Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 12, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When making Gravy…………………..

Salt added to flour used for thickening gravies, etc., will help to prevent lumping. Nothing like a good gravy!

Happy Easter!

April 12, 2020 at 6:15 PM | Posted in Ham | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Baked Ham, Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, Gravy, and Apple Pie

Hope everyone is enjoying their Easter! This one is a bit different, most of us are at our own homes and no eating out today because of the Virus. It seems to be getting some what better but we still have a ways to go. I just hope people don’t start getting out more and the Virus rebounds. Let’s just stay the course and finish riding this thing out. Everyone enjoy your Easter and stay safe. Take care all!

Kitchen Closed tonight – Bob Evans

March 20, 2020 at 6:45 PM | Posted in fish, Food | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Bob Evans (Home Delivered)

 

 

 

For Breakfast I toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin that I topped with Smucker’s Sugar Free Blackberry Jam. I also had my morning cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Outside we had rain showers in the morning and cloudy and 68 degrees for the afternoon. We have had up to 3-4 inches of rain the past 3 days, a lot of local flooding. So not much going on, waiting out the virus. The Kitchen is closed and we had Bob Evans deliver our Dinner tonight! Mom had a Slow Roasted Turkey Dinner while I had the Lemon Pepper Sole.

 

 

 

I was tired of cooking and I needed a day off. So I had an email come in from Bob Evans come yesterday and they were offering Free Delivery! So it had been quite some time since I had Bob Evans so it sounded good. Mom ordered the Slow Roasted Turkey and Dressing Dinner. With sides of Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Stuffing, Carrots, Cranberry Relish, and a Roll. For myself I ordered the Lemon Pepper Sole. I had sides of Sugar Snap Peas and a Roll, I gave the Roll to Mom. Both Dinners were Delicious and they arrived Hot. We Really enjoyed it! Thank you Bob Evans! For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bob Evans
FREE DELIVERY
Breakfast, lunch or dinner, we’ve got you covered with FREE DELIVERY (where available).
https://www.bobevans.com/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 25, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Less stress Christmas Day……………………….

There is so much that can be done a day or two ahead of time: stuffing can be prepared, sprouts can be peeled, carrots can be chopped, the gravy and other sauces can be made, you can even partially roast the potatoes and other vegetables and finish them off on the day. Doing as much as you can the day before will ensure your cooking the Christmas dinner is much less stressful.

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Pot Roast

November 20, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is a Buffalo Pot Roast. It’s a Winter Comfort Food Classic – Buffalo Pot Roast! Made using the Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast. You can find this recipe and purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

 

Buffalo Pot Roast
Nothing represents “comfort food” more than a traditional pot roast. Wild Idea’s 100% grass-fed, rich and slightly sweet bison roast, braised until tender and juicy, nestled in a bed of potatoes and carrots, and covered with pan gravy, says it all! Always a favorite, but this savory, one pot meal is a wonderful way to welcome the fall! (Serves 6 to 8)

Ingredients:
1 – 3 pound Wild Idea Buffalo 3 Lbs. Chuck Roast
2 – tablespoons olive oil
2 – teaspoons sea salt
2 – teaspoons black pepper
2 – teaspoons garlic powder
2 – teaspoons thyme, or two to three sprigs fresh thyme *I use half fresh & half-dried.
1 – teaspoon rosemary, or one to two small fresh sprigs *I use half fresh & half-dried.
1 – teaspoon oregano, or one sprig oregano *I use half fresh & half-dried.
2 – onions, 1 diced and 1 quartered
1 to 2 tomatoes, coarse chopped
5 – cups buffalo, vegetable or organic beef stock
2 – bay leaves
6 – potatoes, quartered
3 – celery stalks, quartered
4 to 6 – carrots, peeled and quartered
½ – cup red wine
1 – tablespoon corn starch, or more if needed

Preparation:

1) Preheat oven to 225°. Rinse bison roast, pat dry and remove string. *Removing string is optional; I usually remove for this preparation, so I don’t loose the seasoning in removing after cooking.

2) Mix all the dried seasonings together. Rub the roast with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, and rub the dried seasoning into the roast.

3) In a heavy pot over high heat, heat the remaining tablespoon of the olive oil. Place the seasoned roast into the hot oil and brown for 5 minutes. Turn roast 3 times, searing for 5 minutes each. *Positioning roast up against the pan sidewalls will help in browning the whole roast.

4) Move the roast to the side and add the chopped onions, lifting the roast so onions cover the bottom and stir occasionally. Allow the onions to cook for about 5 minutes.

5) Add the chopped tomatoes around the roast, the bay leaf, and pour in the stock. Let the stock come to a full boil, then cover and turn off the heat.

6) Transfer covered roast into the preheated oven on the middle rack. Braise the buffalo pot roast for 6 hours.

7) During the last half hour of cooking, add the potatoes, pushing them down into the juices. Cover and increase heat to 375°.

8) Cook the potatoes for 15 minutes, then, add the celery, onion, and carrots. Cover and cook for an additional 15 minutes. Check the vegetables to insure they are cooked through, but still slightly firm. Continue to cook for a few more minutes if needed.

9) Remove the pot roast from the oven, and transfer the roast and the vegetables to a cutting board or platter. Cover with foil.

10) Place the pot with the juices on the stovetop over medium high heat. Bring to a boil. Mix the cornstarch into the wine, and whisk into the bubbling pan juices. If the gravy is not to your desired thickness add more wine/cornstarch mix, until desired consistency is achieved. Season to taste.

11) Carve the roast and pass with gravy and crusty bread.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/thanksgiving-recipes

One of America’s Favorites – Po’ boy

October 21, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A po’ boy (also po-boy, po boy) is a traditional sandwich from Louisiana. It almost always consists of meat, which is usually roast beef or fried seafood, often shrimp, crawfish, fish, oysters or crab. The meat is served on baguette-like New Orleans French bread, known for its crisp crust and fluffy center.

Roast beef was New Orleans’ most popular po’boy filler up to the 1970s and fried oyster po’boys are popular enough that they are sometimes called an oyster loaf, but the fillings can be almost anything, according to Sarah Rohan who in her book Gumbo Tales mentions fried shrimp, catfish, crawfish, Louisiana hot sausage, fried chicken, baked ham, duck, and rabbit.

A “dressed” po’ boy has lettuce, tomato, pickles, and mayonnaise. Fried seafood po’ boys are often dressed by default with melted butter and sliced pickle rounds. A Louisiana style hot sauce is optional. Non-seafood po’ boys will also often have Creole mustard.

The New Orleans sloppy roast beef po’ boy is generally served hot with gravy and resembles a Chicago Italian beef sandwich in appearance and method of preparation, although the size, bread, and toppings differ. To make it, a cut of beef (usually chuck or shoulder) is typically simmered in beef stock with seasonings such as garlic, pepper, thyme, and bay for several hours. The beef can be processed into “debris” by cutting it to shreds when done (folklore says that a po’ boy roast is done when it “falls apart with a hard stare”) and simmering the shredded beef in the pot for a longer time to absorb more of the juice and seasoning.

A roast beef po' boy

A roast beef po’ boy

In the late 1800s fried oyster sandwiches on French loaves were known in New Orleans as “oyster loaves”, a term still in use. A sandwich containing both fried shrimp and fried oysters is often called a “peacemaker” or La Médiatrice.

The origin of the name is unknown. A popular local theory claims that “po’ boy”, as specifically referring to a type of sandwich, was coined in a New Orleans restaurant owned by Benny and Clovis Martin (originally from Raceland, Louisiana), former streetcar conductors. In 1929, during a four-month strike against the streetcar company, the Martin brothers served their former colleagues free sandwiches. The Martins’ restaurant workers jokingly referred to the strikers as “poor boys”, and soon the sandwiches themselves took on the name. In Louisiana dialect, this is naturally shortened to “po’ boy”.

One New Orleans historian finds the Martin claim suspicious for several reasons, starting with the fact that it wasn’t described by the local press until 40 years after the strike, and that prior to 1969 the story from the Martin brothers themselves was that they had created the po-boy for farmers, dock workers and other “poor boys” who frequented their original location near the French Market. (The Martin brothers did write a letter, reprinted in local newspapers in 1929, promising to feed the streetcar workers, but it referenced “our meal” and made no mention of sandwiches.)

Fried shrimp po' boy at Middendorf's

Fried shrimp po’ boy at Middendorf’s

New Orleans
New Orleans is known for its grand restaurants (see Louisiana Creole cuisine), but more humble fare like the po’ boy is very popular. Po’ boys may be made at home, sold pre-packaged in convenience stores, available at deli counters and most neighborhood restaurants. One of the most basic New Orleans restaurants is the po’ boy shop, and these shops often offer seafood platters, red beans and rice, jambalaya, and other basic Creole dishes.

The two primary sources of po’boy bread are the Leidenheimer Baking Company and Alois J. Binder. There is fierce competition between po’ boy shops, and resident opinions of the best po’ boy shop varies widely.

Each year there is a festival in New Orleans dedicated to the po’ boy, the Oak Street Po’Boy Festival. It is a one-day festival that features live music, arts, and food vendors with multiple types of po’ boys. It is held in mid-November along a commercial strip of Oak Street in the city’s Carrollton neighborhood. The festival gives “best-of” awards, which gives the chefs an incentive to invent some of the most creative po’ boys.

Authentic versions of Louisiana-style po’ boys can be found along the Gulf Coast, from Houston through the Florida Panhandle. The term “po’ boy” has spread further and can be found in the South Atlantic States and in California, where it may instead refer to local variations on the submarine sandwich.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Chicken Fried Steak

August 26, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Chicken fried steak smothered in cream gravy with sides of mashed potatoes, fried okra and a dinner roll.

Chicken fried steak, also known as country-fried steak, is an American breaded cutlet dish consisting of a piece of beefsteak (tenderized cube steak) coated with seasoned flour and pan-fried. It is sometimes associated with the Southern cuisine of the United States. It can also be made from the breast of a chicken, hence “Chicken” and it can be different from country fried steak.

Chicken fried steak resembles the Austrian dish wiener schnitzel and the Italian–South American dish milanesa, which is a tenderized veal or pork cutlet, coated with flour, eggs, chicken stock cube, and bread crumbs, and then fried. It is also similar to the recipe for Scottish collops.

The precise origins of the dish are unclear, but many sources attribute its development to German and Austrian immigrants to Texas in the 19th century, who brought recipes for wiener schnitzel from Europe to the USA. Lamesa, the seat of Dawson County on the Texas South Plains, claims to be the birthplace of chicken fried steak, and hosts an annual celebration accordingly.

The Virginia Housewife, published in 1838 by Mary Randolph, has a recipe for veal cutlets that is one of the earliest recipes for a food like chicken fried steak. The recipe for what we now know as chicken fried steak was included in many regional cookbooks by the late 19th century. The Oxford English Dictionary’s earliest attestation of the term “chicken-fried steak” is from a restaurant advertisement in the 19 June 1914 edition of the Colorado Springs Gazette newspaper.

A 1943 American cookbook recipe for wiener schnitzel includes a white salt and pepper cream gravy.

Chicken fried steak is among numerous popular dishes which make up the official state meal of Oklahoma, added to the list in 1988.

Chicken fried steak is prepared by taking a thin cut of beefsteak and tenderizing it by pounding, cubing, or forking. It is then immersed in egg batter and dredged in flour to which salt, pepper, and often other seasonings have been added (called breading). Chicken fried steak is typically deep-fried and served with a cream gravy, while country fried steak is typically fried in a skillet and served with a brown gravy. The frying medium has traditionally been shortening, but butter and lard have sometimes been used instead. Health concerns have led many cooks to replace the shortening with vegetable oil.

Chicken fried steak with chipotle cream gravy

When there are problems with the breading separating from the meat while cooking, it can be very useful to first dredge the meat in the flour mixture, then the egg, and then the flour mixture again, and then let it sit for a half hour or more before cooking.

The cuts of steak used for chicken fried steak are usually the less expensive, less desirable ones, such as cube steak, chuck, round steak, and occasionally flank steak. The method may be used for chopped or ground beef, but it is not called chicken fried steak. Chicken fried steak is usually served for lunch or dinner topped with cream gravy and with mashed potatoes, vegetables, and biscuits or Texas toast served on the side. In the Midwest, it is also common to serve chicken fried steak for breakfast, along with toast and hash browns.

The steak can be served on a hamburger bun with cream gravy as a “chicken fried steak sandwich”. It can also be cubed and stuffed in a baked potato with the gravy and cheese.

Alternatively, the tenderized steak may be cut into strips, breaded, deep fried, and served for breakfast with eggs and toast or for other meals in a basket with fries and cream gravy. Either is then known as “finger steaks”.

Typically, in Texas and surrounding states, chicken fried steak is fried in a thick layer of oil in a pan and served with traditional peppered milk gravy.

Regionally, chicken fried steak may be known as country fried steak. While some recipes and restaurants will use a traditional peppered milk gravy on country fried steak, a variant using a brown, beef stock based gravy with onions is common, and is the primary difference between the two dishes in regions where both are served.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Smothered Food

August 12, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A plate lunch of smothered steak and gravy served over boiled white rice from Garys Grocery in Lafayette, Louisiana

Smothering meat, seafood or vegetables is a cooking technique used in both Cajun and Creole cuisines of Louisiana. The technique involves cooking in a covered pan over low heat with a moderate amount of liquid, and can be regarded as a form of stove-top braising. The meat dishes cooked in this fashion are typically served over boiled or steamed white rice as a rice and gravy, while the vegetables are typically served as side dishes.

A large variety of meats are “smothered” in South Louisiana cuisine, including both domestic animals and wild game. Domestic animals cooked in this fashion include chicken, domestic duck, pork, beef (including such organs as the liver), and domestic rabbit. Wild game commonly cooked in this fashion include squirrel, rabbit, nutria rat, feral pig, woodcock, wild duck, and venison. Originally a dish made from cheap cuts of meat favored by farmers and laborers, popular versions of the dish such as “smothered steak” and “smothered pork roast” are served throughout Acadiana at local “plate lunch houses”. Raised on Rice and Gravy, a 2009 documentary film by Conni Castille and Allison Bohl, chronicles the prevalence of the dish at local plate lunch houses and its enduring popularity in local cuisine.

 

“Smothering” the meat and vegetables

In French, the word “étouffée” means “smothered”. Étouffée can be made using different shellfish, the most popular version of the dish being Crawfish Étouffée, although shrimp is also used. Originally étouffée was a popular dish in the Acadiana area surrounding Lafayette. In the late twentieth century a waiter at the popular Bourbon Street restaurant, Galatoire’s brought the dish in to his employer to try, the dish was added to their menu. Other restaurants in the city of New Orleans soon followed, with the dish gaining in popularity with locals and tourists alike. Many Cajun restaurant owners claim that étouffée is the most popular dish on their menus.

Varieties of vegetables cooked by smothering include cabbage, okra, potatoes and corn. The vegetables are kept from burning by the addition of animal fats or oils, or the addition of meat products such as salt pork or andouille.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 21, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Making Gravy…………

Start with a flavorful fat – Drippings from cooked turkey, chicken and pork make an excellent base for gravy. Ham and beef, not so much. (Ham is too salty and beef fat just doesn’t taste good.)

Healthy Beef Recipes

July 17, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Beef Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Beef Recipes with recipes like; Southwestern Steak Pizza, Chicken-“Fried” Steak with Spiced Gravy, and Smoky Grilled Flank Steak. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Beef Recipes
Find healthy, delicious beef recipes including ground beef, roast beef, stews and beef brisket. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Southwestern Steak Pizza
Flank steak, black beans, and cilantro bring a Southwestern flair to these individual pizzas……….

Chicken-“Fried” Steak with Spiced Gravy
Stop into just about any diner down South or in the Midwest and you’re sure to find chicken-fried steak on the menu. This baked version allows you to enjoy the great flavor of the traditional favorite without all the fat and calories…………..

Smoky Grilled Flank Steak
This easy grilled flank steak gets its flavor from two smoky ingredients—paprika and chipotle—rather than spending hours in a smoker. For a quick and healthy weeknight dinner, grill your favorite vegetables alongside the steak and voilà! Dinner’s done…………..

 

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Beef Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18237/ingredients/meat-poultry/beef/

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