Healthy Carrot Recipes

July 19, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Carrot Recipes. Some Delicious and Healthy Carrot Recipes with recipes including Skillet Buffalo Chicken, Carrot Rillettes with Dukkah, and Slow-Cooker Chicken with Potatoes, Carrots and Herb Sauce. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Carrot Recipes
Find healthy, delicious carrot recipes including baby carrots, roasted carrots and glazed carrots. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Skillet Buffalo Chicken
If you like Buffalo wings, you’ll love this quick skillet Buffalo chicken recipe. Chicken cutlets are sautéed, then smothered in a creamy-spicy sauce. A side-salad garnish of carrots, celery and blue cheese pulls it all together…………………………..

Carrot Rillettes with Dukkah
Traditional French rillettes are made by slowly cooking pork or duck in its own fat to make a spread. This recipe takes inspiration from that technique to make a plant-based version with carrots. Serve with crackers or bread……………………..

Slow-Cooker Chicken with Potatoes, Carrots and Herb Sauce
Impress the in-laws, neighbors or any other dinner guests with this pretty dish. It’s a slow-cooker chicken recipe that actually looks and tastes like it was oven-roasted. To save time, prep the vegetables a day ahead or in the morning, and then refrigerate until ready to brown the meat and start the slow cooker………………………………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Carrot Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19295/ingredients/vegetables/carrots/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 11, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When buying celery………………..

Buy fresh celery, choose firm, tightly packed stalks with medium-thick ribs that are crisp enough to break apart easily. The leaves should not be wilted and they should be a bright, yet pale green color.

Then what’s the best way to keep celery fresh? For the best results, keep celery heads whole, wrap them up tightly in aluminum foil, and then keep them in the refrigerator crisper drawer as usual. When stored this way, celery stalks can maintain their freshness anywhere from two to four weeks.

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 6:49 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 2:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

Red Beans Turkey and Rice

June 5, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Another one from the Jennie – O Turkey website, Red Beans Turkey and Rice. Cajun Food made healthier! You’ll be using JENNIE-O® Lean Ground Turkey, Onion, Green Pepper, Celery, Hot Pepper Sauce, Tomatoes, Red Kidney Beans, White Rice, and more! A sure fire instant Dinner Favorite! You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the Switch in 2020! https://www.jennieo.com/

Red Beans Turkey and Rice
This recipe is the epitome of classic Cajun comfort food. Fill your house with the aroma of thyme, lean turkey and stewed tomatoes. This low-fat recipe is ready to eat in under 60 minutes!

 

INGREDIENTS

Red Beans Turkey and Rice

1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Lean Ground Turkey
1 cup finely chopped onion
1 green pepper, finely chopped
½ cup sliced celery
2 teaspoons minced garlic
1½ teaspoons thyme
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
½ teaspoon salt
1 (14½-ounce) can cajun-style stewed tomatoes
1 (15-ounce) can red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
¼ cup tomato paste
4 cups cooked white or brown rice
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley

DIRECTIONS
1) In large deep skillet, cook ground turkey as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Add onion, green pepper, celery and garlic; cook 5 minutes or until slightly softened; stirring occasionally.
2) Sprinkle with thyme, hot pepper sauce and salt; cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add cajun-style stewed tomatoes, kidney beans and tomato paste. Cook, uncovered, 10 minutes or until hot and flavors are blended, stirring occasionally.
3) Serve over cooked rice. Sprinkle with fresh parsley and serve with additional hot sauce, if desired.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 350
Protein 23g
Carbohydrates 50g
Fiber 8g
Sugars 8g
Fat 6g
Cholesterol 55mg
Sodium 790mg
Saturated Fat 2g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/77-red-beans-turkey-and-rice

It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Turkey Vegetable Soup with Angel Hair Pasta

May 16, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | Leave a comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday Recipe is a Turkey Vegetable Soup with Angel Hair Pasta. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Turkey or Chicken Broth, Carrots, Celery, Shallots, Dried Mushrooms, Angel Hair Pasta, Chopped Butterball Turkey, and Parsley. Soup is on! The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Turkey Vegetable Soup with Angel Hair Pasta
A delicious, quick-to-make soup using leftover turkey, dried mushrooms, vegetables and pasta.

Recipe Ingredients:
8 cups turkey or chicken broth
1 cup peeled, finely chopped carrots
1 cup thinly sliced celery
2 tablespoons thinly sliced shallots
1/2 ounce dried mushroom pieces, rehydrated*
2 ounces uncooked angel hair pasta
1 cup finely chopped cooked Butterball® Turkey
3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

Cooking Directions:
1 – Bring broth in Dutch oven or large saucepan to boil on high heat.
2 – Add carrots, celery, shallots and mushrooms. Return to boil. Reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, 15 to 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender.
3 – Add pasta. Continue cooking 4 to 5 minutes or until pasta is al dente.
4 – Stir in turkey and parsley. Cook 1 minute or until heated through.
Makes 4 to 5 servings.

*Note: To rehydrate dried mushrooms, cover with warm water and let stand 15 minutes. Rinse under additional water if necessary.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/soup/turkey_vegetable_soup_with_angel_hair_pasta_recipe.html

Low-Carb Cauliflower “Potato” Salad for Diabetics

May 12, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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I’ve got a 2nd Diabetic Friendly Recipe to pass along, Low-Carb Cauliflower “Potato” Salad for Diabetics. This one is made using Cauliflower, Boiled Egg, Red Onion, Celery, Light Mayonnaise, Pickle Relish, Dijon-Style Mustard, Celery Seed, and Black Pepper. A perfect side dish for any meal! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Low-Carb Cauliflower “Potato” Salad for Diabetics
Substituting cauliflower for potatoes in this recipe cuts out much of the carbohydrate — but your taste buds will never know the difference! Hard-boiled egg, red onion, celery, mayo and Dijon-style mustard create a picnic-perfect taste

Ingredients
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 10 minutes.
Chilling time: 2 hours

1 head (2 pounds) cauliflower
1 hard-boiled egg, shelled and chopped
1/4 cup chopped red onion
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/4 cup light mayonnaise
1 tablespoon pickle relish
1 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard
1/4 teaspoon celery seed
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Directions
Yield: 8 servings
Serving size: 1/2 cup

* Remove leaves and core of cauliflower. Break florets into bite-size pieces, and cut stem into bite-size pieces as well, if desired. Total yield should be 4 cups of cauliflower pieces. Fill a medium saucepan 2/3 full of water and bring to a boil. Add cauliflower and cook 8–10 minutes until soft but not mushy. Drain cauliflower in a colander and rinse under cold water for 1–2 minutes to stop the cooking process. Drain well. Blot pieces with paper towel to remove excess moisture. In a large bowl, combine cauliflower, egg, red onion, and celery. In a small bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, pickle relish, mustard, celery seed, and black pepper. Pour mayonnaise mixture over vegetables and mix well. Cover and chill 2 hours prior to serving.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 62 calories, Carbohydrates: 9 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 1 g, Saturated Fat: 0 g, Cholesterol: 2 mg, Sodium: 120 mg, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/salads/low-carb-potato-salad/

 

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Quick White Bean Soup

May 9, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | Leave a comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday Recipe is a Quick White Bean Soup. To make this recipe you’ll be needing Dried White Beans, Canola Oil, Onion, Celery, Ground Black Pepper, Vegetable Stock, Sage, Tomato, Spinach, Salt, Grated Parmesan Cheese, and Basil Pesto. Sounds like a Hearty Soup! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Quick White Bean Soup
This easy homemade soup comes together in less than an hour and is perfect for shaking off the winter doldroms.

Ingredients
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Soaking time: Overnight
Cooking time: 25–30 minutes.

1 cup dried white beans (such as navy, great northern, or cannellini), soaked overnight
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 stalks celery, chopped
Freshly ground pepper
4 cups vegetable stock or water
1/2 teaspoon dried sage
1 can (14 ounces) diced tomatoes
1–2 cups chopped fresh spinach
Salt to taste
Freshly grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
Basil pesto (optional)

Directions
Yield: 6 cups
Serving size: 1 cup

* Drain beans. Heat canola oil in pressure cooker and add drained beans, onion, celery, and a few grinds of fresh pepper. Sauté vegetables and beans for about 5 minutes, until fragrant. Add stock or water and sage. Secure lid and bring to high pressure. Cook for 20 minutes. Turn off heat and allow for natural pressure release. Open lid and add tomatoes and spinach. Simmer until spinach is cooked. Add salt and more fresh ground pepper to taste. Garnish with freshly grated Parmesan cheese or a dollop of basil pesto.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 162 calories, Carbohydrates: 28 g, Protein: 9 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 230 mg, Fiber: 9 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/quick-white-bean-soup/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Barley and Sausage Gumbo

March 21, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | 1 Comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday Recipe is a Barley and Sausage Gumbo. Made using Onion, Green Bell Pepper, Okra, Celery, Garlic, Reduced Sodium Chiken Broth, No Salt Added Tomato Purée, Peral Barley, Dried Oregano, Salt, Red Pepper Flakes, and Low-Fat Chicken Andouille Sausages. One delicious Creole Dish! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Barley and Sausage Gumbo
Celebrate Mardi Gras with this healthful twist on an authentic Creole gumbo dish!

Ingredients
1 small onion, chopped
1 large green bell pepper, chopped
1 cup frozen sliced okra
1 medium stalk celery, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
1 cup no-salt-added tomato purée
1/4 cup uncooked pearl barley
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon salt (optional)
1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 low-fat chicken andouille sausages (3 ounces each), sliced 1/2 inch thick

Directions
Yield:
4 servings

Serving size:
1 1/3-cup

Place onion, bell pepper, okra, celery, and garlic in slow cooker. Add chicken broth, tomato purée, barley, oregano, salt, if desired, and red pepper flakes; stir. Add sliced sausages. Cover; cook on LOW 5 to 6 hours.

Let stand 5 minutes before serving.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 175 calories, Carbohydrates: 24 g, Protein: 12 g, Fat: 5 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 31 mg, Sodium: 363 mg, Fiber: 6 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/barley-sausage-gumbo/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

Caribbean Jerk Turkey Tacos

March 20, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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I’ve got another Jennie – O Turkey Taco Recipe to pass along, Caribbean Jerk Turkey Tacos. Bring a little taste of the Islands with this week’s recipe of Caribbean Jerk Turkey Tacos. These are made using JENNIE-O® Slow Roasted Dark Turkey, Jamaican Jerk Seasoning, Mayonnaise, Celery, Pineapple, Light Brown Sugar, Lime Juice, Ground Ginger, Thyme, and Flour Tortillas. You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the Switch in 2020!  https://www.jennieo.com/

Caribbean Jerk Turkey Tacos
By combining amazing Caribbean Jerk spices with the convenience of tortilla shells, this simple Mediterranean dinner recipe is a delicious mashup of favorites. Ready in under 30 minutes!

INGREDIENTS
2 tablespoons Jamaican jerk seasoning
⅓ cup fat-free mayonnaise
1½ cups shredded JENNIE-O® Slow Roasted Dark Turkey
½ cup celery, thinly sliced
1 cup pineapple, chopped
2 tablespoons light brown sugar
2 tablespoons lime juice
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
8 soft taco-size (6-inch) flour tortillas, warmed
lime wedges, if desired
thyme sprigs, if desired

DIRECTIONS
1) In medium bowl, combine jerk seasoning, mayonnaise, turkey and celery.
2) In medium bowl, combine pineapple, sugar, lime juice, ginger and thyme.
3) Spoon turkey mixture onto each tortilla. Top with pineapple salsa. Fold in half to serve. Serve with lime wedges and thyme, if desired.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 170
Protein 9g
Carbohydrates 22g
Fiber 1g
Sugars 6g
Fat 5g
Cholesterol 25mg
Sodium 640mg
Saturated Fat 1.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/784-caribbean-jerk-turkey-tacos

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