Diabetic Dish of the Week – Authentic Meatloaf

December 10, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I’ve got a Classic Comfort Food Recipe for this week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week – Authentic Meatloaf. Made using 2 types of Meat – Ground Turkey and Ground Beef. You’ll also be needing Tomato Sauce, Egg Whites, Reduced Sodium Chunky Salsa, Oatmeal, Onion, No Salt Added Mushrooms Stems and Pieces, Garlic, and Seasonings. Dinner is served! You can find this recipe at the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and More! So be sure to check it out today. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Authentic Meatloaf

Ingredients
3/4 cup no-salt-added tomato sauce, divided
2 egg whites
4 tablespoons reduced-sodium chunky salsa, divided
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 cup old-fashioned oatmeal
1/2 cup finely minced onion
1/3 cup canned no-salt-added mushroom stems and pieces, drained and chopped
1 clove garlic, finely minced
8 ounces lean ground turkey
8 ounces 96% lean ground beef

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray piece of aluminum foil with nonstick cooking spray. Place foil on broiler pan; set aside.

2 – Mix 1/2 cup tomato sauce, egg whites, 3 tablespoons salsa, and pepper in medium bowl. Stir in oatmeal, onion, mushrooms, and garlic.

3 – Place ground turkey and ground beef in large bowl; mix lightly to combine. Stir in tomato mixture; mix well.

4 – Transfer meat mixture to prepared pan; shape into 4 x 8-inch rectangular loaf. Mix remaining 1/4 cup tomato sauce and 1 tablespoon salsa in small bowl; drizzle on top of meat loaf.

Bake 55 minutes or until cooked through (165°F). Let stand 5 minutes before slicing.

Yield: 4 servings.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 220 calories, Carbohydrates: 13 g, Protein: 26 g, Fat: 7 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Cholesterol: 60 mg, Sodium: 300 mg, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/authentic-meatloaf/

Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower with Sour Cream

December 10, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

What goes better with Meatloaf than Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower with Sour Cream. These are made using Baking Potatoes, Cauliflower, Reduced Fat Sour Cream, Chives, Salt, and Black Pepper. You can find this recipe, like the Meatloaf Recipe, at the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and More! So be sure to check it out today. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower with Sour Cream

Ingredients
12 ounces baking potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 2 1/2 cups)
1 1/4 pounds cauliflower, cut into 1-inch pieces (about 4 1/2 cups)
1/3 cup reduced-fat sour cream
1 tablespoon chives
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Directions
1 – Combine cauliflower and potatoes in large saucepan; cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer about 10 to 12 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Drain.

2 – Add sour cream, chives, salt, and pepper to saucepan. Using potato masher, mash until blended.

Yield: 6 servings.

Serving size: 1/2 cup.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 83 calories, Carbohydrates: 16 g, Protein: 4 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 7 mg, Sodium: 233 mg, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/mashed-potatoes-cauliflower-sour-cream/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 10, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Sear chicken breast and finish in oven……..

Sear a piece of meat, poultry, or fish in a pan and then place it in the oven. Not only does this free up burners, it results in a much moister result. I use Buffalo instead of Beef. Buffalo or Bison cooks up a lot quicker than Beef. So using the Sear and to the oven works perfect for all Buffalo Steaks and Roasts.

Catfish Nuggets w/ Fried Potatoes, Cut Green Beans, and Cast Iron Skillet Baked Corn Bread

December 9, 2019 at 6:34 PM | Posted in fish | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Catfish Nuggets w/ Fried Potatoes, Cut Green Beans, and Cast Iron Skillet Baked Corn Bread

 

 

 

To start this Monday off I had a Poached Egg that I served on a slice of Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. Then I also fried up a few slices Turkey Spam. I also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Rain and more Rain with a high of 56 degrees. After Breakfast I headed to the ATM and then stopped by McDonald’s to pick up Breakfast for Mom. Nothing going on outside with the rain. Cleaned the stove and oven and then the fridge. For Dinner tonight its Catfish Nuggets w/ Fried Potatoes, Cut Green Beans, and Cast Iron Skillet Baked Corn Bread.

 

 

I had purchased the Catfish Nuggets from Kroger yesterday. To prepare them I rinsed the Catfish Nuggets off in cold water and patted dry with a paper towel. Seasoned them with Sea Salt. Then put them in a Hefty Plastic Storage Bag and added Zatarain’s Crispy Southern Fish Fri Breading Mix, shook the bag until all the Nuggets were coated. Then pan fried them in a medium size skillet in Extra Light Olive Oil. Fried each side about 3 1/2 minutes, until a golden brown. The Zatarain’s Crispy Southern Fish Fri is perfect for the Catfish, great flavor and the Nuggets were good size and meaty.

 

 

 

For one side we had Fried Potatoes! I’ve loved these all my life! I bought a bag of Medium Size Red Potatoes, which we’ll be using. To prepare them; first wash the Whole Potatoes and dry with a paper towel. Next grab a Cast Iron Skillet and add 1 tablespoon of Extra Light Olive Oil and heat the Skillet on high.

 

 

 

 

With the skillet heated add the Potatoes. After adding the Potatoes add your Seasoning, we just used Salt and Pepper. Then fry until the Potatoes start to turn brown. Then flip them with a spatula and continue frying until done. I love these Potatoes and they are so easy to prepare.

 

 

 

 

I also made a small Cast Iron Skillet of Corn Bread, for Mom, using Martha White White Corn Meal. First Corn Bread I’ve made in a while and it’s just as good as it always was! What a meal Fried Catfish, Fried Potatoes, Green Beans, and Corn Bread. Then for Dessert/Snack later a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Snyder’s of Hanover Pretzel Sticks with a Sprite Zero to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catfish
The most commonly eaten species in the United States are the channel catfish and the blue catfish, both of which are common in the wild and increasingly widely farmed. Farm-raised catfish became such a staple of the diet of the United States that on 25 June 1987, President Ronald Reagan established National Catfish Day to recognize “the value of farm-raised catfish.”

Catfish is eaten in a variety of ways. In Europe it is often cooked in similar ways to carp, but in the United States it is popularly crumbled with cornmeal and fried.… Wikipedia

Nutrition Facts
Catfish, breaded and fried
Amount Per 1 fillet (87 g)
Calories 199
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 12 g 18%
Saturated fat 2.9 g 14%
Polyunsaturated fat 2.9 g
Monounsaturated fat 4.9 g
Cholesterol 62 mg 20%
Sodium 244 mg 10%
Potassium 296 mg 8%
Total Carbohydrate 7 g 2%
Dietary fiber 0.6 g 2%
Protein 16 g 32%

One of America’s Favorites – Roasting

December 9, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tudor style roasting meat on a spit

Roasting is a cooking method that uses dry heat where hot air covers the food, cooking it evenly on all sides with temperatures of at least 150 °C (300 °F) from an open flame, oven, or other heat source. Roasting can enhance the flavor through caramelization and Maillard browning on the surface of the food. Roasting uses indirect, diffused heat (as in an oven), and is suitable for slower cooking of meat in a larger, whole piece. Meats and most root and bulb vegetables can be roasted. Any piece of meat, especially red meat, that has been cooked in this fashion is called a roast. Meats and vegetables prepared in this way are described as “roasted”, e.g., roasted chicken or roasted squash.

For roasting, the food may be placed on a rack, in a roasting pan or, to ensure even application of heat, may be rotated on a spit or rotisserie. If a pan is used, the juice can be retained for use in gravy, Yorkshire pudding, etc. During oven roasting, hot air circulates around the meat, cooking all sides evenly. There are several plans for roasting meat: low-temperature cooking, high-temperature cooking, and a combination of both. Each method can be suitable, depending on the food and the tastes of the people.

* A low-temperature oven, 95 to 160 °C (200 to 320 °F), is best when cooking with large cuts of meat, turkey and whole chickens. This is not technically roasting temperature, but it is called slow-roasting. The benefit of slow-roasting an item is less moisture loss and a more tender product. More of the collagen that makes meat tough is dissolved in slow cooking. At true roasting temperatures, 200 °C (390 °F) or more, the water inside the muscle is lost at a high rate.

A Sunday roast consisting of roast beef, potatoes, vegetables……..

* Cooking at high temperatures is beneficial if the cut is tender enough—as in fillet Mignon or strip loin—to be finished cooking before the juices escape. A reason for high temperature roasting is to brown the outside of the food, similar to browning food in a pan before pot roasting or stewing it. Fast cooking gives more variety of flavor, because the outside is brown while the center is much less done.
* The combination method uses high heat just at either the beginning or the end of the cooking process, with most of the cooking at a low temperature. This method produces the golden-brown texture and crust, but maintains more of the moisture than simply cooking at a high temperature, although the product will not be as moist as low-temperature cooking the whole time. Searing and then turning down to low is also beneficial when a dark crust and caramelized flavor is desired for the finished product.
In general, in either case, the meat is removed from the heat before it has finished cooking and left to sit for a few minutes, while the inside cooks further from the residual heat content, known as carry over cooking.

The objective in any case is to retain as much moisture as possible, while providing the texture and color. As meat cooks, the structure and especially the collagen breaks down, allowing juice to come out of the meat. So meat is juiciest at about medium rare while the juice is coming out. During roasting, meats and vegetables are frequently basted on the surface with butter, lard, or oil to reduce the loss of moisture by evaporation. In recent times, plastic oven bags have become popular for roasts. These cut cooking times and reduce the loss of moisture during roasting, but reduce flavor development from Maillard browning, somewhat more like (boiled or steamed) stew or pot roast. They are particularly popular for turkeys.

Until the late 19th century, roasting by dry heat in an oven was called baking. Roasting originally meant turning meat or a bird on a spit in front of a fire. It is one of the oldest forms of cooking known.

Whole roast chicken

Traditionally recognized roasting methods consist only of baking and cooking over or near an open fire. Grilling is normally not technically a roast, since a grill (gridiron) is used. Barbecuing and smoking differ from roasting because of the lower temperature and controlled smoke application. Grilling can be considered as a low-fat food preparation, as it allows any fat in the food to drip away.

Before the invention and widespread use of stoves, food was primarily cooked over open flames from a hearth. To roast meat, racks with skewers, or, if accessible, complicated gear arrangements, would be utilized to turn the piece(s). In the past, this method was often associated with the upper class and special occasions, rather than customary mealtimes, because it required freshly killed meat and close attention during cooking. It was easy to ruin the meat’s taste with a smoky fire or negligence to rotate it at regular intervals. Thus, elite families, who were able to afford quality meat, appointed this task to servants or invested in technology like automatic turning devices. With further technological advances, cooking came to accommodate new opportunities. By the 1860s, working families were able to afford low-priced stove models that became sufficiently available. However, the key element of observation during roasting became difficult and dangerous to do with the coal oven. Hence, traditional roasting disappeared as kitchens became no longer equipped for this custom and soon thereafter, “baking” came to be “roasting”.

Roasting can be applied to a wide variety of meat. In general, it works best for cooking whole chickens, turkey, and leaner cuts of lamb, pork, and beef. The aim is to highlight the flavor of the meat itself rather than a sauce or stew, as it is done in braising or other moist-heat methods. Many roasts are tied with string prior to roasting, often using the reef knot or the packer’s knot. Tying holds them together during roasting, keeping any stuffing inside, and keeps the roast in a round profile, which promotes even cooking.

Red meats such as beef, lamb, and venison, and certain game birds are often roasted to be “pink” or “rare”, meaning that the center of the roast is still red. Roasting is a preferred method of cooking for most poultry, and certain cuts of beef, pork, or lamb. Although there is a growing fashion in some restaurants to serve “rose pork”, temperature monitoring of the center of the roast is the only sure way to avoid foodborne disease.

In Britain, Ireland, and Australia, a roast of meat may be referred to as a joint, or a leg, if it is a leg.

Some vegetables, such as potatoes, zucchini, pumpkin, turnips, rutabagas, parsnips, cauliflower, asparagus, squash, and peppers, yam and plantain lend themselves to roasting as well. Roasted chestnuts are also a popular snack in winter.

It is also possible to roast fish as meat.

 

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – BROCCOLI WITH ASIAN TOFU

December 9, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is – BROCCOLI WITH ASIAN TOFU. Made using Tofu, Lite Soy Sauce, Sesame Oil, Brown Sugar, Ginger Root, Broccoli, Peanut Oil, Crushed Red Pepper, Garlic, and Sesame Seeds. Tofu done right! You can find this recipe along with all the other Diabetic Friendly Recipes at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. Check out soon to find Delicious and Healthy Diabetic Friendly Recipes. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

BROCCOLI WITH ASIAN TOFU
Ingredients

1 pkg (16 oz) firm tofu, drained
2 Tbsp lite soy sauce
1 tsp sesame oil (optional)
1/2 Tbsp brown sugar
1 Tbsp fresh ginger root, finely chopped or shredded (or 1 tsp ground ginger)
1 lb fresh broccoli, rinsed and cut into individual spears
1 Tbsp peanut oil or vegetable oil
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper
4 Tbsp garlic, peeled and thinly sliced (about 8 cloves)
1 Tbsp sesame seeds (optional)
Cooking spray

Directions

1 – Slice tofu into eight pieces. Place on a plate or flat surface covered with three paper towels. Top with four more paper towels. Top with another flat plate or cutting board. Press down evenly and gently to squeeze out moisture. Throw away paper towels. Replace with fresh paper towels and press again. (The more liquid you remove, the more sauce the tofu will absorb.)
2 – Place tofu in a bowl just big enough to hold all eight pieces lying on their widest side without overlapping.
In a small bowl, stir to thoroughly combine soy sauce, sesame oil, brown sugar, and ginger into a marinade, and stir thoroughly. Pour over tofu. Carefully turn the tofu several times to coat well. 3 3 – Set aside.
4 РMeanwhile, heat a large nonstick saute pan coated with cooking spray. Add broccoli and saut̩ for about 5 minutes, until it turns bright green and becomes tender and crispy. Remove broccoli from pan and set aside.
5 – Heat a grill pan or flat saute pan over high heat. Drain tofu, reserving marinade. Place on grill pan to heat for about 3 minutes. Gently turn. Heat the second side for 3 minutes.
6 – At the same time, in the saute pan over medium-low heat, warm the peanut oil, crushed red pepper, and garlic until the garlic softens and begins to turn brown, about 30 seconds to 1 minute. 7 – Add broccoli and reserved marinade, and gently mix until well-coated.
8 – Place two slices of tofu on each plate with one-quarter of the broccoli and marinade mixture. Sprinkle with sesame seeds (optional).
NOTES:
Optional: Delicious served on top of brown rice or Asian-style noodles (soba or udon).

Recipe Yield: Yield: 4 servings “Serving size: 2 slices tofu, with broccoli and marinade mixture
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/broccoli-with-asian-tofu

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 9, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Microwave scramble………………

Microwave scrambled eggs – Grab a mug and spritz it with nonstick spray. Crack a couple eggs inside. Top with a splash of milk or water, sprinkle with some shredded cheese, salt and pepper, then stir with a fork to combine. Microwave at 30-second intervals, stirring after each, for a total of 90 seconds and a 12-grams-of-protein-strong breakfast is served!

Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers

December 8, 2019 at 6:48 PM | Posted in Skyline Chili, spaghetti | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers

 

 

 

Just a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea for Breakfast. Cloudy and 54 degrees out today, rain moving in overnight. Went to Walmart for a few items and to finish off my Christmas Shopping for the year. Back home I got the rake, leaf blower, and cart out and raked the front and side yard. Spent the rest of the day watching NFL Football. For Dinner tonight I prepared a package of Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers.

 

 

 

So I wanted something easy to prepare but I still wanted a hot good meal. So since I’m always in the mood for some Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers that’s what we had tonight. Nothing says comfort food more than a Skyline 3 Way! As always I used my favorite, the Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti. It comes packaged for the microwave, a bit smaller size than what you get at a Skyline but just right for those that want a few lower calories and carbs than the normal size. It comes with Spaghetti topped with Skyline Chili. To prepare it, it couldn’t be easier!

 

 

It comes in a microwavable pouch. Easily prepared – Just shake the pouch. Then tear the corner off to vent while cooking. Place the pouch standing upright in the microwave. Then microwave on high for 2 1/2 minutes. Let stand for 1 minute and it’s ready! And I needed this. I had not had this in a while and it really hit the spot!

 

 

 

 

Poured the Chili into a bowl, added a couple of shakes of Frank’s Hot Sauce, topped it with Sargento Reduced Fat Shredded Sharp Cheddar Cheese. I also had a side of Skyline Oyster Crackers. And if you’re having Oyster Crackers, then Frank’s Red Hot Sauce is a must! Just add a few drops on top of the Crackers, it’s the local way to have your Oyster Crackers. For Dessert/Snack later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn and a Diet Dr. Pepper to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Skyline Chili Spaghetti, 14oz Microwavable Pouch

It’s a great new way to enjoy the original Cincinnati favorite, Skyline Chili with spaghetti!
* Skyline Chili Spaghetti One 14oz Microwavable Pouch
* Cheese Not Included
* Cincinnati’s Famous Heats in 2 Minutes
* Also Can be Prepared on Stove top

Sunday’s Chicken Dinner Recipe – Autumn Chicken Pot Pie

December 8, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Sunday's Chicken Dinner | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Sunday’s Chicken Dinner Recipe is – Autumn Chicken Pot Pie. To make this Classic Comfort Food some of the ingredients you’ll need are Cooked Chicken, Pearl Onions, Carrots, Granny Smith Apple, and Dried Cranberries and more all in a Lemon-Ginger Pastry Crust. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website where you’ll find a fantastic selection of recipes to please all tastes, diets, and cuisines so check it out today! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Autumn Chicken Pot Pie
A buttery, lemon-ginger pastry crust covers a filling with tender pieces of chicken, pearl onions, carrots, chunks of Granny Smith apple and dried cranberries.

Recipe Ingredients:
Dough:
1 cup all purpose-flour
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup butter, softened
3 tablespoons cold water

Filling:
1 cup pearl onions, peeled and steamed until tender
2 medium carrots, cut into slices and steamed until tender
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced
2 cups chicken broth
1 medium Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored and cut into chunks
1/4 cup dried cranberries
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 cups cooked chicken, chopped (leftover from roast chicken or freshly poached)
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt

Cooking Directions:
1 – For Dough: In large bowl combine flour, ginger, lemon zest and salt. With a pastry blender or 2 knives, cut in 1/3 cup butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle 3 tablespoons of water over the mixture and toss with fork. The dough should be just barely moistened, enough to hold together when formed into a ball. Add more water if needed. Form the dough into a flat disk and wrap in plastic. Refrigerate while making the filling.
2 – Preheat oven to 450°F (230°C).
3 – For Filling: Drop pearl onions into boiling water for 30 seconds; drain, peel. Steam pearl onions and carrots until tender.
4 – In large saucepan over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons butter. Whisk in flour and ginger until smooth. Reduce heat to low and gradually whisk in chicken broth. Stir in pearl onions, carrots, apples, cranberries, lemon juice and chicken. Let simmer for 5 minutes, stirring regularly. Season with salt and pepper. Spoon filling into deep, 10-inch ceramic or glass pie dish.
5 – On a lightly floured surface, roll dough out to a circle, about 12-inches in diameter. Lay the dough over the top of pie dish. Trim and crimp edges. Use a small knife to cut several slits in the center of pie. (Alternatively, make decorative cuts in pie crust before setting it on top of pie.)
6 – Set the pie on a baking sheet and place in oven on middle rack. Bake for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 400°F (205°C) and continue baking for additional 20 minutes, until pie bubbles around edges and top is nicely browned. Serve while piping hot.

Makes 6 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/chicken/autumn_chicken_pot_pie_recipe.html

Healthy Chicken Main Dish Recipes

December 8, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From thge EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Chicken Main Dish Recipes. Winner, Winner Chicken Dinner Recipes with recipes like Slow-Cooker Chicken and Honey-Glazed Root Vegetables, Slow-Cooker Sweet and Spicy Glazed Chicken, and Chicken Cacciatore Hoagies. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Chicken Main Dish Recipes
Find healthy, delicious chicken main dish recipes including chicken and pasta, easy chicken casseroles, low-calorie chicken recipes, and chicken pot pie. Healthier Recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Slow-Cooker Chicken and Honey-Glazed Root Vegetables
This beautiful slow-cooker chicken dish should be a standby for day-of decisions to host dinner. In the spring, substitute baby white turnips and baby carrots for the regular varieties. To reduce prep time, cut the vegetables the night before; refrigerate. Place in the slow cooker with the browned chicken the next day…………………

Slow-Cooker Sweet and Spicy Glazed Chicken
You can fully indulge in the sticky-sweetness this slow-cooker chicken dish offers when you know that calories, saturated fat, carbs and sugar are in check……………..

Chicken Cacciatore Hoagies
This easy chicken cacciatore, the Italian braised hunter’s dish, gets a touch of Philly when you turn it into a sandwich and call it a hoagie. This is a chicken sandwich recipe to remember………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Chicken Main Dish Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/17932/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/main-dish/

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Shayna's Kitchen

Shayna Taylor - Food and Wellness, Healthy GF Recipes

Traffic Light Cook

Find the link between health and food

Michelle Can Cook!

I do many things, but when I'm doing what I love - it is cooking! Welcome to my happy place filled with all things delicious!

Anchored Female

Life and Health Coach for Moms, Teens, and Young Women

All About the Kids

You thought giving birth was hard, try raising them!

Leite's Culinaria

Recipes, Food, and Cooking Blog

The Gourmet RD

Simple. Wholesome. Delicious.

Britney Breaks Bread

Let's break bread together!

Nature's Flavors Blog

Specializing in All-Natural and Organic Flavorings and Extracts for over 40 Years!

Moved By Design

Food, decor and more!

Sip and Feast

A food and drink blog with delicious recipes

Our Happy Mess

Fast. Fresh. Family-friendly.

Easy Chicken Recipes

Family-Friendly Meals

and everything nice

the story of us

My Pocket Kitchen

Easy and elegant recipes from a pro in her tiny kitchen

Authentically Vegan

Serving up authenticity with a side of veganism