Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 13, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Hand me those tongs………

You will want to have a couple of sets of tongs to use on your grill to turn your meat or ribs over with. You don’t want to use a fork as this will let some of the flavor escape.

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Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 7, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Add Sugar…………..

Before sauteing meats, sprinkle a tiny amount of sugar on the surface. The sugar will react with the juices and then caramelize, causing a deeper browning as well as improved flavor.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 12, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Meat in the morning…………..

The best time to shop for meat is in the morning. That’s usually when the butcher marks down meat that is close to its sell by date. If you won’t cook it now, freeze it for later. Now get out there and save some money!

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 8, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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No stab zone…….

When cooking meat never stab the meat with a fork or knife to flip it over. The punctures will allow juices to escape and can lead to drying of the meat and less flavorful. Always use a spatula or tongs when you need to turn your meats.

One of America’s Favorites – Risotto

April 9, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Creamy baked mushroom risotto

Risotto /rɪˈzɒtoʊ/ (Italian: [riˈzɔtto] or [riˈsɔtto]) is a northern Italian rice dish cooked in a broth to a creamy consistency. The broth can be derived from meat, fish, or vegetables. Many types of risotto contain butter, wine, and onion. It is one of the most common ways of cooking rice in Italy. Saffron was originally used for flavor and its attractive yellow color.

Risotto in Italy is normally a primo (first course), served on its own before the main course, but risotto alla milanese, (pronounced [riˈzɔtto alla milaˈneːze]), is often served together with ossobuco alla milanese.

Rice was grown in southern Italy since the 14th century, and eventually reached Milano in the northern region of Italy. While according to a legend a young glassblower apprentice from Flanders who used to use saffron as a pigment added it to a rice dish at a wedding feast, the first recipe identifiable as risotto dates from 1809. It includes rice sautéed in butter, sausages, bone marrow, onions with hot broth with saffron gradually added. There is a recipe for a dish named as a risotto in the 1854 Trattato di cucina (Treatise on Cooking) by Giovanni Vialardi, assistant chief chef to kings. However, the question of who invented the risotto in Milano remains unanswered today.

The rice varieties nowadays associated with risotto were developed in the 20th century, starting with Maratelli in 1914.

A high-starch (amylopectin), low-amylose round medium- or short- grain white rice is usually used for making risotto. Such rices have the ability to absorb liquids and to release starch and so they are stickier than the long grain varieties. The principal varieties used in Italy are Arborio, Baldo, Carnaroli, Maratelli, Padano, Roma, and Vialone Nano. Carnaroli, Maratelli (historical Italian variety) and Vialone Nano are considered to be the best (and most expensive) varieties, with different users preferring one over another. They have slightly different properties. For example, Carnaroli is less likely than Vialone Nano to get overcooked, but the latter, being smaller, cooks faster and absorbs condiments better. Other varieties such as Roma, Baldo, Ribe and Originario may be used but will not have the creaminess of the traditional dish; these varieties are considered better for soups and other non-risotto rice dishes, and sweet rice desserts. Rice designations of superfino, semifino and fino refer to the size and shape (specifically the length and the narrowness) of the grains, and not the quality.

Mushroom and Chicken Risotto

There are many different risotto recipes with different ingredients, but they are all based on rice of an appropriate variety, cooked in a standard procedure, requiring, unlike other rice dishes, constant care and attention. The rice is not pre-rinsed, as washing would remove much of the starch required for a creamy texture.

The rice is first cooked briefly in a soffritto of onion and butter or olive oil, to coat each grain in a film of fat, called tostatura; white wine is added and must be absorbed by the grains. When it has been absorbed the heat is raised to medium high, and boiling stock is gradually added in small amounts, while stirring constantly. The constant stirring, with only a small amount of liquid present, forces the grains to rub against each other and release the starch molecules from the outside of the grains into the surrounding liquid, creating a smooth creamy-textured mass. When the rice is cooked the pot is taken off the heat for mantecatura, vigorously beating in refrigerated balls of grated parmesan cheese and butter, to make the texture as creamy and smooth as possible. It may be removed from the heat a few minutes earlier and left to cook with its residual heat.

Properly cooked risotto is rich and creamy even if no cream is added, due to the starch in the grains, if properly prepared. It has some resistance or bite (al dente) and separate grains. The traditional texture is fairly fluid, or all’onda (“wavy, or flowing in waves”). It is served on flat dishes and should easily spread out but not have excess watery liquid around the perimeter. It must be eaten at once, as it continues to cook in its own heat, making the grains absorb all the liquid and become soft and dry.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 30, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Do Not Touch…….

When grilling – To start always oil your grill grate up. Then start your grill and let it heat up 15-20 minutes before adding the meat. Then once you put food on the grill, do your best not to disturb it. Meats — especially burgers, steaks and chops — are meant to be flipped just once. After placing something on the grill, let it sit for a few minutes to get a good sear. Once it’s been cooking for a bit, use your tongs to test and see it if pulls away from the grates. The meat will then either stick or release when it’s cooked long enough. If there’s any resistance, it needs to be left alone a few moments longer. Enjoy that grilling!

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 29, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Have a Beer………

Marinate the meat for your chili in beer. It’s a great tenderizer for tough, inexpensive cuts of beef, and it will add great flavor. All you need to do is soak the meat for an hour before cooking, or marinate it overnight in the refrigerator.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 15, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Room temperature……………

All meat except organ meats and ground beef should stand at room temperature for a few minutes before cooking. This allows it to brown more evenly, cook faster, retain more juices, and stick less when frying.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

February 17, 2018 at 5:53 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Freeze the meat…….

To easily slice meat or poultry, partially freeze it beforehand and your knife will glide right through.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

February 3, 2018 at 7:24 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Don’t stab and let it sit………

Never stab the meat with a fork or knife to flip it over. Punctures allow juices to escape and can lead to drying of the meat and less-flavorful. Always use a spatula or tongs when you need to turn your meats. Also always let your meat rest 5-8 minutes before slicing. This allows it a chance to sit will help the juices to disperse throughout the center of the meat, which means a more flavorful meat.

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