Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Biscuits with Spinach Turkey Gravy

December 7, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is – Biscuits with Spinach Turkey Gravy. Start your day off right with this week’s recipe of Biscuits with Spinach Turkey Gravy. Made using JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Breakfast Sausage Roll – Mild. Gravy and Biscuit like you’ve never had! It’s 280 calories and 24 net carbs. You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

Biscuits with Spinach Turkey Gravy
Looking for something special for breakfast? Try this: Freshly baked biscuits smothered in a savory spinach and turkey sausage gravy. An amazing breakfast at under 300 calories per serving.

INGREDIENTS
BISCUITS
2 cups white whole wheat flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
pinch of salt
⅛ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
¾ cup plus 1 tablespoon very cold milk
¼ cup very cold butter, cubed
GRAVY
1 small shallot, diced
1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Turkey Breakfast Sausage Roll – Mild
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground paprika
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
2 cups chopped fresh spinach
¼ cup white whole wheat flour
2 cups milk
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
pinch of salt
2 teaspoons freshly ground pepper

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 425°F. In large mixing bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt and pepper. Add milk and butter, use your hands (or a pastry blender) to rub it into the flour until mixture is crumbly. Do not over mix.
2) Turn dough out onto a clean lightly floured surface. With a rolling pin, roll dough into a 1-inch thick rectangle. Use a round biscuit cutter or the top of a water glass to cut out biscuits. Place the biscuits onto a lined and lightly sprayed baking sheet. Bake 12 minutes or until golden brown.
3) Meanwhile, in large non-stick skillet, saute shallot. Remove to a small bowl; set aside. In same skillet, add sausage and cook as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F. as measured by a meat thermometer. Drain off any excess fat and add the shallot back to the pan. Sprinkle with cumin, paprika, thyme and fold in the spinach, stirring gently allowing the heat to wilt the spinach. Transfer mixture to a bowl and cover to keep warm.
4) In medium bowl, whisk flour, milk, broth, salt and pepper until smooth. Add mixture to the same pan used to cook the sausage. Cook over medium-low heat stirring continuously, 15 minutes or until mixture has thickened and flour is completely cooked off. Add the reserved turkey sausage mixture and cook until the gravy is heated through.
5) Cut the cooled biscuits in half. Spoon turkey gravy over biscuits and serve.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 280
Protein 16g
Carbohydrates 29g
Fiber 5g
Sugars 0g
Fat 10
Cholesterol 40mg
Sodium 730mg
Saturated Fat 3g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/766-biscuits-with-spinach-turkey-gravy

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Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Pot Roast

November 28, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is a Buffalo Pot Roast. It’s a Winter Comfort Food Classic – Buffalo Pot Roast! Made using the Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast. You can find this recipe and purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

Nothing represents “comfort food” more than a traditional pot roast. Wild Idea’s 100% grass-fed, rich and slightly sweet bison roast, braised until tender and juicy, nestled in a bed of potatoes and carrots, and covered with pan gravy, says it all! Always a favorite, but this savory, one pot meal is a wonderful way to welcome the fall! (Serves 6 to 8)

Ingredients:
1 – 3 pound Wild Idea Buffalo 3 Lbs. Chuck Roast
2 – tablespoons olive oil
2 – teaspoons sea salt
2 – teaspoons black pepper
2 – teaspoons garlic powder
2 – teaspoons thyme, or two to three sprigs fresh thyme *I use half fresh & half-dried.
1 – teaspoon rosemary, or one to two small fresh sprigs *I use half fresh & half-dried.
1 – teaspoon oregano, or one sprig oregano *I use half fresh & half-dried.
2 – onions, 1 diced and 1 quartered
1 to 2 tomatoes, coarse chopped
5 – cups buffalo, vegetable or organic beef stock
2 – bay leaves
6 – potatoes, quartered
3 – celery stalks, quartered
4 to 6 – carrots, peeled and quartered
½ – cup red wine
1 – tablespoon corn starch, or more if needed

Preparation:

1) Preheat oven to 225°. Rinse bison roast, pat dry and remove string. *Removing string is optional; I usually remove for this preparation, so I don’t loose the seasoning in removing after cooking.

2) Mix all the dried seasonings together. Rub the roast with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, and rub the dried seasoning into the roast.

3) In a heavy pot over high heat, heat the remaining tablespoon of the olive oil. Place the seasoned roast into the hot oil and brown for 5 minutes. Turn roast 3 times, searing for 5 minutes each. *Positioning roast up against the pan sidewalls will help in browning the whole roast.

4) Move the roast to the side and add the chopped onions, lifting the roast so onions cover the bottom and stir occasionally. Allow the onions to cook for about 5 minutes.

5) Add the chopped tomatoes around the roast, the bay leaf, and pour in the stock. Let the stock come to a full boil, then cover and turn off the heat.

6) Transfer covered roast into the preheated oven on the middle rack. Braise the buffalo pot roast for 6 hours.

7) During the last half hour of cooking, add the potatoes, pushing them down into the juices. Cover and increase heat to 375°.

8) Cook the potatoes for 15 minutes, then, add the celery, onion, and carrots. Cover and cook for an additional 15 minutes. Check the vegetables to insure they are cooked through, but still slightly firm. Continue to cook for a few more minutes if needed.

9) Remove the pot roast from the oven, and transfer the roast and the vegetables to a cutting board or platter. Cover with foil.

10) Place the pot with the juices on the stovetop over medium high heat. Bring to a boil. Mix the cornstarch into the wine, and whisk into the bubbling pan juices. If the gravy is not to your desired thickness add more wine/cornstarch mix, until desired consistency is achieved. Season to taste.

11) Carve the roast and pass with gravy and crusty bread.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/54660929-buffalo-pot-roast

Healthy Aging Recipes

November 4, 2018 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Aging Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Aging Recipes like; Ham and Egg Breakfast Burrito, Grilled Steak and Peppers, and Whole-Wheat Biscuits and Sausage Gravy. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Aging Recipes
Find healthy, delicious healthy aging recipes including breakfasts, lunches and dinners. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Ham and Egg Breakfast Burrito
This breakfast burrito is quick to make and easy to eat. Ham, egg and a dash of hot sauce cook up into an omelet and get rolled up in a delicious high-fiber tortillafor some fun fork-free eating…….

Grilled Steak and Peppers
Skewered marinated peppers and onions grill up nicely alongside beef tenderloins in this 35-minute dinner recipe. Serve with a green or grain salad for a complete meal………..

Whole-Wheat Biscuits and Sausage Gravy
Homemade creamy sausage gravy over flaky biscuits is the perfect breakfast to start a weekend morning. A mixture of white whole-wheat flour and cake flour makes these southern whole-wheat biscuits exceptionally tender. Cake flour has a lower protein content than all-purpose flour and is used for delicate cakes and biscuits. Look for unbleached cake flour, available at large supermarkets and natural food stores………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Aging Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18053/lifestyle-diets/healthy-aging/

One of America’s Favorites – Biscuits

October 29, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Biscuits

A biscuit in the United States and parts of Canada, is a variety of small baked goods with a firm browned crust and a soft interior. They are made with baking powder or baking soda as a chemical leavening agent rather than yeast. They are similar to British scones or the bannock from the Shetland Isles.

Biscuits, soda breads, and cornbread, among others, are often referred to collectively as “quick breads”, to indicate that they do not need time to rise before baking.

Although the American English and British English use the same word to refer to two distinctly different modern foods, early hard biscuits (North American: cookies), were derived from a simple, storable version of bread. The word “biscuit” itself originates from the medieval Latin word ‘biscoctus’, meaning “twice-cooked”.

The modern Italian baked goods known as biscotti (also meaning “twice-cooked” in Italian) most closely resemble the Medieval Latin item and cooking technique.

In the Hispanic world a bizcocho refers to an array of differing baked goods depending on the country, from Spain and throughout Hispanic America. In the Philippines, a biskotso (also spelled “biscocho”), derived from a word used by the Spanish conquerors, refers to a type of garlic bread.

The definitive explanation for the differences in the usage of “biscuit” in the English speaking world is provided by Elizabeth David in English Bread and Yeast Cookery, in the chapter “Yeast Buns and Small Tea Cakes” and section “Soft Biscuits”. She writes,

It is interesting that these soft biscuits are common to Scotland and Guernsey, and that the term biscuit as applied to a soft product was retained in these places, and in America, whereas in England it has completely died out.

Early European settlers in the United States brought with them a simple, easy style of cooking, most often based on ground wheat and warmed with gravy.

Biscuits and Gravy

The biscuit emerged as a distinct food type in the early 19th century, before the American Civil War. Cooks created a cheaply produced addition for their meals that required no yeast, which was expensive and difficult to store. With no leavening agents except the bitter-tasting pearlash available, beaten biscuits were laboriously beaten and folded to incorporate air into the dough which expanded when heated in the oven causing the biscuit to rise. In eating, the advantage of the biscuit over a slice of bread was that it was harder, and hence kept its shape when wiping up gravy in the popular combination biscuits and gravy.

In 1875, Alexander P. Ashbourne patented the first biscuit cutter. It consisted of a board to roll the biscuits out on, which was hinged to a metal plate with various biscuit cutter shapes mounted to it.

Southern chefs may have had an advantage in creating biscuits. Northern American all-purpose flours, mainly grown in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, are made from the hard spring wheats that grow in the North’s cold-winter climate. Southern American bleached all-purpose flours, originally grown in the Carolinas, Georgia and Tennessee before national food distribution networks, are made from the soft winter wheat that grows in the warm southern summer. This summer growth results in wheat that has less protein, which is more suited to the creation of quick breads, as well as cookies, cakes and muffins.

Pre-shaped ready-to-bake biscuits can be purchased in supermarkets, in the form of small refrigerated cylindrical segments of dough encased in a cardboard can. These refrigerator biscuits were patented by Ballard and Ballard in 1931.

Biscuits can be prepared for baking in several ways. The dough can be rolled out flat and cut into rounds, which expand when baked into flaky-layered cylinders. If extra liquid is added, the

Open biscuit with honey being drizzled in it

dough’s texture changes to resemble stiff pancake batter so that small spoonfuls can be dropped into the baking sheet to produce “drop biscuits”, which are more amorphous in texture and shape.

Large drop biscuits, because of their size and rough exterior texture, are sometimes referred to as “cat head biscuits”. A common variation on basic biscuits is “cheese biscuits”, made by adding grated Cheddar or American cheese to the basic recipe.

Home cooks may use refrigerator biscuits for a quicker alternative to rolled or drop biscuits. Refrigerator biscuits can even be cooked over a campfire on a stick.

A sweet biscuit layered or topped with fruit (typically strawberries), juice-based syrup, and cream is called shortcake. A type of biscuit called an “angel biscuit” contains yeast as well, as do those made with a sourdough starter.

While there are many different ways to prepare and top biscuits, the ingredients from recipe to recipe are generally the same. Most recipes will call for all-purpose flour, baking powder, salt, either milk or buttermilk, and either butter or shortening (about half will also call for a small amount of sugar as well). The amount of each ingredient will vary for each recipe much the general concept is the same for these simple baked goods.

Biscuits
Open biscuit with honey being drizzled in it

One of America’s Favorites – Rabbit Pie

August 20, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A meat pie made with rabbit and chicken

Rabbit pie is a game pie consisting of rabbit meat in a gravy with other ingredients (typically onions, celery and carrots) enclosed in a pastry crust. Rabbit pie is part of traditional American and English cuisine. It has recently found renewed popularity.

Wild rabbit, as opposed to farmed, is most often used as it is easily and affordably obtained, and is described as more flavorsome.

Along with rabbit meat, ingredients of the filling of a rabbit pie typically include onions, celery and carrots. Other ingredients may include prunes, bacon and cider. Australian recipes for rabbit pie sometimes include the food paste Vegemite as an ingredient.

Rabbit pie was a staple dish of the American pioneers. Thanks to the increasing demand for wild and fresh ingredients, rabbit pie is often seen on the menus of fashionable restaurants and gastropubs.

Two huge rabbit pies are part of traditional Easter celebrations in the English village of Hallaton, Leicestershire.

In Beatrix Potter’s children’s book The Tale of Peter Rabbit, the title character’s father was put into a rabbit pie for going into Mr McGregor’s garden.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 7, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Saving the gravy…………

To help prevent lumpy gravy, add a pinch of salt to the flour before using any liquid. If lumps persist, use your blender to smooth it out. If your gravy burns, just stir in a teaspoon of peanut butter to cover up the burnt flavor without altering the meaty flavor.

One of America’s Favorites – Burgoo

April 30, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Kentucky burgoo served with mashed potatoes

Burgoo is a spicy stew, similar to Irish or Mulligan stew, often served with cornbread or corn muffins. It is often prepared communally as a social gathering. It is popular as the basis for civic fund-raisers in the American Midwest and South.

Traditional burgoo was made using whatever meats and vegetables were available—typically, venison, squirrel, opossum, raccoon or game birds, and was often associated with autumn and the harvest season. Today, local barbecue restaurants use a specific meat in their recipes, usually pork, chicken, or mutton, which, along with the spices used, creates a flavor unique to each restaurant.

A typical burgoo is a combination of meats: pork, chicken, mutton or beef, often hickory-smoked, but other meats are seen occasionally; and vegetables, such as lima beans, corn, okra, tomatoes, cabbage and potatoes. Typically, since burgoo is a slow-cooked dish, the starch from the added vegetables results in thickening of the stew. However, a thickening agent, such as cornmeal, ground beans, whole wheat, or potato starch can be used when cooked in a non-traditional way. In addition, soup bones can be added for taste and thickening.

The ingredients are combined in order of cooking time required, with meat first, vegetables next, and thickening agents as necessary. A good burgoo is said to be able to have a spoon stand up in it. Cider vinegar, hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce, or chili powder are common condiments.

Cooking burgoo in Kentucky often serves as a communal effort and social event, in which each attendee brings one or more ingredients. In Kentucky and surrounding states such as Indiana, burgoo is often used for fund-raising for schools. This kind of event has been claimed to have been invented by the family of Ollie Beard, a former Major League Baseball player.

In Brighton, Illinois, a local traditional burgoo is prepared and served annually at the village’s summer festival, the Betsy Ann Picnic. Franklin, Illinois self identifies as the Burgoo Capital of the World;[citation needed] they have an annual burgoo cookout over July 3 and July 4. Burgoo events are also held in Cass County, Illinois in the towns of Chandlerville and Arenzville. Arenzville claims to be the home of the world’s best burgoo.

Several cities have claimed to be the burgoo capital of the world such as Franklin, Illinois, Lawrenceburg, Kentucky, and Owensboro, Kentucky.

 

Healthy Sauce Recipes

April 7, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Sauce Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Sauce Recipes for recipes like; Puttanesca Pork Chops, Barbecue Chicken Pizza, and Salmon and Fall Vegetables with Bagna Cauda. FRind these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Also don’t forget to subscribe to the EatingWell Magazine, one of my favorites! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Sauce Recipes
Find healthy, delicious sauce recipes including BBQ, cheese, cream and pasta sauce. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Puttanesca Pork Chops
This flavorful pork chop dinner recipe is proof that bold Neapolitan puttanesca sauce can liven up more than just spaghetti. Unlike brined olives like Kalamatas, oil-cured olives have a meatier bite because they’re coated in salt then macerated in oil. Look for them on olive bars or with other Italian products. Serve with sautéed broccoli rabe and whole-wheat orzo……

Barbecue Chicken Pizza
We gave classic barbecue chicken pizza a healthy twist with hidden shredded zucchini in the sauce. It’s a great way to sneak extra veggies into both you and your children’s diet!……

Salmon and Fall Vegetables with Bagna Cauda
In this family-style meal, a platter full of salmon and roasted and raw vegetables—served with a Northern Italian-inspired garlic-anchovy dip—lets everyone choose their own dining adventure. Serve with crusty bread and white wine………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Sauce Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18275/side-dishes/sauces-condiments/sauce/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 12, 2018 at 5:35 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Too much salt in the gravy……..

Thank you to Jenny for sharing this hint – When gravy is too salty, put in a few pieces of toasted bread for two or three minutes. The bread will absorb much of the salt.

Homestyle Turkey Shepherd’s Pie

February 25, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Passing along a quick and easy recipe for Homestyle Turkey Shepherd’s Pie. The recipe is from the Jennie – O Turkey website. It’s made using the always a fresh and delicious JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast, I always use this when making my 3 Bean Turkey Chili. Easily prepared in 30 minutes and only 240 calories and 26 net carbs! Check the Jennie – O website out for all it’s many delicious and healthy recipes! Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

 

Homestyle Turkey Shepherd’s Pie
The aroma of this lean Shepherd’s Pie is enough to lead the whole family to the table. Make dinner in under 30 minutes and under 300 calories with savory ground turkey, mashed potatoes and cheese.

INGREDIENTS
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast
½ teaspoon dried basil
½ teaspoon thyme
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 (12-ounce) jar fat-free turkey gravy
½ cup frozen corn kernels
½ cup frozen tiny peas
2½ cups prepared mashed potatoes
½ cup shredded low-fat Cheddar cheese

DIRECTIONS
1) Spray 10-inch oven-proof skillet with cooking spray. Place over medium-high heat; add garlic and turkey. Cook turkey as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165ºF as measured by a meat thermometer. Add basil, thyme, pepper, gravy, corn and peas; simmer uncovered 5 minutes or until mixture is hot. Spoon mashed potatoes over turkey mixture.
2) Sprinkle with cheese. Broil 4 to 5-inches from heat source 2 to 3 minutes or until mixture is bubbly and cheese is melted.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 240
Protein 24g
Carbohydrates 29g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 2g
Fat 2.5g
Cholesterol 45mg
Sodium 750mg
Saturated Fat 1g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/84-homestyle-turkey-shepherds-pie

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