Healthy Hamburger Recipes

September 21, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website it’s Healthy Hamburger Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Hamburger Recipes with recipes including Jalapeño Popper Burgers, Classic Beef Burgers with Cauliflower Buns, and Bacon and Mango Tango Sliders. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Hamburger Recipes
Find healthy, delicious hamburger recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Jalapeño Popper Burgers
We’ve taken a simple burger recipe and made it pop with an easy three-ingredient jalapeño cheese topping. Ground sirloin is lean ground beef made exclusively from the center loin cut. It has less connective tissue than regular ground beef for a super-tender burger……

Classic Beef Burgers with Cauliflower Buns
These juicy burgers skip the traditional bread bun in favor of a savory grain-free cauliflower bun that contains a bit of Cheddar cheese. A mixture of onions, ketchup and Worcestershire sauce gives the burger patties tons of flavor, and the addition of a tangy special sauce makes for a burger with serious personality. Note: If you would like to make these burgers gluten-free, be sure to check the ingredients for the ketchup and Worcestershire sauce to make sure they’re gluten-free……

Bacon and Mango Tango Sliders
With a touch of sweet from the mango, savory from the bacon, plus a creamy avocado spread, this healthy slider recipe with takes burgers to a whole new level. Double the avocado mayo and use it for your next BLT……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Hamburger Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18901/main-dishes/burgers/hamburgers/

Country Style Barbecued Onions

September 11, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Here’s a recipe for Country Style Barbecued Onions. To make this recipe you’ll be needing Vidalia Onions, Can of BUSH’S® Country Style Baked Beans, Dark Brown Sugar, Sweet Red Barbecue Sauce, Butter, Bacon, and Fresh Ground Pepper. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Country Style Barbecued Onions
The flavors of several ingredients blend together perfectly in these hearty, barbecue bean-stuffed onions.

Recipe Ingredients:
8 medium Vidalia onions or other sweet onions
1 (28-ounce) can BUSH’S® Country Style Baked Beans
1/4 cup dark brown sugar
1/2 cup sweet red barbecue sauce
4 tablespoons butter, cut into 8 pieces
2 strips bacon, precooked, cut into 8 pieces
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Cooking Directions:
Cut off onion stems and peel. Hollow out onions leaving base intact. Finely chop pieces removed from onions.
In mixing bowl, combine BUSH’S Country Style Baked Beans, onions, brown sugar and barbecue sauce.
Spoon baked beans mixture into onions. Top each onion with piece of butter, ground pepper and piece of bacon.
Arrange onions on grill grate away from fire. Grill onions 40 to 60 minutes or until golden brown and tender.
Makes 8 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/8 of recipe): Calories: 269; Total Fat: 7.7g; Cholesterol: 17mg; Sodium: 736mg; Total Carbs: 43.5g; Dietary Fiber: 7.6g;Protein: 7.4g
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/sidedish/country_style_barbecued_onions_recipe.html

One of America’s Favorites – Cheeseburger

July 18, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cheeseburger served with French fries

A cheeseburger is a hamburger topped with cheese. Traditionally, the slice of cheese is placed on top of the meat patty. The cheese is usually added to the cooking hamburger patty shortly before serving, which allows the cheese to melt. Cheeseburgers can include variations in structure, ingredients and composition. As with other hamburgers, a cheeseburger may include toppings such as lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, bacon, mayonnaise, ketchup, and mustard.

In fast food restaurants, the cheese used in cheeseburgers is usually processed cheese. Other meltable cheeses may be used as alternatives. Common examples include cheddar, Swiss, mozzarella, blue cheese, and pepper jack. Popular restaurants that sell cheeseburgers include McDonald’s, Burger King, Wendy’s, and many more.

By the late 19th century, the vast grasslands of the Great Plains had been opened up for cattle ranching. This made it possible for many Americans to consume beef almost daily. The hamburger remains as one of the cheapest sources of beef in America.

Some cheeseburger ingredients

Adding cheese to hamburgers became popular in 1920. There are several competing claims as to who created the first cheeseburger. Lionel Sternberger is reputed to have introduced the cheeseburger in 1924 at the age of 16. He was working as a fry cook at his father’s Pasadena, California sandwich shop, “The Rite Spot”, and “experimentally dropped a slab of American cheese on a sizzling hamburger.” An early example of the cheeseburger appearing on a menu is a 1928 menu for the Los Angeles restaurant O’Dell’s which listed a cheeseburger smothered with chili for 25 cents.

Other restaurants also claim to have invented the cheeseburger. For example, Kaelin’s Restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky, said it invented the cheeseburger in 1934. One year later, a trademark for the name “cheeseburger” was awarded to Louis Ballast of the Humpty Dumpty Drive-In in Denver, Colorado. According to Steak ‘n Shake archives, the restaurant’s founder, Gus Belt, applied for a trademark on the word in the 1930s.

An A&W Restaurants franchise in Lansing, Michigan is credited with inventing the bacon cheeseburger in 1963, putting it on the menu after repeated requests from the same customer.

The steamed cheeseburger, a variation almost exclusively served in central Connecticut, is believed to have been invented at a restaurant called Jack’s Lunch in Middletown, Connecticut, in the 1930s.

A Burger King Quad Stacker cheeseburger, containing four patties and bacon

The largest cheeseburger ever made weighed 2,014 pounds. It is said to have included “60 pounds of bacon, 50 pounds of lettuce, 50 pounds of sliced onions, 40 pounds of pickles, and 40 pounds of cheese.” This record was set in 2012 by Minnesota’s Black Bear Casino, smashing the previous record of 881 pounds.

In the United States, National Cheeseburger Day is celebrated annually on September 18.

The ingredients used to create cheeseburgers follow similar patterns found in the regional variations of hamburgers, although most start with ground beef. Common cheeses used for topping are American, Swiss, Cheddar and other meltable cheeses. Popular toppings include lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, bacon, avocado or guacamole, sliced sautéed mushrooms, cheese sauce or chili, but the variety of possible toppings is broad.

A cheeseburger may have more than one patty or more than one slice of cheese—it is reasonably common, but by no means automatic, for the number to increase at the same rate with cheese and meat interleaved. A stack of two or more patties follows the same basic pattern as hamburgers: with two patties will be called a double cheeseburger; a triple cheeseburger has three, and while much less common, a quadruple has four.

Sometimes cheeseburgers are prepared with the cheese enclosed within the ground beef, rather than on top. This is sometimes known as a Jucy Lucy.

One of America’s Favorites – Baked Beans

July 4, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Baked beans over scrambled eggs on toast

Baked beans is a dish traditionally containing white beans that are parboiled and then, in the US, baked in sauce at low temperature for a lengthy period. In the United Kingdom, the dish is sometimes baked, but usually stewed in sauce. Canned baked beans are not baked, but are cooked through a steam process.

Baked beans originate in Native American cuisine, and are made from beans indigenous to the Americas. The dish was adopted and adapted by English colonists in New England in the 17th century and, through cookbooks published in the 19th century, spread to other regions of the United States and into Canada. Today, in the New England region of the United States, a variety of indigenous legumes are used in restaurants or in the home, such as Jacob’s cattle, soldier beans, yellow-eyed beans, and navy beans (also known as native beans).

Originally, Native Americans sweetened baked beans with maple syrup, a tradition some recipes still follow, but some English colonists used brown sugar beginning in the 17th century. In the 18th century, the convention of using American-made molasses as a sweetening agent became increasingly popular to avoid British taxes on sugar. Boston baked beans use a sauce prepared with molasses and salt pork, a dish whose popularity has given Boston the nickname “Beantown”.

Today, baked beans are served throughout the United States alongside barbecue foods and at picnics. Beans in a brown sugar, sugar, or corn syrup sauce (with or without tomatoes) are widely available throughout the United States. Bush Brothers are the largest producer. After the American Revolutionary War, Independence Day celebrations often included baked beans.

Canned baked beans are used as a convenience food; most are made from haricot beans (aka navy beans) in sauce. They may be eaten hot or cold, and straight from the can, as they are fully cooked. H. J. Heinz began producing canned baked beans in 1886. In the early 20th century, canned baked beans gained international popularity, particularly in the United Kingdom, where they have become a common part of an English full breakfast.

Three beanpots used for cooking homemade baked beans. The small one is glazed with the letters “Boston Baked Beans”

According to chef and food historian Walter Staib of Philadelphia’s City Tavern, baked beans had their roots as a Native peoples dish in the Americas long before the dish became known to Western culture. Native Americans mixed beans, maple sugar, and bear fat in earthenware pots which they placed in pits called “bean holes” which were lined in hot rocks to cook slowly over a long period of time.

British colonists in New England were the first westerners to adopt the dish from the Native peoples, and were quick to embrace it largely because the dish was reminiscent of pease porridge and because the dish used ingredients native to the New World. They substituted molasses or sugar for the maple syrup, bacon or ham for the bear fat, and simmered their beans for hours in pots over the fire instead of underground. Each colony in America had its own regional variations of the dish, with navy or white pea beans used in Massachusetts, Jacob’s Cattle and soldier beans used in Maine, and yellow-eyed beans in Vermont.[4] This variation likely resulted from the colonists receiving the dish from different Native peoples who used different native beans.

While some historians have theorized that baked beans had originated from the cassoulet or bean stew tradition in Southern France, this is unlikely as the beans used to make baked beans are all native to South America and were introduced to Europe around 1528. However, it is likely that English colonists used their knowledge of cassoulet cooking to modify the cooking technique of the beans from the traditional Native American version, by soaking the bean overnight and simmering the beans over a fire before baking it in earthen pots in order to decrease the cooking time.

A dish which was a clear precursor to baked beans, entitled “beans and bacon”, was known in medieval England. The addition of onion and mustard to some baked beans recipes published in New England in the 19th century was likely based on traditional cassoulet recipes from Staffordshire, England which utilized mustard, beans, and leeks. These ingredients are still often added to baked beans today. Nineteenth-century cookbooks published in New England, spread to other portions of the United States and Canada, which familiarized other people with the dish.

Beans on toast

While many recipes today are stewed, traditionally dried beans were soaked overnight, simmered until tender (parboiled), and then slow-baked in a ceramic or cast-iron beanpot. Originally baked beans were sweetened with maple syrup by Native Americans, a tradition some recipes still follow, but some English colonists modified the sweetening agent to brown sugar beginning in the 17th century. In the 18th century the convention of using American made molasses as a sweetening agent became increasingly popular in order to avoid British taxes on sugar. The molasses style of baked beans has become closely associated with the city of Boston and is often referred to as Boston baked beans.

Today in the New England region, baked beans are flavored either with maple syrup (Northern New England), or with molasses (Boston), and are traditionally cooked with salt pork in a beanpot in a brick oven for six to eight hours. In the absence of a brick oven, the beans were cooked in a beanpot nestled in a bed of embers placed near the outer edges of a hearth, about a foot away from the fire. Today, baked beans can be made in a slow cooker or in a modern oven using a traditional beanpot, Dutch oven, or casserole dish. The results of the dish, commonly described as having a savory-sweet flavor and a brownish- or reddish-tinted white bean, however, cooked are the same.

A tradition in Maine of “bean hole” cooking may have originated with the native Penobscot people and was later practiced in logging camps. A fire would be made in a stone-lined pit and allowed to burn down to hot coals, and then a pot with 11 pounds of seasoned beans would be placed in the ashes, covered over with dirt, and left to cook overnight or longer. These beans were a staple of Maine’s logging camps, served at every meal.

While baked beans was initially a New England region cuisine, the dish has become a popular item throughout the United States; and is now a staple item served most frequently along various types of barbecue and at picnics. This is due in part to the ease of handling, as they can be served hot or cold, directly from the can, making them handy for outdoor eating. The tomato-based sweet sauce also complements many types of barbecue. The already-cooked beans may also be baked in a casserole dish topped with slices of raw bacon, which is baked until the bacon is cooked. Additional seasonings are sometimes used, such as additional brown sugar or mustard to make the sauce more tangy.

 

A bowl of Beanie Weenies, also known as Franks and Beans or Beans and Wieners

Canned beans, often containing pork, were among the first convenience foods, and were exported and popularised by U.S. companies internationally in the early 20th century. The American Food and Drug Administration stated in 1996: “It has for years been recognized by consumers generally that the designation ‘beans with pork,’ or ‘pork and beans’ is the common or usual name for an article of commerce that contains very little pork.” The included pork is typically a piece of salt pork that adds fat to the dish.

The first mass-produced commercial canning of baked beans in the United States began in 1895 by the Pennsylvania-based H. J. Heinz Company. Heinz was also the first company to sell baked beans outside of the United States, beginning with sales limited solely to Fortnum & Mason in 1886, when the item was considered a luxury. They began selling baked beans throughout the UK in 1901, and baked beans became a standard part of the English full breakfast soon after. Heinz removed pork from the product during the Second World War rationing.

Originally, Heinz baked beans were prepared in the traditional United States manner for sales in Ireland and Great Britain. Over time, the recipe was altered to a less sweet tomato sauce without maple syrup, molasses, or brown sugar to appeal to the tastes of the United Kingdom. This is the version of baked beans most commonly eaten outside of the United States. Baked beans are commonly eaten on toast or as part of a full English, Scottish, or Irish breakfast.

Today, baked beans are a staple convenience food in the UK, often eaten as part of the modern full English breakfast and particularly on toast (called simply “beans on toast”). Heinz Baked Beans remains the best-selling brand in the UK. The Baked Bean Museum of Excellence in Port Talbot, Wales, is dedicated to baked beans.

 

In 2002, the British Dietetic Association allowed manufacturers of canned baked beans to advertise the product as contributing to the recommended daily consumption of five to six vegetables per person. This concession was criticized by heart specialists, who pointed to the high levels of sugar and salt in the product. However, it has been proven that consumption of baked beans does indeed lower total cholesterol levels and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, even in normo-cholesterolaemic individuals. Some manufacturers produce a “healthy” version of the product with reduced levels of sugar and salt.

Healthy Pancakes Recipes

June 12, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Pancakes Recipes. Start your mornings off with these Delicious and Healthy Pancakes Recipes with recipes including Healthy Pancake Mix, Egg and Bacon Pancake Breakfast Wraps, and Oatmeal Pancakes with Maple Fruit. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Pancakes Recipes
Find healthy, delicious pancake recipes including blueberry, banana, chocolate chip and low-calorie pancakes. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Healthy Pancake Mix
With this whole-grain mix on hand, you can enjoy homemade pancakes on busy weekday mornings. This is also a great item to pack on camping trips. Be sure to refrigerate or freeze the mix as flaxseed meal is highly perishable……

Egg and Bacon Pancake Breakfast Wraps
Maple syrup sweetens up this easy grab-and-go breakfast wrap that adults and kids alike will love. The batter for the pancake is spread thin in the pan like a crepe for easy rolling……

Oatmeal Pancakes with Maple Fruit
Have a full house and need a breakfast idea? Here’s a quick pancake recipe that serves eight! Everyone at your table will enjoy these filling oatmeal-buttermilk pancakes, topped with fresh fruit and a decadent cinnamon-maple sauce……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Pancakes Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18659/mealtimes/breakfast-brunch/pancakes/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 27, 2022 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

A little flour will do it…..

Sprinkle flour on your bacon to reduce grease splatters. It’ll also make your bacon extra crispy.
Thank you to Molly A. for passing this Hint along.

Healthy Omelet Recipes

May 18, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Omelet Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Omelet Recipes with recipes including Bacon, Cheddar and Chive Omelet, Denver Omelet Sandwiches, and Easy Loaded Baked Omelet Muffins. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Omelet Recipes
Find healthy, delicious omelet recipes, from EatingWell, including cheese, egg white and spinach omelets.

Bacon, Cheddar and Chive Omelet
In this satisfying healthy breakfast recipe, bacon and cheese are tucked into the omelet. The key to this omelet is cooking the eggs over low heat so the curds set up nice and soft. A splash of milk in the eggs is added insurance to keep the omelet from turning rubbery……

Denver Omelet Sandwiches
This egg sandwich recipe with flavorful Canadian bacon and crunchy bell pepper is a perfect healthy breakfast-for-dinner candidate. For an evening meal, serve with roasted potatoes and a tomato salad. For breakfast, just add a cup of coffee or tea and you’re good to go……

Easy Loaded Baked Omelet Muffins
Protein-packed omelet muffins, or baked mini omelets, are a perfect breakfast for busy mornings. Make a batch ahead and freeze for the days when you don’t have time for your typical bowl of oatmeal. You can also serve these fresh with fruit salad for a simple weekend brunch……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Omelet Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/21525/mealtimes/breakfast-brunch/eggs/omelets/

Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Boston-Style Baked Beans

May 1, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is Boston-Style Baked Beans. This week’s side dish is made using Navy Beans, Bacon, Onion, Yellow Mustard, Splenda, and Molasses. The Dish is 140 calories and 16 net carbs. The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Boston-Style Baked Beans
A delicious formula for rich and flavorful, diabetic-friendly Boston baked beans.

Recipe Ingredients:
4 (15-ounce) cans navy beans, undrained1/2 pound bacon, chopped
1 medium onion, chopped
1/4 cup yellow mustard
1/3 cup Splenda® No Calorie Sweetener, Granular
2 tablespoons robust molasses

Cooking Directions:
1 – Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).
2 – Drain navy beans and reserve 1 1/4 cups liquid.
3 – Fry bacon in a large skillet until browned. Remove bacon and reserve half of the bacon fat.
4 – Fry onion in reserved bacon fat and cook until translucent. Stir in beans and remaining ingredients.
5 – Pour beans into a 3-quart baking dish.
6 – Bake for 45 minutes.
Makes 18 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/18 of recipe): Calories: 140 Calories from Fat: 25 Total Fat: 3g Saturated Fat: 1g Cholesterol: 5mg Sodium: 520mg Total Carbs: 21g Dietary Fiber: 5g Sugars: 3g Protein: 9g.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/boston-style_baked_beans_recipe.html

One of America’s Favorites – Breakfast Sandwich

March 28, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A breakfast sandwich on sourdough bread

A breakfast sandwich is any sandwich filled with foods associated with the breakfast meal. Breakfast sandwiches are served at fast food restaurants (for example, the Burger King breakfast sandwiches) and delicatessens or bought as fast, ready to heat and eat sandwiches from a store. Breakfast sandwiches are commonly made at home. Different types of breakfast sandwich include the bacon sandwich, the egg sandwich, and the sausage sandwich; or various combinations thereof, like the bacon, egg and cheese sandwich. The breakfast sandwich is related to the breakfast roll.

Breakfast sandwiches are typically made using breakfast meats (generally cured meats such as sausages, patty sausages, bacon, country ham, scrapple, Spam, and pork roll), breads, eggs and cheese. These sandwiches were typically regional specialties until fast food restaurants began serving breakfast. Because the common types of bread, such as biscuits, bagels, and English muffin, were similar in size to fast food hamburger buns, they made an obvious choice for fast food restaurants. Unlike other breakfast items, they were perfect for the innovation of the drive-through. These sandwiches have also become a staple of many convenience stores.

A breakfast sandwich featuring eggs, bacon jam, and microgreens on a buttermilk biscuit

Although the ingredients for the breakfast sandwich have been common elements of breakfast meals in the English-speaking world for centuries, it was not until the 19th century in the United States that people began regularly eating eggs, cheese, and meat in a sandwich. What would later be known as “breakfast sandwiches” became increasingly popular after the American Civil War, and were a favorite food of pioneers during American westward expansion. The first known published recipe for a “breakfast sandwich” was in an 1897 American cookbook.

Types of bread used
There are several types of bread used to make breakfast sandwiches:

* Hard roll: The traditional breakfast sandwich of the northeast’s tri-state region of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. It is believed to be one of the earliest forms of the breakfast sandwich in the United States. It consists of a hard roll, eggs, cheese and sausage, bacon or ham. In New Jersey, a common breakfast sandwich is the Jersey breakfast which consists of pork roll, egg, and cheese on a hard Kaiser roll.
* Biscuit: Consists of a large, or cat-head biscuit, sliced, on which meat, cheese, or eggs are served. Popular biscuits include: Sausage biscuit, bacon, tomato, and country ham. Fast food restaurants have put smaller versions of fried chicken fillets on biscuits to create chicken biscuits. Scrambled eggs and/or American cheese are often added.
* Bagel sandwiches: Due to its connection with German and Jewish ethnic groups, Bagels often have foods popular in these communities. Deli meats, Canadian bacon, lox or other smoked fish, and cream cheese are popular on bagel sandwiches.
* English muffin: Generally contains egg and cheese with either breakfast sausage or ham. Often served in US fast food outlets such as McDonald’s and Starbucks.

A New-York-style bacon and egg sandwich on a roll

* Toast: Toasted bread is one of the oldest forms of breakfast sandwich in America, and the closest to the original sandwich in form. While any number of items might be served on toast, eggs and bacon are the ones most associated with breakfast.

* Specialty breads: Mostly served by restaurant chains,[citation needed] there are other breakfast sandwiches that do not use one of the common breakfast breads used in the United States. Burger King uses a croissant to make a breakfast sandwich called the Croissan’wich, or croissant sandwich, depending on the market. McDonald’s offers its traditional biscuit fillings on a sandwich made from maple flavored pancakes called a McGriddles. Dunkin’ Donuts has a waffle sandwich that is similar to the McGriddles. These can be found at American fast food franchises worldwide. Kangaroo Brands makes a variety of breakfast sandwiches made with pita bread.

One of America’s Favorites – Pork Jowl

February 28, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Sliced jowl bacon

Pork jowl is a cut of pork from a pig’s cheek. Different food traditions have used it as a fresh cut or as a cured pork product (with smoke and/or curing salt). As a cured and smoked meat in America it is called jowl bacon or, especially in the Southern United States, hog jowl. In the US, hog jowl is a staple of soul food, and there is a longer culinary tradition outside the United States: the cured non-smoked Italian variant is called guanciale.

Jowl bacon can be fried and eaten as a main course, similar to streaky bacon, such as in a traditional full English breakfast. Often, it is used as a seasoning for beans, black-eyed peas or cooked with leafy green vegetables such as collard greens or turnip greens in a traditional Southeastern meal.

Fried pork jowl

Jowl meat may also be chopped and used as a garnish, similar to bacon bits, or served in sandwich form. Pork jowl can be used as a binding ingredient in pork liver sausages such as liverwurst and braunschweiger.

A Southern US tradition of eating black-eyed peas and greens with either pork jowls or fatback on New Year’s Day to ensure prosperity throughout the new year goes back hundreds of years. During the American Civil War (1861 to 1865), the peas were thought to represent wealth to the Southerners, while the Northern army considered the food to be fit as livestock feed only. Pigs (and by extension, pork products) were symbolic of “wealth and gluttony” and consuming jowls or fatback on New Year’s Day guaranteed a good new year.

Storage – Because pork jowl can be cured, like many other cuts of pork, it has been a traditional wintertime food as it is able to be stored for long periods of time without refrigeration.

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Life with Autism

Articles about Life with Autism, Employment, Education, Special Interests, and Pets

Dish With Me

Recipes from my kitchen to yours

Greens, Beans & Love Always

Life Powered by Plants, Gratitude, and Messy Motherhood

Izzy's Vegetarian Recipes

Easy and delicious vegetarian recipes!

OneGreatVegan

Gabrielle Reyes - The Singing Chef

Get With It For Life with JEN

LIFE. HEALTH. FITNESS.

Healthy with Hannah

Helping you reach your goals through sustainable and realistic nutrition.

Beauty and the Bench Press

Healthy Eats. Beauty. Lifestyle

That's Deelicious!

Easy. Tasty. Tried & True. A collection of our favorite recipes!

Rate My Bistro

Cafe, Restaurant and Bistro Review Website

Wander Culinaire

a blog from a real chef & nutritionist

Zaza Chef

Cook. Eat. Repeat.

Sincerely, Cabra.

The public, social feed of Jaime Cabra

Mayuri's Jikoni

Where meals and memories are made.

Middle School Foodie

A website with recipes and restaurant reviews, written by a kid.

Kit's Kitchen

Simple Healthy Recipes