One of America’s Favorites – Gyros

June 14, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Gyros sandwiches wraps in Greece, with meat, onions, tomato, lettuce, fries, and tzatziki rolled in a pita

A gyro or gyros pronounced [ˈʝiros]) is a Greek dish made from meat cooked on a vertical rotisserie. Like shawarma and al pastor meat, it is derived from the lamb-based doner kebab. In Greece and Cyprus it is prepared most often with pork or chicken, whilst beef, chicken, and lamb are common in other countries. It is typically served wrapped or stuffed in a pita, along with ingredients such as tomato, onion, and tzatziki sauce.

Grilling a vertical spit of stacked meat slices and cutting it off as it cooks was developed in Bursa in the 19th century Ottoman Empire, and called doner kebab (Turkish: döner kebap). Following World War II, doner kebab made with lamb was present in Athens, introduced by immigrants from Anatolia and the Middle East. A distinct Greek variation developed, often made with pork and served with tzatziki sauce, which later became known as gyros.

By 1970, gyros wrapped sandwiches were already a popular fast food in Athens, as well as in Chicago and New York City. At that time, although vertical rotisseries were starting to be mass-produced in the US by Gyros Inc. of Chicago, the stacks of meat were still hand-made.

Gyros plate

According to Margaret Garlic, it was she who first came up with the idea to mass-produce gyros meat cones, after watching a demonstration by a Greek restaurant owner carving gyros on the What’s My Line? television show. She convinced her husband John Garlic, a Jewish former Marine and then Cadillac salesman, of the idea. After obtaining a recipe from a Greek chef in Chicago, the couple rented a space in a sausage plant in Milwaukee and began operating the world’s first assembly line producing gyros meat from beef and lamb trimmings, in the early 1970s. The Garlics later sold their business to Gyros Inc., which along with Central Gyros Wholesale, and Kronos Foods, Inc, also of Chicago, began large-scale production in the mid-1970s.

 

The name comes from the Greek γύρος (gyros, ‘circle’ or ‘turn’), and is a calque of the Turkish word döner, from dönmek, also meaning “turn”. It was originally called ντονέρ (pronounced [doˈner]) in Greece. The word ντονέρ was criticized in mid-1970s Greece for being Turkish. The word gyro or gyros was already in use in English by at least 1970, and along with γύρος in Greek, eventually came to replace doner kebab for the Greek version of the dish. Some Greek restaurants in the US, such as the Syntagma Square in New York City—which can be seen briefly in the 1976 film Taxi Driver—continued to use both doner kebab and gyros to refer to the same dish, in the 1970s.

 

In Greece, gyros is normally made with pork, though other meats are also used. Chicken is common, and lamb or beef may be found more rarely. Typical American mass-produced gyros are made with finely ground beef mixed with lamb.

Gyros preparation

For hand-made gyros, meat is cut into approximately round, thin, flat slices, which are then stacked on a spit and seasoned. Fat trimmings are usually interspersed. Spices may include cumin, oregano, thyme, rosemary, and others. The pieces of meat, in the shape of an inverted cone, are placed on a tall vertical rotisserie, which turns slowly in front of a source of heat or broiler. As the cone cooks, lower parts are basted with the juices running off the upper parts. The outside of the meat is sliced vertically in thin, crisp shavings when done.

The rate of roasting can be adjusted by varying the intensity of the heat, the distance between the heat and the meat, and the speed of spit rotation, thus allowing the cook to adjust for varying rates of consumption.

In Greece it is customarily served in an oiled, lightly grilled piece of pita, rolled up with sliced tomatoes, chopped onions, lettuce, and french fries, topped with tzatziki sauce or, sometimes in northern Greece, ketchup or mustard.

Healthy Chili Recipes

June 9, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Chili Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Chili Recipes with recipes including Chili-Cheese Nachos, Chicken Chili with Sweet Potatoes, and Kickin’ Hot Chili. I can just smell that Chili Simmering! Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Chili Recipes

Find healthy, delicious chili recipes including black bean, chicken, turkey, beef and vegetarian chili. Find healthy recipes for your Crock Pot, slow cooker or Instant Pot, or make a classic pot of healthy chili on the stove.

Chili-Cheese Nachos
Make nachos a healthy dinner when you top them with an easy 30-minute chili. Serve this healthy recipe with sliced scallions, avocado, fresh tomatoes and sour cream, if desired……….

Chicken Chili with Sweet Potatoes
Tons of spice, corn and bell pepper give this healthy one-pot chicken chili recipe Southwestern flair. Serve with your favorite hot sauce, tortilla chips and a cold beer…………

Kickin’ Hot Chili
If you like your chili seriously hot, this recipe is for you. For an even bigger kick, use the whole teaspoon of cayenne pepper………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Chili Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18222/main-dishes/chili/

One of America’s Favorites – Chili Mac

May 31, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A plate of chili mac prepared with macaroni noodles, chili, cheese, onion and green onion

Chili mac is a dish prepared using chili and macaroni as primary ingredients, which is often topped or intermingled with cheese. Some versions are made using prepared or homemade macaroni and cheese. It is a common dish in the cuisine of the Midwestern United States, and is also popular in other areas of the United States.

Several variations of the dish exist, and prepared canned and boxed versions also exist. It can be a relatively inexpensive dish to prepare, and has been described as a comfort food.

Preparation
Several preparation methods exist. Basic versions may be prepared using chopped meat, tomato, spices, and elbow macaroni. Another basic preparation method incorporates boxed, prepared macaroni and cheese and canned chili. Some recipes incorporate all of the ingredients together, while others are prepared with the ingredients separately layered. Those that use cheese may use grated cheese atop the dish, while others mix the cheese throughout the dish. Sometimes, onions or beans are added. Some diners in St. Louis, Missouri serve a version called “chili mac a la mode”, in which the dish is served topped with fried eggs.

The dish may be prepared on a range top in a skillet, in a slow cooker, or baked as a casserole. Vegetarian and vegan versions of the dish are sometimes prepared.

Versions
Chili mac has been a staple dish at American military dining facilities for years. It was introduced into the Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE) field ration menu in 1995 and is one of only three of the twelve MRE meals offered in 1995 that has remained on the MRE menu to date. A variation called “taco chili mac” has been consumed by NASA astronauts in space. It is processed by NASA as a freeze-dried product.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 31, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When buying Ribs……….

Choose the right rib. Baby backs make great starter ribs — they’re tender, well-marbled, and quick and easy to cook. Also when buying ribs, look for plump meaty racks. Avoid “shiners” — ribs with so much meat removed you see the shiny bones.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 30, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Preheat that grill………..

Preheat your grill with the lid closed for 10 to 15 minutes. The heat loosens any bits and pieces of food hanging onto the grate, making it easy to brush them off. Preheating your grill also helps prevent food from sticking to the grate, and gets the grate hot enough to sear properly.

One of America’s Favorites – Pig Pickin’

May 3, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A pig pickin’ (also known as rolling a pig, pig pull, pig roast or, among the Cajun, “cochon de lait”) is a type of party or gathering held primarily in the American South which involves the barbecuing of a whole hog (the castrated male pig or barrow, bred for consumption at about 12 weeks old). Females, or gilts, are used as well. Boars (full-grown intact males) and sows generally are too large.

Many Southern families have a pig roast for Thanksgiving or Christmas, graduations, weddings, or summer gatherings. Some communities hold cook-offs during festivals, where cooks compete against one another for prize money.

 

A pig, often around 80–120 pounds dressed weight, is split in half and spread onto a large charcoal or propane grill. Some practitioners use a separate stove filled with hardwood to produce coals which are then transferred under the charcoal grill by shovel; others use charcoal with chunks of either blackjack oak, hickory wood or some other hardwood added for flavor. The style of these grills are as varied as the methods of producing them, some being homemade while others are custom-made.

There is a long-running debate among barbecue enthusiasts over the merits of different fuels. Propane is said to maintain a consistent temperature, whereas charcoal or charwood are often touted as producing better-tasting meat.

The cooking process is communal and usually directed by an authority figure; the host is helped by friends or family. It usually takes four to eight hours to cook the pig completely; the pig is often started “meat-side” down, and then is flipped one time once the hog has stopped dripping rendered fat. Some practitioners clean ashes from the skin with paper towels or a small whisk broom before flipping the hog to help produce high quality cracklings from the skin.

Often the hog is basted while cooking, though the method and sauce used differs according to region. For instance, a typical South Carolina Piedmont-area baste would be a mustard based sauce, an Eastern North Carolina baste is usually a very light vinegar based sauce with red pepper flakes, and Western North Carolina barbecue uses sauce with a ketchup base similar to traditional barbecue sauce.

When the cooking is complete, the meat should ideally be tender to the point of falling off of the bone. The meat is then either chopped or pulled into traditional Carolina-style pork barbecue, or it is picked off the hog itself by the guests. It is from the latter that the gathering gains its name. The barbecue is sometimes eaten with hushpuppies (fried cornmeal, occasionally flavored with onions), coleslaw, baked beans or sometimes Brunswick stew. In South Carolina, it is common to serve pilaf or hash as a side dish. Hash is a blend of leftover pork mixed with barbecue sauce and usually served over rice.

Sweet tea, beer, and soft drinks are often served.

The pig pickin’ is a significant part of the culture of the South; the necessary work and time needed to cook the hog makes it ideal for church gatherings (“dinner on the grounds”) or family reunions, and they can be held virtually year-round thanks to the region’s mild winters. Pig pickin’s are popular amongst the most devoted tailgaters at college football games across the South. The pig pickin’ has been long associated with politics; many local political parties and politicians still use the pig pickin’ to attract people to meetings and campaign rallies.[citation needed] In 1983, Rufus Edmisten, running for Governor of North Carolina at the time, was overheard saying “I’ve eaten enough barbecue. I am not going to eat any more. I’m taking my stand and that is it.”

Culturally and culinarily different from traditional Deep South pig pickin’ events, pig roasts are a common occurrence in Cuba, as well as the non-mainland American state of Hawaii, with roasts being done in the traditions of those places.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 29, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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For a super tender Pork Loin……………….

When roasting a pork loin, cook it with the fat side down for the first 20 minutes, so that the fat begins to liquefy. Then turn the roast over for the balance of the cooking time, and the fat will baste the meat.

One of America’s Favorites – Chimichanga

April 26, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Chimichanga

A chimichanga is a deep-fried burrito that is common in Tex-Mex and other Southwestern U.S. cuisine. The dish is typically prepared by filling a flour tortilla with various ingredients, most commonly rice, cheese, beans, and a meat such as machaca (dried meat), carne adobada (marinated meat), carne seca (dried beef), or shredded chicken, and folding it into a rectangular package. It is then deep-fried, and can be accompanied by salsa, guacamole, sour cream, or carne asada.

The origin of the chimichanga is uncertain. By some accounts, it originated in Mexico, in others, by accident in Arizona, United States. Given the variant chivichanga, specifically employed in Mexico, one derivation indicated that immigrants to the United States brought the dish with them, mainly through Sonora into Arizona. The words chimi and changa come from two Mexican Spanish terms: chamuscado (past participle of the verb chamuscar), which means seared or singed, and changa, related to chinga (third-person present tense form of the vulgar verb chingar, a rude expression for the unexpected or a small insult.

One of America’s Favorites – Chimichanga

A chimichanga is a deep-fried burrito that is common in Tex-Mex and other Southwestern U.S. cuisine. The dish is typically prepared by filling a flour tortilla with various ingredients, most commonly rice, cheese, beans, and a meat such as machaca (dried meat), carne adobada (marinated meat), carne seca (dried beef), or shredded chicken, and folding it into a rectangular package. It is then deep-fried, and can be accompanied by salsa, guacamole, sour cream, or carne asada.

Chimichanga from Amigos in Melbourne, Australia.

The origin of the chimichanga is uncertain. By some accounts, it originated in Mexico, in others, by accident in Arizona, United States. Given the variant chivichanga, specifically employed in Mexico, one derivation indicated that immigrants to the United States brought the dish with them, mainly through Sonora into Arizona. The words chimi and changa come from two Mexican Spanish terms: chamuscado (past participle of the verb chamuscar), which means seared or singed, and changa, related to chinga (third-person present tense form of the vulgar verb chingar), a rude expression for the unexpected or a small insult.

According to one source, Monica Flin, the founder of the Tucson, Arizona, restaurant El Charro, accidentally dropped a burrito into the deep-fat fryer in 1922. She immediately began to utter a Spanish profanity beginning “chi…” (chingada), but quickly stopped herself and instead exclaimed chimichanga, a Spanish equivalent of “thingamajig”. Knowledge and appreciation of the dish spread slowly outward from the Tucson area, with popularity elsewhere accelerating in recent decades. Though the chimichanga is now found as part of the Tex-Mex cuisine, its roots within the U.S. are mainly in Tucson, Arizona.

Woody Johnson, founder of Macayo’s Mexican Kitchen, claimed he had invented the chimichanga in 1946 when he put some burritos into a deep fryer as an experiment at his original restaurant Woody’s El Nido, in Phoenix, Arizona. These “fried burritos” became so popular that by 1952, when Woody’s El Nido became Macayo’s, the chimichanga was one of the restaurant’s main menu items. Johnson opened Macayo’s in 1952. Although no official records indicate when the dish first appeared, retired University of Arizona folklorist Jim Griffith recalls seeing chimichangas at the Yaqui Old Pascua Village in Tucson in the mid-1950s.

According to data presented by the United States Department of Agriculture, a typical 183-gram (6.5-ounce) serving of a beef and cheese chimichanga contains 443 calories, 20 grams protein, 39 grams carbohydrates, 23 grams total fat, 11 grams saturated fat, 51 milligrams cholesterol, and 957 milligrams of sodium.

 

Cumin Spiced Pork Chop w/ Baked Potato and Glazed Apples

April 18, 2021 at 7:03 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, Pork, pork chops | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Cumin Spiced Pork Chop w/ Baked Potato and Glazed Apples

 

 

Just a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea for Breakfast. Another windy day but sunny and 62 degrees out. Did a load of laundry after Breakfast. Later made a Pick Up order from Kroger. They were out of a lot of items, picked the order up at 2:00. Did some yard work also. For Dinner tonight it’s a Cumin Spiced Pork Chop w/ Baked Potato and Glazed Apples.

 

While at Meijer I picked up a couple of huge Bone – In Pork Loin Chops To prepare my Chops I’ll need; The Cumin Spiced Rub which consists of 1 tbsp Roasted Cumin, 1 tsp Garlic Powder, 1 tsp Chili Powder, 1 teaspoon Sea Salt, 1/2 teaspoon Hungarian Paprika, 2 teaspoons Dried Oregano, and 1/4 teaspoon Black Pepper. To prepare it, preheat oven to 400°. Combine all the ingredients; rub it all over the pork chop. Let stand 20 minutes. Start by heating the Extra Virgin Olive oil in a Cast Iron Skillet over medium-high heat. Add pork to the pan; cook for 3 minutes, browning both sides. From the stove to the oven and bake at 400° for 20 minutes until the thermometer registered 150° (slightly pink), turning after 5 minutes. Let stand 10 minutes before slicing. Fantastic combo of Spices, which makes one incredible Crust on the Chop with the inside being tender and moist! Love this seasoning on Pork!

 

For a side I baked a Russet Potato for a side with Steak. Seasoned with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Peppercorn Medley, and topped with I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter and Daisy Light Sour Cream.

 

I also heated up some Bob Evan’s Glazed Apples, it comes in a microwavable container and is a quick and delicious way to have Glazed Apples. And Apples are perfect for any Pork dish! Quite a dinner tonight! Also baked a loaf of La Baguetterie Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. Perfect Bread with any Dish. For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pork Facts….
One serving of pork is 3 ounces, or about the size of a deck of cards, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. An image of the portion size is important because a thick pork chop can be twice that size and without realizing it you can eat double the calories. You’ll get 137 calories and 4 grams of fat from a 3-ounce pork chop. Pork is similar to chicken, with 3 ounces of chicken breast containing 140 calories and 3 grams of fat. A pork chop has 65 milligrams of cholesterol, compared to 72 grams in chicken breast, but they both have just 1 gram of saturated fat.

 

 

 

 

BOB EVANS SLICED GLAZED APPLES
A classic taste that will make everyone think you slaved in the kitchen, Bob Evans Sliced Glazed Apples are a perfect side dish or topping. Sold in the grocer’s refrigerated section, they’re ready to serve in less than 5 minutes.
BOB EVANS SLICED GLAZED APPLES
Serving Size 1/2 cup (116g)

Amount Per Serving
Calories: 140
Total Fat 2g
Saturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 35mg
Total Carbs 32g
Dietary Fiber 1g
Protein 2g
https://www.bobevansgrocery.com/products/bob-evans-sliced-glazed-apple

Healthy Meatball Recipes

April 17, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Meatball Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Meatball Recipes with recipes like Meatballs with Roasted Green Beans and Potatoes, Easy Italian Chicken Meatballs, and Italian Turkey Meatballs. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Meatball Recipes
Find healthy, delicious meatball recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Meatballs with Roasted Green Beans and Potatoes
Meatballs, green beans and potatoes happily coexist while roasting together on a large sheet pan. Seasoned with fresh rosemary and Italian seasoning and served with pasta sauce and Parmesan, this one-dish meal is one you’ll want to make again and again…………

Easy Italian Chicken Meatballs
These meatballs are flavor-packed–thanks to a little sausage added to the ground chicken mix–and all-purpose: serve them with spaghetti for a healthy dinner, on a toothpick with dipping sauce as an easy appetizer or stir them into a soup to make it more satisfying………….

Italian Turkey Meatballs
In this healthy turkey meatball recipe, a base of sautéed mushrooms, celery and garlic adds flavor and helps keep calories in check and portions hearty. Serve these meatballs with marinara as an appetizer, on top of spaghetti or on a roll for a healthy meatball sub………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Meatball Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18896/main-dishes/meat/meatballs/

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