One of America’s Favorites – Gravy

February 18, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Mushroom gravy atop French fries.

Gravy is a sauce often made from the juices of meats that run naturally during cooking and thickened with wheat flour or corn starch for added texture. In the United States and Singapore, the term can refer to a wider variety of sauces. The gravy may be further colored and flavored with gravy salt (a simple mix of salt and caramel food coloring) or gravy browning (gravy salt dissolved in water) or ready-made cubes and powders can be used as a substitute for natural meat or vegetable extracts. Canned and instant gravies are also available. Gravy is commonly served with roasts, meatloaf, rice, and mashed potatoes.

* Brown gravy in is the name for a gravy made from the drippings from roasted meat or fowl. The drippings are cooked on the stove top at high heat with onions and/or other vegetables, then thickened with a thin mixture of water and either wheat flour or cornstarch.

* Chocolate gravy is a variety of gravy made with fat, flour, cocoa powder and sometimes a small amount of sugar.

* Cream gravy is the gravy typically used in biscuits and gravy and chicken fried steak. It is a variety of gravy that starts with the roux being made of meat and or meat drippings and flour. Milk is added and thickened by the roux; once prepared, black pepper and bits of mild sausage or chicken liver are sometimes added. Besides cream and sawmill gravy, common names include country gravy, white gravy, milk gravy, and sausage gravy.

* Egg gravy is a variety of gravy made starting with meat drippings (usually from bacon) followed by flour being used to make a thick roux. Water, broth, or milk is added and the liquid is brought back up to a boil, then salt and peppered to taste. A well-beaten egg is then slowly added while the gravy is stirred or whisked swiftly, cooking the egg immediately and separating it into small fragments in the gravy. Called rich man’s gravy in some areas of the southern US.

* Giblet gravy has the giblets of turkey or chicken added when it is to be served with those types of poultry, or uses stock made from the giblets.

Sausage gravy served atop a biscuits and gravy dish

* Mushroom gravy is a variety of gravy made with mushrooms.

* Onion gravy is made from large quantities of slowly sweated, chopped onions mixed with stock or wine. Commonly served with bangers and mash, eggs, chops, or other grilled or fried meat which by way of the cooking method would not produce their own gravy.

* Red-eye gravy is a gravy made from the drippings of ham fried in a skillet/frying pan. The pan is deglazed with coffee, giving the gravy its name, and uses no thickening agent. This gravy is a staple of Southern United States cuisine and is usually served over ham, grits or biscuits.

* Vegetable gravy or vegetarian gravy is gravy made with boiled or roasted vegetables. A quick and flavorful vegetable gravy can be made from any combination of vegetable broth or vegetable stock, flour, and one of either butter, oil, or margarine. One recipe uses vegetarian bouillon cubes with cornstarch (corn flour) as a thickener (cowboy roux), which is whisked into boiling water. Sometimes vegetable juices are added to enrich the flavor, which may give the gravy a dark green color. Wine could be added. Brown vegetarian gravy can also be made with savory yeast extract like Marmite or Vegemite. There are also commercially produced instant gravy granules which are suitable for both vegetarians and vegans.

In United Kingdom and Ireland, a Sunday roast is usually served with gravy. It is commonly eaten with pork, chicken, lamb, or beef. It is also popular in different parts of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland to have gravy with just chips (mostly from a fish and chip shop).

In United Kingdom and Irish cuisine, as well as in the cuisines of Commonwealth countries like Australia, New Zealand, and some areas in Canada, the word gravy refers only to the meat based sauce derived from meat juices, stock cubes or gravy granules. Use of the word “gravy” does not include other thickened sauces. One of the most popular forms is onion gravy, which is eaten with sausages, Yorkshire pudding and roast meat.

Throughout the United States, gravy is commonly eaten with Thanksgiving foods such as turkey, mashed potatoes and stuffing. One Southern United States variation is sausage gravy eaten with American biscuits. Another Southern US dish that has white gravy is chicken fried steak. Rice and gravy is a staple of Cajun and Creole cuisine in the southern US state of Louisiana.

Gravy is an integral part of the Canadian dish poutine. It uses a mix of beef and chicken stock as well as vinegar.

In many parts of Asia, particularly India, Malaysia, and Singapore, gravy is any thickened liquid part of a dish. For example, the liquid part of a thick curry may be referred to as gravy.

In the Mediterranean, Maghreb cuisine is dominated with gravy and bread-based dishes. Tajine and most Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia) dishes are derivatives of oil, meat and vegetable gravies. The dish is usually served with a loaf of bread. The bread is then dipped into the gravy and then used to gather or scoop the meat and vegetables between the index, middle finger and thumb, and consumed.

In gastronomy of Menorca, it has been used since the English influence during the 17th century in typical Menorcan and Catalan dishes, as for example macarrons amb grevi (pasta).

In Italian-American communities, particularly on the East Coast and around the Chicago area, the term “gravy”, “tomato gravy”, or “Sunday gravy” is used, but this refers to a tomato sauce rather than meat drippings mixed with a thickener. Used in this context, “gravy” is meant to be an English translation from the Italian sugo, which means sauce, as in sugo per pastasciutta. Whether certain sauces are referred to as “gravy” or “sauce” in Italian-American cuisine continues to be a source of debate and varies according to different family and community traditions.

 

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Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Wild Idea Stuffed Bison Roast with Red Wine Gravy

January 23, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo recipe of the Week is Wild Idea Stuffed Bison Roast with Red Wine Gravy. You’ll be using the Wild Idea 3 lb. Sirloin Tip Roast along with an incredible homemade stuffing (recipe below). You can find this recipe or purchase any of the healthy and delicious Wild Idea Buffalo Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One!
http://wildideabuffalo.com/

Wild Idea Stuffed Bison Roast with Red Wine Gravy

I tested this recipe out on visiting guests, and it was a big success! prepping the roast will take a little effort, but a sharp filet knife will make it very manageable. The end result will be a very tender, medium roast, with a delicious, savory sausage stuffing and red wine gravy!

Ingredients for Roast & Gravy:
1 – 3 lb. Wild Idea 3 lb. Sirloin Tip Roast 
1 – tablespoon olive oil
½ – tablespoon black pepper
½ – tablespoon salt
1 – onion, coarse chopped and flash processed
½ recipe Savory Buffalo Sausage Stuffing (Use other half for your organic Turkey or chicken or just heat by itself.)
2 – sticks butter
¼ – cup flour
1 – quart buffalo, organic beef stock
2 – cups wine
1 – tablespoon fresh rosemary, minced
½ – tablespoon thyme
½ – tablespoon sage

Instructions: *Preheat oven to 185°
1) Rinse roast and pat dry. Remove any exterior fat. Using a filet knife butterfly roast, in a jelly roll fashion. You will make 3 major cuts lengthwise, starting about 1½ inches in from left, slicing down about 2 inches, flip roast slightly and slice again, repeat. You will encounter a piece of sinew that runs through the roast, slice through and contend with after flat.
2) Flatten out meat with hands. Using the tip of the filet knife remove visible sinew, but avoid cutting through, which will produce holes. Cut away any miss-shaped end pieces and reserve. There will still be a little sinew in roast, which can be cut away during serving time.
3) Cover roast with plastic wrap and using a mallet or rolling pin, pound out to about 1 inch thick.
4) Place stuffing down the center of the roast and wrap meat around until meat touches. Secure with heavy toothpicks.
5) Pour olive oil, salt and pepper in roasting pan and mix together. Roll roast in seasoned oil, until evenly coated. Add miss-shaped meat pieces to the roasting pan.
6) Place chopped onion in food processor and flash process, to create smaller pieces and release some of the onions juices.
7) Pour onions with juices over roast, and press lightly in to meat.
8) Place roast in pre-heated oven and roast for 5 hours.
9) Remove roast from oven, and from roasting pan and wrap in foil. Set aside. Increase oven temperature to 500°.
10) In a saucepan melt one stick of the butter over medium heat. Scrape onion bits and juices from the roasting pan, into the saucepan. Whisk in flour, and stir until well incorporated and lightly brown.
11) Slowly whisk in stock and wine, stirring constantly.
12) Add seasoning and bring to a full boil. Reduce heat and allow to simmer until reduce by a third.
13) Remove roast from foil and return roast to pan. Melt remaining stick of butter and pour over the onions on top of the roast. Return roast to lower shelf in oven, and turn oven to broil. Roast until onions are golden brown.
14) Remove roast from oven. Transfer roast to cutting board, for carving. Pass with Red Wine Gravy.

Savory Buffalo Sausage Stuffing
Ingredients:
2 – Tablespoons butter
2 – Tablespoons olive oil
1 – 1 lb. Chorizo Sausage or Italian Sausage
1 – onion, diced
3 – stalks celery, sliced
2 – teaspoons dried sage
2 – teaspoons dried thyme
1 – teaspoon ground fennel1 – teaspoon salt
1 – Tablespoon pepper
1 – 14oz. bag herbed seasoned stuffing
2½ – cups organic chicken stock

Instructions:
1) In heavy skillet over medium high heat, heat butter and olive oil.
2) Crumble in Sausage, add; onion, celery and all of the dried seasonings. Sauté for 8 minutes.
3) Add herbed stuffing and stir to incorporate.
4) Slowly add you stock. Mixture should be moist and hold together.
5) Transfer stuffing to a different pan to cool, and follow instructions above.

http://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/55195073-wild-idea-stuffed-bison-roast-with-red-wine-gravy

Healthy Chicken Thigh Recipes

January 2, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 1 Comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Chicken Thigh Recipes. Chicken Thighs are our favorite around here! So here’s some Delicious and Healthy Chicken Thigh Recipes. With recipes like; Slow-Cooker Butter Chicken, Italian-Herbed Chicken and Mozzarella Melts, and Chicken, Potato, and Gravy Bowls. You can find these recipes and much more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Chicken Thigh Recipes
Find healthy, delicious chicken thigh recipes including BBQ, baked and fried chicken thighs. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Slow-Cooker Butter Chicken
Browning the chicken and sautéing the aromatics before everything goes into the crock pot is key to building the flavors in our version of this popular curry…………

Italian-Herbed Chicken and Mozzarella Melts
Chicken thighs are slowly cooked with Italian-style sauce and herbs, then served on crusty bread slices with olives and two savory cheeses…………..

Chicken, Potato, and Gravy Bowls
Tender potatoes and flavorful chicken are topped with a delicious gravy in this meal-in-a bowl………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Chicken Thigh Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19160/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/thighs/?page=2

Healthy Buttermilk Recipes

December 30, 2018 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Buttermilk Recipes. I love Buttermilk. Not only to drink but for recipes, especially using it as brine or marinade for Chicken. EatingWell has some Delicious and Healthy Buttermilk Recipes like; Whole-Wheat Biscuits and Sausage Gravy, Buttermilk Corn Muffins, and Panko-Crusted Chicken. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Buttermilk Recipes
Find healthy, delicious buttermilk recipes from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Whole-Wheat Biscuits and Sausage Gravy
Homemade creamy sausage gravy over flaky biscuits is the perfect breakfast to start a weekend morning. A mixture of white whole-wheat flour and cake flour makes these southern whole-wheat biscuits exceptionally tender. Cake flour has a lower protein content than all-purpose flour and is used for delicate cakes and biscuits. Look for unbleached cake flour, available at large supermarkets and natural food stores……

Buttermilk Corn Muffins
This savory muffin recipe is less sweet than most corn breads. The muffins are quick, easy, and make a great side dish for dinner and for Thanksgiving………

Panko-Crusted Chicken
This recipe is the perfect way to add some extra flavor to your dinner. Combine this recipe with your favorite vegetables and a serving of whole-grains to make a balanced meal…….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Buttermilk Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19162/ingredients/dairy/buttermilk/

Diabetic Christmas Main Dish Recipes

December 20, 2018 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Diabetic Christmas Main Dish Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Diabetic Christmas Main Dish Recipes like; Cranberry Glazed Turkey Breast with Wild Rice Pilaf, Stuffed Pork Loin and Pineapple, and Herbed-Lemon Turkey with Wild Mushroom Gravy. Find these Diabetic Christmas Main Dish Recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy through the Holidays! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Diabetic Christmas Main Dish Recipes
Find healthy, delicious diabetic Christmas main dish recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Cranberry Glazed Turkey Breast with Wild Rice Pilaf
This cranberry-glazed turkey breast recipe, which uses a split bone-in turkey breast, is the perfect thing to make if you’re serving a smaller crowd or if everyone wants white meat. The wild rice pilaf recipe is delicious on its own so you can make it even if you don’t prepare the turkey……..

Stuffed Pork Loin and Pineapple
You’ll want to use fresh pineapple, not canned, in this recipe calling for the classic flavor combo of pork and pineapple. Grilling both the fruit and the meat imparts a pleasant smokiness to both………….

Herbed-Lemon Turkey with Wild Mushroom Gravy
Dried cherries and sage tucked under the skin of the turkey breast give each serving a hint of sweetness mixed with a fabulous herb flavor…………

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/22566/health-condition/diabetic/holidays-events/christmas/main-dishes/

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Biscuits with Spinach Turkey Gravy

December 7, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is – Biscuits with Spinach Turkey Gravy. Start your day off right with this week’s recipe of Biscuits with Spinach Turkey Gravy. Made using JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Breakfast Sausage Roll – Mild. Gravy and Biscuit like you’ve never had! It’s 280 calories and 24 net carbs. You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

Biscuits with Spinach Turkey Gravy
Looking for something special for breakfast? Try this: Freshly baked biscuits smothered in a savory spinach and turkey sausage gravy. An amazing breakfast at under 300 calories per serving.

INGREDIENTS
BISCUITS
2 cups white whole wheat flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
pinch of salt
⅛ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
¾ cup plus 1 tablespoon very cold milk
¼ cup very cold butter, cubed
GRAVY
1 small shallot, diced
1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Breakfast Sausage Roll – Mild
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground paprika
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
2 cups chopped fresh spinach
¼ cup white whole wheat flour
2 cups milk
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
pinch of salt
2 teaspoons freshly ground pepper

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 425°F. In large mixing bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt and pepper. Add milk and butter, use your hands (or a pastry blender) to rub it into the flour until mixture is crumbly. Do not over mix.
2) Turn dough out onto a clean lightly floured surface. With a rolling pin, roll dough into a 1-inch thick rectangle. Use a round biscuit cutter or the top of a water glass to cut out biscuits. Place the biscuits onto a lined and lightly sprayed baking sheet. Bake 12 minutes or until golden brown.
3) Meanwhile, in large non-stick skillet, saute shallot. Remove to a small bowl; set aside. In same skillet, add sausage and cook as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F. as measured by a meat thermometer. Drain off any excess fat and add the shallot back to the pan. Sprinkle with cumin, paprika, thyme and fold in the spinach, stirring gently allowing the heat to wilt the spinach. Transfer mixture to a bowl and cover to keep warm.
4) In medium bowl, whisk flour, milk, broth, salt and pepper until smooth. Add mixture to the same pan used to cook the sausage. Cook over medium-low heat stirring continuously, 15 minutes or until mixture has thickened and flour is completely cooked off. Add the reserved turkey sausage mixture and cook until the gravy is heated through.
5) Cut the cooled biscuits in half. Spoon turkey gravy over biscuits and serve.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 280
Protein 16g
Carbohydrates 29g
Fiber 5g
Sugars 0g
Fat 10
Cholesterol 40mg
Sodium 730mg
Saturated Fat 3g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/766-biscuits-with-spinach-turkey-gravy

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Pot Roast

November 28, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is a Buffalo Pot Roast. It’s a Winter Comfort Food Classic – Buffalo Pot Roast! Made using the Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast. You can find this recipe and purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

Nothing represents “comfort food” more than a traditional pot roast. Wild Idea’s 100% grass-fed, rich and slightly sweet bison roast, braised until tender and juicy, nestled in a bed of potatoes and carrots, and covered with pan gravy, says it all! Always a favorite, but this savory, one pot meal is a wonderful way to welcome the fall! (Serves 6 to 8)

Ingredients:
1 – 3 pound Wild Idea Buffalo 3 Lbs. Chuck Roast
2 – tablespoons olive oil
2 – teaspoons sea salt
2 – teaspoons black pepper
2 – teaspoons garlic powder
2 – teaspoons thyme, or two to three sprigs fresh thyme *I use half fresh & half-dried.
1 – teaspoon rosemary, or one to two small fresh sprigs *I use half fresh & half-dried.
1 – teaspoon oregano, or one sprig oregano *I use half fresh & half-dried.
2 – onions, 1 diced and 1 quartered
1 to 2 tomatoes, coarse chopped
5 – cups buffalo, vegetable or organic beef stock
2 – bay leaves
6 – potatoes, quartered
3 – celery stalks, quartered
4 to 6 – carrots, peeled and quartered
½ – cup red wine
1 – tablespoon corn starch, or more if needed

Preparation:

1) Preheat oven to 225°. Rinse bison roast, pat dry and remove string. *Removing string is optional; I usually remove for this preparation, so I don’t loose the seasoning in removing after cooking.

2) Mix all the dried seasonings together. Rub the roast with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, and rub the dried seasoning into the roast.

3) In a heavy pot over high heat, heat the remaining tablespoon of the olive oil. Place the seasoned roast into the hot oil and brown for 5 minutes. Turn roast 3 times, searing for 5 minutes each. *Positioning roast up against the pan sidewalls will help in browning the whole roast.

4) Move the roast to the side and add the chopped onions, lifting the roast so onions cover the bottom and stir occasionally. Allow the onions to cook for about 5 minutes.

5) Add the chopped tomatoes around the roast, the bay leaf, and pour in the stock. Let the stock come to a full boil, then cover and turn off the heat.

6) Transfer covered roast into the preheated oven on the middle rack. Braise the buffalo pot roast for 6 hours.

7) During the last half hour of cooking, add the potatoes, pushing them down into the juices. Cover and increase heat to 375°.

8) Cook the potatoes for 15 minutes, then, add the celery, onion, and carrots. Cover and cook for an additional 15 minutes. Check the vegetables to insure they are cooked through, but still slightly firm. Continue to cook for a few more minutes if needed.

9) Remove the pot roast from the oven, and transfer the roast and the vegetables to a cutting board or platter. Cover with foil.

10) Place the pot with the juices on the stovetop over medium high heat. Bring to a boil. Mix the cornstarch into the wine, and whisk into the bubbling pan juices. If the gravy is not to your desired thickness add more wine/cornstarch mix, until desired consistency is achieved. Season to taste.

11) Carve the roast and pass with gravy and crusty bread.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/54660929-buffalo-pot-roast

Healthy Aging Recipes

November 4, 2018 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Aging Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Aging Recipes like; Ham and Egg Breakfast Burrito, Grilled Steak and Peppers, and Whole-Wheat Biscuits and Sausage Gravy. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Aging Recipes
Find healthy, delicious healthy aging recipes including breakfasts, lunches and dinners. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Ham and Egg Breakfast Burrito
This breakfast burrito is quick to make and easy to eat. Ham, egg and a dash of hot sauce cook up into an omelet and get rolled up in a delicious high-fiber tortillafor some fun fork-free eating…….

Grilled Steak and Peppers
Skewered marinated peppers and onions grill up nicely alongside beef tenderloins in this 35-minute dinner recipe. Serve with a green or grain salad for a complete meal………..

Whole-Wheat Biscuits and Sausage Gravy
Homemade creamy sausage gravy over flaky biscuits is the perfect breakfast to start a weekend morning. A mixture of white whole-wheat flour and cake flour makes these southern whole-wheat biscuits exceptionally tender. Cake flour has a lower protein content than all-purpose flour and is used for delicate cakes and biscuits. Look for unbleached cake flour, available at large supermarkets and natural food stores………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Aging Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18053/lifestyle-diets/healthy-aging/

One of America’s Favorites – Biscuits

October 29, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Biscuits

A biscuit in the United States and parts of Canada, is a variety of small baked goods with a firm browned crust and a soft interior. They are made with baking powder or baking soda as a chemical leavening agent rather than yeast. They are similar to British scones or the bannock from the Shetland Isles.

Biscuits, soda breads, and cornbread, among others, are often referred to collectively as “quick breads”, to indicate that they do not need time to rise before baking.

Although the American English and British English use the same word to refer to two distinctly different modern foods, early hard biscuits (North American: cookies), were derived from a simple, storable version of bread. The word “biscuit” itself originates from the medieval Latin word ‘biscoctus’, meaning “twice-cooked”.

The modern Italian baked goods known as biscotti (also meaning “twice-cooked” in Italian) most closely resemble the Medieval Latin item and cooking technique.

In the Hispanic world a bizcocho refers to an array of differing baked goods depending on the country, from Spain and throughout Hispanic America. In the Philippines, a biskotso (also spelled “biscocho”), derived from a word used by the Spanish conquerors, refers to a type of garlic bread.

The definitive explanation for the differences in the usage of “biscuit” in the English speaking world is provided by Elizabeth David in English Bread and Yeast Cookery, in the chapter “Yeast Buns and Small Tea Cakes” and section “Soft Biscuits”. She writes,

It is interesting that these soft biscuits are common to Scotland and Guernsey, and that the term biscuit as applied to a soft product was retained in these places, and in America, whereas in England it has completely died out.

Early European settlers in the United States brought with them a simple, easy style of cooking, most often based on ground wheat and warmed with gravy.

Biscuits and Gravy

The biscuit emerged as a distinct food type in the early 19th century, before the American Civil War. Cooks created a cheaply produced addition for their meals that required no yeast, which was expensive and difficult to store. With no leavening agents except the bitter-tasting pearlash available, beaten biscuits were laboriously beaten and folded to incorporate air into the dough which expanded when heated in the oven causing the biscuit to rise. In eating, the advantage of the biscuit over a slice of bread was that it was harder, and hence kept its shape when wiping up gravy in the popular combination biscuits and gravy.

In 1875, Alexander P. Ashbourne patented the first biscuit cutter. It consisted of a board to roll the biscuits out on, which was hinged to a metal plate with various biscuit cutter shapes mounted to it.

Southern chefs may have had an advantage in creating biscuits. Northern American all-purpose flours, mainly grown in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, are made from the hard spring wheats that grow in the North’s cold-winter climate. Southern American bleached all-purpose flours, originally grown in the Carolinas, Georgia and Tennessee before national food distribution networks, are made from the soft winter wheat that grows in the warm southern summer. This summer growth results in wheat that has less protein, which is more suited to the creation of quick breads, as well as cookies, cakes and muffins.

Pre-shaped ready-to-bake biscuits can be purchased in supermarkets, in the form of small refrigerated cylindrical segments of dough encased in a cardboard can. These refrigerator biscuits were patented by Ballard and Ballard in 1931.

Biscuits can be prepared for baking in several ways. The dough can be rolled out flat and cut into rounds, which expand when baked into flaky-layered cylinders. If extra liquid is added, the

Open biscuit with honey being drizzled in it

dough’s texture changes to resemble stiff pancake batter so that small spoonfuls can be dropped into the baking sheet to produce “drop biscuits”, which are more amorphous in texture and shape.

Large drop biscuits, because of their size and rough exterior texture, are sometimes referred to as “cat head biscuits”. A common variation on basic biscuits is “cheese biscuits”, made by adding grated Cheddar or American cheese to the basic recipe.

Home cooks may use refrigerator biscuits for a quicker alternative to rolled or drop biscuits. Refrigerator biscuits can even be cooked over a campfire on a stick.

A sweet biscuit layered or topped with fruit (typically strawberries), juice-based syrup, and cream is called shortcake. A type of biscuit called an “angel biscuit” contains yeast as well, as do those made with a sourdough starter.

While there are many different ways to prepare and top biscuits, the ingredients from recipe to recipe are generally the same. Most recipes will call for all-purpose flour, baking powder, salt, either milk or buttermilk, and either butter or shortening (about half will also call for a small amount of sugar as well). The amount of each ingredient will vary for each recipe much the general concept is the same for these simple baked goods.

Biscuits
Open biscuit with honey being drizzled in it

One of America’s Favorites – Rabbit Pie

August 20, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A meat pie made with rabbit and chicken

Rabbit pie is a game pie consisting of rabbit meat in a gravy with other ingredients (typically onions, celery and carrots) enclosed in a pastry crust. Rabbit pie is part of traditional American and English cuisine. It has recently found renewed popularity.

Wild rabbit, as opposed to farmed, is most often used as it is easily and affordably obtained, and is described as more flavorsome.

Along with rabbit meat, ingredients of the filling of a rabbit pie typically include onions, celery and carrots. Other ingredients may include prunes, bacon and cider. Australian recipes for rabbit pie sometimes include the food paste Vegemite as an ingredient.

Rabbit pie was a staple dish of the American pioneers. Thanks to the increasing demand for wild and fresh ingredients, rabbit pie is often seen on the menus of fashionable restaurants and gastropubs.

Two huge rabbit pies are part of traditional Easter celebrations in the English village of Hallaton, Leicestershire.

In Beatrix Potter’s children’s book The Tale of Peter Rabbit, the title character’s father was put into a rabbit pie for going into Mr McGregor’s garden.

 

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