Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 21, 2017 at 5:07 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When grilling……….

 
Is it done? The best way to know if protein is fully cooked is to check its internal temperature with an instant-read thermometer.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 16, 2017 at 5:40 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Hold the Salt……..

 
When grilling meat don’t add any salt until the meat is cooked to prevent it from getting dry and tough, as the salt will draw away moisture.

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

April 9, 2017 at 5:05 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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Planning on using a Smoker, keep these hints in mind………..

 

 

* These’s a wide selection of wood flavors to choose from. Hickory and mesquite wood are very popular for smoking meat. The wood of alder, oak, pecan, maple and other fruit trees like cherry, plum, apple and peach are widely used for smoking as well. Try soaking your wood chips for 30-40 minutes and allow them to drip-dry before introducing them to the fire.

* Leave all the fat on the food as you are smoking and grilling meat. It will up the great flavor to the food and this fat melt off into the pit or grill.

* There should not be any flames as you are smoking your meat. If it flares up, take off the food and increase the rack distance above the flames. Or, spray down the flames using water.

* Don’t leave your meat to remain in the smoker when it is done or it will dry out.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 7, 2017 at 6:30 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When cooking Vegetables in a Slow Cooker…….

 
Place root vegetables near the sides or the bottom of the stoneware because they often cook slower than meat. Cut vegetables accordingly to cook at the same rate as the meat. For example, smaller cuts of vegetables for lean meat versus larger vegetables for marbled meat.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 29, 2017 at 6:24 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Use the Slow Cooker and save $…..

 
Slow cookers are great for cooking cheaper cuts like beef brisket, pork shoulder, lamb shoulder and chicken thighs. You can also use less meat as slow-cooking really extracts a meaty flavor that permeates the whole dish.

One of America’s Favorites – Burgoo

February 13, 2017 at 5:56 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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kentucky-burgoo-served-with-mashed-potatoes

Burgoo is a spicy stew, similar to Irish or Mulligan stew, often served with cornbread or corn muffins. It is often prepared communally as a social gathering. It is popular as the basis for civic fund-raisers in the American Midwest and South.

 

 

 
Traditional burgoo was made using whatever meats and vegetables were available—typically, venison, squirrel, opossum, raccoon or game birds, and was often associated with autumn and the harvest season. Today, local barbecue restaurants use a specific meat in their recipes, usually pork, chicken, or mutton, which, along with the spices used, creates a flavor unique to each restaurant.

A typical burgoo is a combination of meats: pork, chicken, mutton or beef, often hickory-smoked, but other meats are seen occasionally; and vegetables, such as lima beans, corn, okra, tomatoes, cabbage and potatoes. Typically, since burgoo is a slow-cooked dish, the starch from the added vegetables results in thickening of the stew. However, a thickening agent, such as cornmeal, ground beans, whole wheat, or potato starch can be used when cooked in a non-traditional way. In addition, soup bones can be added for taste and thickening.

The ingredients are combined in order of cooking time required, with meat first, vegetables next, and thickening agents as necessary. A good burgoo is said to be able to have a spoon stand up in it. Cider vinegar, hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce, or chili powder are common condiments.
Burgoo making in Kentucky often serves as a social event, in which each attendee brings one or more ingredients. In Kentucky and surrounding states such as Indiana, burgoo is often used for fund-raising for schools. This kind of event has been claimed to have been invented by the family of Ollie Beard, a former Major League Baseball player.

In Brighton, Illinois, a local traditional burgoo is prepared and served annually at the village’s summer festival, the Betsy Ann Picnic. Franklin, Illinois identifies as the Burgoo Capital of the World;[citation needed] they have an annual burgoo cookout over July 3 and July 4. Burgoo events are also held in Cass County, Illinois in the towns of Chandlerville and Arenzville. Arenzville claims to be the home of the world’s best burgoo.

Multiple cities have claimed to be the burgoo capital of the world such as Franklin, Illinois, Lawrenceburg, Kentucky, and Owensboro, Kentucky.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 18, 2017 at 6:03 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Beer please….

 
For some tender and tasty Chili marinate the meat for your Chili in Beer. It’s a great tenderizer for tough, inexpensive cuts of beef,and it will add great flavor. All you need to do is soak the meat for an hour before cooking, or marinate it overnight in the refrigerator.

One of America’s Favorites – Hotdish

January 16, 2017 at 6:32 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A tater tot hotdish

A tater tot hotdish

Hotdish is a variety of casserole which typically contains a starch, a meat or other protein, and a canned or frozen vegetable, mixed with canned soup. The dish originates from and is popular in the Upper Midwest region of the United States, particularly the states of Minnesota and North Dakota. Hotdish is cooked and served hot in a single baking dish and commonly appears at communal gatherings such as family reunions and church suppers.

 

 
The history of the hotdish goes back to when “budget-minded farm wives needed to feed their own families, as well as congregations in the basements of the first Minnesota churches.” According to Howard Mohr, author of How to Talk Minnesotan, “A traditional main course, hotdish is cooked and served hot in a single baking dish and commonly appears at family reunions and church suppers.” The most typical meat for many years has been ground beef, and cream of mushroom remains the favorite canned soup. In past years a pasta was the most frequently used starch, but tater tots and local wild rice have now become very popular as well.

Hotdishes are filling, convenient, and easy to make. They are well-suited for family reunions, funerals, church suppers, and potlucks where they may be paired with potato salad, coleslaw, Jello salads and desserts, and pan-baked desserts known as bars.

 
Typical ingredients in hotdish are potatoes or pasta, ground beef, green beans, and corn, with canned soup added as a binder, flavoring and sauce. Potatoes may be in the form of tater tots, hash browns, potato chips, or shoe string potatoes. The dish is usually seasoned lightly with salt and pepper, and it may be eaten with ketchup as a condiment. Another popular hotdish is the tuna hotdish, made with macaroni or egg noodles, canned tuna, peas, and mushroom soup. Also common is a dish known as goulash, though it bears no resemblance to the familiar Hungarian goulash. Minnesota goulash is usually made with ground beef, macaroni, canned tomatoes, and perhaps a can of creamed corn.

Cream of mushroom soup is so ubiquitous in hotdish that it is often referred to in such recipes as “Lutheran Binder,” referring to hotdish’s position as a staple of Lutheran church cookbooks. The soup is considered a defining ingredient by some commentators.

 
Hotdish frequently appears, along with other stereotypical Minnesotan dishes such as lutefisk, in the radio program

Tater Tot Hotdish from the Saint Paul, Minnesota, Winter Carnival

Tater Tot Hotdish from the Saint Paul, Minnesota, Winter Carnival

A Prairie Home Companion. Hotdish is also described in Howard Mohr’s book How to Talk Minnesotan. Hotdish is an integral element of the book Hotdish to Die For, a collection of six culinary mystery short stories in which the weapon of choice is hotdish

Minnesota public television station, KSMQ in Austin, Minnesota, has produced a 2012 documentary video entitled “Minnesota Hotdish.” providing a historical and humorous look at the popular church supper and family gathering staple.

Hotdish was also the main meal featured in the comedy-drama film “Manny & Lo”.

“Hot Dish” is also the name of an Anchorage-based blue grass band, hotdishbluegrass.com. Their band name was chosen with a nod to mid-western roots of three of the five band members.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 8, 2017 at 8:50 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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A slow cooker hint……..
Don’t add raw meat to the slow cooker. There’s no doubt that slow cookers are wonderfully convenient and can truly transform a piece of meat. To get the most delicious flavor out of your meal, it’s best not to add raw meat straight in the bowl of the slow cooker. Brown meat on the stovetop before adding it to the slow cooker. It adds a wonderful caramelized flavor you just can’t get from the slow cooker.

One of America’s Favorites – Enchilada

November 28, 2016 at 6:50 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Enchiladas with mole sauce, served with refried beans and Spanish rice

Enchiladas with mole sauce, served with refried beans and Spanish rice

An enchilada (/ˌɛntʃᵻˈlɑːdə/, Spanish: [entʃiˈlaða]) is a corn tortilla rolled around a filling and covered with a chili pepper sauce. Enchiladas can be filled with a variety of ingredients, including meat, cheese, beans, potatoes, vegetables or combinations.

 

 

 

 
The Real Academia Española defines the word enchilada, as used in Mexico, as a rolled maize tortilla stuffed with meat and covered with a tomato and chili sauce. Enchilada is the past participle of Spanish enchilar, “to add chili pepper to”, literally to “season (or decorate) with chili”.

The idiomatic English phrase “the whole enchilada” means “the whole thing”.

 

 

enchiladas

enchiladas

Enchiladas originated in Mexico, where the practice of rolling tortillas around other food dates back at least to Mayan times. The people living in the lake region of the Valley of Mexico traditionally ate corn tortillas folded or rolled around small fish. Writing at the time of the Spanish conquistadors, Bernal Díaz del Castillo documented a feast enjoyed by Europeans hosted by Hernán Cortés in Coyoacán, which included foods served in corn tortillas. In the 19th century, as Mexican cuisine was being memorialized, enchiladas were mentioned in the first Mexican cookbook, El cocinero mexicano (“The Mexican Chef”), published in 1831, and in Mariano Galvan Rivera’s Diccionario de Cocina, published in 1845. An early mention, in English, is a 1914 recipe found in California Mexican-Spanish Cookbook, by Bertha Haffner Ginger.

 
In their original form as Mexican street food, enchiladas were simply corn tortillas dipped in chili sauce and eaten without fillings. There are now many varieties, which are distinguished primarily by their sauces, fillings and, in one instance, by their form. Various adjectives may be used to describe the recipe content or origin, e.g. enchilada tapatia would be a recipe from Jalisco.

Varieties include:

Enchiladas with red and green

Enchiladas with red and green

* Enchiladas con chile rojo (with red chile) is a traditional red enchilada sauce, composed of dried red chili peppers soaked and ground into a sauce with other seasonings, Chile Colorado sauce adds a tomato base.
* Enchiladas con mole, instead of chili sauce, are served with mole, and are also known as enmoladas.
* Enchiladas placera are Michoacán plaza-style, made with vegetables and poultry.
* Enchiladas poblanas are soft corn tortillas filled with chicken and poblano peppers, topped with oaxaca cheese.
* Enchiladas potosinas originate from San Luis Potosi, Mexico and are made with cheese-filled, chili-spiced masa.
* Enchiladas San Miguel are San Miguel de Allende-style enchiladas flavored with guajillo chilies by searing the flavor into the tortillas in a frying pan.
* Enchiladas suizas (Swiss-style) are topped with a white, milk or cream-based sauce, such as béchamel. This appellation is derived from Swiss immigrants to Mexico who established dairies to produce cream and cheese.
* Enfrijoladas are topped with refried beans rather than chili sauce; their name comes from frijol, meaning “bean”.
* Entomatadas are made with tomato sauce instead of chile sauce.
* Enchiladas montadas, stacked enchiladas, are a New Mexico variation in which corn tortillas are fried flat until softened but not tough, then stacked with red or green sauce, chopped onion and shredded cheese between the layers and on top of the stack. Ground beef or chicken can be added to the filling, but meat is not traditional. The stack is often topped (montada) with a fried egg. Shredded lettuce and sliced black olives may be added as a garnish.

 
Fillings include meat (e.g. beef, poultry, pork, seafood) or cheese, potatoes, vegetables, and any combination of these. Enchiladas are commonly topped or garnished with cheese, sour cream, lettuce, olives, chopped onions, chili peppers, salsa, or fresh cilantro.

 

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