Healthy Baked and Roasted Chicken Recipes

May 10, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Baked and Roasted Chicken Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Baked and Roasted Chicken Recipes with recipes including Skillet Lemon Chicken and Potatoes with Kale, Quick Chicken Cordon Bleu, and Baked Chicken with Onions and Leeks. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Baked and Roasted Chicken Recipes
Find healthy, delicious baked and roasted chicken recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Skillet Lemon Chicken and Potatoes with Kale
This easy one-pan skillet-roasted lemon chicken is perfect for weeknight dinners. Juicy chicken thighs are cooked in the same pan as baby potatoes and kale for a satisfying meal with the added bonus of minimal cleanup……

Baked Chicken with Onions and Leeks
Baking pieces of chicken is one of the easiest ways to put a meal on the table for your family. This mustard-glazed chicken is roasted on a bed of sliced onions, leeks and garlic that you can serve alongside it……

Quick Chicken Cordon Bleu
To make traditional cordon bleu, you layer prosciutto (or other ham) and cheese in between thin slices of chicken or veal, then bread and sauté the whole stack. This quick, easy version keeps the flavors the same, but skips the fussy layering and breading steps. Serve with: Delicata squash and broccoli……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Baked and Roasted Chicken Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18927/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/baked-roasted/

One of America’s Favorites – French Dip

May 2, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Roast Beef Dip au jus, with French fries

A French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip, is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats) on a “French roll” or baguette. It is usually served plain but a variation is to top with Swiss cheese, onions, and a dipping container of beef broth produced from the cooking process (termed au jus, “with juice”). Beef stock, a light beef gravy, or beef consommé is sometimes substituted. The sandwich is an American invention, with the name seeming to refer to the style of bread, rather than any French origin. Although the sandwich is most commonly served with a cup of jus or broth on the side of the plate, into which the sandwich is dipped as it is eaten, this is not how the sandwich was served when it was invented.

Two Los Angeles restaurants have claimed to be the birthplace of the French dip sandwich: Cole’s Pacific Electric Buffet and Philippe the Original. Philippe’s website describes the dish as a “specialty of the house”, and the words “Home of the Original French Dip Sandwich” are present in the restaurant’s logo. At Phillippe’s, the roll is dipped in the hot beef juices before the sandwich is assembled, and is served “wet”, while at Cole’s it is served with a side of beef juices. The sandwich can also be requested “double dipped”, where both halves of the sandwich are dipped before serving, at either establishment. Both restaurants feature their own brand of spicy mustard that is traditionally used by patrons to complement the sandwich.

A French dip sandwich

The controversy over who originated the sandwich remains unresolved. Both restaurants were established in 1908. However, Cole’s claims to have originated the sandwich shortly after the restaurant opened in 1908, while Philippe’s claims that owner Philippe Mathieu invented it in 1918.

The story of the sandwich’s invention by Philippe’s has several variants: some sources say that it was first created by a cook or a server who, while preparing a sandwich for a police officer or fireman, accidentally dropped it into a pan of meat drippings. The patron liked it, and the dish surged in popularity shortly after its invention. Other accounts say that a customer who didn’t want some meat drippings to go to waste requested his sandwich be dipped in them. Still others say that a chef dipped a sandwich into a pan of meat drippings after a customer complained that the bread was stale. Cole’s account states that the sandwich was invented by a sympathetic chef, Jack Garlinghouse, for a customer who was complaining of sore gums. Some accounts tell Philippe’s version of events, but assign the location to Cole’s. The mystery of the sandwich’s invention might not be solved due to a lack of information and observable evidence.

The French dip is now served at a number of restaurant chains including fast food places, diners, and standard restaurants. A sandwich based on a similar concept is known as a Baron of beef.

Healthy Burger Recipes

April 6, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Burger Recipes. Find a great selection of some Delicious and Healthy Burger Recipes with recipes including Mushroom-Swiss Turkey Burgers, Classic Hamburger, and Better-Than-Takeout Burgers with Sweet Potato Fries. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Burger Recipes
Find healthy, delicious burger recipes including classic hamburgers, turkey burgers and chicken burgers. Healthier Recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Mushroom-Swiss Turkey Burgers
In this gluten-free turkey burger recipe, lean ground turkey stands in for ground beef, and portobello mushrooms produce a juicy, flavorful alternative to the traditional bun. Melted Swiss cheese, sliced tomato and arugula top off this delicious low-carb dinner!…..

Classic Hamburger
Slow-cooked onions add moisture and flavor to these lean beef burgers. A quick blend of mayonnaise, ketchup, relish and vinegar makes a perfect tangy, sweet and creamy “special sauce” for this burger. We love the dill relish here, but use sweet relish if you prefer it. Serve with sweet potato fries……

Better-Than-Takeout Burgers with Sweet Potato Fries
This healthy take on burgers and fries swaps in chopped mushrooms for some of the meat in the burger patties, to cut back on calories and saturated fat.

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Burger Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/17919/main-dishes/burgers/

One of America’s Favorites – Hot Dogs

April 4, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A typical hot dog with added mustard as a condiment

A hot dog (also spelled hotdog) is a cooked sausage, traditionally grilled or steamed and served in a sliced bun as a sandwich. There are also Hot dog variants that include the corn dog and pigs in blankets. Typical hot dog garnishes include mustard, ketchup, onions, mayonnaise, relish, cheese, chili, and sauerkraut.

The sausages were culturally imported from Germany and popularized in the United States, where they were a working class street food sold at hot dog stands that came to be associated with baseball and America. Hot dog preparation and condiment styles also vary regionally across the United States. The hot dog’s cultural traditions include the Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest and Wienermobile.

Claims about hot dog invention are difficult to assess, as stories assert the creation of the sausage, the placing of the sausage (or another kind of sausage) on bread or a bun as finger food, the popularization of the existing dish, or the application of the name “hot dog” to a sausage and bun combination most commonly used with ketchup or mustard and sometimes relish.

The word frankfurter comes from Frankfurt, Germany, where pork sausages similar to hot dogs originated. These sausages, Frankfurter Würstchen, were known since the 13th century and given to the people on the event of imperial coronations, starting with the coronation of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor as King. Wiener refers to Vienna, Austria, whose German name is “Wien”, home to a sausage made of a mixture of pork and beef (cf. Hamburger, whose name also derives from a German-speaking city). Johann Georg Lahner, a 18th/19th century butcher from the Franconian city of Coburg, is said to have brought the Frankfurter Würstchen to Vienna, where he added beef to the mixture and simply called it Frankfurter. Nowadays, in German speaking countries, except Austria, hot dog sausages are called Wiener or Wiener Würstchen (Würstchen means “little sausage”), in differentiation to the original pork only mixture from Frankfurt. In Swiss German, it is called Wienerli, while in Austria the terms Frankfurter or Frankfurter Würstel are used.

Grilled hot dogs

Around 1870, on Coney Island, German immigrant Charles Feltman began selling sausages in rolls.

Others are credited with first serving hot dogs on rolls. A Bavarian immigrant named Feuchtwanger allegedly pioneered the practice in the American midwest; there are several versions of the story with varying details. According to one account, Antonoine Feuchtwanger’s wife proposed the use of a bun in 1880: Feuchtwanger sold hot dogs on the streets of St. Louis, Missouri, United States, and provided gloves to his customers so that they could handle the sausages without burning their hands. Losing money when customers did not return the gloves, Feuchtwanger’s wife suggested serving the food in a roll instead. In another version, Anton Ludwig Feuchtwanger served sausages in rolls at the World’s Fair–either the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago or the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St Louis–again allegedly because the white gloves provided to customers to protect their hands were being kept as souvenirs.

The association between hot dogs and baseball began as early as 1893 with Chris von der Ahe, a German immigrant who owned not only the St. Louis Browns, but also an amusement park.

Another claim of inventing the hot dog is told by Harry M. Stevens, an American sports concessionaire whose vendors sold German sausages and rolls to spectators at the old New York Polo Grounds during the winter. He called them “Dachshund sandwiches”, but a New York Post cartoonist “couldn’t spell dachshund, so when he drew the cartoon, he called them hot dogs.”

In 1916, a Polish American employee of Feltman’s named Nathan Handwerker was encouraged by Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante, both working as waiters/musicians, to go into business in competition with his former employer. Handwerker undercut Feltman’s by charging five cents for a hot dog when his former employer was charging ten.

At an earlier time in food regulation, when the hot dog was suspect, Handwerker made sure that men wearing surgeon’s smocks were seen eating at Nathan’s Famous to reassure potential customers.

Ingredients:

Hormel hot dogs going into a smoker (1964)

Common hot dog ingredients include:

* Meat trimmings and fat
* Flavorings, such as salt, garlic, and paprika
* Preservatives (cure) – typically sodium erythorbate and sodium nitrite
Pork and beef are the traditional meats used in hot dogs. Less expensive hot dogs are often made from chicken or turkey, using low-cost mechanically separated poultry. Hot dogs often have high sodium, fat and nitrite content, ingredients linked to health problems. Changes in meat technology and dietary preferences have led manufacturers to use turkey, chicken, vegetarian meat substitutes, and to lower the salt content.

If a manufacturer produces two types of hot dogs, “wieners” tend to contain pork and are blander, while “franks” tend to be all beef and more strongly seasoned.

Hot dogs being grilled

Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.
Commercial preparation:
Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.
Natural casing hot dogs:
As with most sausages, hot dogs must be in a casing to be cooked. Traditional casing is made from the small intestines of sheep. The products are known as “natural casing” hot dogs or frankfurters. These hot dogs have firmer texture and a “snap” that releases juices and flavor when the product is bitten.

Kosher casings are expensive in commercial quantities in the US, so kosher hot dogs are usually skinless or made with reconstituted collagen casings.

Skinless hot dogs:
“Skinless” hot dogs must use a casing in the cooking process when the product is manufactured, but the casing is usually a long tube of thin cellulose that is removed between cooking and packaging. This process was invented in Chicago in 1925 by Erwin O. Freund, founder of Visking which would later become Viskase Companies.

The first skinless hot dog casings were produced by Freund’s new company under the name “Nojax”, short for “no jackets” and sold to local Chicago sausage makers.

Skinless hot dogs vary in the texture of the product surface but have a softer “bite” than natural casing hot dogs. Skinless hot dogs are more uniform in shape and size than natural casing hot dogs and less expensive.

Home cooking hot dogs:
Hot dogs are prepared and eaten in a variety of ways. The wieners may be boiled, grilled, fried, steamed, broiled, baked, or microwaved. The cooked wiener may be served on a bun (usually topped with condiments), or it may be used as an ingredient in another dish. Various models of hot dog toasters exist that cook the hot dog and buns by toasting.

In the US, “hot dog” may refer to just the sausage or to the combination of a sausage in a bun. Many nicknames for hot dogs have popped up over the years. A hot dog can often be seen under the names of frankfurter, frank, red hot, wiener, weenie, durger, coney, or just “dog”.
Hot dog restaurants
Hot dog stands and trucks sell hot dogs at street and highway locations. Wandering hot dog vendors sell their product in baseball parks. At convenience stores, hot dogs are kept heated on rotating grills. 7-Eleven sells the most grilled hot dogs in North America — 100 million annually. Hot dogs are also common on restaurants’ children’s menus.
Condiments
Hot dogs may be served plain, but are commonly served with a variety of condiments, including ketchup, mustard, chile con carne, pickle relish, sauerkraut, onion, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, cheese, and chili peppers.

In 2005, the US-based National Hot Dog & Sausage Council (part of the American Meat Institute) found mustard to be the most popular condiment, with 32% of respondents preferring it; 23% of Americans said they preferred ketchup; chili con carne came in third at 17%, followed by relish at 9% and onions at 7%. Southerners showed the strongest preference for chili, while Midwesterners showed the greatest affinity for ketchup.

A Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion, and mustard

Condiments vary across the country. All-beef Chicago-style hot dogs are topped with mustard, fresh tomatoes, onions, sport peppers, bright green relish, dill pickles, and celery salt, but they exclude ketchup.

Many variations are named after regions other than the one in which they are popular. Italian hot dogs popular in New Jersey include peppers, onions, and potatoes. Meaty Michigan hot dogs are popular in upstate New York (as are white hots), while beefy Coney Island hot dogs are popular in Michigan. In New York City, conventional hot dogs are available on Coney Island, as are bagel dogs. Hot wieners, or weenies, are a staple in Rhode Island where they are sold at restaurants with the misleading name “New York System.” Texas hot dogs are spicy variants found in upstate New York and Pennsylvania (and as “all the way dogs” in New Jersey), but not Texas.

Some baseball parks have signature hot dogs, such as Fenway Franks at Fenway Park in Boston and Dodger Dogs at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. The Fenway signature is that the hot dog is boiled and grilled, and then served on a New England-style bun, covered with ketchup and relish. Often during Red Sox games, vendors traverse the stadium selling the hot dogs plain, giving customers the choice of adding the condiments.

Hot dogs outside North America
In most of the world, “hot dog” is recognized as a sausage in a bun, but the type varies considerably. The name is applied to something that would not be described as a hot dog in North America. For example, in New Zealand, it refers to a battered sausage, often on a stick (which is known as a corn dog in North America), and the version in a bun is called an “American hot dog”.

The world’s longest hot dog created was 197 ft, which rested within a 198 ft bun. The hot dog was prepared by

Pictured in August 2006, the world’s longest hot dog stretched 60 meters (197 ft).

Shizuoka Meat Producers for the All-Japan Bread Association, which baked the bun and coordinated the event, including official measurement for the world record. The hot dog and bun were the center of a media event in celebration of the Association’s 50th anniversary on August 4, 2006, at the Akasaka Prince Hotel, Tokyo, Japan.
An Austrian “hot dog” can use a hollowed-out baguette as the bread
In most of the world, a “hot dog” is recognized as a sausage in a bun, but the type varies considerably. The name is often applied to something that would not be described as a hot dog in North America. For example, in New Zealand a “hot dog” is a battered sausage, often on a stick, which is known as a corn dog in North America; an “American hot dog” is the version in a bun.
A hot dog prepared by head chef Joe Calderone in Manhattan sold for $69 during the National Hot Dog Day in 2010, making it the most expensive hot dog sold at the time. The hot dog was topped with truffle oil, duck foie gras, and truffle butter.

On May 31, 2012, Guinness World Records certified the world record for most expensive hot dog at $145.49. The “California Capitol City Dawg”, served at Capitol Dawg in Sacramento, California, features a grilled 18 in all-beef in natural casing frank from Chicago, served on a fresh baked herb and oil focaccia roll, spread with white truffle butter, then grilled. The record breaking hot dog is topped with a whole grain mustard from France, garlic & herb mayonnaise, sauteed chopped shallots, organic mixed baby greens, maple syrup marinated/fruitwood smoked uncured bacon from New Hampshire, chopped tomato, expensive moose cheese from Sweden, sweetened dried cranberries, basil olive oil/pear-cranberry-coconut balsamic vinaigrette, and ground peppercorn. Proceeds from the sale of each 3 lb super dog are donated to the Shriners Hospitals for Children.

Healthy Pea Recipes

March 27, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Pea Recipes. Here you can find some Delicious and Healthy Pea Recipes with recipes including Easy Pea and Spinach Carbonara, Skillet Pork Chops with Peas, Carrots and Pearl Onions, and Pea Soup. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Easy Pea and Spinach Carbonara
Fresh pasta cooks up faster than dried, making it a must-have for fast weeknight dinners like this luscious yet healthy meal. Eggs are the base of the creamy sauce. They don’t get fully cooked, so use pasteurized-in-the-shell eggs if you prefer……

Skillet Pork Chops with Peas, Carrots and Pearl Onions
This superfast one-dish dinner is full of classic flavor and is such a crowd pleaser that you’ll want to work it into your regular weeknight dinner rotation. We call for bone-in pork chops to maximize flavor, but boneless pork chops are a fine substitution. To round out this meal a little more, serve with rice or mashed potatoes……

Pea Soup
A simple pea soup makes an elegant start to a spring meal. It’s also a great way to use frozen vegetables when the produce section is looking bleak……

Healthy Pea Recipes
Find healthy, delicious pea recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Pea Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19311/ingredients/vegetables/peas/

Low-Carb Side Dish Recipes

March 13, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Low-Carb Side Dish Recipes. Find some Delicious and Low-Carb Side Dish Recipes with recipes including Roasted Potatoes and Brussels Sprouts, Loaded Cauliflower Casserole, and Melting Onions. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Low-Carb Side Dish Recipes
Find healthy, delicious low-carb side dish recipes including low-carb vegetables, beans, quinoa and potatoes. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Roasted Potatoes and Brussels Sprouts
Roasted potatoes and Brussels sprouts make a great quick and easy side dish for dinner, or you can twist it into a breakfast hash served with an egg on top. Either way, with its super-easy prep, you’ll come back to these roasted potatoes and Brussels sprouts again and again……

Loaded Cauliflower Casserole
You’ll never want to eat roasted cauliflower any other way once you try this tasty recipe. Bacon, sour cream and sharp Cheddar cheese coat good-for-you cauliflower in deliciousness for an easy side that will make everyone actually want to eat their vegetables……

Melting Onions
Onions lose their bite and melt in your mouth when they’re sliced and roasted with butter and fresh herbs and then tenderized further by braising in broth. Serve alongside roasted chicken or cook them in vegetable broth for an easy, elegant vegetarian side dish……

* Click the link below to get all the Low-Carb Side Dish Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18449/lifestyle-diets/low-carb/side-dishes/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

February 17, 2022 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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Caramelizing Onions…..

To cook caramelized onions quicker, you should add baking soda when it turns slightly brown in a frying pan. Add about 1 tbsp of soda, for every 2 lbs of onions – you will notice that the onions will caramelize at twice the speed, and do not end up burning. Enjoy!

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – CHORIZO HASH

February 9, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is CHORIZO HASH. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Wild Idea Buffalo Chorizo, Olive Oil, Onions, Squash, Cumin, Coriander, Salt, Pepper, Chili Powder, Spinach, Lemon, and Chili Flake. You can find this recipe and purchase any of the Wild Idea Buffalo Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

CHORIZO HASH
One way of adding a whole lot of flavor with very little effort to any recipe is to have our Buffalo Chorizo on hand. Both of the recipes below can be prepared meatless, but by adding the Chorizo you are adding flavor and a super healthy protein!
I used half a pound of Chorizo for this recipe, but if you were wanting to feed a crowd for a casual dinner, just double it up! I think you are going to really like this!

Ingredients: (serves 6 or 4 hungry ranchers)
1 – half pound package Wild Idea Buffalo Chorizo
1 – tablespoon olive oil
1 – cup onions, chopped
2 – cups squash or yams, diced & partially cooked through
1 – teaspoon each; cumin, coriander, salt & pepper
1/4 – teaspoon chili powder
2 to 3 cups – spinach, chopped
I – lemon, juiced
Chili Flake

Preparation:

1 – Prep all ingredients as noted in ingredient list.
2 – In a large sauté pan or cast iron skillet over medium high heat, add olive oil, onions and spices. Stir to incorporate and allow to start to brown.
3 – Crumble in the Chorizo Sausage and break up into the onions with a spatula. Continue to cook until lightly browned.
4 – Stir in squash or yams and stir to incorporate, stirring occasionally. About seven minutes.
5 – Add chopped spinach and stir to incorporate. Add lemon juice and stir in. Reduce heat to low.
6 – Season to taste and finish with a sprinkle of chili flake.
Serve immediately with crusty bread. Leftovers make a great breakfast with a poached egg on the top!
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/chorizo-recipes

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Chorizo Sausage
Our Mexican-style Chorizo makes any dish taste delicious! Wild Idea Buffalo Chorizo has a flavor that is every bit traditional Chorizo, seasoned with just the right spices, but our 100% grass-fed bison meat adds a lighter twist with powerful health benefits. Available in a 1 lb. package.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/brats-sausages-hot-dogs/products/1-lb-chorizo-sausage

Healthy Hot Sandwich Recipes

February 2, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Hot Sandwich Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Hot Sandwich Recipes with recipes including Beef and Bean Sloppy Joes, Philly Cheese Steak Sloppy Joes, and Italian-Herbed Chicken and Mozzarella Melts. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Hot Sandwich Recipes
Find healthy, delicious hot sandwich recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Beef and Bean Sloppy Joes
This healthy copycat recipe of the comfort food classic trades beans for some of the meat to bump up fiber by 7 grams. We also cut back on the sugar and ketchup in this Sloppy Joe recipe makeover to save you 12 grams of added sugar……

Philly Cheese Steak Sloppy Joes
Two of our favorite comfort-food sandwiches join forces in these family-friendly dinner sandwiches. We found that softer buns make this easier to eat, and it’s all the better when wrapped takeout-style in a sheet of foil……

Italian-Herbed Chicken and Mozzarella Melts
Chicken thighs are slowly cooked with Italian-style sauce and herbs, then served on crusty bread slices with olives and two savory cheeses……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Hot Sandwich Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19030/main-dishes/sandwiches/hot/

CHUNKY CHICKEN, VEGETABLE AND ROSEMARY STEW

January 18, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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Here’s a recipe for a CHUNKY CHICKEN, VEGETABLE AND ROSEMARY STEW. Nothing like a Hot Stew to warm up on these cold Winter days. Chicken Breasts, Onions, Carrots, and Celery are just a few of the ingredients that make up this week’s recipe. So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

CHUNKY CHICKEN, VEGETABLE AND ROSEMARY STEW

Ingredients

1 Tbsp canola oil
12 oz boneless chicken breasts, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 Tbsp canola oil
1 medium onion, cut in 8 wedges
3 medium carrots, quartered lengthwise and cut into thirds
1 medium celery stalk, cut into 1-inch (2.5-cm) pieces
2 cups water
2 dried bay leaves
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1 can (15 oz) reduced-sodium navy beans, rinsed and drained
1 cup grape tomatoes, quartered
1/2 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley
1 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary
3/4 tsp salt

Directions

1 – In Dutch oven, heat 1 Tbsp canola oil over medium-high heat. Add chicken and cook about 3 minutes per side or until it begins to brown. (Center will still be slightly pink.) Remove from oven and set aside.
2 – Add remaining 1 Tbsp canola oil, onion, carrot and celery. Saute for 5 minutes or until just beginning to lightly brown on edges, stirring frequently. Add water, bay leaves and pepper flakes. Bring to boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium low and simmer, covered, 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender.
3 – Stir in chicken, beans, tomatoes, Italian parsley, rosemary and salt. Cover and cook 5 minutes or until tomatoes are tender and chicken is cooked.
NOTES:
Here’s a great one-pot meal to warm and soothe a hungry, weary body after a hard day.

Recipe Yield: Yield: 6 servings.

Serving Size: 1 cup

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 220
Fat: 7 grams
Saturated Fat: 1 grams
Fiber: 6 grams
Sodium: 380 milligrams
Cholesterol: 50 milligrams
Protein: 22 grams
Carbohydrates: 17 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipe/chunky-chicken-vegetable-and-rosemary-stew

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