One of America’s Favorites – Potato Cakes

May 29, 2017 at 5:19 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A pair of potato cakes

Potato scallop a term that is sometimes applied to various different food preparations using potatoes.

 

 

 

 
Hashed potatoes
In parts of England, the term can refer to a patty of hashed potatoes, a kind of hash brown. These are available pre-made and frozen in supermarkets and are served by many restaurants, such as fast food stands, often as part of the breakfast menu. It can also refer to a sort of potato pancake.

Best eaten warm, with baked beans, as part of a full English breakfast.

 
Mashed potatoes
Another variant popular in the United Kingdom is prepared from cold mashed potatoes and fresh eggs. The two ingredients are combined together, then fried until crispy on the outside.

 
Scallops

American potato cakes, also referred to as a potato patties

In Australia and England potato cakes in the form of thin slices of potato, battered and deep-fried, are commonly sold in fish and chip shops and takeaway food shops. The terminology used in Australia differs from state to state. In New South Wales, Queensland, and the ACT they are usually referred to as “potato scallops”, or simply as “scallops” (to avoid confusion, scallops eaten as seafood may be known as “sea scallops”. In Tasmania and Victoria, the term “potato cakes” is used, while in South Australia and Western Australia “potato fritter” is most common.

Potato scallops originate from central England and are common in fish and chip shops there. This variant is normally a thin slice of potato, dipped in batter and deep fried, with no additional flavoring added except salt and vinegar. This type of “potato scallop” is also found in New Zealand fish and chip shops, however it is referred to as a potato fritter, not scallop. More commonly in New Zealand, a potato cake is made from either mashed or grated potato and is not covered in batter or deep fried. Hash browns, which are also widely available, are distinctly different. In Scotland what are known as potato cakes in Australia are known as potato fritters and are of the same type as the English variant. They are very common in fish and chip shops and are often the cheapest item on the menu.

The term may refer to a preparation of mashed potatoes baked in the form of pie or a scallop made using potatoes or potato flour.

 
Tattie scones

U.S. potato cake

Scottish tattie scones and Lancashire potato cakes are made from mashed or reconstituted potato and flour and baked on a griddle. They are typically served fried with breakfast or as a snack with butter or margarine, although they are often served with other toppings such as baked beans, scrambled eggs, garlic butter or tomato ketchup.

 

 

 

 
Irish potato cakes
Irish potato cakes are typically made from mashed potato and flour or baking soda, and are usually fried. This is not the same dish as boxty, because boxty is made using raw potatoes whereas potato cake is made using cooked potatoes. In Ireland, potato cakes are typically known as potato bread, or spud bread, and are served in traditional breakfasts along with soda bread and toast.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Barbecue Sandwich

May 22, 2017 at 5:22 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A barbecue sandwich served with pickled cucumber

A barbecue sandwich is a sandwich that is typically prepared with barbecued meats. Several types of meats are used to prepare barbecue sandwiches. Some varieties use cooked meats that are not barbecued, but include barbecue sauce. Many variations, including regional variations, exist, along with diverse types of cooking styles, preparations and ingredients.

 

 

 
A plethora of meats and preparation styles for barbecue sandwiches exist. Meats may be sliced, chopped or pulled, and various types are used, such as pork, pulled pork, pork shoulder, beef, beef brisket, chicken, sausage, pork ribs and turkey. Some versions use slow-smoked meats. Barbecue sandwiches typically have barbecue sauce included in their preparation, either when the meat is cooked, as a sauce within a sandwich, or both. Some meats may be seasoned with a spice rub. Some barbecue sandwiches may use cooked meats that are not barbecued, but include a barbecue sauce. Coleslaw is sometimes served with barbecue

A pulled pork barbecue sandwich

sandwiches, either on the sandwich itself or as a side dish. Sometimes sautéed vegetables such as onion and garlic are also used. Some versions prepared with beef brisket include both lean and fatty portions from the cut of beef to enhance their flavor. Pre-packaged barbecue sandwiches are also manufactured.

Breads used in the preparation of barbecue sandwiches include white bread, hamburger buns, whole wheat bread and even rye bread. The bread can help to prevent the meat from drying and to retain its temperature.

 

 

Regional variations

Missouri – Kansas City-style barbecue refers to the specific regional barbecue style of slowly smoked meat that first started from the pit of Henry Perry in the early 1900s in Kansas City, Missouri. Kansas City barbecue is slow-smoked over a variety of woods and then covered with a thick tomato- and molasses-based sauce.

North Carolina – Chopped pork barbecue sandwiches with coleslaw served on the sandwich are common in North Carolina. The term “barbecue” in North Carolina commonly refers specifically to barbecued, chopped pork, whereas other barbecued foods are often referred to by their actual food name.

Tennessee – Chopped pork shoulder barbecue sandwiches served with coleslaw atop them are common in Memphis, Tennessee. For example, Leonard Heuberger, who in 1922 founded a barbecue restaurant in Memphis named Leonard’s, has been reputed there as being the inventor of the “classic Memphis pork barbecue sandwich”. This sandwich was prepared on a bun with chopped or pulled pork shoulder meat, a tomato-based sauce, an

A barbecue sandwich, served with a side of smoked beans

d coleslaw. In the book Southern Food: At Home, on the Road, in History, it is stated that other restaurants “followed suit” regarding this sandwich style, and that “…the standard has not changed in more than 60 years.” At the Memphis restaurant chain Tops, pork shoulder sandwiches are described in this book as a “mainstay” that have existed as such since 1952, when the first Tops restaurant opened.

Texas – Texas Barbecue is a traditional style of preparing meat unique to the cuisine of Texas. It is one of the many different varieties of barbecue found around the world. Texas barbecue traditions can be divided into four general styles: East Texas, Central Texas, South Texas, and West Texas. The Central and East Texas varieties are generally the most well-known.
Generally speaking, the different Texas barbecue styles are distinguished as follows:
* East Texas style: The meat is slowly cooked to the point that it is “falling off the bone.” It is typically cooked over hickory wood and marinated in a sweet, tomato-based sauce.
* Central Texas style: The meat is rubbed with spices and cooked over indirect heat from pecan or oak wood.
* West Texas style: The meat is cooked over direct heat from mesquite wood.
* South Texas style: Features thick, molasses-like sauces that keep the meat very moist.

 

One of America’s Favorites – New York-Style Pizza

May 15, 2017 at 5:14 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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New York-style pizza from Brooklyn

New York-style pizza is a style of pizza characterized by large hand-tossed thin-crust pies, often sold in wide slices to go. It has a crust which is crisp along its edge yet soft and pliable enough beneath its toppings to be folded in half to eat. This style evolved in the U.S. from a type that originated in New York City in the early 1900s, and today refers to the style of pizza eaten in the states of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. This style of pizza is similar to the original Italian version. Regional variations exist throughout the Northeast and elsewhere in the U.S.

 

 

 

Slices of New York-style pizza to-go topped with pepperoni

The first pizzeria in the United States of America was founded by Gennaro Lombardi in New York City’s Little Italy in 1905. An immigrant pizzaiolo from Naples, he opened a grocery store in 1897; eight years later, it was licensed to sell pizza by New York State. An employee, Antonio Totonno Pero, began making pizza, which sold for five cents a pie. Many people, however, could not afford a whole pie and instead would offer what they could in return for a corresponding sized slice,[citation needed] which was wrapped in paper tied with string. In 1924, Totonno left Lombardi’s to open his own pizzeria on Coney Island, called Totonno’s.

The original pizzerias in New York used coal brick ovens and baked their pizza with the cheese on the bottom and sauce on top.[citation needed] By 2010, over 400 pizza restaurants existed in New York City, with hundreds more of varied cuisine also offering the dish.

 
New York-style pizza is traditionally hand-tossed, consisting in its basic form of a light layer of tomato sauce and dry,

New York-style pizza with various toppings

grated, full-fat mozzarella cheese; additional toppings are placed atop the cheese. Pies are typically around 18 inches in diameter, and commonly cut into 8 slices. These large wide slices are often eaten as fast food or a “street snack” while folded in half from the crust, as their flexibility sometimes makes them unwieldy to eat flat. Folding the slice also allows it to be eaten with one hand.

New York-style pizza gets its distinguishing crust from the high-gluten bread flour with which it is made. Minerals present in New York City’s tap water supply are also credited with giving the dough in metro area pies their characteristic flavor. Some out-of-state pizza makers even transport the water cross-country for the sake of authenticity.

 

Typical condiments include dried oregano, dried basil, grated Parmesan cheese, garlic powder, and dried red chili pepper flakes.
New York-style pizza is most prevalent in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, but can be found throughout the Northeastern region and beyond. Outside this area, many pizzas described as “New York style,” including those of major pizza chains such as Pizza Hut, generally do not fall within the variations commonly accepted as genuine in its native area.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Moon Pies

May 8, 2017 at 5:26 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Moon pie

A moon pie or MoonPie is a confection, popular in parts of the United States, which consists of two round graham cracker cookies, with marshmallow filling in the center, dipped in a flavored coating. The snack is often associated with the cuisine of the American South where they are traditionally accompanied by an RC Cola. Today, MoonPies are made by the Chattanooga Bakery in Chattanooga, TN.

The traditional pie is approximately four inches in diameter. A smaller version exists (mini MoonPie) that is approximately half the size, and a Double-Decker MoonPie of the traditional diameter features a third cookie and attendant layer of marshmallow. The four main flavors are chocolate, vanilla, strawberry, and banana. Double Decker MoonPies also come in lemon and orange; MoonPie Crunch comes only in peanut butter or mint. In 2014, a salted caramel flavor was introduced.

 
MoonPies have been made daily at the Chattanooga Bakery since the incorporation of MoonPie on April 29, 1917. Earl Mitchell Junior said his father came up with the idea for MoonPies when he asked a Kentucky coal miner what kind of snack he would like to eat, and the miner requested something with graham cracker and marshmallow. Popular folklore, repeated and encouraged by the Chattanooga Bakery itself, states the miner then asked the snack be “as big as the moon”, which inspired the name “moon pie”.

There is a custom for eating MoonPies with RC Cola, although the origin of this is unknown. It is likely that their

A double-decker Moon Pie split in half.

inexpensive prices, combined with their larger serving sizes, contributed to establishing this combination as the “working man’s lunch”. The popularity of this combination was celebrated in a popular song of the 1950s, by Big Bill Lister, “Gimmee an RC Cola and a Moon Pie”. In 1973, NRBQ had a minor hit with the song, “An RC Cola and a Moon Pie”.

Since New Year’s Eve 2008, the city of Mobile, Alabama has been raising a 12-foot-tall lighted mechanical moon pie to celebrate the coming of the new year. The giant banana colored MoonPie is raised by a crane to a height of 200 feet as the clock strikes midnight. Also, the city had for the 2008 New Year’s celebration the world’s largest MoonPie baked for the occasion. It weighed 55 pounds and contained 45,000 calories.

An annual RC & MoonPie Festival is celebrated in Bell Buckle, Tennessee, and a MoonPie Eating Contest is held in Bessemer, Alabama.

On October 16, 2010, Sonya Thomas, a competitive eater known as the “Black Widow”, ate 38 MoonPies in eight minutes in Caruthersville, Missouri.

Newport, Tennessee held its first annual MoonPie Festival in May 2012.

 
Mardi Gras tradition
The MoonPie became a traditional “throw” (an item thrown from a parade float into the crowd) of Mardi Gras “krewes” (parade participants) in Mobile, Alabama during 1956, followed by other communities along the Mississippi Gulf Coast. The westernmost outpost of the MoonPie as an important Carnival throw is Slidell, Louisiana, which has a parade by “The Krewe of Mona Lisa and MoonPie”. Also, in the town of Oneonta, Alabama, there is a MoonPie eating contest started by Wal-Mart employee John Love when he inadvertently ordered too many. This anecdote was featured in Sam Walton’s autobiography, Made in America.

 
Apollo 11 great moon walk tradition
The MoonPie is a traditional celebratory food for remembering the Apollo 11 moon walk that took place on July 20, 1969. MoonPies are used in the commemorative celebration by aerospace workers and enthusiasts across the globe.

 
A MoonPie is made with marshmallow, which is a low-fat but high-sugar food. The nutritional content of a chocolate full-size or Mini MoonPie (from 2004) is detailed below, showing (full-size) 226 calories, saturated fat 3.5g, carbohydrate 40g, protein 4g, iron 5%, of a total weight of 57 grams (2 ounces). The nutritional data for a chocolate Mini MoonPie is about 65% the amount of full-size.

The ingredients are as follows: enriched wheat flour (niacin, reduced iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), corn syrup, sugar, vegetable shortening (contains partially hydrogenated soybean oil and/or cottonseed oil and/or coconut oil and/or palm kernel oil and/or palm oil), soy flour, dutched cocoa (processed with alkali), cocoa, kosher gelatin, baking soda, lecithin, salt, artificial flavoring, sodium sulfite.

 

 

Wagon Wheels are similar to moon pies and are found in the United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada

In the northern areas of the U.S. a similar product is called a “Scooter Pie” and there is also a single-cracker marshmallow cookie called “Mallomars”. Little Debbie also makes what they call “Marshmallow Pies” which are nearly identical to the Moonpies. In the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada a similar product is called “Wagon Wheels” and in Japan, “Choco Pie” and the smaller-sized “Angel Pies” by Morinaga.

Some South Korean and Taiwanese companies produce “Choco pies”, and in Mexico there are similar cookie pies called “Mamut” (Spanish for “Mammoth”, sold by Gamesa), and “Rocko” (marketed by Marinela); there are several other minor brands as well. In Turkey, a similar pie is called “Halley”. In Egypt, a similar pie is called “Bimbo”. In Argentina a similar treat is “Alfajor”, more than 20 brands marketed as “alfajores” are very popular.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Cacciatore

May 1, 2017 at 5:14 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Chicken cacciatore

 

 

Cacciatore (pronounced [kattʃaˈtoːre]) means “hunter” in Italian. In cuisine, alla cacciatora refers to a meal prepared “hunter-style” with onions, herbs, usually tomatoes, often bell peppers, and sometimes wine.

Cacciatore is popularly made with braised chicken (pollo alla cacciatora) or rabbit (coniglio alla cacciatora). The salamino cacciatore is a small salami that is seasoned with only garlic and pepper.

 

 

 
A basic cacciatore recipe usually begins with a couple of tablespoons of olive oil heated in a large frying pan. Chicken

Rabbit cacciatore

parts, dusted with salt and pepper, are seared in the oil for three to four minutes on each side. The chicken is removed from the pan, and most of the fat poured off. The remaining fat is used to fry the onions, peppers or other vegetables for several minutes. A small can of peeled tomatoes (drained of liquid and chopped coarsely) is typically added to the pan along with rosemary and a half cup of dry red wine. Bay leaf may be used, along with chopped carrot to give extra sweetness. The seared chicken parts are returned to the pan which is then covered. The dish is done after about an hour at a very low simmer. Cacciatore is often served with a rustic bread or pasta on the side.

 
Chicken cacciatore typically, but not always, includes base ingredients of onion, garlic, and tomato.

 

 

U.S.-style chicken cacciatore

There are many different variations of this entree based upon ingredients available in specific regions. For example, in southern Italy, cacciatore often includes red wine, while northern Italian chefs might use white wine. Some versions of the dish may use mushrooms.
In the United States, cacciatore dishes may be prepared with marinara sauce, though in Italy the dish does not always include tomatoes.

 

One of America’s Favorites – The Baked Potato

April 24, 2017 at 5:31 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A baked potato with butter

A baked potato, or jacket potato, is a potato that has been baked for eating. When well cooked, a baked potato has a fluffy interior and a crisp skin. It may be served with fillings and condiments such as butter, cheese or ham. Potatoes can be baked in a conventional gas or electric oven, a convection oven, a microwave oven, on a barbecue grill, or on/in an open fire. Some restaurants use special ovens designed specifically to cook large numbers of potatoes, then keep them warm and ready for service.

Prior to cooking, the potato should be scrubbed clean, washed and dried with eyes and surface blemishes removed, and basted with oil (usually Olive oil) or butter and/or salt. Pricking the potato with a fork or knife allows steam to escape during the cooking process. Potatoes cooked in a microwave oven without pricking the skin might split open due to built up internal pressure from unvented steam. It takes between one and two hours to bake a large potato in a conventional oven at 200 °C (392 °F). Microwaving takes from six to twelve minutes depending on oven power and potato size, but does not generally produce a crisp skin. Some recipes call for use of both a microwave and a conventional oven, with the microwave being used to vent most of the steam prior to the cooking process.

Some varieties of potato such as Russet and King Edward potatoes are more suitable for baking than others, owing to their size and consistency.

Wrapping the potato in aluminium foil before cooking in a standard oven will help to retain moisture, while leaving it unwrapped will result in a crisp skin. When cooking over an open fire or in the coals of a barbecue, it may require wrapping in foil to prevent burning of the skin. A potato buried directly in coals of a fire cooks very nicely, with a mostly burned and inedible skin. A baked potato is fully cooked when its internal temperature reaches 99 °C (210 °F).

Once a potato has been baked, some people discard the skin and eat only the softer and moister interior, while others enjoy the taste and texture of the crisp skin. Potatoes baked in their skins may lose between 20 and 40% of their vitamin C content because heating in air is slow and vitamin inactivation can continue for a long time. Small potatoes bake more quickly than large ones and therefore retain more of their vitamin C. Despite the popular misconception that potatoes are fattening, baked potatoes can be used as part of a healthy diet.

 

 

Baked potato and sweet potato, with kale

Some people bake their potatoes and then scoop out the interior, leaving the skin as a shell. The white interior flesh can then be mixed with various other food items such as cheese, butter, or bacon bits. This mixture is then spooned back into the skin shells and they are replaced in the oven to warm through. In America these are known variously as loaded potato skins, filled potatoes and twice baked potatoes. In Great Britain, toppings or fillings tend to be more varied than they are in America: baked beans, curried chicken, tuna, and prawn fillings are popular, and in Scotland even haggis is used as a filling for jacket potatoes.

A variation is Hasselback potatoes, where the potato is cut into very thin slices almost down the bottom, so that the potato still holds together, and is then baked in the oven, occasionally scalloped with cheese. The proper noun “Hasselback” refers to the luxurious Hasselbacken hotel and restaurant in Stockholm which originated this dish.

 
Many restaurants serve baked potatoes with sides such as butter, sour cream, chives, shredded cheese, and bacon bits. These potatoes can be a side item to a steak dinner, or some similar entree. Sides are usually optional and customers can order as many or as few as they wish.

Large, stuffed baked potatoes may be served as an entree, usually filled with meat in addition to any of the ingredients mentioned above. Barbecued or smoked meat or chili is substituted. Vegetables such as broccoli may also be added.

 

 

A baked potato with shrimp, cottage cheese, dill, tomato and lettuce

Idaho is the major producing state of potatoes. The Idaho baked potato was heavily promoted by the Northern Pacific Railroad in the early 20th century, often using Hollywood movie stars.

Hazen Titus was appointed as the Northern Pacific Railway’s dining car superintendent in 1908. He talked to Yakima Valley farmers who complained that they were unable to sell their potato crops because their potatoes were simply too large. They fed them to hogs. Titus learned that a single potato could weigh from two to five pounds, but that smaller potatoes were preferred by the end buyers of the vegetable and that many considered them not to be edible because they were difficult to cook because of their thick, rough skin.

Titus and his staff discovered the “inedible” potatoes were delicious after baking in a slow oven. He contracted to purchase as many potatoes as the farmers could produce that were more than two pounds in weight. Soon after the first delivery of “Netted Gem Bakers”, they were offered to diners on the North Coast Limited beginning in 1909. Word of the line’s specialty offering traveled quickly, and before long it was using “the Great Big Baked Potato” as a slogan to promote the railroad’s passenger service. When an addition was built for the Northern Pacific’s Seattle commissary in 1914, reporter wrote, “A large trade mark, in the shape of a baked potato, 40 ft.long and 18 ft. in diameter, surmounts the roof. The potato is electric lighted and its eyes, through the electric mechanism, are made to wink constantly. A cube of butter thrust into its split top glows intermittently.” Premiums such as postcards, letter openers, and spoons were also produced to promote “The Route of the Great Big Baked Potato”; the slogan served the Northern Pacific for about 50 years. The song “Great Big Baked Potato” (words by N.R. Streeter and H. Caldwell ; Music by Oliver George) was written about this potato.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Chicken Parmigiana

April 17, 2017 at 5:33 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A chicken Parmigiano, served with french fries and salad.

Chicken parmigiana, or chicken parmesan (Italian Pollo alla parmigiana) (also referred to colloquially in the United States as ‘chicken parm’ and in Australia as a parma or parm is a popular Italian-American dish. It consists of a breaded chicken breast topped with tomato sauce and mozzarella, parmesan or provolone cheese. A slice of ham or bacon is sometimes added, but not all chefs are in agreement with the addition of pork. It has been speculated that the dish is based on a combination of the Italian melanzane alla Parmigiana, a dish using breaded eggplant slices instead of chicken, along with costelette Parmigiana (the latter generally served without sauce or cheese in Italy).

 

Chicken parmigiana is included as the base of a number of different meals, including sandwiches and pies, and the meal is used as the subject of eating contests at some restaurants.

 

 

 

Chicken parmesan in a pan

In the United States and Canada, chicken parmigiana is often served as an entree, and sometimes with a side of or on top of pasta. Many restaurants also offer chicken parm sandwiches, putting chicken parmigiana between two slices of bread. A recipe for chicken parmigiana was published in The New York Times in 1962. The New York Public Library has in their collection a menu from New York City Italian restaurant that has been in the same location since 1906 which shows that chicken parmigiana was being offered in 1958. In the same collection at the New York Public Library, there is a menu from a restaurant on board an ocean liner of the Italian Line that crossed the North Atlantic between North America and Europe and had offered Petti Di Pollo Alla Parmigiana in 1956. There is a recipe that was published in the 1953 issue of the New York Herald Tribune that used frozen fried chicken patties or fillets along with other pre-processed foods to make a version of the dish at home.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Cashew Chicken

April 10, 2017 at 5:16 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A plate of stir-fried cashew chicken (traditional)

Cashew chicken is a simple Chinese-American dish that combines chicken (usually stir-fried but occasionally deep-fried, depending on the variation), with cashews and either a light brown garlic sauce or a thick sauce made from chicken stock, soy sauce and oyster sauce.

 

 

 

 
is a simple Chinese-American dish that combines chicken (usually stir-fried but occasionally deep-fried, depending on the variation), with cashews and either a light brown garlic sauce or a thick sauce made from chicken stock, soy sauce and oyster sauce.

 

Springfield-style cashew chicken

 

A plate of Springfield-style (deep fried) cashew chicken

The deep-fried version of the dish is closely associated with the city of Springfield, Missouri. Deep-fried cashew chicken was apparently first served in 1963 at the Grove Supper Club in Springfield. David Leong, the chef, who moved to the United States from China in 1940, struggled to gain acceptance for the foods of his homeland so he began searching for a dish that would appeal to local residents’ taste buds. His famous deep-fried cashew chicken recipe was so popular he soon opened Leong’s Tea House in Springfield. The dish became exceedingly popular in the Springfield area and is often cited as the unofficial “dish of the city”. Springfield even hosts an annual festival that is centered on this chicken dish: Springfield Sertoma’s Cashew Craze.

 

Borrowing from the local love of fried chicken, Leong came up with a variation of the preexisting dish. Instead of stir-frying the chicken, as is normally done, he deep-fried the chicken chunks. He then covered them with the typical sauce made from chicken stock, soy sauce and oyster sauce, and added the handful of cashews. He also included chopped green onions as a twist and it became an immediate hit with the local crowd. As word spread about the dish, so did the recipe. Leong’s Tea House closed its doors in 1997, but Springfield-style cashew chicken is still being served at over 70 Chinese restaurants, as well as many non-Chinese restaurants, in and around the Springfield metropolitan area, and elsewhere in Missouri and other states. Springfield-style cashew chicken has been mentioned on The Food Channel, a nationwide syndicated radio program, and the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives.

 

In 2010, Leong’s son, with his father’s assistance, opened a new restaurant in Springfield serving the same style of cashew chicken.

 
In Thai cuisine, there is a related stir-fry dish called kai pad med mamuang himmapan or gai pad med ma muang.

In Haitian cuisine, there is an unrelated chicken stew with cashews called poul ak nwa.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Hash Browns

April 3, 2017 at 5:32 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Shredded hash browns, pictured with slider sandwiches

Hash browns or hashed browns are a simple preparation in which potatoes are pan-fried after being shredded, diced, julienned or riced, in the style of a Swiss Rösti. In some cultures, hash browns or hashed browns can refer to any of these preparations, while in others it may refer to one specific preparation. Hash browns are a staple breakfast food at diners in North America and the UK, where they are often fried on a large common cooktop or grill.

In some parts of the United States, hash browns strictly refer to shredded or riced pan-fried potatoes and are considered a breakfast food, while potatoes diced or cubed and pan-fried are also a side dish called country fried potatoes or home fries (though many variations of home fries are par-cooked before frying). Some recipes add diced or chopped onions.

Hash browns are a mass-produced product that are purveyed in refrigerated and frozen varieties. The product is also manufactured in dehydrated form.

 

 

 

Hash browns, bacon, eggs and coffee

Originally, the full name was “hashed brown potatoes” (or “hashed browned potatoes”), of which the first known mention is by food author Maria Parloa (1843–1909) in 1888. The name was gradually shortened to ‘hash brown potatoes’. Bite sized Hash Browns are small cylindrical dumplings, known as Tater Tots in the USA and Potato Gems in Australia, and are sold commercially at diners and in frozen food aisles in packets.

 

 

 

Hash browns with eggs

A chef may prepare hash browns by forming riced potatoes into patties before frying with onions (moisture and potato starch can hold them together); however, if a binding agent is added (egg or oil for example), such a preparation constitutes a potato pancake. Frozen hash browns are sometimes made into patty form for ease of handling, and the compact, flat shape can also be cooked in a toaster oven or toaster. If a dish of hash browned potatoes incorporates chopped meat, leftovers, or other vegetables, it is more commonly referred to as hash.

Hash browns are also manufactured as a dehydrated food, which is sometimes used by backpackers.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Cobbler

March 27, 2017 at 5:16 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Cobbler

Cobbler refers to a variety of dishes, particularly in the United Kingdom and United States, consisting of a fruit or savory filling poured into a large baking dish and covered with a batter, biscuit, or dumpling (in England) before being baked. Some cobbler recipes, especially in the American south, resemble a thick-crusted, deep-dish pie with both a top and bottom crust.

 

 

 

 
Cobblers originated in the British American colonies. English settlers were unable to make traditional suet puddings due to lack of suitable ingredients and cooking equipment, so instead covered a stewed filling with a layer of uncooked plain biscuits or dumplings, fitted together.[citation needed] The origin of the name cobbler, recorded from 1859, is uncertain: it may be related to the archaic word cobbler, meaning “wooden bowl”.

 

 
North America

Peach cobbler with ice cream

Grunts, pandowdy, and slumps are Canadian Maritimes and New England varieties of cobbler, typically cooked on the stovetop, or in an iron skillet or pan, with the dough on top in the shape of dumplings. They reportedly take their name from the grunting sound they make while cooking. Another name for the types of biscuits/dumplings used are called dough-boys. Dough-boys are used in stews and cobblers alike.

In the United States, additional varieties of cobbler include the apple pan dowdy (an apple cobbler whose crust has been broken and perhaps stirred back into the filling), the Betty, the buckle (made with yellow batter (like cake batter), with the filling mixed in with the batter), the dump (or dump cake), the grump, the slump, and the sonker. The sonker is unique to North Carolina: it is a deep-dish version of the American cobbler.

In the Deep South, cobblers most commonly come in single fruit varieties and are named as such, such as blackberry, blueberry, and peach cobbler. The Deep South tradition also gives the option of topping the fruit cobbler with a scoop or two of vanilla ice cream. Savory cobblers are less common in the region; for example, tomato cobbler, which may include onion and a biscuit topping that may include cheese or cornmeal, is one savoury variant that also resembles Southern tomato pie.

 
Betty
The American variant known as the Betty or brown Betty dates from native times. In 1864, in the Yale Literary Magazine, it appeared with “brown” in lower case, thus making “Betty” the proper name. In 1890, however, a recipe was published in Practical Sanitary and Economic Cooking Adapted to Persons of Moderate and Small Means with the word “Brown” capitalised, making “Brown Betty” the proper name.

Brown Betties are made with breadcrumbs (or bread pieces, or graham cracker crumbs), and fruit, usually diced apples, in alternating layers. They are baked covered and have a consistency like bread pudding.

In the midwestern United States, apple or strawberry Betty is often a synonym for apple crisp.

 
UK and British Commonwealth
In the UK and British Commonwealth, the scone-topped cobbler predominates, and is found in both sweet and savoury versions. Common sweet fillings include apple, blackberry, and peach. Savoury versions, such as beef, lamb, or mutton, consist of a casserole filling, sometimes with a simple ring of cobbles around the edge, rather than a complete layer, to aid cooking of the meat. Cheese or herb scones may also be used as a savoury topping.

Cobblers and crumbles were promoted by the Ministry of Food during the Second World War, since they are filling, yet require less butter than a traditional pastry, and can be made with margarine.

 

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