Diabetic Dish of the Week – Cajun Stew

September 20, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is a Cajun Stew. This week’s recipe is made using Onion, Celery, Boneless Skinless Chicken Thighs, Turkey Andouille Sausage Links, Tomatoes, Okra, Rice and more! The Stew is 199 calories per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Cajun Stew
In the mood for some home cooking? You’ll love this authentic taste of the bayou! Featuring a hearty blend of chicken, andouille sausage, okra and brown rice, it will keep you fueled for hours.

Ingredients
1 teaspoon canola oil
1 onion, chopped
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 boneless skinless chicken thigh (about 4 ounces), cut into bite-size pieces
2 (2-ounce) turkey or chicken andouille sausage links, sliced into 1/4-inch-thick pieces
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1 can (about 14 ounces) no-salt-added diced tomatoes
2 cups frozen sliced okra
1 cup cooked brown rice
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/8 teaspoon dried thyme

Directions
Yield: 4 servings
Serving size: 1 1/2 cups

1. Heat oil in large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onion, celery and garlic; cook and stir 3 minutes. Add chicken and turkey sausage; cook and stir 2 minutes, or until browned on all sides. Pour in broth, stirring to scrape up browned bits.

2. Stir tomatoes, okra, rice, red pepper flakes, salt, black pepper and thyme into saucepan. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and cook 10 minutes.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 199 calories, Protein: 14 g, Fat: 6 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 47 mg, Sodium: 436 mg, Fiber: 5 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/soups-stews/cajun-stew/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes

September 13, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes with recipes including Tater Tot Breakfast Casserole, Slow-Cooker Jambalaya, and Fall Vegetable and Sausage Stew. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes
Find healthy, delicious turkey sausage recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Tater Tot Breakfast Casserole
There is something for everyone in this Tater Tot breakfast casserole. It’s crunchy on top and soft in the center with the bottom layer packed with vegetables and crumbled turkey sausage. The eggs hold everything together. This easy breakfast casserole is perfect for the holidays when you need to feed a hungry crowd……

Slow-Cooker Jambalaya
This hearty jambalaya is bursting with chicken, smoked turkey sausage, and shrimp. It takes just 25 minutes to prep in the morning and then your slow cooker will work its magic and deliver a tasty meal at the end of the day……

Fall Vegetable and Sausage Stew
Hot Italian sausage complements the sweet potatoes and greens, providing just the right amount of heat in this comforting soup. Simmering with rosemary sprigs infuses the soup with aromatic flavor without the extra work required to mince the leaves before cooking them……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19059/ingredients/meat-poultry/sausage/turkey/

Healthy Okra Recipes

August 28, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Okra Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Okra Recipes with recipes including Sausage Gumbo, Grilled Creole-Style Jambalaya, and Cornmeal-Crusted Shrimp with Corn and Okra. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Okra Recipes
Find healthy, delicious okra recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Sausage Gumbo
To keep it simple, we’ve opted for just the essential ingredients in this rendition of the hearty Creole favorite: sausage, okra, rice and a little spice……

Grilled Creole-Style Jambalaya
Every one of the ingredients used in this grilled spin on a Louisiana favorite is awesome with some charred flavor. Even the rice gets some smokiness from grilled tomatoes, a signature in this Creole-style dish. Also known as the Holy Trinity, the combo of bell pepper, onion and celery (which here we swapped for celery seed) is used to flavor Cajun and Creole dishes like gumbo and this jambalaya. No skewers? Use a grill basket instead……

Cornmeal-Crusted Shrimp with Corn and Okra
Coating shrimp in buttermilk, hot sauce and Cajun seasoning not only gives them a tangy, spicy flavor, it also helps the cornmeal stick to form a crispy crust……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Okra Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19308/ingredients/vegetables/okra/

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes

April 27, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes with recipes including Slow-Cooker Jambalaya, Three-Bean Chili, and Sausage Gumbo. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
Find healthy, delicious Cajun and Creole recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Slow-Cooker Jambalaya
This hearty jambalaya is bursting with chicken, smoked turkey sausage, and shrimp. It takes just 25 minutes to prep in the morning and then your slow cooker will work its magic and deliver a tasty meal at the end of the day……

Three-Bean Chili
This rib-sticking bean chili is richly flavored with cumin, chili, paprika, oregano and an assortment of peppers. Use whatever beans you have in your pantry……

Sausage Gumbo
To keep it simple, we’ve opted for just the essential ingredients in this rendition of the hearty Creole favorite: sausage, okra, rice and a little spice……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19698/cuisines-regions/usa/cajun-creole/

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes

April 20, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes with recipes including Vegan Jambalaya, Cajun Mayo, and Pork, White Bean and Kale Soup. I’ll be featuring the Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes for a couple more days, Enjoy! Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
Find healthy, delicious Cajun and Creole recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Vegan Jambalaya
You won’t miss the meat in this healthy jambalaya recipe. Vegan smoked sausage takes its place while the classic “trinity” of vegetables–onion, red bell pepper and celery–get a kick from jalapeño peppers. And everything is cooked in one skillet, which means cleanup is a breeze!…..

Cajun Mayo
Use this healthy condiment recipe for dipping popcorn shrimp or crudités, or slather it onto a sandwich or burger for a touch of Cajun tang……

Pork, White Bean and Kale Soup
Kale is matched up here with white beans and chunks of lean pork tenderloin to create a soup that’s satisfying and quick to make. Smoked paprika gives the soup a Spanish flair so some warm bread and sliced Manchego cheese would go well on the side……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19698/cuisines-regions/usa/cajun-creole/

Healthy Sausage Recipes

December 11, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Sausage Recipes. Find some always Delicious Healthy Sausage Recipes with recipes including Louisiana Gumbo, Sheet-Pan Sausage and Peppers, and Cast-Iron Skillet Pizza with Sausage and Kale. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Sausage Recipes
Find healthy, delicious sausage recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Louisiana Gumbo
Chock-full of shrimp, chicken, sausage, okra and tomatoes, this flavorful stew is a staple in Louisiana. Make it a meal and serve with Real Cornbread (see associated recipe)……

Sheet-Pan Sausage and Peppers
This easy one-dish meal is bound to become a regular in your dinner rotation–it’s super simple and comes together quickly. Be sure to preheat your sheet pan–adding vegetables to a hot pan helps start the charring and caramelization, without steaming your veggies. And remember, you are only heating up your sausage, not cooking it from raw in this recipe, but if you substitute with fresh sausage (which you can), you’ll need to cook the sausage longer……

Cast-Iron Skillet Pizza with Sausage and Kale
A piping-hot cast-iron skillet turns pizza dough into a puffy, crisp-bottomed crust (similar to focaccia). If you have children, let them help make this easy pizza recipe: While you cook the sausage, have the kids tear up the kale–no knife required!

* Click the link below to get all all the Healthy Sausage Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/22791/ingredients/meat-poultry/sausage/

Diabetic Dish of the Week – Cajun Stew

March 2, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is a Cajun Stew. This week’s recipe is made using Onion, Celery, Boneless Skinless Chicken Thighs, Turkey Andouille Sausage Links, Tomatoes, Okra, Rice and more! The Stew is 199 calories per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Cajun Stew
In the mood for some home cooking? You’ll love this authentic taste of the bayou! Featuring a hearty blend of chicken, andouille sausage, okra and brown rice, it will keep you fueled for hours.

Ingredients
1 teaspoon canola oil
1 onion, chopped
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 boneless skinless chicken thigh (about 4 ounces), cut into bite-size pieces
2 (2-ounce) turkey or chicken andouille sausage links, sliced into 1/4-inch-thick pieces
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1 can (about 14 ounces) no-salt-added diced tomatoes
2 cups frozen sliced okra
1 cup cooked brown rice
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/8 teaspoon dried thyme

Directions
Yield: 4 servings
Serving size: 1 1/2 cups

1. Heat oil in large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onion, celery and garlic; cook and stir 3 minutes. Add chicken and turkey sausage; cook and stir 2 minutes, or until browned on all sides. Pour in broth, stirring to scrape up browned bits.

2. Stir tomatoes, okra, rice, red pepper flakes, salt, black pepper and thyme into saucepan. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and cook 10 minutes.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 199 calories, Protein: 14 g, Fat: 6 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 47 mg, Sodium: 436 mg, Fiber: 5 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/soups-stews/cajun-stew/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 2, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Buying and storing Okra……………….

Look for smooth, tender, blemish-free, bright green pods. Avoid pods with brown spots or dry end. If you’re cooking it quickly, like in a sauté, use okra that’s under 4 inches long. If you’re stewing it or using it in a gumbo, look for the tougher, larger pods.

Fresh okra is very perishable. Keep no more than two to three days in the refrigerator. Store in a paper bag or wrapped in a paper towel and placed inside a perforated plastic bag to keep pods very dry. Moisture causes pods to become slimy.

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 6:49 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 2:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

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