Bison and Vegetable Kabobs with Couscous Salad

July 8, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in bison, CooksRecipes | Leave a comment
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I’ve got a Bison and Vegetable Kabobs with Couscous Salad recipe to pass along. Some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are Bison Steaks, Mushrooms, Onions, Peppers, Green Onions, Couscous, Squash, Tomatoes, Spices, and more! Put that grill to good use! The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Bison and Vegetable Kabobs with Couscous Salad
This recipe for bison and vegetable kabobs with couscous salad is a great way to bring big flavors to a healthy diet.

Recipe Ingredients:
1/2 cup and 1/4 cup, extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon granulated garlic
1 tablespoon cracked black pepper
1 tablespoon oregano
1 tablespoon basil
1 teaspoon sea salt
1 tablespoon thyme
1 (16-ounce) package baby bella mushrooms, washed and drained
1 red onion
1 red pepper, cut into 1 inch pieces
1 yellow pepper, cut into 1 inch pieces
1 green pepper, cut into 1 inch pieces
3 bison steaks, cut into 1 inch pieces
Skewers
1 1/2 cups water, boiling (salted if desired)
1 1/2 cups instant couscous
1 green onion, sliced
Roasted squash and tomatoes
1 orange

Cooking Directions:
1 – To a measuring cup add a 1/2 cup of the extra virgin olive oil, red wine vinegar, granulated garlic, cracked black pepper, oregano, basil, sea salt, and thyme. Whisk to combine all the ingredients.
2 – Now pour half of this marinade into a bowl with the baby bello mushrooms, the red onion and the red, yellow and green peppers. Toss to coat. Save the tops and the bottoms of the peppers to add to the couscous salad later.
3 – To a medium bowl with the bison, add the other half of the marinade and toss.
4 – Now skewer the marinated vegetables and bison. Keep them separate because the bison will cook a lot faster than the vegetables.
5 – To a pot of 1 1/2 cups boiling water, add the couscous and cover, turning the heat off.
6 – Cook the vegetable skewers on the grill for 10 to 12 minutes, turning frequently, and then cook the bison skewers for about 3 to 4 minutes per side.
7 – Pour the cooked couscous into a large bowl and add the chopped reserved peppers, green onion, squash and tomatoes, 1/4 cup of extra virgin olive oil and juice from 1/2 of the orange. Toss to combine.
8 – Serve with the skewers placed on top of the couscous salad.
Makes 6 to 8 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/game/bison_&_vegetable_kebobs_with_couscous_salad_recipe.html

Smoked Turkey Sausage and Crawfish Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

June 29, 2020 at 7:12 PM | Posted in gumbo, leftovers, Zatarain's | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

 

 

 

Just a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea for Breakfast this morning. Not a nice day out there today! 90 degrees and extremely humid. So not a thing going on today outside. I took the trash out a couple of times, moved the garbage cans down to the street (Garbage Day tomorrow), and watered my Pepper Plants. Besides that I stayed in all day. For Dinner tonight the Delicious Leftovers from last night, Smoked Turkey Sausage and Crawfish Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread. Just reheated the Gumbo on low and served the Bread. I never let Leftover Gumbo go to waste! I’ve left last night’s post below for description and recipe. Enjoy and Stay Safe Everyone!

I love Gumbo and Cajun Cuisine, looking forward to this meal tonight! So for Dinner tonight I’m preparing a Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo. Using the Zatrain’s Gumbo Mix, Butterball Hardwood Smoked Turkey Sausage, and a bag of Crawfish Tails. Add all together and I’ve one Delicious Meal coming! I had purchased a couple of 1lb. packages of frozen Cooked Crawfish Tails from Jungle Jim’s International Market in Fairfield. I had them in the freezer and I took 1 of the packages and sat it in the fridge to thaw overnight. I love Crawfish Tails, just don’t use them often.

 

To prepare it I got a large saucepan and sprayed it with Pam Non Stick Cooking Spray. Then added 6 cups of Water, bite sized sliced 1 1/2 Sausages of the Butterball Smoked Turkey Sausage, and the Gumbo Mix. Mixed until well blended together. I brought it to a boil; covered and simmered for 25 minutes.

 

Next as the Gumbo was cooking I got the Crawfish Tails out of the fridge washed then and let then drain in a colander. Then with 5 minutes of cooking time left I added the Crawfish to the Gumbo, stirring again until well mixed. Continued for 15 minutes. Removed the pot from the heat and let it stand for 5 minutes before serving.

 

 

This made one excellent Gumbo Dish! The Mix itself was flavored perfect, spicy but not overpowering. Then with the added Sausage and Crawfish Tail, it just capped everything off! I added a few shakes of Frank’s Hot Sauce to the Dish also. Lots of delicious leftovers! Just a word on the Crawfish, it was delicious! I’ll have to use it more often, much more often! The added Crawfish Tails adds just a hint of sweetness to the dish. Also, and don’t get me wrong, I love Shrimp but the Crawfish maybe be a better fit for the Gumbo than Shrimp. Whether it’s made with Shrimp or Crawfish, It is flat out Delicious! Leftovers are coming soon!


Then I also baked a loaf of La Baguette Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. Perfect Bread for Gumbo. For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZATARAIN’S® GUMBO MIX WITH RICE
In New Orleans, there are as many different varieties of gumbo as there are people who make it. Zatarain’s Gumbo Mix with Rice is a flavorful foundation, making it easy to create classics like shrimp and okra or chicken and sausage gumbo – or to invent a new signature gumbo of your own!

Gumbo is the quintessential dish of New Orleans, a city of diverse influences that formed a new culture greater than the sum of its parts. Those same influences are reflected in every bowl of gumbo. The dish is a rich and flavorful melting pot, just like its hometown.

Gumbo can be prepared with your choice of 1 lb. of cooked chicken, smoked sausage or seafood, cut into bite-size pieces.

STOVE TOP DIRECTIONS
1. MIX 6 cups water and Gumbo Mix in 4-quart saucepan until well blended.
2. For Chicken or Sausage Gumbo: Stir in chicken or sausage. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 25 minutes or until rice is tender.
For Seafood Gumbo: Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in seafood. Cover and simmer 10 minutes longer or until rice is tender.

80 CALORIES
0g TOTAL FAT
0mg CHOLESTEROL
750mg SODIUM
18g CARBOHYDRATES
<1g FIBER
0g SUGAR
2g PROTEIN
https://www.mccormick.com/zatarains/products/dinner-and-side-mixes/rice-mixes-and-side-dishes/gumbo-mix-with-rice

 

 


Crawfish
Crawfish are usually less tough and more subtle compared to shrimp, and the taste can more accurately be described as a combination of crab and shrimp. Crawfish has a sweet taste with a little bit of salt and mineral flavor.
Crawfish also contain a good amount of B vitamins, as well as iron and selenium — important minerals that can be hard to get through your diet. The only drawback to crawfish is that they do contain some dietary cholesterol. But ultimately, crawfish are an overall healthy source of protein.

One of America’s Favorites – Red Beans and Rice

June 29, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Red beans and rice at a restaurant in California

Red beans and rice is an emblematic dish of Louisiana Creole cuisine (not originally of Cajun cuisine) traditionally made on Mondays with red beans, vegetables (bell pepper, onion, and celery), spices (thyme, cayenne pepper, and bay leaf) and pork bones as left over from Sunday dinner, cooked together slowly in a pot and served over rice. Meats such as ham, sausage (most commonly andouille), and tasso ham are also frequently used in the dish. The dish is customary – ham was traditionally a Sunday meal and Monday was washday. A pot of beans could sit on the stove and simmer while the women were busy scrubbing clothes. The dish is now fairly common throughout the Southeast. Similar dishes are common in Latin American cuisine, including moros y cristianos, gallo pinto and feijoada.

Red beans and rice is one of the few New Orleans style dishes to be commonly served both in people’s homes and in restaurants. Many neighborhood restaurants and even schools continue to serve it as a Monday lunch or dinner special, usually with a side order of cornbread and either smoked sausage or a pork chop. While Monday washdays are largely a thing of the past, red beans remain a staple for large gatherings such as Super Bowl and Mardi Gras parties. Indeed, red beans and rice is very much part of the New Orleans identity. New Orleanian Louis Armstrong’s favorite food was red beans and rice – the musician would sign letters “Red Beans and Ricely Yours, Louis Armstrong”. And in 1965, the R&B instrumental group Booker T. & the M.G.’s wrote and recorded a song titled “Red Beans and Rice” that was originally a B-side but later became popular in its own right.

The similar vegetarian dish Rajma chawal (which translates literally to red beans and rice) is popular in North India. Red beans and rice is also a dietary staple in Central America, where it is known as “arroz con habichuelas”. The dish is popular in Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican, Haitian and Jamaican cuisine as well.

A plate of red beans and rice with sausage from The Chimes restaurant in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Red kidney beans or small red beans are used and they are usually (but not always) soaked beforehand. Add celery, onion, and peppers to the pot along with a ham hock. Add water. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer for several hours or until the beans are soft.

The dish is highly nutritious. Rice is rich in starch, an excellent source of energy. Rice also has iron, vitamin B and protein. Beans also contain a good amount of iron and an even greater amount of protein than rice. Together they make up a complete protein, which provides each of the amino acids the body cannot make for itself.

In addition, rice and beans are common and affordable ingredients, often available in difficult economic times.

 

Smoked Turkey Sausage and Crawfish Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

June 28, 2020 at 6:58 PM | Posted in Zatarain's | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I Scrambled a Couple of Eggs, toasted a Healthy Life Whole Grain English Muffin, and had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. 81 degrees and rain on and off all day! Got up had Breakfast, did the dishes, worked out, got a shower, and BAM, I turned into a slug! I didn’t do a thing all day and it felt pretty good! Anyway for Dinner tonight I prepared Smoked Turkey Sausage and Crawfish Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread.

 

I love Gumbo and Cajun Cuisine, looking forward to this meal tonight! So for Dinner tonight I’m preparing a Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo. Using the Zatrain’s Gumbo Mix, Butterball Hardwood Smoked Turkey Sausage, and a bag of Crawfish Tails. Add all together and I’ve one Delicious Meal coming! I had purchased a couple of 1lb. packages of frozen Cooked Crawfish Tails from Jungle Jim’s International Market in Fairfield. I had them in the freezer and I took 1 of the packages and sat it in the fridge to thaw overnight. I love Crawfish Tails, just don’t use them often.

 

To prepare it I got a large saucepan and sprayed it with Pam Non Stick Cooking Spray. Then added 6 cups of Water, bite sized sliced 1 1/2 Sausages of the Butterball Smoked Turkey Sausage, and the Gumbo Mix. Mixed until well blended together. I brought it to a boil; covered and simmered for 25 minutes.

Next as the Gumbo was cooking I got the Crawfish Tails out of the fridge washed then and let then drain in a colander. Then with 5 minutes of cooking time left I added the Crawfish to the Gumbo, stirring again until well mixed. Continued for 15 minutes. Removed the pot from the heat and let it stand for 5 minutes before serving.

This made one excellent Gumbo Dish! The Mix itself was flavored perfect, spicy but not over powering. Then with the added Sausage and Crawfish Tail, it just capped everything off! I added a few shakes of Frank’s Hot Sauce to the Dish also. Lots of delicious leftovers! Just a word on the Crawfish, it was delicious! I’ll have to use it more often, much more often! The added Crawfish Tails add a just a hint of sweetness to the dish. Also, and don’t get me wrong, I love Shrimp but the Crawfish maybe be a better fit for the Gumbo than Shrimp. Wether it’s made with Shrimp or Crawfish, It is flat out Delicious! Leftovers are coming soon!

Then I also baked a loaf of La Baguette Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. Perfect Bread for Gumbo. For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZATARAIN’S® GUMBO MIX WITH RICE
In New Orleans, there are as many different varieties of gumbo as there are people who make it. Zatarain’s Gumbo Mix with Rice is a flavorful foundation, making it easy to create classics like shrimp and okra or chicken and sausage gumbo – or to invent a new signature gumbo of your own!

Gumbo is the quintessential dish of New Orleans, a city of diverse influences that formed a new culture greater than the sum of its parts. Those same influences are reflected in every bowl of gumbo. The dish is a rich and flavorful melting pot, just like its hometown.

Gumbo can be prepared with your choice of 1 lb. of cooked chicken, smoked sausage or seafood, cut into bite-size pieces.

STOVE TOP DIRECTIONS
1. MIX 6 cups water and Gumbo Mix in 4-quart saucepan until well blended.
2. For Chicken or Sausage Gumbo: Stir in chicken or sausage. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 25 minutes or until rice is tender.
For Seafood Gumbo: Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in seafood. Cover and simmer 10 minutes longer or until rice is tender.

80 CALORIES
0g TOTAL FAT
0mg CHOLESTEROL
750mg SODIUM
18g CARBOHYDRATES
<1g FIBER
0g SUGAR
2g PROTEIN
https://www.mccormick.com/zatarains/products/dinner-and-side-mixes/rice-mixes-and-side-dishes/gumbo-mix-with-rice

 

 

Crawfish
Crawfish are usually less tough and more subtle compared to shrimp, and the taste can more accurately be described as a combination of crab and shrimp. Crawfish has a sweet taste with a little bit of salt and mineral flavor.
Crawfish also contain a good amount of B vitamins, as well as iron and selenium — important minerals that can be hard to get through your diet. The only drawback to crawfish is that they do contain some dietary cholesterol. But ultimately, crawfish are an overall healthy source of protein.

Healthy Macaroni and Cheese Recipes

June 28, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Macaroni and Cheese Recipes. Here’s some Delicious and Healthy Macaroni and Cheese Recipes. Find recipes like Skillet Chili Mac, Four-Cheese Macaroni and Cheese, and Quick Stovetop Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Macaroni and Cheese Recipes
Find healthy, delicious macaroni and cheese recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Skillet Chili Mac
Poblanos add a kick of heat to this chili mac recipe. If that’s not your thing, swap in green bell peppers to tone down the heat in this easy pasta dish, which mashes up mac and cheese and chili into a seriously satisfying skillet dinner……………………..

Four-Cheese Macaroni and Cheese
The more cheese the merrier in this baked macaroni recipe, which also features butternut squash and whole-grain pasta…………………………

Quick Stovetop Butternut Squash Mac and Cheese
Precut butternut squash in your grocery store’s produce section makes this healthy mac and cheese recipe come together in a flash. For extra flavor, try smoked Gouda cheese…………………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Macaroni and Cheese Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/20698/ingredients/pasta-noodle/pasta-by-shape/macaroni/macaroni-and-cheese/

Diabetic Beef Recipes

June 23, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Diabetic Beef Recipes. Delicious, Healthy, Diabetic Beef Recipes. You’ll find recipes like Old-Fashioned Meatloaf, Chipotle Skirt Steak Tacos with Smoky Tomatillo Salsa, and Grilled Beef and Vegetable Kebabs. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Diabetic Beef Recipes
Find healthy, delicious diabetic beef recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Old-Fashioned Meatloaf
Mushrooms, garlic and oats sneak some extra nutrients into this hearty and easy meatloaf. Serve with sweet potatoes and your favorite green vegetables for a super-satisfying comfort food dinner………………………………..

Chipotle Skirt Steak Tacos with Smoky Tomatillo Salsa
Here’s a pro tip from chef Rick Bayless, who shared this skirt steak taco recipe: puree a can of chipotles in adobo sauce and keep it in your fridge. Adobo is a vinegary tomato sauce, so along with the chipotles (smoked jalapeños), it becomes an all-purpose marinade that’s spicy, smoky and salty, all in one. In this recipe you brush it on the steak before grilling but Bayless also does the same move on eggplant, chicken and fish. And having the sauce on hand means you’re ready to whip up this easy grilled dinner at a moment’s notice……………………..

Grilled Beef and Vegetable Kebabs
These easy grilled beef & vegetable kebabs are not only delicious–they’re economical too. Tri-tip is an inexpensive and flavorful cut of beef that takes beautifully to cooking over an open flame. Thread it onto skewers with colorful veggies and marinate for up to eight hours before cooking on the grill or over your campfire. Either way, it’s a healthy and tasty summer meal………………………

* Click the link below to get all the Diabetic Beef Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/22999/health-condition/diabetic/dinner/meats/beef/

Healthy Grilled Eggplant Recipes

June 16, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine it’s Healthy Grilled Eggplant Recipes. Bring on the Eggplant! Here’s some Delicious and Healthy Grilled Eggplant Recipes with recipes including Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille, Grilled Eggplant, and Open-Face Eggplant Parmesan Sandwiches. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Grilled Eggplant Recipes
Find healthy, delicious grilled eggplant recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille
This ratatouille dish is perfect for your bounty from the garden or farmers’ market. To keep the veggies from burning, watch them carefully while grilling. If necessary, move any that are cooking too quickly to a cooler spot on the grill……………………………….

Grilled Eggplant
Master this simple grilled eggplant recipe and you’ll have the foundation for all sorts of healthy summer dishes. Serve the eggplant slices as a side with grilled chicken, fish or meat; add grilled eggplant to a salad; stuff it into sandwiches; chop it and top pizza with it; stir it into pasta dishes or grain bowls–the possibilities are almost endless……………………………

Open-Face Eggplant Parmesan Sandwiches
This cheeseburger and eggplant Parm fusion recipe is a winning combination. Breaded eggplant slices are topped with marinara sauce, mozzarella cheese, and a delicious grilled lean beef burger–it’s American classic meets Italian restaurant favorite! To make it a complete meal, serve with spaghetti with a side of steamed vegetables…………………………………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Grilled Eggplant Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/20792/cooking-methods-styles/bbq-grilling/vegetables/eggplant/

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 6:49 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 2:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

Healthy Stew Recipes SATURDAY

June 13, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Stew Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Stew Recipes with recipes including Vegetarian Gumbo, Slow-Cooker Spicy Barbecue Pork Stew, and Moroccan Chicken Tagine with Apricots and Olives. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Stew Recipes
Find healthy, delicious stew recipes including beef, chicken and fish stew. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Vegetarian Gumbo
This flavorful vegan dinner is a veggie version of the Louisiana classic. It’s chock-full of butternut squash, tomatoes, poblano peppers and okra, to name just a few. This vegetarian gumbo is a quick dinner packed with flavor and spice that’s done in only 30 minutes. To make it a meal, serve it with cornbread drizzled with olive oil…………………………

Slow-Cooker Spicy Barbecue Pork Stew
Eat this dish along with cornbread on a cold day. This slow-cooker pork stew is filling, and the heat from the spicy barbecue sauce and vinegar from the hot peppers will warm you. Reduce the amount of barbecue sauce or use a sweet variety if you can’t handle the heat………………………….

Moroccan Chicken Tagine with Apricots and Olives
This healthy chicken stew is full of warming, spicy flavor thanks to ras el hanout, an aromatic Moroccan spice blend. You can find it in well-stocked grocery stores–or substitute 1/2 tsp. each ground cumin and ginger and 1/4 tsp. each ground cinnamon, coriander and allspice…………………………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Stew Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18232/main-dishes/stew/

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