Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 3, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Keep the tongs handy…………………….

Use tongs to turn your sausage; not a fork. You don’t want to poke the casing and let out all the juices. Grill low and slow; fast and hot will cause the juices in the sausage to boil, making the casing burst open, resulting in a burnt outside and a raw inside.

One of America’s Favorites – Red Beans and Rice

June 29, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Red beans and rice at a restaurant in California

Red beans and rice is an emblematic dish of Louisiana Creole cuisine (not originally of Cajun cuisine) traditionally made on Mondays with red beans, vegetables (bell pepper, onion, and celery), spices (thyme, cayenne pepper, and bay leaf) and pork bones as left over from Sunday dinner, cooked together slowly in a pot and served over rice. Meats such as ham, sausage (most commonly andouille), and tasso ham are also frequently used in the dish. The dish is customary – ham was traditionally a Sunday meal and Monday was washday. A pot of beans could sit on the stove and simmer while the women were busy scrubbing clothes. The dish is now fairly common throughout the Southeast. Similar dishes are common in Latin American cuisine, including moros y cristianos, gallo pinto and feijoada.

Red beans and rice is one of the few New Orleans style dishes to be commonly served both in people’s homes and in restaurants. Many neighborhood restaurants and even schools continue to serve it as a Monday lunch or dinner special, usually with a side order of cornbread and either smoked sausage or a pork chop. While Monday washdays are largely a thing of the past, red beans remain a staple for large gatherings such as Super Bowl and Mardi Gras parties. Indeed, red beans and rice is very much part of the New Orleans identity. New Orleanian Louis Armstrong’s favorite food was red beans and rice – the musician would sign letters “Red Beans and Ricely Yours, Louis Armstrong”. And in 1965, the R&B instrumental group Booker T. & the M.G.’s wrote and recorded a song titled “Red Beans and Rice” that was originally a B-side but later became popular in its own right.

The similar vegetarian dish Rajma chawal (which translates literally to red beans and rice) is popular in North India. Red beans and rice is also a dietary staple in Central America, where it is known as “arroz con habichuelas”. The dish is popular in Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican, Haitian and Jamaican cuisine as well.

A plate of red beans and rice with sausage from The Chimes restaurant in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Red kidney beans or small red beans are used and they are usually (but not always) soaked beforehand. Add celery, onion, and peppers to the pot along with a ham hock. Add water. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer for several hours or until the beans are soft.

The dish is highly nutritious. Rice is rich in starch, an excellent source of energy. Rice also has iron, vitamin B and protein. Beans also contain a good amount of iron and an even greater amount of protein than rice. Together they make up a complete protein, which provides each of the amino acids the body cannot make for itself.

In addition, rice and beans are common and affordable ingredients, often available in difficult economic times.

 

Kitchen Closed, Domino Pizza!

June 24, 2020 at 6:59 PM | Posted in pizza | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Kitchen Closed – It’s Pizza Tonight from Domino’s


My allergies got the best of me today, headaches all day! So the Kitchen is closed and hello Domino’s! I ordered a Domino’s Hand Tossed Pizza Large with Cheese, Sauce, Pepperoni, Italian Sausage, Mushrooms, and Black Olives, Green Olives. First Pizza in a while, and it was over due! As always the Pizza arrived on time, hot and delicious! For Dessert/Snack later a Diet Peach Snapple. Take Care All!

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 6:49 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 2:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

Healthy 20 Minute Dinner Recipes

June 7, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 1 Comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy 20 Minute Dinner Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy 20 Minute Dinner Recipes with recipes including Potato Hash with Sausage and Fried Egg, Skillet Buffalo Chicken, and Salt and Pepper Shrimp with Snow Peas. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy 20 Minute Dinner Recipes
Find healthy, delicious 20 minute dinner recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Potato Hash with Sausage and Fried Egg
Leftover cooked potatoes and peppers form the base of this quick weeknight meal for one. Alternatively, use frozen cubed hash browns and and bell pepper-onion stir-fry mix………………………….

Skillet Buffalo Chicken
If you like Buffalo wings, you’ll love this quick skillet Buffalo chicken recipe. Chicken cutlets are sautéed, then smothered in a creamy-spicy sauce. A side-salad garnish of carrots, celery and blue cheese pulls it all together…………………………….

Salt and Pepper Shrimp with Snow Peas
In China, salt and pepper shrimp is traditionally made with tongue-numbing Sichuan peppercorns. If you have some in the pantry, feel free to use them here; we opted for a combo of easier-to-find white and black pepper. The white pepper adds earthy flavor, while black kicks up the heat…………………………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy 20 Minute Dinner Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/20535/cooking-methods-styles/quick-easy/dinner/20-minute/

Kitchen Closed – Pizza Night!

May 23, 2020 at 6:57 PM | Posted in pizza | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Domino Pizza Night

 

 

 

To start my morning off I made a Fried Egg Sandwich. Cracked a couple of Eggs and fried it till the bottom browns and flip it. I then added my slice of Kraft Deli Deluxe Sharp Cheddar Cheese on top of it. As the Eggs were cooking I toasted a couple of slices of Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread, served the Eggs on the toast. I also had my morning cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Mostly cloudy and 86 degrees out to today. Got the cart out of the shed after Lunch and did a few things around the house and yard. Mom wanted Pizza tonight! So the Kitchen is closed and Domino delivered us a Pizza!

 

So what Mom wants, Mom gets! So I ordered our favorite Pizza, Domino Pizza. I ordered Mom’s favorite, Domino’s Hand Tossed Pizza Large with Cheese, Sauce, Pepperoni, Italian Sausage, Mushrooms, and Black Olives, Green Olives. As always the Pizza arrived on time, hot and delicious! I had a Coke Zero to drink. For Dessert/Snack later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn with a Diet Peach Snapple to drink. The Kitchen will reopen tomorrow. Take care all and have a fantastic Memorial Day Weekend!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domino’s Medium (12″) Hand Tossed Pizza
Whole: Cheese, Pepperoni, Italian Sausage, Green Olives, Black Olives, Mushrooms, Robust Inspired Tomato Sauce.
https://www.dominos.com/en/index.jsp

Healthy Italian Sausage Recipes

May 17, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Italian Sausage Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Italian Sausage Recipes with recipes like Whole-Grain Spaghetti with Italian Turkey Sausage, Arugula and Balsamic Tomato Sauce, Minestrone with Italian Sausage and Pesto, and Sausage, Mushroom and Pesto Grilled Pizza. Oh, the aroma of these dishes! Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Italian Sausage Recipes
Find healthy, delicious Italian sausage recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Whole-Grain Spaghetti with Italian Turkey Sausage, Arugula and Balsamic Tomato Sauce
Total happiness in a bowl: pasta, sausage, tomatoes and herbs. The tomatoes get sweet and tender and turn into sauce with the stock and the pasta. Without ever adding any butter, the spaghetti sauce is rich and silky. Adding the herbs at the end gives the dish a fresh pop of color and flavor. This is one healthy pasta recipe we can definitely get behind!……………………………..

Minestrone with Italian Sausage and Pesto
With two convenience foods–precooked chicken sausage and refrigerated basil pesto–you can turn ordinary canned minestrone soup into a lunch or dinner that’s satisfying and unique. While scanning the canned soup aisle, look for healthy soups that contain less than 450 mg sodium and more than 3 g fiber per 1-cup serving………………………………..

Sausage, Mushroom and Pesto Grilled Pizza
Healthy homemade sausage-and-mushroom pizza in the comfort of your backyard? Yes, please. All you need for a Naples-worthy pie is a hot grill, store-bought pizza dough and easy prepared ingredients. Serve with a glass of Chianti…………………………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Italian Sausage Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/21083/cuisines-regions/european/italian/sausage/

Healthy Noodle Recipes

May 2, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Noodle Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Noodle Recipes with recipes including Lemon Shrimp and Orzo Salad, Whole-Grain Spaghetti with Italian Turkey Sausage, Arugula and Balsamic Tomato Sauce, and Pasta Salad with Arugula-Lemon Pesto. If you’re a Pasta Lover like myself you are going to love these recipes! So find these recipes and many more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Noodle Recipes
Find healthy, delicious noodle recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Lemon Shrimp and Orzo Salad
Consider making a double batch of this easy pasta salad–it’s delicious the next day. The orzo will absorb the dressing as it sits, so add a little more olive oil and lemon juice if you’d like…………………..

Whole-Grain Spaghetti with Italian Turkey Sausage, Arugula and Balsamic Tomato Sauce
Total happiness in a bowl: pasta, sausage, tomatoes and herbs. The tomatoes get sweet and tender and turn into sauce with the stock and the pasta. Without ever adding any butter, the spaghetti sauce is rich and silky. Adding the herbs at the end gives the dish a fresh pop of color and flavor. This is one healthy pasta recipe we can definitely get behind!…………………………..

Pasta Salad with Arugula-Lemon Pesto
If you want proof that school gardens help create sophisticated and adventurous eaters, look no further. Just say “arugula-lemon pesto” to yourself and marvel that the origin of this pasta salad recipe is a cookbook that is an offshoot of school garden programs in Vermont…………………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Noodle Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19258/ingredients/pasta-noodle/noodle/

Kitchen Closed – Pizza Night!

April 17, 2020 at 6:50 PM | Posted in pizza | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Domino Pizza Night

 

 

To start my morning off I toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin that I topped with Smucker’s Sugar Free Blackberry Jam. Rain and 47 degrees out today. I had to make some repairs to my wheelchair that I keep in the trunk of my car. Then later replaced the rubber tips on the legs of my 2 walkers. Got the leaf blower out and cleaned off the driveway area. Just trying to stay busy! From what I hear the virus is showing signs of slowing down here in Ohio, finally! Sure hope it gets back to normal soon! The Kitchen is closed and Domino delivered Pizza!

 

I was planning on making some Gumbo for Dinner tonight but Mom wanted Pizza. So what Mom wants, Mom gets! So I ordered our favorite Pizza, Domino Pizza. I ordered Mom’s favorite, Domino’s Hand Tossed Pizza Large with Cheese, Sauce, Pepperoni, Italian Sausage, Mushrooms, and Black Olives, Green Olives. As always the Pizza arrived on time, hot and delicious! I had a Coke Zero to drink. For Dessert/Snack later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn with a Diet Peach Snapple to drink. The Kitchen reopens tomorrow with Gumbo! Take care all and Stay SAFE!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domino’s Medium (12″) Hand Tossed Pizza
Whole: Cheese, Pepperoni, Italian Sausage, Green Olives, Black Olives, Mushrooms, Robust Inspired Tomato Sauce.
https://www.dominos.com/en/index.jsp

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