One of America’s Favorites – Chicken Fried Steak

August 26, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Chicken fried steak smothered in cream gravy with sides of mashed potatoes, fried okra and a dinner roll.

Chicken fried steak, also known as country-fried steak, is an American breaded cutlet dish consisting of a piece of beefsteak (tenderized cube steak) coated with seasoned flour and pan-fried. It is sometimes associated with the Southern cuisine of the United States. It can also be made from the breast of a chicken, hence “Chicken” and it can be different from country fried steak.

Chicken fried steak resembles the Austrian dish wiener schnitzel and the Italian–South American dish milanesa, which is a tenderized veal or pork cutlet, coated with flour, eggs, chicken stock cube, and bread crumbs, and then fried. It is also similar to the recipe for Scottish collops.

The precise origins of the dish are unclear, but many sources attribute its development to German and Austrian immigrants to Texas in the 19th century, who brought recipes for wiener schnitzel from Europe to the USA. Lamesa, the seat of Dawson County on the Texas South Plains, claims to be the birthplace of chicken fried steak, and hosts an annual celebration accordingly.

The Virginia Housewife, published in 1838 by Mary Randolph, has a recipe for veal cutlets that is one of the earliest recipes for a food like chicken fried steak. The recipe for what we now know as chicken fried steak was included in many regional cookbooks by the late 19th century. The Oxford English Dictionary’s earliest attestation of the term “chicken-fried steak” is from a restaurant advertisement in the 19 June 1914 edition of the Colorado Springs Gazette newspaper.

A 1943 American cookbook recipe for wiener schnitzel includes a white salt and pepper cream gravy.

Chicken fried steak is among numerous popular dishes which make up the official state meal of Oklahoma, added to the list in 1988.

Chicken fried steak is prepared by taking a thin cut of beefsteak and tenderizing it by pounding, cubing, or forking. It is then immersed in egg batter and dredged in flour to which salt, pepper, and often other seasonings have been added (called breading). Chicken fried steak is typically deep-fried and served with a cream gravy, while country fried steak is typically fried in a skillet and served with a brown gravy. The frying medium has traditionally been shortening, but butter and lard have sometimes been used instead. Health concerns have led many cooks to replace the shortening with vegetable oil.

Chicken fried steak with chipotle cream gravy

When there are problems with the breading separating from the meat while cooking, it can be very useful to first dredge the meat in the flour mixture, then the egg, and then the flour mixture again, and then let it sit for a half hour or more before cooking.

The cuts of steak used for chicken fried steak are usually the less expensive, less desirable ones, such as cube steak, chuck, round steak, and occasionally flank steak. The method may be used for chopped or ground beef, but it is not called chicken fried steak. Chicken fried steak is usually served for lunch or dinner topped with cream gravy and with mashed potatoes, vegetables, and biscuits or Texas toast served on the side. In the Midwest, it is also common to serve chicken fried steak for breakfast, along with toast and hash browns.

The steak can be served on a hamburger bun with cream gravy as a “chicken fried steak sandwich”. It can also be cubed and stuffed in a baked potato with the gravy and cheese.

Alternatively, the tenderized steak may be cut into strips, breaded, deep fried, and served for breakfast with eggs and toast or for other meals in a basket with fries and cream gravy. Either is then known as “finger steaks”.

Typically, in Texas and surrounding states, chicken fried steak is fried in a thick layer of oil in a pan and served with traditional peppered milk gravy.

Regionally, chicken fried steak may be known as country fried steak. While some recipes and restaurants will use a traditional peppered milk gravy on country fried steak, a variant using a brown, beef stock based gravy with onions is common, and is the primary difference between the two dishes in regions where both are served.

 

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One of America’s Favorites – Smothered Food

August 12, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A plate lunch of smothered steak and gravy served over boiled white rice from Garys Grocery in Lafayette, Louisiana

Smothering meat, seafood or vegetables is a cooking technique used in both Cajun and Creole cuisines of Louisiana. The technique involves cooking in a covered pan over low heat with a moderate amount of liquid, and can be regarded as a form of stove-top braising. The meat dishes cooked in this fashion are typically served over boiled or steamed white rice as a rice and gravy, while the vegetables are typically served as side dishes.

A large variety of meats are “smothered” in South Louisiana cuisine, including both domestic animals and wild game. Domestic animals cooked in this fashion include chicken, domestic duck, pork, beef (including such organs as the liver), and domestic rabbit. Wild game commonly cooked in this fashion include squirrel, rabbit, nutria rat, feral pig, woodcock, wild duck, and venison. Originally a dish made from cheap cuts of meat favored by farmers and laborers, popular versions of the dish such as “smothered steak” and “smothered pork roast” are served throughout Acadiana at local “plate lunch houses”. Raised on Rice and Gravy, a 2009 documentary film by Conni Castille and Allison Bohl, chronicles the prevalence of the dish at local plate lunch houses and its enduring popularity in local cuisine.

 

“Smothering” the meat and vegetables

In French, the word “étouffée” means “smothered”. Étouffée can be made using different shellfish, the most popular version of the dish being Crawfish Étouffée, although shrimp is also used. Originally étouffée was a popular dish in the Acadiana area surrounding Lafayette. In the late twentieth century a waiter at the popular Bourbon Street restaurant, Galatoire’s brought the dish in to his employer to try, the dish was added to their menu. Other restaurants in the city of New Orleans soon followed, with the dish gaining in popularity with locals and tourists alike. Many Cajun restaurant owners claim that étouffée is the most popular dish on their menus.

Varieties of vegetables cooked by smothering include cabbage, okra, potatoes and corn. The vegetables are kept from burning by the addition of animal fats or oils, or the addition of meat products such as salt pork or andouille.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 21, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Making Gravy…………

Start with a flavorful fat – Drippings from cooked turkey, chicken and pork make an excellent base for gravy. Ham and beef, not so much. (Ham is too salty and beef fat just doesn’t taste good.)

Healthy Beef Recipes

July 17, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Beef Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Beef Recipes with recipes like; Southwestern Steak Pizza, Chicken-“Fried” Steak with Spiced Gravy, and Smoky Grilled Flank Steak. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Beef Recipes
Find healthy, delicious beef recipes including ground beef, roast beef, stews and beef brisket. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Southwestern Steak Pizza
Flank steak, black beans, and cilantro bring a Southwestern flair to these individual pizzas……….

Chicken-“Fried” Steak with Spiced Gravy
Stop into just about any diner down South or in the Midwest and you’re sure to find chicken-fried steak on the menu. This baked version allows you to enjoy the great flavor of the traditional favorite without all the fat and calories…………..

Smoky Grilled Flank Steak
This easy grilled flank steak gets its flavor from two smoky ingredients—paprika and chipotle—rather than spending hours in a smoker. For a quick and healthy weeknight dinner, grill your favorite vegetables alongside the steak and voilà! Dinner’s done…………..

 

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Beef Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18237/ingredients/meat-poultry/beef/

One of America’s Favorites – Salisbury Steak

June 24, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Salisbury steak with brown sauce

Salisbury steak is a dish, originating in the United States, made from a blend of ground beef and other ingredients and usually served with gravy or brown sauce. Hamburg steak is a similar product but differs in ingredients.

Prior to the popularity of minced or ground beef like Salisbury steak in the United States, similar foods already existed in the culinary tradition of Europe. The Apicius cookbook, a collection of ancient Roman recipes that may date to the early 4th century, details a preparation of beef called isicia omentata; served as a baked patty in which minced or chopped beef is mixed with pine kernels, black and green peppercorns, and white wine, isicia omentata may be the earliest precursor to the hamburger. In the 12th century, the nomadic Mongols carried food made of several varieties of milk (kumis) and meat (horse or camel). During the life of their leader Genghis Khan (1167–1227), the Mongol army occupied the western portions of the modern-day nations of Russia, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan, forming the so-called Golden Horde. This cavalry dominated army was fast moving and sometimes unable to stop for a meal, so they often ate while riding. They wrapped a few slices of meat under their saddles so it would crumble under pressure and motion and be cooked by heat and friction. This recipe for minced meat spread throughout the Mongol Empire until its split in the 1240s. It was common for Mongol armies to follow different groups of animals (such as herds of horses or oxen or flocks of sheep) that provided the necessary protein for the warriors’ diets. Marco Polo also recorded descriptions of the culinary customs of the Mongol warriors, indicating that the flesh of a single pony could provide one day’s sustenance for 100 warriors.

When Genghis Khan’s grandson Kublai Khan (1215–1294) invaded Moscow, he and his warriors introduced minced horsemeat to the Muscovites. This was later called steak tartare. The city states of what is now Germany took to this ground meat product and created many of their own dishes by adding capers, onions and even caviar to the blend and selling it on the streets. One of the oldest references to a Hamburgh Sausage appeared in 1763 in the cookbook entitled Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy by Hannah Glasse (1708–1770). Hamburg Sausage is made with minced meat and a variety of spices, including nutmeg, cloves, black pepper, garlic, and salt, and is typically served with toast. A wide variety of traditional European dishes are also made with minced meat, such as meatloaf, the Serbian pljeskavica, the Arab kofta, and meatballs.

Hamburg and its port
Minced meat was a delicacy in medieval cuisine, red meat usually being restricted to the higher classes. Very little mincing was done by medieval butchers or recorded in the cookbooks of the time, perhaps because it was not part of the sausage-making process that preserve meat. Russian ships brought recipes for steak tartare to the port of Hamburg during the 17th century, a time when there was such a great presence of Russian residents there that it was nicknamed “the Russian port”. Trade within the Hanseatic League between the 13th and 17th centuries made this port one of the largest in Europe, its commercial importance being further heightened as it became vital to early transatlantic voyages during the age of steam. In the period of European colonization of the Americas, immigrants to this port were a “bridge” between old European recipes and the future development of the hamburger in the United States.

During the first half of the 19th century, most of the northern European emigrants who traveled to the New World embarked on their transatlantic voyages from Hamburg. The German shipping company Hamburg America Line, also known as the Hamburg Amerikanische Packetfahrt Actien-Gesellschaft (HAPAG), was involved in Atlantic transport for almost a century. The company began operations in 1847 and employed many German immigrants, many of them fleeing the revolutions of 1848–9. New York City was the most common destination for ships traveling from Hamburg, and various restaurants in the city began offering the Hamburg-style steak in order to attract German sailors. The steak frequently appeared on the menu as a Hamburg-style American fillet, or even beefsteak à Hambourgeoise. Early American preparations of minced beef were therefore made to fit the tastes of European immigrants, evoking memories of the port of Hamburg and the world they left behind.

Hamburg steak

Hamburg steak is known by the name “Frikadelle” in Germany since (at least) the 17th century.

In the late 19th century, the Hamburg steak became popular on the menus of many restaurants in the port of New York. This kind of fillet was beef minced by hand, lightly salted and often smoked, and usually served raw in a dish along with onions and bread crumbs. The oldest document that refers to the Hamburg steak is a Delmonico’s Restaurant menu from 1873 which offered customers an 11-cent plate of Hamburg steak that had been developed by American chef Charles Ranhofer (1836–1899). This price was high for the time, twice the price of a simple fillet of beef steak. However, by the end of the century the Hamburg steak was gaining popularity because of its ease of preparation decreasing cost. This is evident from its detailed description in some of the most popular cookbooks of the day. Documents show that this preparation style was used by 1887 in some U.S. restaurants and was also used for feeding patients in hospitals; the Hamburg steak was served raw or lightly cooked and was accompanied by a raw egg.

The menus of many American restaurants during the 19th century included a Hamburg beefsteak that was often sold for breakfast.

Dr. Salisbury
Coming from this history of ground meat dishes is the Salisbury steak, which today is usually served with a gravy similar in texture to brown sauce. Dr. James Salisbury (1823–1905), an American physician and chemist, advocated for a meat-centered diet to promote health, and the term Salisbury steak has been used in the United States since 1897.[18]

Dr. Salisbury recommended this recipe (somewhat different from modern Salisbury steak recipes) for the treatment of alimentation (digestive problems):

“ Eat the muscle pulp of lean beef made into cakes and broiled. This pulp should be as free as possible from connective or glue tissue, fat and cartilage…previous to chopping, the fat, bones, tendons and fasciae should all be cut away, and the lean muscle cut up in pieces an inch or two square. Steaks cut through the centre of the round are the richest and best for this purpose. Beef should be procured from well fatted animals that are from four to six years old.
The pulp should not be pressed too firmly together before broiling, or it will taste livery. Simply press it sufficiently to hold it together. Make the cakes from half an inch to an inch thick. Broil slowly and moderately well over a fire free from blaze and smoke. When cooked, put it on a hot plate and season to taste with butter, pepper, salt; also use either Worcestershire or Halford sauce, mustard, horseradish or lemon juice on the meat if desired. Celery may be moderately used as a relish. ”

Salisbury steak remains popular in the United States, where it is traditionally served with gravy and mashed potatoes or pasta.

United States Department of Agriculture standards for processed, packaged “Salisbury steak” require a minimum content of 65% meat, of which up to 25% can be pork, except if de-fatted beef or pork is used, the limit is 12% combined. No more than 30% may be fat. Meat byproducts are not permitted; however, beef heart meat is allowed. Extender (bread crumbs, flour, oat flakes, etc.) content is limited to 12%, except isolated soy protein at 6.8% is considered equivalent to 12% of the others. The remainder consists of seasonings, fungi or vegetables (onion, bell pepper, mushroom or the like), binders (can include egg) and liquids (such as water, milk, cream, skim milk, buttermilk, brine, vinegar etc.). The product must be fully cooked, or else labeled “Patties for Salisbury Steak”.

The standards for hamburger limit the meat to beef only, and of skeletal origin only. Salt, seasonings and vegetables in condimental proportions can be used, but liquids, binders and/or extenders preclude the use of the term “hamburger” or “burger”. With these added, the product is considered “beef patties”.

Products not made in USDA-inspected establishments are not bound by these standards and may be bound by other standards which vary from country to country.

Hamburg steak is a very similar dish.

The “Hamburger Rundstück” was popular already 1869, and is believed to be a precursor to the modern hamburger.

In Sweden, Pannbiff is similar to a Salisbury steak and is often made by a mix of ground pork and beef, chopped onions, salt and pepper. It is served with boiled potatoes, gravy made from cream, caramelized onions and lingonberries. It is a very traditional dish that is common in the husman cuisine.[citation needed]

Minced cutlet (котлета рубленая, kotleta rublenaya), or, since the late 19th century, simply “cutlet”, is a staple of Russian cuisine. It is similar to a Salisbury steak, with the main difference being pure beef is rarely employed, usually pork or a beef-pork mixture is used. The meat is seasoned with salt and pepper, mixed with finely chopped onion (optionally fried), garlic, and a binder (eggs and breadcrumbs soaked in milk), divided into oval-shaped patties, lightly breaded and shallow-fried in a half-inch of vegetable oil. The transliterated Japanese dish, menchi katsu, is always deep-fried and heavily breaded, being essentially a mincemeat croquette, while the Russian version is always shallow-fried.

 

Healthy Beef Stew Recipes

June 22, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Beef Stew Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Beef Stew Recipes with recipes including; Hungarian Goulash, Low-Carb Beef Stew, and Slow-Cooker Beef Stew. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website and also you subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. Each issue is loaded with recipes and cooking ideas. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Beef Stew Recipes
Find healthy, delicious beef stew recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Hungarian Goulash
Layer the vegetables, meat and tomato mixture in your slow cooker in the morning and let it cook it until dinner. All you’ll need to do is prepare the noodles and this beef stew will be ready to serve…………..

Low-Carb Beef Stew
Turnips lend an earthy flavor and a texture that is similar to potatoes—but with fewer carbs—to this rich and flavorful beef stew………….

Slow-Cooker Beef Stew
Load the crock pot and go with this stew recipe that’s prepped in the morning and simmers all day so you’ll come home to a Sunday-worthy dinner (and your house smelling downright heavenly). Tender beef, melt-in-your-mouth potatoes and carrots in a rich broth—this could be the best and easiest beef stew you’ve ever made……………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Beef Stew Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/22763/ingredients/meat-poultry/beef/main-dish/beef-stew/

One of America’s Favorites – Biscuits and Gravy

June 10, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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A serving of biscuits and gravy, accompanied by home fries

Biscuits and gravy is a popular breakfast dish in the United States, especially in the South.

It consists of soft dough biscuits covered in either sawmill or sausage gravy, made from the drippings of cooked pork sausage, white flour, milk, and often (but not always) bits of sausage, bacon, ground beef, or other meat. The gravy is often flavored with black pepper.

American English and British English use the word “biscuit” to refer to two distinctly different modern foods. Early hard biscuits (North American: cookies) were derived from a twice-baked bread, whereas the North American biscuit is similar to a savoury European scone.

Early European settlers in the United States brought with them a simpler and easy style of cooking, most often based on meat, ground wheat and warmed with gravy. After the first pigs were carried from England to Jamestown, Virginia in 1608, they became popular as a home-grown edible animal.

The meal emerged as a distinct regional dish after the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), when stocks of foodstuffs were in short supply. Breakfast was necessarily the most substantial meal of the day in the South, for a person facing a day of work on the plantations. In addition, the lack of supplies and money meant it had to be cheap.

Sausage gravy served atop a biscuits and gravy dish

Restaurant chains specializing in biscuits and gravy are found in North Carolina, which has Biscuitville, and West Virginia, which has Tudor’s Biscuit World. In 2015 McDonald’s offered an all-day breakfast menu which served their traditional muffins in most of the United States, but limited biscuits mostly to the southeastern United States.

While biscuits and gravy generally refers to sausage gravy, it can also refer to egg gravy, made in one of two ways:

* by scrambling eggs in bacon grease (dripping), then adding flour and milk to make gravy, and adding crumbled bacon back to the mixture
* by making a basic roux, creating a brown gravy base, then whisking beaten eggs into the boiling gravy
Tomato gravy is white gravy mixed with crushed or diced tomatoes.

In some areas Biscuits and Gravy is also known as a gravy biscuit.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Gravy

February 18, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Mushroom gravy atop French fries.

Gravy is a sauce often made from the juices of meats that run naturally during cooking and thickened with wheat flour or corn starch for added texture. In the United States and Singapore, the term can refer to a wider variety of sauces. The gravy may be further colored and flavored with gravy salt (a simple mix of salt and caramel food coloring) or gravy browning (gravy salt dissolved in water) or ready-made cubes and powders can be used as a substitute for natural meat or vegetable extracts. Canned and instant gravies are also available. Gravy is commonly served with roasts, meatloaf, rice, and mashed potatoes.

* Brown gravy in is the name for a gravy made from the drippings from roasted meat or fowl. The drippings are cooked on the stove top at high heat with onions and/or other vegetables, then thickened with a thin mixture of water and either wheat flour or cornstarch.

* Chocolate gravy is a variety of gravy made with fat, flour, cocoa powder and sometimes a small amount of sugar.

* Cream gravy is the gravy typically used in biscuits and gravy and chicken fried steak. It is a variety of gravy that starts with the roux being made of meat and or meat drippings and flour. Milk is added and thickened by the roux; once prepared, black pepper and bits of mild sausage or chicken liver are sometimes added. Besides cream and sawmill gravy, common names include country gravy, white gravy, milk gravy, and sausage gravy.

* Egg gravy is a variety of gravy made starting with meat drippings (usually from bacon) followed by flour being used to make a thick roux. Water, broth, or milk is added and the liquid is brought back up to a boil, then salt and peppered to taste. A well-beaten egg is then slowly added while the gravy is stirred or whisked swiftly, cooking the egg immediately and separating it into small fragments in the gravy. Called rich man’s gravy in some areas of the southern US.

* Giblet gravy has the giblets of turkey or chicken added when it is to be served with those types of poultry, or uses stock made from the giblets.

Sausage gravy served atop a biscuits and gravy dish

* Mushroom gravy is a variety of gravy made with mushrooms.

* Onion gravy is made from large quantities of slowly sweated, chopped onions mixed with stock or wine. Commonly served with bangers and mash, eggs, chops, or other grilled or fried meat which by way of the cooking method would not produce their own gravy.

* Red-eye gravy is a gravy made from the drippings of ham fried in a skillet/frying pan. The pan is deglazed with coffee, giving the gravy its name, and uses no thickening agent. This gravy is a staple of Southern United States cuisine and is usually served over ham, grits or biscuits.

* Vegetable gravy or vegetarian gravy is gravy made with boiled or roasted vegetables. A quick and flavorful vegetable gravy can be made from any combination of vegetable broth or vegetable stock, flour, and one of either butter, oil, or margarine. One recipe uses vegetarian bouillon cubes with cornstarch (corn flour) as a thickener (cowboy roux), which is whisked into boiling water. Sometimes vegetable juices are added to enrich the flavor, which may give the gravy a dark green color. Wine could be added. Brown vegetarian gravy can also be made with savory yeast extract like Marmite or Vegemite. There are also commercially produced instant gravy granules which are suitable for both vegetarians and vegans.

In United Kingdom and Ireland, a Sunday roast is usually served with gravy. It is commonly eaten with pork, chicken, lamb, or beef. It is also popular in different parts of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland to have gravy with just chips (mostly from a fish and chip shop).

In United Kingdom and Irish cuisine, as well as in the cuisines of Commonwealth countries like Australia, New Zealand, and some areas in Canada, the word gravy refers only to the meat based sauce derived from meat juices, stock cubes or gravy granules. Use of the word “gravy” does not include other thickened sauces. One of the most popular forms is onion gravy, which is eaten with sausages, Yorkshire pudding and roast meat.

Throughout the United States, gravy is commonly eaten with Thanksgiving foods such as turkey, mashed potatoes and stuffing. One Southern United States variation is sausage gravy eaten with American biscuits. Another Southern US dish that has white gravy is chicken fried steak. Rice and gravy is a staple of Cajun and Creole cuisine in the southern US state of Louisiana.

Gravy is an integral part of the Canadian dish poutine. It uses a mix of beef and chicken stock as well as vinegar.

In many parts of Asia, particularly India, Malaysia, and Singapore, gravy is any thickened liquid part of a dish. For example, the liquid part of a thick curry may be referred to as gravy.

In the Mediterranean, Maghreb cuisine is dominated with gravy and bread-based dishes. Tajine and most Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia) dishes are derivatives of oil, meat and vegetable gravies. The dish is usually served with a loaf of bread. The bread is then dipped into the gravy and then used to gather or scoop the meat and vegetables between the index, middle finger and thumb, and consumed.

In gastronomy of Menorca, it has been used since the English influence during the 17th century in typical Menorcan and Catalan dishes, as for example macarrons amb grevi (pasta).

In Italian-American communities, particularly on the East Coast and around the Chicago area, the term “gravy”, “tomato gravy”, or “Sunday gravy” is used, but this refers to a tomato sauce rather than meat drippings mixed with a thickener. Used in this context, “gravy” is meant to be an English translation from the Italian sugo, which means sauce, as in sugo per pastasciutta. Whether certain sauces are referred to as “gravy” or “sauce” in Italian-American cuisine continues to be a source of debate and varies according to different family and community traditions.

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Wild Idea Stuffed Bison Roast with Red Wine Gravy

January 23, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo recipe of the Week is Wild Idea Stuffed Bison Roast with Red Wine Gravy. You’ll be using the Wild Idea 3 lb. Sirloin Tip Roast along with an incredible homemade stuffing (recipe below). You can find this recipe or purchase any of the healthy and delicious Wild Idea Buffalo Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One!
http://wildideabuffalo.com/

Wild Idea Stuffed Bison Roast with Red Wine Gravy

I tested this recipe out on visiting guests, and it was a big success! prepping the roast will take a little effort, but a sharp filet knife will make it very manageable. The end result will be a very tender, medium roast, with a delicious, savory sausage stuffing and red wine gravy!

Ingredients for Roast & Gravy:
1 – 3 lb. Wild Idea 3 lb. Sirloin Tip Roast 
1 – tablespoon olive oil
½ – tablespoon black pepper
½ – tablespoon salt
1 – onion, coarse chopped and flash processed
½ recipe Savory Buffalo Sausage Stuffing (Use other half for your organic Turkey or chicken or just heat by itself.)
2 – sticks butter
¼ – cup flour
1 – quart buffalo, organic beef stock
2 – cups wine
1 – tablespoon fresh rosemary, minced
½ – tablespoon thyme
½ – tablespoon sage

Instructions: *Preheat oven to 185°
1) Rinse roast and pat dry. Remove any exterior fat. Using a filet knife butterfly roast, in a jelly roll fashion. You will make 3 major cuts lengthwise, starting about 1½ inches in from left, slicing down about 2 inches, flip roast slightly and slice again, repeat. You will encounter a piece of sinew that runs through the roast, slice through and contend with after flat.
2) Flatten out meat with hands. Using the tip of the filet knife remove visible sinew, but avoid cutting through, which will produce holes. Cut away any miss-shaped end pieces and reserve. There will still be a little sinew in roast, which can be cut away during serving time.
3) Cover roast with plastic wrap and using a mallet or rolling pin, pound out to about 1 inch thick.
4) Place stuffing down the center of the roast and wrap meat around until meat touches. Secure with heavy toothpicks.
5) Pour olive oil, salt and pepper in roasting pan and mix together. Roll roast in seasoned oil, until evenly coated. Add miss-shaped meat pieces to the roasting pan.
6) Place chopped onion in food processor and flash process, to create smaller pieces and release some of the onions juices.
7) Pour onions with juices over roast, and press lightly in to meat.
8) Place roast in pre-heated oven and roast for 5 hours.
9) Remove roast from oven, and from roasting pan and wrap in foil. Set aside. Increase oven temperature to 500°.
10) In a saucepan melt one stick of the butter over medium heat. Scrape onion bits and juices from the roasting pan, into the saucepan. Whisk in flour, and stir until well incorporated and lightly brown.
11) Slowly whisk in stock and wine, stirring constantly.
12) Add seasoning and bring to a full boil. Reduce heat and allow to simmer until reduce by a third.
13) Remove roast from foil and return roast to pan. Melt remaining stick of butter and pour over the onions on top of the roast. Return roast to lower shelf in oven, and turn oven to broil. Roast until onions are golden brown.
14) Remove roast from oven. Transfer roast to cutting board, for carving. Pass with Red Wine Gravy.

Savory Buffalo Sausage Stuffing
Ingredients:
2 – Tablespoons butter
2 – Tablespoons olive oil
1 – 1 lb. Chorizo Sausage or Italian Sausage
1 – onion, diced
3 – stalks celery, sliced
2 – teaspoons dried sage
2 – teaspoons dried thyme
1 – teaspoon ground fennel1 – teaspoon salt
1 – Tablespoon pepper
1 – 14oz. bag herbed seasoned stuffing
2½ – cups organic chicken stock

Instructions:
1) In heavy skillet over medium high heat, heat butter and olive oil.
2) Crumble in Sausage, add; onion, celery and all of the dried seasonings. Sauté for 8 minutes.
3) Add herbed stuffing and stir to incorporate.
4) Slowly add you stock. Mixture should be moist and hold together.
5) Transfer stuffing to a different pan to cool, and follow instructions above.

http://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/55195073-wild-idea-stuffed-bison-roast-with-red-wine-gravy

Healthy Chicken Thigh Recipes

January 2, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 1 Comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Chicken Thigh Recipes. Chicken Thighs are our favorite around here! So here’s some Delicious and Healthy Chicken Thigh Recipes. With recipes like; Slow-Cooker Butter Chicken, Italian-Herbed Chicken and Mozzarella Melts, and Chicken, Potato, and Gravy Bowls. You can find these recipes and much more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Chicken Thigh Recipes
Find healthy, delicious chicken thigh recipes including BBQ, baked and fried chicken thighs. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Slow-Cooker Butter Chicken
Browning the chicken and sautéing the aromatics before everything goes into the crock pot is key to building the flavors in our version of this popular curry…………

Italian-Herbed Chicken and Mozzarella Melts
Chicken thighs are slowly cooked with Italian-style sauce and herbs, then served on crusty bread slices with olives and two savory cheeses…………..

Chicken, Potato, and Gravy Bowls
Tender potatoes and flavorful chicken are topped with a delicious gravy in this meal-in-a bowl………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Chicken Thigh Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19160/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/thighs/?page=2

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