about 10 to 15 minutes). Remove with slotted spoon and set aside. Remove all but 1 teaspoon of drippings from pan. Add eggs, parsley, and seasonings, stirring to scramble. Stir while cooking for 2 to 3 minutes or until eggs are just set.
2 – Meanwhile, place pizza crust on a pizza pan or baking sheet and top with 1/2 cup of the cheese. Place in a preheated 400°F (205°C) oven for 3 to 5 minutes until cheese is melted. Remove crust and top with eggs, sausage, and onions. Top with bacon and remaining cheese. Return to oven until cheese is melted and bacon is crisp.
3 – Garnish with additional parsley, if desired. Slice to serve.

Makes 8 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/pizza_recipes/breakfast_sausage_pizza_recipe.html

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Herbed Spinach Quiche Portabella Caps

October 21, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Meatless Monday | 1 Comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is a Herbed Spinach Quiche Portabella Caps. Made using Portabella Mushroom Caps, Eggs, Egg Whites, Whole Wheat Grated Bread Crumbs, Nonfat Milk, Mrs. Dash Low-Sodium Garlic and Herb Blend, Frozen Spinach, and Reduced Fat Parmesan Cheese.190 calories per serving. The recipe comes from the CooksRecipes website which has a huge selection of recipes to please all tastes. Be sure to check the CooksRecipes site out soon. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Herbed Spinach Quiche Portabella Caps
Recipe Ingredients:
4 portabella mushrooms, 3-inches in diameter
Cooking spray
3 large eggs
6 large egg whites
1/2 cup whole wheat grated bread crumbs (panko)
1/2 cup nonfat milk
1 teaspoon low-sodium garlic and herb blend (such as Mrs. Dash)
1 cup cooked chopped frozen spinach, drained with excess liquid squeezed out
1/2 cup reduced-fat Parmesan cheese – divided use

Cooking Directions:
1 – Place oven rack in center of oven; preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).
2 – Remove portabella stems; wipe clean with damp paper towel. Spray baking sheet with cooking spray, and place mushroom caps on baking sheet.
3 – In a mixing bowl, whisk together all remaining ingredients, except 1 tablespoon Parmesan cheese.
4 – Coat 10-inch non-stick pan with cooking spray and heat over medium flame. Cook and scramble egg mixture until it just starts to thicken. Remove from heat.
5 – Using a large spoon, scoop partially-cooked, hot egg mixture into portabella caps. Sprinkle tops with remaining Parmesan cheese.
6 – Bake about 20 minutes. Serve immediately.
Makes 4 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/4 of recipe): Calories: 190; Total Fat: 6g; Saturated Fat: 2g; Cholesterol: 145mg; Total Carbs: 14g; Fiber: 4g; Protein: 17g; Sodium: 330mg.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/herbed_spinach_quiche_portabella_caps_recipe.html

Diabetic Dessert of the Week -Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread

October 17, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread. What better Dessert for the Fall Season than a Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread! This Diabetic Friendly Dessert Recipe is only 142 calories and 9 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes Management Tips, Diabetes News, and more! So be sure to check it out soon. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Whole Wheat Pumpkin Bread
With only 142 calories and 10 grams of carbohydrate per serving, this scrumptious, low-carb bread is the perfect way to end your hectic day. Curl up on the couch and enjoy with a mug of tea or cocoa for a relaxing treat.

Preparation time: 10 minutes. Baking time: 50 minutes.

Ingredients
Nonstick cooking spray
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granular
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup pumpkin puree
1/2 cup canola oil
1 whole egg
1 egg white
1/3 cup water
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon allspice

Directions
Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray a 9″ x 5″ x 3″ loaf pan with nonstick cooking spray. In a large mixing bowl, combine all ingredients in the order listed, stirring after each addition. Stir only enough to combine ingredients into a smooth batter. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 45–50 minutes, until a cake tester inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean.

Yield: 10 servings.

Serving size: 1/10th of a loaf.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 142 calories, Carbohydrates: 10 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 10 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 21 mg, Sodium: 292 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/whole-wheat-pumpkin-bread/

Kitchen Hint of the Week!

October 10, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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Keep it cold…………….

When making Pies – Keep the ingredients cold. Butter should be kept refrigerated until using; solid vegetable shortening can be stored in the freezer without freezing hard as a rock. Also add ice cubes to a measuring cup and fill it with more water than you’ll need; add ice-cold water to the pastry mixture a tablespoon at a time.

Healthy Chicken Stir Fry Recipes

October 6, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Chicken Stir Fry Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Chicken Stir Fry Recipes with recipes including; Kung Pao Chicken with Bell Peppers, Chicken-Peanut Stir-Fry, and Sweet and Sour Chicken with Brown Rice. These are just 3 of recipes you’ll find at the EatingWell website! Be sure to check it out daily for all the Delicious and Healthy Recipes. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/


Healthy Chicken Stir Fry Recipes
Find healthy, delicious chicken stir fry recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Kung Pao Chicken with Bell Peppers
Here’s an easy chicken recipe you’ll definitely want to add to your dinner repertoire. A quick marinade tenderizes the chicken and infuses flavor in this healthy version of a take-out favorite. Adding a little oil to finish the marinade coats the chicken and helps keep it from sticking to the pan………………..

Chicken-Peanut Stir-Fry
There’s no need to order take-out when you can make this delicious meal at home. Using a ready-made broccoli slaw mix means there’s less vegetable prep time, so this chicken stir-fry with citrus-peanut sauce will be on your table that much faster………………

Sweet and Sour Chicken with Brown Rice
In about the time it takes to order and pick up Chinese takeout, you can make this much healthier version of sweet & sour chicken. Our version loses all the saturated fat that comes from deep-frying, along with the extra sugar and salt. If you prefer, use tofu instead of chicken, and use your favorite vegetables; just be sure to cut them into similar-size pieces so they all cook at about the same rate……………………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Chicken Stir Fry Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19372/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/stir-fry/

One of America’s Favorites – Bacon

September 23, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A strip of cooked side (streaky) bacon

Bacon is a type of salt-cured pork. Bacon is prepared from several different cuts of meat, typically from the pork belly or from back cuts, which have less fat than the belly. It is eaten on its own, as a side dish (particularly in breakfasts), or used as a minor ingredient to flavour dishes (e.g., the club sandwich). Bacon is also used for barding and larding roasts, especially game, including venison and pheasant. The word is derived from the Old High German bacho, meaning “buttock”, “ham” or “side of bacon”, and is cognate with the Old French bacon.

Meat from other animals, such as beef, lamb, chicken, goat, or turkey, may also be cut, cured, or otherwise prepared to resemble bacon, and may even be referred to as, for example, “turkey bacon”. Such use is common in areas with significant Jewish and Muslim populations as both religions prohibit the consumption of pork. Vegetarian bacons such as “soy bacon” also exist and attract vegetarians and vegans.

Cured side bacon in a pan

Bacon is cured through either a process of injecting with or soaking in brine, known as wet curing, or using plain crystal salt, known as dry curing. Bacon brine has added curing ingredients, most notably sodium nitrite (or less often, potassium nitrate), which speed the curing and stabilize color. Fresh bacon may then be dried for weeks or months in cold air, or it may be smoked or boiled. Fresh and dried bacon are typically cooked before eating, often by pan frying. Boiled bacon is ready to eat, as is some smoked bacon, but they may be cooked further before eating. Differing flavours can be achieved by using various types of wood, or less common fuels such as corn cobs or peat. This process can take up to eighteen hours, depending on the intensity of the flavor desired. The Virginia Housewife (1824), thought to be one of the earliest American cookbooks, gives no indication that bacon is ever not smoked, though it gives no advice on flavoring, noting only that care should be taken lest the fire get too hot. In early American history, the curing and smoking of bacon (like the making of sausage) seems to have been one of the few food-preparation processes not divided by gender.

Bacon is distinguished from other salt-cured pork by differences in the cuts of meat used and in the brine or dry packing. Historically, the terms “ham” and “bacon” referred to different cuts of meat that were brined or packed identically, often together in the same barrel. Today, ham is defined as coming from the hind portion of the pig and brine specifically for curing ham includes a greater amount of sugar, while bacon is less sweet, though ingredients such as brown sugar or maple syrup are used for flavor. Bacon is similar to salt pork, which in modern times is often prepared from similar cuts, but salt pork is never smoked, and has a much higher salt content.

For safety, bacon may be treated to prevent trichinosis, caused by Trichinella, a parasitic roundworm which can be destroyed by heating, freezing, drying, or smoking. Sodium polyphosphates, such as sodium triphosphate, may also be added to make the product easier to slice and to reduce spattering when the bacon is pan-fried.

Varieties differ depending on the primal cut from which they are prepared. Different cuts of pork are used for making bacon depending on local preferences.

Uncured pork belly

* Side bacon, or streaky bacon, comes from the pork belly. It has long alternating layers of fat and muscle running parallel to the rind. This is the most common form of bacon in the United States.
* Pancetta is an Italian form of side bacon, sold smoked or unsmoked (aqua). It is generally rolled up into cylinders after curing, and is known for having a strong flavor.
* Back bacon contains meat from the loin in the middle of the back of the pig. It is a leaner cut, with less fat compared to side bacon. Most bacon consumed in the United Kingdom and Ireland is back bacon.
* Collar bacon is taken from the back of a pig near the head.
* Cottage bacon is made from the lean meat from a boneless pork shoulder that is typically tied into an oval shape.
* Jowl bacon is cured and smoked cheeks of pork. Guanciale is an Italian jowl bacon that is seasoned and dry cured but not smoked.
The inclusion of skin with a cut of bacon, known as the ‘bacon rind’, varies, though is less common in the English-speaking world.

The term bacon on its own generally refers to side bacon, which is the most popular type of bacon sold in the US. Back bacon is known as “Canadian bacon” or “Canadian-style bacon”, and is usually sold pre-cooked and thick-sliced. American bacons include varieties smoked with hickory, mesquite or applewood and flavourings such as chili pepper, maple, brown sugar, honey, or molasses. A side of unsliced bacon is known as “slab bacon”.

Grilled pork belly

The United States and Canada have seen an increase in the popularity of bacon and bacon-related recipes, dubbed “bacon mania”. The sale of bacon in the US has increased significantly since 2011. Sales climbed 9.5% in 2013, making it an all-time high of nearly $4 billion in US. In a survey conducted by Smithfield, 65% of Americans would support bacon as their “national food”. Dishes such as bacon explosion, chicken fried bacon, and chocolate-covered bacon have been popularised over the internet, as has using candied bacon. Recipes spread quickly through both countries’ national media, culinary blogs, and YouTube. Restaurants have organised and are organising bacon and beer tasting nights, The New York Times reported on bacon infused with Irish whiskey used for Saint Patrick’s Day cocktails, and celebrity chef Bobby Flay has endorsed a “Bacon of the Month” club online, in print, and on national television.

Commentators explain this surging interest in bacon by reference to what they deem American cultural characteristics. Sarah Hepola, in a 2008 article in Salon.com, suggests a number of reasons, one of them being that eating bacon in the modern, health-conscious world is an act of rebellion: “Loving bacon is like shoving a middle finger in the face of all that is healthy and holy while an unfiltered cigarette smoulders between your lips.” She also suggests bacon is sexy (with a reference to Sarah Katherine Lewis’ book Sex and Bacon), kitsch, and funny. Hepola concludes by saying that “Bacon is American”.

Alison Cook, writing in the Houston Chronicle, argues the case of bacon’s American citizenship by referring to historical and geographical uses of bacon. Early American literature echoes the sentiment—in Ebenezer Cooke’s 1708 poem The Sot-Weed Factor, a satire of life in early colonial America, the narrator already complains that practically all the food in America was bacon-infused.

On 1 February 2017, The Ohio Pork Council released a report that demand for pork belly (bacon) product is outpacing supply. As of December 2016 national frozen pork belly inventory totaled 17.8 million lb (8.1 million kg), the lowest level in 50 years.

Bacon and egg on toast, garnished with a strawberry

Bacon dishes include bacon and eggs, bacon, lettuce, and tomato (BLT) sandwiches, Cobb salad, and various bacon-wrapped foods, such as scallops, shrimp, and asparagus. Recently invented bacon dishes include chicken fried bacon, chocolate covered bacon, and the bacon explosion. Tatws Pum Munud is a traditional Welsh stew, made with sliced potatoes, vegetables and smoked bacon. Bacon jam and bacon marmalade are also commercially available.

In the US and Europe, bacon is commonly used as a condiment or topping on other foods, often in the form of bacon bits. Streaky bacon is more commonly used as a topping in the US on such items as pizza, salads, sandwiches, hamburgers, baked potatoes, hot dogs, and soups. In the US, sliced smoked back bacon is used less frequently than the streaky variety, but can sometimes be found on pizza, salads, and omelettes.

Bacon is also used in adaptations of dishes; for example, bacon wrapped meatloaf, and can be mixed in with green beans or served sautéed over spinach.

Bacon fat liquefies and becomes drippings when it is heated. Once cool, it firms into a form of lard. Bacon fat is flavourful and is used for various cooking purposes. Traditionally, bacon grease is saved in British and southern US cuisine, and used as a base for cooking and as an all-purpose flavouring, for everything from gravy to cornbread to salad dressing.

In Germany, Griebenschmalz is a popular spread made from bacon lard.

Bacon is often used for a cooking technique called barding consisting of laying or wrapping strips of bacon or other fats over a roast to provide additional fat to a lean piece of meat. It is often used for roast game birds, and is a traditional method of preparing beef filet mignon, which is wrapped in strips of bacon before cooking. The bacon itself may afterwards be discarded or served to eat, like cracklings. It may also be cut into lardons.

One teaspoon (4 g or 0.14 oz) of bacon grease has 38 calories (40 kJ/g). It is composed almost completely of fat, with very little additional nutritional value. Bacon fat is roughly 40% saturated. Despite the disputed health risks of excessive bacon grease consumption, it remains popular in the cuisine of the American South.

Alternatives
Several alternatives to and substitutes for bacon have been developed for those who cannot or prefer not to eat standard pork bacon.

Turkey bacon

Turkey bacon cooking in skillet.

Turkey bacon is an alternative to bacon. People may choose turkey bacon over real bacon due to health benefits, religious laws, or other reasons. It is lower in fat and food energy than bacon, but may be used in a similar manner (such as in a BLT sandwich).

The meat for turkey bacon comes from the whole turkey and can be cured or uncured, smoked, chopped, and reformed into strips that resemble bacon. Turkey bacon is cooked by pan-frying. Cured turkey bacon made from dark meat can be 90% fat free. The low fat content of turkey bacon means it does not shrink while being cooked and has a tendency to stick to the pan.

Macon
Macon is another alternative to bacon, produced by curing cuts of mutton in a manner similar to the production of pork bacon. Historically produced in Scotland, it was introduced across Britain during World War II as a consequence of rationing. It is today available as an alternative to bacon, produced for the Muslim market and sold at halal butchers; it is largely similar in appearance to pork bacon except for the darker color.

Vegetarian bacon
Vegetarian bacon, also referred to as facon, veggie bacon, or vacon, is a product marketed as a bacon alternative. It has no cholesterol, is low in fat, and contains large amounts of protein and fibre. Two slices contain about 310 kilojoules (74 kcal). Vegetarian bacon is usually made from marinated strips of textured soy protein or tempeh.

 

Healthy Chicken Sausage Recipes

September 22, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Chicken Sausage Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Chicken Sausage Recipes like; Mexican Breakfast Scramble, Chicken Sausage and Dirty Rice, and Potato, Sausage and Egg Breakfast. Find these Recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/


Healthy Chicken Sausage Recipes
Find healthy, delicious chicken sausage recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Mexican Breakfast Scramble
In this zesty Mexican-inspired recipe, queso fresco cheese, peppers, onion, chicken sausage, and eggs are cooked up with crisp corn tortilla pieces, and garnished with jalapeño and cilantro. You may not be able to eat this with your hands like a breakfast tortilla wrap, but trust us—you’ll enjoy every forkful!……………

Chicken Sausage and Dirty Rice
This Cajun-inspired main dish is made with spicy Andouille sausage and served over brown rice that’s been cooked with colorful chopped vegetables and cayenne pepper……………

Potato, Sausage and Egg Breakfast
This delicious, hearty breakfast takes almost no effort to prepare. This recipe will cook overnight in a slow cooker and all you need to do in the morning is prepare the poached eggs…………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Chicken Sausage Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18948/ingredients/meat-poultry/sausage/chicken/

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Turkey Chorizo Mac and Cheese

September 20, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is Turkey Chorizo Mac and Cheese. Made using JENNIE-O® Chorizo Seasoning Turkey Sausage along with Whole Grain Elbow Macaroni, Eggs, Milk, Seasonings, Bell Peppers, Black Beans, Corn, Cheddar Cheese, Monterey Jack Cheese, Butter, and Breadcrumbs. You can find this recipe along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

Turkey Chorizo Mac and Cheese
It’s time to turn up the heat on your homemade mac and cheese! Our Turkey Chorizo Mac and Cheese combines everything you love about baked mac and cheese recipes with the savory addition of black beans, bell peppers, and chorizo. Your family will love this easy, spicy take on classic comfort food.

INGREDIENTS
1½ cups whole grain elbow macaroni
1 large egg
¾ cup milk
½ teaspoon granulated garlic
½ teaspoon onion powder
1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Chorizo Seasoning Turkey Sausage
½ cup diced green bell pepper
½ cup diced red bell pepper
½ cup black beans, drained
½ cup corn
1½ cups shredded Cheddar cheese
1½ cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1½ cups breadcrumbs

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 350°F.
2) Cook macaroni as specified on the package; set aside.
3) Whisk egg. Add and combine milk, garlic and onion powder; set aside.
4) In 9 x 13-inch baking pan, evenly add chorizo, peppers, beans, corn and cheeses. Stir in macaroni. Pour in milk sauce and stir.
5) In skillet, over medium heat, melt butter. Stir in breadcrumbs. Top turkey mixture evenly with breadcrumbs. Bake 40 to 50 minutes or until golden color. Let set for 15 minutes before cutting.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 470
Protein 31g
Carbohydrates 44g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 4g
Fat 20g
Cholesterol 95mg
Sodium 760mg
Saturated Fat 9g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1247-turkey-chorizo-mac-and-cheese

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