Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes

August 2, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is a Twice-Baked Sweet Potato. These Delicious Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes are made using Sweet Potatoes, Reduced Calorie Margarine, Brown Sugar Substitute, Ground Cinnamon, Allspice, Nutmeg, Crushed Pineapple, Walnuts, and Mini Marshmallows. These are some kicked up Sweet Taters! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes
Put the fall’s harvest to good use with this classic side dish. With its combination of cinnamon, allspice, nutmeg, chopped walnuts, and miniature marshmallows, this casserole is so delightful, you won’t even need dessert.

Ingredients
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Baking time: approximately 1 hour and 10 minutes
Cooling time: 15 minutes

4 sweet potatoes (8 ounces each), unpeeled
1 tablespoon reduced-calorie margarine
1/2 teaspoon brown sugar substitute
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1 can (8 ounces) crushed pineapple, canned in juice
2 tablespoons chopped walnuts
I cup miniature marshmallows

Directions
Yield: 8 stuffed potato halves
Serving size: 1 stuffed potato half

1 – Preheat oven to 400˚F. Wrap each sweet potato in foil, place on oven rack, and bake for one hour, or until tender when pierced with a fork. Remove from oven and allow to cool 15 minutes. Cut each potato in half lengthwise and carefully scoop flesh into a bowl, leaving shells intact with 1/8–1/4 inch of flesh. Place shells in a baking dish and set aside. Using an electric mixer, mash flesh until smooth. Mix in margarine, brown sugar substitute, and spices. Drain pineapple well in a sieve, forcing out extra liquid with the back of a spoon. Stir drained pineapple into mashed sweet potatoes. Spoon filling into shells; sprinkle with walnuts and press on marshmallows. Return to the oven for 8–10 minutes, or until marshmallows are lightly toasted and potato is heated through.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 174 calories, Carbohydrates: 36 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: <1 g, Sodium: 37 mg, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/twice-baked-sweet-potatoes/

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It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Jalapeño Sweet Potato and Chicken Chowder

June 27, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | 1 Comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday is a recipe for Jalapeño Sweet Potato and Chicken Chowder. To make this delicious Chowder you’ll need Sweet Potatoes, Onion, Vegetable Broth, Chicken, Whole Kernel Corn, Jalapeños, Heavy Cream, Green Onions, and Seasonings. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Jalapeño Sweet Potato and Chicken Chowder

Recipe Ingredients:
2 large sweet potatoes
2 tablespoons butter or vegetable oil
1 small onion, 1/4-inch diced
Up to 1 quart vegetable broth, chicken stock or water
2 cups cooked chicken, cubed
1 1/2 cups whole kernel corn (fresh or frozen)
2 teaspoons jalapeños, minced (or more to taste)
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon salt
Chopped green onions for garnish

Cooking Directions:
1 – Bake sweet potatoes at 350°F (175°C) until softened. Scoop out flesh; discard skin. Purée (or mash) sweet potatoes.
2 – In a soup pot, sauté onion in butter until softened. Add puréed sweet potato and desired amount of chicken stock. Bring to a boil, reducing liquid slightly.
3 – Add chicken, corn, jalapeños, heavy cream and salt. Simmer soup for 10 minutes.
4 – Serve garnished with chopped green onions.
Makes 4 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/4 of recipe): Calories: 361; Total Fat: 16g; Total Carbs: 35g; Fiber: 4g; Protein: 20g.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/soup/jalapeno_sweet_potato_chicken_chowder_recipe.html

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 20, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Buying and Storing Sweet Potatoes…………………………..

Firm sweet potatoes have a golden skin and lighter flesh while soft sweet potatoes have a copper skin with orange flesh. When shopping, look for sweet potatoes that feel heavy for their size and have no bruises, soft spots, or signs of sprouting. Whatever you do, handle them gently because they bruise very easily.

The best way to store sweet potatoes is to select an area that is dry and cool. Those areas that come to mind for storing sweet potatoes in the home include a garage, basement or cellar. It is important to meet these environmental conditions or it could result in your sweet potato becoming rotted or sprouted.

Happy Easter!

April 12, 2020 at 6:15 PM | Posted in Ham | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Baked Ham, Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, Gravy, and Apple Pie

Hope everyone is enjoying their Easter! This one is a bit different, most of us are at our own homes and no eating out today because of the Virus. It seems to be getting some what better but we still have a ways to go. I just hope people don’t start getting out more and the Virus rebounds. Let’s just stay the course and finish riding this thing out. Everyone enjoy your Easter and stay safe. Take care all!

Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe – Cuban Glazed Pork Loin

March 1, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Diabetes Self Management, Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe | 1 Comment
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This week’s Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe is a Cuban Glazed Pork Loin. To make this Delicious Roast you’ll need a Boneless Pork Loin Roast, Lime, Orange Juice Concentrate, Garlic, Olive Oil, Ground Cumin, Salt and Pepper, Sweet Potatoes, and Red Onion. Let Sunday’s Dinner begin! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Cuban Glazed Pork Loin
Recipe Ingredients:
3 1/4 to 3 1/2 pounds boneless pork loin roast
1 lime
2 tablespoons frozen orange juice concentrate, thawed
1 tablespoon garlic, minced
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks (optional)
1 large red onion, cut into 1-inch wedges (optional)

Cooking Directions:
1 – Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C). Arrange the pork roast in the center of a shallow roasting pan.
2 – Grate the zest of the lime into a small bowl. Juice the lime and add 1 tablespoon to the bowl; reserve remaining juice for another use. Stir the remaining ingredients into the bowl. Spread the citrus mixture over the surface of the pork. Surround the pork with the sweet potatoes and onion if desired.
3 – Roast 20 minutes per pound or about 65 to 70 minutes (22 minutes per pound if roast is rolled and tied) until the internal temperature on an instant read thermometer reaches 145°F (62.7°C).
Remove from oven and let the roast rest for 10 minutes before slicing to serve.
Makes 12 servings.

Serving Suggestion: Slice slightly over a third of the roast, surround with roasted vegetables if desired; and serve. Reserve the remaining roast, cut in cubes and refrigerate, covered, for two additional meals.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/12 of recipe): Calories: 160; Total Fat: 4g; Saturated Fat: 1g; Cholesterol: 80mg; Total Carbs: 3g; Fiber: 0g; Protein: 26g; Sodium: 210mg.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/pork/cuban_glazed_pork_loin_recipe.html

 

 

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Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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Roasted Root Vegetables

December 17, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | 1 Comment
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I’ve got a side dish for the Holiday Stuffed Beef Tenderloin, Roasted Root Vegetables. For this side dish you’ll need Sweet Potatoes, Turnips, Red Onions, Baby Carrots, Garlic, and Seasoning. The Dish is 120 calories and 15 net carbs per serving. This recipe also comes from the Diabetes Self Management website. Looking for Diabetic Friendly Recipes? Be sure to check out the Diabetes Self Management website. You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One!  https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Roasted Root Vegetables
Ingredients
2 sweet potatoes (about 1 pound), scrubbed, peeled, and cut into 32 wedges
3 turnips (about 8 ounces), peeled and cut into 18 wedges
1 medium red onion, cut into 16 wedges
1 1/2 cups baby carrots
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 cloves garlic, crushed
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 425°F. Place cut vegetables in large bowl. Add oil, garlic, salt, and pepper and toss.

2 – Bake 40 to 45 minutes or until vegetables are tender and browned; stirring occasionally.

Yield: 6 servings.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 120 calories, Carbohydrates: 19 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 5 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 340 mg, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/roasted-root-vegetables/

 

 

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“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Herbed Bean and Sweet Potato Hash

December 2, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is a Herbed Bean and Sweet Potato Hash. A Vegetarian Hash, just full of of Sweet Potatoes, Bell Peppers, Onion, Dark Red Kidney Beans, and Red Beans! No Meat needed with this Dish! The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website which has a large selection of Vegetarian Recipes along with recipes to please all tastes, diets, and cuisines. Check it out today. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Herbed Bean and Sweet Potato Hash
This wholesome and colorful vegetarian hash can be served anytime of the day, with or without the egg topper.

Recipe Ingredients:
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
4 cups peeled cubed sweet potato (1/2-inch cubes)
1 cup chopped red bell pepper
1 cup chopped onion
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped fresh or 1 teaspoon dried rosemary leaves
1 to 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh or 1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1 (15-ounce) can dark red kidney beans, rinsed, drained (1 1/2 cups cooked)
1 (15-ounce) can small red beans, rinsed, drained (1 1/2 cups cooked)
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper

Cooking Directions:
1 – Melt butter in a large skillet; add sweet potatoes, bell pepper, onion, garlic, and herbs. Cook, covered, over medium heat until vegetables are tender, 5 to 8 minutes, stirring occasionally.
2 – Mash beans coarsely; stir into vegetable mixture and cook until hot through, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in salt and pepper.
Makes 6 servings (about 1 cup each).

Tip: Top with one poached or sunny-side-up egg.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/4 of recipe): Calories 250; Fat 3g; % Calories from Fat 10; Potassium; 641mg; Calcium 67mg; Carbohydrate 48g; Folate 96mcg; Sodium 711mg; Protein 10g; Dietary Fiber 13g; Cholesterol 5mg.

https://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/herbed_bean_and_sweet_potato_hash_recipe.html

Happy Thanksgiving!

November 28, 2019 at 5:33 PM | Posted in cooking, Food | 5 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Thanksgiving Day Dinner

Have a Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!

 

Just a brief post today to wish you all a very Happy Thanksgiving! We are spending the day with family and friends. I’ll be back tomorrow with a full post. So have a great Thanksgiving, take care!

 

 

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – Thanksgiving Dinner

November 25, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Thanksgiving Dinner

The centerpiece of contemporary Thanksgiving in the United States and in Canada is a large meal, generally centered on a large roasted turkey. It is served with a variety of side dishes which vary from traditional dishes such as mashed potatoes, stuffing, and cranberry sauce, to ones that reflect regional or cultural heritage. The majority of the dishes in the traditional American version of Thanksgiving dinner are made from foods native to the New World, as according to tradition the Pilgrims received these foods, or learned how to grow them, from the Native Americans. Thanksgiving dinner is the largest eating event in the United States; people eat more on Thanksgiving than on any other day of the year.

According to what traditionally is known as “The First Thanksgiving,” the 1621 feast between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag at Plymouth Colony contained waterfowl, venison, ham, lobster, clams, berries, fruit, pumpkin, and squash. William Bradford noted that, “besides waterfowl, there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many.” Many of the foods that were included in the first feast (except, notably, the seafood) have since gone on to become staples of the modern Thanksgiving dinner. Early feasts of the Order of Good Cheer, a French Canadian predecessor to the modern Thanksgiving, featured a potluck dinner with freshly-hunted fowl, game, and fish, hunted and shared by both French Canadians and local natives.

The use of the turkey in the US for Thanksgiving precedes Lincoln’s nationalization of the holiday in 1863. Alexander Hamilton proclaimed that no “Citizen of the United States should refrain from turkey on Thanksgiving Day,” and Benjamin Franklin had high regard for the wild turkey as an American icon, but turkey was uncommon as Thanksgiving fare until after 1800. By 1857, turkey had become part of the traditional dinner in New England.

The White House Cook Book, 1887, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette, et al., had the following menu: oysters on half shell, cream of chicken soup, fried smelts, sauce tartare, roast turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, baked squash, boiled onions, parsnip fritters, olives, chicken salad, venison pastry, pumpkin pie, mince pie, Charlotte russe, almond ice cream, lemon jelly, hickory nut cake, cheese, fruits and coffee.

A Thanksgiving Day dinner served to the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935 included: pickles, green olives, celery, roast turkey, oyster stew, cranberry sauce, giblet gravy, dressing, creamed asparagus tips, snowflake potatoes, baked carrots, hot rolls, fruit salad, mince meat pie, fruit cake, candies, grapes, apples, clams, fish, and many other food harvests. French drip coffee, cigars and cigarettes.

Sugar, among other food commodities, was rationed from 1942 to 1946. In 1947, as part of a voluntary rationing campaign, the Harry Truman Administration attempted to promote “Poultryless Thursdays,” discouraging Americans from eating poultry or egg products on Thursdays. Because Thanksgiving is always on a Thursday, this meant that turkey and pumpkin pie, two Thanksgiving staples, were discouraged, not only for that holiday, but for Christmas and New Year’s Day as well, since those holidays landed on Thursday in 1947. (Pumpkin pie was discouraged because it contained eggs.) The National Poultry and Egg Board furiously lobbied the President to cease promoting the plan; it culminated in a truce at the National Thanksgiving Turkey Presentation shortly before Thanksgiving. Turkey was no longer forbidden, but Eggless Thursdays remained for the rest of the year, meaning no pumpkin pie was served at the White House dinner that year.

Oven roasted turkey

Turkey is the most common main dish of a Thanksgiving dinner, to the point where Thanksgiving is sometimes colloquially called “Turkey Day.” In 2006, American turkey growers were expected to raise 270 million turkeys, to be processed into five billion pounds of turkey meat valued at almost $8 billion, with one third of all turkey consumption occurring in the Thanksgiving-Christmas season, and a per capita consumption of almost 18 pounds. The Broad Breasted White turkey is particularly bred for Thanksgiving dinner and similar large feasts; its large size (specimens can grow to over 40 pounds) and meat content make it ideal for such situations, although the breed must be artificially bred and suffers from health problems due to its size.

Most Thanksgiving turkeys are stuffed with a bread-based mixture and roasted. Sage is the traditional herb added to the stuffing, along with chopped celery, carrots, and onions. Other ingredients, such as chopped chestnuts or other tree nuts, crumbled sausage or bacon, cranberries, raisins, or apples, may be added to stuffing. If this mixture is prepared outside the bird, it may be known as dressing. Deep-fried turkey is rising in popularity due to its shorter preparation time, but carries safety risks.

The consumption of turkey on Thanksgiving is so ingrained in American culture that each year since 1947, the National Turkey Federation has presented a live turkey to the President of the United States prior to each Thanksgiving. These turkeys were initially slaughtered and eaten for the President’s Thanksgiving dinner; since 1989, the presented turkeys have typically been given a mock pardon to great fanfare and sent to a park to live out the rest of their usually short natural lives.

Non-traditional foods other than turkey are usually served as the main dish for a Thanksgiving dinner. Ham is often served alongside turkey in many non-traditional households. Goose and duck, foods which were traditional European centerpieces of Christmas dinners before being displaced, are now sometimes served in place of the Thanksgiving turkey. Sometimes, fowl native to the region where the meal is taking place is used; for example, an article in Texas Monthly magazine suggested quail as the main dish for a Texan Thanksgiving feast. John Madden, who appeared on television for the NFL Thanksgiving Day game from 1981 to 2001, frequently advocated his fondness for the turducken, deboned turkey, duck and chicken nested inside each other then cooked. In a few areas of the West Coast of the United States, Dungeness crab is common as an alternate main dish, as crab season starts in early November. Similarly, Thanksgiving falls within deer hunting season in the Northeastern United States, which encourages the use of venison as a centerpiece. Vegetarians or vegans may have a tofu, wheat gluten or lentil-based substitute; or stuffed squash. In Alaskan villages, whale meat is sometimes eaten. Irish immigrants have been known to have prime rib of beef as their centerpiece since beef in Ireland was once a rarity; families would save up money for this dish to signify newfound prosperity and hope. Many Italian-Americans will serve capon as the main course to the Thanksgiving meal.

In the United States, a globalist approach to Thanksgiving has become common with the impact of immigration. Basic “Thanksgiving” ingredients, or the intent of the holiday, can be transformed to a variety of dishes by using flavors, techniques, and traditions from their own cuisines. Others celebrate the holiday with a variety of dishes particularly when there is a crowd to be fed, guests’ tastes vary and considering the financial means available.

Many offerings are typically served alongside the main dish—so many that, because of the amount of food, the Thanksgiving meal is sometimes served midday or early afternoon to make time for all the eating, and preparation may begin at dawn or on days prior. Copious leftovers are also common following the meal proper.

Traditional Thanksgiving foods are sometimes specific to the day, such as riced potatoes, and although some of the foods might be seen at any semi-formal meal in the United States, the meal often has something of a ritual or traditional quality. Many Americans would say it is “incomplete” without cranberry sauce, stuffing or dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy, and brussels sprouts. Other commonly served dishes include winter squash and sweet potatoes, the latter often prepared with sweeteners such as brown sugar, molasses, or marshmallows. Fresh, canned, or frozen corn is popular and green beans are frequently served; in particular, green bean casserole, a product invented in 1955 by the Campbell Soup Company to promote use of its cream of mushroom soup, has become a Thanksgiving standard. Other roasted vegetables are often served, such as carrots or parsnips, celery stalks, beets, turnips, radishes, asparagus, Brussels sprouts or cauliflower. A fresh salad may be included, especially on the West Coast. A relish tray, with various pickles, olives, onions or peppers, is often included either with the meal itself or as a pre-meal appetizer. Bread rolls, biscuits, or cornbread, the latter particularly in the South and parts of New England, may also be served. For dessert, various pies are usually served, particularly pumpkin pie, though apple pie, mincemeat pie, sweet potato pie, cherry pie, chocolate pie, and pecan pie are often served as well.

There are also regional differences as to the stuffing or dressing traditionally served with the turkey. The traditional version has white bread cubes, sage, onion, celery and parsley. Southerners generally make their dressing from cornbread, while those in other parts of the country may opt for wheat or rye bread as the base. One or several of the following may be added to the dressing/stuffing: oysters, apples, chestnuts, raisins, and sausages or the turkey’s giblets.

Other dishes reflect the region or cultural background of those who have come together for the meal. For example, Sauerkraut (among those in the Mid-Atlantic; especially Baltimore) is

Green bean casserole

sometimes served. Many African Americans and Southerners serve baked macaroni and cheese and collard greens, along with chitterlings and sweet potato pie, while some Italian-Americans often have lasagne on the table and Ashkenazi Jews may serve noodle kugel, a sweet dessert pudding. Other Jewish families may consume foods commonly associated with Hanukkah, such as latkes or a sufganiyah; the two holidays are usually in close proximity and on extremely rare occasions overlap. It is not unheard of for Mexican Americans to serve their turkey with mole and roasted corn. In Puerto Rico, the Thanksgiving meal is completed with arroz con gandules (rice with pigeon peas) or arroz con maiz (rice with corn), pasteles (root tamales) stuffed with turkey, pumpkin-coconut crème caramel, corn bread with longaniza, potato salad, roasted white sweet potatoes and Spanish sparkling hard cider. Turkey in Puerto Rico is stuffed with mofongo. Cuban-Americans traditionally serve the turkey alongside a small roasted pork and include white rice and black beans or kidney beans. Vegetarians or vegans have been known to serve alternative entree centerpieces such as a large vegetable pie or a stuffed and baked pumpkin or tofu substitutes. Many Midwesterners (such as Minnesotans) of Norwegian or Scandinavian descent set the table with lefse.

The beverages at Thanksgiving can vary as much as the side dishes, often depending on who is present at the table and their tastes. Spirits or cocktails sometimes may be served before the main meal. On the dinner table, unfermented apple cider (still or sparkling) or wine are often served. Pitchers of sweet tea can often be found on Southern tables[citation needed]. Beaujolais nouveau is sometimes served; the beverage has been marketed as a Thanksgiving drink since the producers of the wine (which is made available only for a short window each year) set the annual release date to be one week before Thanksgiving beginning in 1985, and it is said to pair well with the wide variety of food served for Thanksgiving dinner. Thanksgiving marks the beginning of eggnog season.

 

Healthy Holiday and Occasion Recipes

November 6, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 2 Comments
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Holiday and Occasion Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Holiday and Occasion Recipes with recipes including; Farmers’ Market Fried Rice, Pulled Pork with Caramelized Onions, and Maple-Roasted Sweet Potatoes. Find these recipes and much more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Holiday and Occasion Recipes
Find healthy, delicious holiday recipes including Christmas, Thanksgiving, Easter, and 4th of July recipes from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Farmers’ Market Fried Rice
This fried rice recipe features a fall mixture of sliced Brussels sprouts and parsnips, but feel free to use whatever is fresh and in season. This recipe works best in a wok— a skillet is too small for the volume of food and requires more oil to prevent sticking. Always use cold cooked rice otherwise the fried rice will be gummy and sticky……………….

Pulled Pork with Caramelized Onions
Traditional pulled pork is barbecued, which gives it a smoky flavor. But the slow cooker happens to be the absolute easiest way to cook pulled pork—and you can get a hint of smoke by adding chipotle chile. Serve the pulled pork with potato salad, collard greens and grits. Or make it into a sandwich and serve it on a bun with coleslaw…………

Maple-Roasted Sweet Potatoes
In this easy vegetable side dish recipe, sweet potatoes are tossed with maple syrup, butter and lemon juice and are roasted until tender and golden brown. The delicious glaze that forms on these maple-roasted sweet potatoes transform this ultra-simple dish into something sublime……….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Holiday and Occasion Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/17959/holidays-occasions/

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