Healthy Vegetable Soup Recipes

November 17, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Vegetable Soup Recipes. Here’s some Delicious and Healthy Vegetable Soup Recipes with recipes including Creamy Chicken Noodle Soup with Rotisserie Chicken, Cream of Turkey and Wild Rice Soup, and Butternut Squash Soup with Apple Grilled Cheese Sandwiches. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Vegetable Soup Recipes
Find healthy, delicious vegetable soup recipes including chicken vegetable, minestrone and pea soup. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Creamy Chicken Noodle Soup with Rotisserie Chicken
This rich-tasting but better-for-you creamy chicken soup has a delicious chicken pot pie feel to it. We call for rotisserie chicken to streamline your prep time–look for a nice big one with lots of breast meat on it. Pair this comforting and easy soup recipe with a green salad, or, if you’re really hungry, a grilled cheese sandwich……

Cream of Turkey and Wild Rice Soup
Got leftover cooked chicken or turkey? Cook up a pot of soup! This recipe is a healthier twist on a classic creamy turkey and wild rice soup that hails from Minnesota. Serve with a crisp romaine salad and whole-grain bread……

Butternut Squash Soup with Apple Grilled Cheese Sandwiches
Layering apple slices into grilled cheese sandwiches adds a little crunch to a favorite soup dipper. And creamy butternut squash soup with ginger, cumin and turmeric is a nice change of pace from grilled cheese’s usual tomato soup partner. Serve the duo for a comforting and easy weeknight dinner for the family. The soup keeps well in the fridge, so save leftovers for lunch or dinner later in the week.

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Vegetable Soup Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18219/soup/vegetable/

One of America’s Favorites – Stuffing

November 15, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Stuffing a turkey

Stuffing, filling, or dressing is an edible mixture, often composed of herbs and a starch such as bread, used to fill a cavity in the preparation of another food item. Many foods may be stuffed, including poultry, seafood, and vegetables. As a cooking technique stuffing helps retain moisture, while the mixture itself serves to augment and absorb flavors during its preparation.

Poultry stuffing often consists of breadcrumbs, onion, celery, spices, and herbs such as sage, combined with the giblets. Additions in the United Kingdom include dried fruits and nuts (such as apricots and flaked almonds), and chestnuts.

It is not known when stuffings were first used. The earliest documentary evidence is the Roman cookbook, Apicius De Re Coquinaria, which contains recipes for stuffed chicken, dormouse, hare, and pig. Most of the stuffings described consist of vegetables, herbs and spices, nuts, and spelt (an old cereal), and frequently contain chopped liver, brains, and other organ meat.

Names for stuffing include “farce” (~1390), “stuffing” (1538), “forcemeat” (1688), and relatively more recently in the United States; “dressing” (1850).

In addition to stuffing the body cavity of animals, including birds, fish, and mammals, various cuts of meat may be stuffed after they have been deboned or a pouch has been cut into them. Recipes include stuffed chicken legs, stuffed pork chops, stuffed breast of veal, as well as the traditional holiday stuffed turkey or goose.

Stuffed turkey

Many types of vegetables are also suitable for stuffing, after their seeds or flesh has been removed. Tomatoes, capsicums (sweet or hot peppers), vegetable marrows (e.g., zucchini) may be prepared in this way. Cabbages and similar vegetables can also be stuffed or wrapped around a filling. They are usually blanched first, in order to make their leaves more pliable. Then, the interior may be replaced by stuffing, or small amounts of stuffing may be inserted between the individual leaves.

Purportedly ancient Roman, or else Medieval, cooks developed engastration recipes, stuffing animals with other animals. An anonymous Andalusian cookbook from the 13th century includes a recipe for a ram stuffed with small birds. A similar recipe for a camel stuffed with sheep stuffed with bustards stuffed with carp stuffed with eggs is mentioned in T.C. Boyle’s book Water Music. Multi-bird-stuffed dishes such as the turducken or gooducken are contemporary variations.

Almost anything can serve as a stuffing. Many Anglo-American stuffings contain bread or cereals, usually together with vegetables, herbs and spices, and eggs. Middle Eastern

Stuffed orange pepper

vegetable stuffings may be based on seasoned rice, on minced meat, or a combination thereof. Other stuffings may contain only vegetables and herbs. Some types of stuffing contain sausage meat, or forcemeat, while vegetarian stuffings sometimes contain tofu. Roast pork is often accompanied by sage and onion stuffing in England; roast poultry in a Christmas dinner may be stuffed with sweet chestnuts. Oysters are used in one traditional stuffing for Thanksgiving. These may also be combined with mashed potatoes, for a heavy stuffing. Fruits and dried fruits can be added to stuffing including apples, apricots, dried prunes, and raisins. In England, a stuffing is sometimes made of minced pork shoulder seasoned with various ingredients, sage, onion, bread, chestnuts, dried apricots, dried cranberries etc. The stuffing mixture may be cooked separately and served as a side dish. This may still be called stuffing or it may be called dressing.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that cooking animals with a body cavity filled with stuffing can present potential food safety issues. These can occur because when the meat reaches a safe temperature, the stuffing inside can still harbor bacteria (and if the meat is cooked until the stuffing reaches a safe temperature, the meat may be overcooked). For turkeys, for instance, the USDA recommends cooking stuffing separately from the bird and not buying pre-stuffed birds.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 12, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Baste away……

Turkey Tip; With a basting needle, inject the raw turkey around the breast and thighs with 1/4 pound melted butter. You will have a juicier bird.

One of America’s Favorites – Turkey

November 8, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A roast turkey prepared for a traditional U.S. Thanksgiving meal. The white plastic object in the breast is a pop-up thermometer.

Turkey meat, commonly referred to as just turkey, is the meat from turkeys, typically domesticated turkeys but also wild turkeys. It is a popular poultry dish, especially in North America, where it is traditionally consumed as part of culturally significant events such as Thanksgiving and Christmas, as well as in standard cuisine.

Turkeys are sold sliced and ground, as well as “whole” in a manner similar to chicken with the head, feet, and feathers removed. Frozen whole turkeys remain popular. Sliced turkey is frequently used as a sandwich meat or served as cold cuts; in some cases where recipes call for chicken, it can be used as a substitute. Ground turkey is sold, and frequently marketed as a healthy alternative to ground beef. Without careful preparation, cooked turkey is usually considered to end up less moist than other poultry meats such as chicken or duck.

Wild turkeys, while technically the same species as domesticated turkeys, have a very different taste from farm-raised turkeys. Almost all of the meat is “dark” (including the breast) with a more intense flavor. The flavor can also vary seasonally with changes in available forage, often leaving wild turkey meat with a gamier flavor in late summer, due to the greater number of insects in its diet over the preceding months. Wild turkey that has fed predominantly on grass and grain has a milder flavor. Older heritage breeds also differ in flavor. Traditionally raised English turkey meat has been granted the EU and UK designation Traditional Specialty Guaranteed under the name Traditional Farm Fresh Turkey.

A large amount of turkey meat is processed. It can be smoked, and as such, is sometimes sold as turkey ham or turkey bacon, which is considered to be far healthier than pork bacon. Twisted helices of deep-fried turkey meat, sold as “turkey twizzlers”, came to prominence in the UK in 2004, when chef Jamie Oliver campaigned to have them and similar foods removed from school dinners.

Roast turkey

Unlike chicken eggs, turkey eggs are not commonly sold as food due to the high demand for whole turkeys and lower output of eggs as compared with other fowl (not only chickens, but even ducks or quail). The value of a single turkey egg is estimated to be about $3.50 on the open market, substantially more than an entire carton of one dozen chicken eggs.

Turkeys are traditionally eaten as the main course of Thanksgiving dinner feasts in the United States and Canada, and at Christmas dinner feasts in much of the rest of the world[citation needed] (often as stuffed turkey).

Turkey meat has been eaten by indigenous peoples from Mexico, Central America, and the southern tier of the United States since antiquity. In the 15th century, Spanish conquistadores took Aztec turkeys back to Europe.

Turkey was eaten in as early as the 16th century in England. Before the 20th century, pork ribs were the most common food for the North American holidays, as the animals were usually slaughtered in November. Turkeys were once so abundant in the wild that they were eaten throughout the year, the food considered commonplace, whereas pork ribs were rarely available outside of the Thanksgiving–New Year season. While the tradition of turkey at Christmas spread throughout Britain in the 17th century, among the working classes, it became common to serve goose, which remained the predominant roast until the Victorian era.

Turkey with mole is regarded as Mexico’s “national dish”.

Both fresh and frozen turkeys are used for cooking; as with most foods, fresh turkeys are generally preferred, although they cost more. Around holiday seasons, high demand for fresh turkeys often makes them difficult to purchase without ordering in advance. For the frozen variety, the large size of the turkeys typically used for consumption makes defrosting them a major endeavor: a typically sized turkey will take several days to properly defrost.

A roast turkey, a traditional American Thanksgiving meal.

Turkeys are usually baked or roasted in an oven for several hours, often while the cook prepares the remainder of the meal. Sometimes, a turkey is brined before roasting to enhance flavor and moisture content. This is done because the dark meat requires a higher temperature to denature all of the myoglobin pigment than the white meat (very low in myoglobin), so that fully cooking the dark meat tends to dry out the breast. Brining makes it possible to fully cook the dark meat without drying the breast meat. Turkeys are sometimes decorated with turkey frills, paper frills or “booties” that are placed on the end of drumsticks or bones of other cutlets.

In some areas, particularly the American South, they may also be deep fried in hot oil (often peanut oil) for 30 to 45 minutes by using a turkey fryer. Deep frying turkey has become something of a fad, with hazardous consequences for those unprepared to safely handle the large quantities of hot oil required.

Nutrition
When raw, turkey breast meat is 74% water, 25% protein, 1% fat, and contains no carbohydrates (table). In a 100-gram (3+1⁄2-ounce) reference amount, turkey breast supplies 465 kilojoules (111 kilocalories) of food energy, and contains high amounts (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of protein, niacin, vitamin B6, and phosphorus, with moderate content (10–19% DV) of pantothenic acid and zinc.

A 100 gram amount of turkey breast contains 279 mg of tryptophan, a low content compared to other amino acids in turkey breast meat. There is no scientific evidence that this amount of tryptophan from turkey causes

For Thanksgiving in the United States, turkey is traditionally served stuffed or with dressing (on the side), with cranberry sauce and gravy. Common complementary dishes include mashed potatoes, corn on the cob, green beans, squash, and sweet potatoes. Pie is the usual dessert, especially those made from pumpkins, apples, or pecans. It can also be eaten at Christmas in the United States and North America.

Roast turkey served with salad, sauces, sparkling apple juice, and Yule Log cake during a Christmas dinner feast.

For Christmas in the United Kingdom, turkey is traditionally served with winter vegetables, including roast potatoes, Brussels sprouts, and parsnips. Cranberry sauce is the traditional condiment in the northern rural areas of the United Kingdom where wild cranberries grow. In the south and in urban areas, where cranberries until recently were difficult to obtain, bread sauce was used in its place, but the availability of commercial cranberry sauce has seen a rise in its popularity in these areas, too. Sometimes, sausage meat, cocktail sausages, or liver wrapped in bacon is also served (known as bacon rolls or “pigs in blankets”).

Especially during holiday seasons around Thanksgiving and Christmas, stuffing or dressing is traditionally served with turkey. The many varieties include oatmeal, chestnut, sage and onion (flavored bread), cornbread, and sausage are the most traditional. Stuffing is used to stuff the turkey (as the name implies) or may be cooked separately and served as a side dish (dressing).

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 8, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Thawing frozen Turkey…..

It takes approximately 24 hours for every 4 to 5 pounds of whole turkey to thaw in the refrigerator. Once the turkey is thawed, you can keep it in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 additional days before cooking. For more information about thawing a turkey, go to Turkey Basics: Safe Thawing.

Kitchen Closed – Penn Station

October 27, 2021 at 7:41 PM | Posted in Penn Station | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Penn Station Subs

 

Just a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea for Breakfast this morning. A light frost out there this morning. 59 degrees and sunny for the afternoon. Can’t believe how short the days are getting. I wake up now and it’s dark till going on 8:00 in the morning and then it gets dark around 6 or so! I hate these short days. I started a load of laundry after Breakfast and then I headed to Kroger for a few items for Mom. Back home got the cart and rake out and raked the front and side yards. I’ll have to do the back yard later, it’s loaded with leaves. Running short on time so the Kitchen closed. And so with the Kitchen shutdown it’s Penn Station Dagwood and Reuben tonight!

 

Running short on time this afternoon so I had to order out. We really enjoy Penn Station Subs so Subs it is! ! I ordered a couple of Subs for us. Mom had the Reuben Footlong with Fresh Cut Fries and I had the Dagwood on Multi Grain Bun with Turkey, Salami, Ham, and American Cheese. We’ve made this a regular stop, these are so Delicious! The Fresh Cut Fries were good too! Great Job as always Penn Station! For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Cherry Jello. Take Care and Stay Safe All!

 

 

 

 

 

Penn Station
Enjoy The Grill Thing.

Penn Station has developed a unique product line that demonstrates, in full customer view, the true quality of our products. Our menu features an array of mouth watering grilled submarine sandwiches, fresh-cut fries and hand-squeezed lemonade. All sandwiches are prepared fresh in full view of the customer using delicious hearth-baked bread, USDA steak and the finest meats, cheeses and vegetables. The potatoes are hand selected, fresh-cut and flash-fried in cholesterol-free peanut oil. The lemonade is made from scratch every day using hand-squeezed lemons.

Our franchisees and their crew are happy to serve you and ensure your dining experience meets our high standards for the quality that produces the finest grilled subs and fresh-cut fries around. Come visit a Penn Station® to see why “It’s all about good taste”.

Dagwood
Cold, Grilled, Wrap or Salad
Your choice of meats, cheese, toppings and condiments.
MEATS: Smoked ham, hard salami, pepperoni, oven-roasted turkey, slow-roasted corned beef.
CHEESES: Provolone, Swiss, American.
TOPPINGS: Lettuce, Roma tomatoes, red onions, peppers, pickles.
CONDIMENTS: Spicy brown mustard, honey mustard, mayo, olive oil & red wine vinegar, salt & pepper, oregano.

Reuben
Grilled, Cold, Wrap or Salad
Slow-roasted corned beef, sauerkraut, Swiss
YOUR CHOICE: Thousand Island dressing
https://www.penn-station.com/index.php

Ground Turkey Recipes

October 6, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Ground Turkey Recipes. Find some Healthy and Delicious Ground Turkey Recipes with recipes including Easy Turkey Meatballs, Greek Turkey Burgers with Spinach, Feta and Tzatziki, and Sloppy Joe Casserole. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Ground Turkey Recipes
Find healthy, delicious ground turkey recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Easy Turkey Meatballs
These easy turkey meatballs can be enjoyed warm or cold, making them perfect for make-ahead lunches. Pack them along with a dipping sauce, slice them up for a sandwich filling or crumble them up as a topper for salad or tacos……..

Greek Turkey Burgers with Spinach, Feta and Tzatziki
Creamy tzatziki and crisp sliced cucumber add a refreshing twist to this easy Greek-inspired burger recipe loaded with feta, spinach and Mediterranean spices. No tzatziki? No problem! Make your own at home by combining plain Greek yogurt with a squeeze of lemon, dill and finely chopped cucumber…………

Sloppy Joe Casserole
Like sloppy Joes? Then you’ll love this sloppy Joe casserole recipe. This kid-friendly dinner has the classic sloppy Joe flavors kids love, while parents will like all the veggies that are packed in to make it a healthy meal………..

* Click the link below to get all the Ground Turkey Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19282/ingredients/meat-poultry/turkey/ground/

Healthy Squash Recipes

September 25, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Squash Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Squash Recipes with recipes including Four-Bean and Pumpkin Chili, Spaghetti Squash Casserole, and Lemon Zucchini Bread. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Squash Recipes
Find healthy, delicious squash recipes including butternut, acorn, spaghetti and yellow squash. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Four-Bean and Pumpkin Chili
This healthy vegetarian chili has a fragrant touch of cinnamon for added flavor. Let diners top it with whatever suits their taste…………

Spaghetti Squash Casserole
Strands of tender squash replace pasta for a more flavorful version of spaghetti pie casserole. Not to mention, spaghetti squash is a low-carb alternative to pasta and saves more than 150 calories per serving compared to a traditional recipe. A sprinkling of nutty fontina cheese melts into a gooey topping………….

Lemon Zucchini Bread
This super-moist zucchini bread is a great way to use up homegrown summer zucchini! Full of bright lemon flavor, it makes the perfect breakfast, snack or dessert. It’s just sweet enough to satisfy a craving without giving you a sugar crash………….

 

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Squash Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19318/ingredients/vegetables/squash/

Kitchen Closed – Penn Station

September 24, 2021 at 7:11 PM | Posted in Penn Station | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Penn Station Subs

 

To start this day off I had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. A high of 72 degrees and sunny. It was the perfect Fall Day out there! Did a load of laundry after my Tea. I went outside about 9:30 this morning and stayed out all day working in the yard and a couple of my neighbors yards. Both are elderly in poor health so I always help them out with what ever I can, and today it was yard work. I didn’t call it a day till around 3:00. It felt so good enjoying that beautiful day and helping out those that need it! Nothing sounded good for Dinner tonight and Mom was about the same way. We finally decided on Penn Station! So with the Kitchen shutdown it’s Penn Station Dagwood and Reuben tonight!

 

We really enjoy Penn Station Subs! I ordered a couple of Subs for us. Mom had the Reuben Footlong with Fresh Cut Fries and I had the Dagwood on Multi Grain Bun with Turkey, Salami, Ham, and American Cheese. We’ve made this a regular stop, these are so Delicious! The Fresh Cut Fries were good too! Great Job as always Penn Station! For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Cherry Jello. Take Care and Stay Safe All!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Penn Station
Enjoy The Grill Thing.

Penn Station has developed a unique product line that demonstrates, in full customer view, the true quality of our products. Our menu features an array of mouth watering grilled submarine sandwiches, fresh-cut fries and hand-squeezed lemonade. All sandwiches are prepared fresh in full view of the customer using delicious hearth-baked bread, USDA steak and the finest meats, cheeses and vegetables. The potatoes are hand selected, fresh-cut and flash-fried in cholesterol-free peanut oil. The lemonade is made from scratch every day using hand-squeezed lemons.

Our franchisees and their crew are happy to serve you and ensure your dining experience meets our high standards for the quality that produces the finest grilled subs and fresh-cut fries around. Come visit a Penn Station® to see why “It’s all about good taste”.

Dagwood
Cold, Grilled, Wrap or Salad
Your choice of meats, cheese, toppings and condiments.
MEATS: Smoked ham, hard salami, pepperoni, oven-roasted turkey, slow-roasted corned beef.
CHEESES: Provolone, Swiss, American.
TOPPINGS: Lettuce, Roma tomatoes, red onions, peppers, pickles.
CONDIMENTS: Spicy brown mustard, honey mustard, mayo, olive oil & red wine vinegar, salt & pepper, oregano.

Reuben
Grilled, Cold, Wrap or Salad
Slow-roasted corned beef, sauerkraut, Swiss
YOUR CHOICE: Thousand Island dressing
https://www.penn-station.com/index.php

One of America’s Favorites – Chili Con Carne

August 30, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A bowl of chili con carne served with tortilla chips

Chili con carne (also spelled chilli con carne or chile con carne and shortened to chili or chilli; Spanish pronunciation: [ˈtʃili kon ˈkaɾne]), meaning “chili with meat”, is a spicy stew containing chili peppers (sometimes in the form of chili powder), meat (usually beef), tomatoes and optionally kidney beans. Other seasonings may include garlic, onions, and cumin. The dish originated in northern Mexico or southern Texas.

Geographic and personal tastes involve different types of meat and other ingredients. Recipes provoke disputes among aficionados, some of whom insist that the word chili applies only to the basic dish, without beans and tomatoes. Chili con carne is a common dish for cook-offs, and may be used as a side, garnish, or ingredient in other dishes, such as soups or salsas.

In writings from 1529, the Franciscan friar, Bernardino de Sahagún described chili pepper-seasoned stews being consumed in the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, now the location of Mexico City. The use of beef as the primary meat originated with Spanish colonizers. In Spanish, the term “chile con carne”, consisting of the word chile (from the Nahuatl chīlli) and carne, Spanish for ‘meat’, is first recorded in a book from 1857 about the Mexican-American War. A recipe dating back to the 1850s describes dried beef, suet, dried chili peppers and salt, which were pounded together, formed into bricks and left to dry, which could then be boiled in pots in an army encampment in Monterrey, of what is now Nuevo León, Mexico.

Chili became commonly prepared in northern Mexico and southern Texas. Unlike some other Texas foods, such as barbecued brisket, chili largely originated with working-class Tejana and Mexican women. The chili queens of San Antonio, Texas were particularly famous in previous decades for selling their inexpensive chili-flavored beef stew in their casual “chili joints”.

A pot of chili with whole green hot chilis, kidney beans, and tomatoes

 

The San Antonio Chili Stand, in operation at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, helped popularize chili by giving many Americans their first taste of it. San Antonio was a tourist destination and helped Texas-style chili con carne spread throughout the South and West. Chili con carne is the official dish of the U.S. state of Texas as designated by the House Concurrent Resolution Number 18 of the 65th Texas Legislature during its regular session in 1977.

Before World War II, hundreds of small, family-run chili parlors could be found throughout Texas and other states, particularly those in which émigré Texans had made new homes. Each establishment usually had a claim to some kind of secret recipe.

By 1904, chili parlors were opening outside of Texas, in part due to the availability of commercial versions of chili powder, first manufactured in Texas in the late 19th century. After working at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, Charles Taylor opened a chili parlor in Carlinville, Illinois, serving Mexican Chili. Varallo’s, the oldest restaurant in Tennessee, opened as a chili parlor in 1907, competing with other chili parlors that had opened in Nashville during the 1890s. In the 1920s and 1930s, chains of diner-style chili parlors began opening in the Midwest.

Cincinnati chili, a dish developed by Macedonian and Greek immigrants deriving from their own culinary traditions, arguably represents the most vibrant continuation of the chili parlor tradition, with dozens of restaurants offering this style throughout the Cincinnati area. It can be traced back to at least 1922, when the original Empress Chili location opened.

In Green Bay, Wisconsin, the chili parlor Chili John’s has existed since 1913. As with Cincinnati chili, it is most commonly served over spaghetti with oyster crackers, but the recipe is less sweet with a higher proportion of fat. The original proprietor’s son opened a second location in Burbank, California in 1946, which is also still in existence.

Until the late 2000s, a chili parlor dating to 1904, O.T. Hodge, continued to operate in St. Louis. It featured a chili-topped dish called a slinger: two cheeseburger patties, hash browns, and two eggs, and smothered in chili. As of 2014 no O.T. Hodge-branded locations remain, though Tully’s Tap, a pub and restaurant in O’Fallon, Missouri, offers what it claims to be the original O.T. Hodge recipe on its menu.

Dispute over ingredients

Ingredients for chili con carne

Beans
Beans, a staple of Tex-Mex cuisine, have been associated with chili as far back as the early 20th century. The question of whether beans belong in chili has long been a matter of contention among chili cooks. While it is generally accepted that the earliest chilis did not include beans, proponents of their inclusion contend that chili with beans has a long enough history to be considered authentic. The Chili Appreciation Society International specified in 1999 that, among other things, cooks are forbidden to include beans in the preparation of chili for official competition—nor are they allowed to marinate any meats. Small red or pink common beans are commonly used for chili, as are black beans, black-eyed peas, kidney beans, pinto beans, great northern beans, or navy beans.

Most commercially prepared canned chili includes beans. Commercial chili prepared without beans is usually called “chili no beans” in the United States. Some U.S. manufacturers, notably Bush Brothers and Company and Eden Organic, also sell canned precooked beans (without meat) that are labeled “chili beans”; these beans are intended for consumers to add to a chili recipe and are often sold with spices added.

Tomatoes
Tomatoes are another ingredient on which opinions differ. Wick Fowler, a north Texas newspaperman and inventor of “Two-Alarm Chili” (which he later marketed as a kit of spices), insisted on adding tomato sauce to his chili in the ratio of one 15-ounce can per three pounds of meat. He also believed that chili should never be eaten freshly cooked, but refrigerated overnight to seal in the flavor. Matt Weinstock, a Los Angeles newspaper columnist, once remarked that Fowler’s chili “was reputed to open eighteen sinus cavities unknown to the medical profession”.

Variations

Vegetarian chili

A pot of vegetarian chili

Vegetarian chili (also known as chili sin carne, chili without meat, chili non carne, and chili sans carne) acquired wide popularity in the U.S. during the 1960s and 1970s with the rise of vegetarianism. It is also popular with those on a diet restricting the use of red meat. To make the chili vegetarian, the cook leaves out the meat or replaces it with a meat analogue, such as textured vegetable protein or tofu, quinoa, or a starchy vegetable, such as potatoes. These chilis nearly always include beans. Variants may contain corn, squash, sautéed mushrooms, pearl onions, shallots or beets.

Chili verde
Chili verde (‘green chili’) is a moderately to extremely spicy New Mexican stew or sauce usually made from chunks of pork that have been slow-cooked in chicken broth, garlic, green tomatillos, and roasted green chilis.] The spiciness of the chili is adjusted by the use of various peppers: poblano, jalapeño, serrano, and occasionally habanero. Chili verde is a common filling for the Mission burrito.

White chili

A bowl of Texas-style chili without beans

White chili is made using chicken or turkey meat and broth, white beans, and green chili peppers. The resulting dish appears white when cooked and is more of a soup rather than a thickened stew. A white cheese, such as Monterey Jack, or sour cream are often added when served.

The dish may be served with toppings or accompaniments; grated cheese, diced onions, and sour cream are common toppings, as are saltine crackers, tortilla chips or corn chips, cornbread, rolled-up corn or flour tortillas, and pork tamales. Chili can also be served over rice or pasta in dishes such as chili mac.

Pre-made chili
Canned chili
Willie Gebhardt, originally of New Braunfels, Texas, and later of San Antonio, produced the first canned chili in 1908. Rancher Lyman Davis near Corsicana, Texas, developed Wolf Brand Chili in 1895. He owned a meat market and was a particular fan of Texas-style chili. In the 1880s, in partnership with an experienced range cook, he began producing heavily spiced chili based on chunks of lean beef and rendered beef suet, which he sold by the pot to local cafés.

In 1921, Davis began canning his product, naming it for his pet wolf, Kaiser Bill. Wolf Brand canned chili was a favorite of Will Rogers, who always took along a case when traveling and performing in other regions of the world. Ernest Tubb, the country singer, was such a fan that one Texas hotel maintained a supply of Wolf Brand for his visits. Both the Gebhardt and Wolf brands are now owned by ConAgra Foods, Inc. Another major maker of canned chili, Hormel, sells chili available with or without beans, made with turkey or in vegetarian varieties, under their own name and other brands like Stagg.

Brick chili

Chili with garnishes and tortilla chips

Another method of marketing commercial chili in the days before widespread home refrigerators was “brick chili”. It was produced by pressing out nearly all of the moisture, leaving a solid substance roughly the size and shape of a half-brick. Wolf Brand was originally sold in this form. Commonly available in small towns and rural areas of the American Southwest in the first three-quarters of the 20th century, brick chili has largely been surpassed by canned chili, but can still be found in some stores.

Seasoning mix
Home cooks may also purchase seasoning mixes for chili, including packets of dry ingredients such as chili powder, masa flour, salt, and cayenne pepper, to flavor meat and other ingredients.

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

The Grosenheiders

From recipe's, toddler activities, our health journey and everything in between!

Beetroot Hummus

Inspiring recipes

Albari News

International Media News Company

Fancy Food Fundamentals

Formal food made easy Instagram: FancyFoodFundamentals

Cooking with Courtney

Cooking with love, patience, and persistence one dish at a time.

In the Kitchen with Mare

Adding variety to dishes from around the world

Home Beccanomics

Read Your Recipe!

The Haute Mommy Handbook

Motherhood Misadventures + Creative Living

in cahoots with muddy boots

Cooking, gardening, traveling and photographing around the globe

First For Women

Natural Health, Quick Tips, Women Over 45

The Saboscrivner

The Saboscrivner is a librarian who writes about food in Orlando, Florida, and beyond. I was inspired by Chew, a brilliant, bizarre, food-obsessed comic book series about characters with food-related super powers. Creators John Layman and Rob Guillory introduced their saboscrivner in Chew #3 with a description: "[A saboscrivner] can write about food so accurately, so vividly and with such precision – people get the actual sensation of taste when reading about the meals [he] writes about."

Prairie Dawn Bakes

Sweets, Treats, and Eats

Mamal Diane

Keeping it Simple,green living,cooking,grandparenting,giveaways

Real Life Talk

Lifestyle without Barriers

Scrumptious Bits

all things scrumptious