One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 6:49 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 2:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Barley and Sausage Gumbo

March 21, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | 1 Comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday Recipe is a Barley and Sausage Gumbo. Made using Onion, Green Bell Pepper, Okra, Celery, Garlic, Reduced Sodium Chiken Broth, No Salt Added Tomato Purée, Peral Barley, Dried Oregano, Salt, Red Pepper Flakes, and Low-Fat Chicken Andouille Sausages. One delicious Creole Dish! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Barley and Sausage Gumbo
Celebrate Mardi Gras with this healthful twist on an authentic Creole gumbo dish!

Ingredients
1 small onion, chopped
1 large green bell pepper, chopped
1 cup frozen sliced okra
1 medium stalk celery, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
1 cup no-salt-added tomato purée
1/4 cup uncooked pearl barley
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon salt (optional)
1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 low-fat chicken andouille sausages (3 ounces each), sliced 1/2 inch thick

Directions
Yield:
4 servings

Serving size:
1 1/3-cup

Place onion, bell pepper, okra, celery, and garlic in slow cooker. Add chicken broth, tomato purée, barley, oregano, salt, if desired, and red pepper flakes; stir. Add sliced sausages. Cover; cook on LOW 5 to 6 hours.

Let stand 5 minutes before serving.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 175 calories, Carbohydrates: 24 g, Protein: 12 g, Fat: 5 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 31 mg, Sodium: 363 mg, Fiber: 6 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/barley-sausage-gumbo/

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Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Chicken Gumbo SATURDAY

February 22, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in chicken, Diabetes Self Management, gumbo, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | 1 Comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday Recipe is a Chicken Gumbo. You’ll be needing Cooked and Diced Chicken Breast, Okra, 1 can No Sodium Diced Tomatoes, Onion, Garlic, Salt and Pepper, Cayenne Pepper, Reduced Sodium Fat Free Chicken Broth, and Brown Rice. It’s Gumbo time! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Chicken Gumbo
Ingredients
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 45–55 minutes.

Cooking spray
3/4 pound fresh okra or frozen, thawed okra, cut in 1/2-inch slices
1 tablespoon corn oil
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 can (14 1/2 ounces) no-salt-added diced tomatoes, drained
1 medium onion, chopped
1 teaspoon (or 1 clove) minced garlic
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 cans (14 1/2 ounces each) 50%-reduced-sodium, fat-free chicken broth
1 cup water
1 pound cooked, diced, chicken breast (for convenience, thaw fully-cooked, frozen, diced chicken, such as Tyson)
3 2/3 cups cooked hot brown rice

Directions
Yield: 11 servings
Serving size: 1 cup gumbo over 1/3 cup rice

* Coat a nonstick skillet with cooking spray, warm over medium heat, add okra, and cook until slightly softened, about 6–8 minutes. Remove okra to a plate and set aside. Add oil to the skillet and warm over medium-high heat. Gradually add flour, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to medium-low and continue cooking and stirring until the flour-oil mixture turns golden brown, about 3–5 minutes. Increase heat to medium-high then stir in tomatoes, onion, garlic, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and salt. Cook until onion becomes translucent, about 5 minutes. Meanwhile combine broth and water in a stockpot, cover, and warm over medium heat. Stir tomato mixture into hot broth, mixing well. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to low and stir in okra and chicken. Cover and simmer 30–40 minutes. Serve 1 cup gumbo over 1/3 cup cooked rice.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 163 calories, Carbohydrates: 22 g, Protein: 12 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: <1 g, Cholesterol: 22 mg, Sodium: 391 mg, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/chicken-gumbo/

 

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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Buffalo 5oz. Petite Top Sirloin w/ Fried Okra and Cut Green Beans

January 25, 2020 at 6:41 PM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Buffalo 5oz. Petite Top Sirloin w/ Fried Okra and Cut Green Beans

 

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I just had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Light rain and snow showers out today, high of 37 degrees. After lunch I went to the post office, then by the bank to the ATM, and then stopped and got gas. Cleaned and straightened the fridge and pantry. Just trying to find stuff to do to stay busy. For Dinner tonight a Buffalo 5oz. Petite Top Sirloin w/ Fried Okra and Cut Green Beans.

 

 

 

 

I’ll be using the Wild Idea Buffalo Petite Top Sirloin Steak (5 oz.). To prepare the Steak; I rubbed the Steak with a 1 teaspoon of Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Then seasoned it with McCormick’s Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. As the Steak rested I preheated the oven on 400 degrees and heated up a small Cast Iron Skillet on medium heat. When the skillet was heated I added my Buffalo Sirloin, I cooked it 1 minute per side. Then moved the skillet to the oven and cooked it another 5 minutes to a beautiful Medium Rare! The Wild Idea Buffalo Steaks are just incredible. So tender and juicy and the best flavor of any Steak, Beef or Buffalo, I’ve ever had.

 

Well this is a first, I’m having Fried Okra. I’ve had Okra in Gumbo but never on its own, until tonight! Mom said it had been forever since she had some so I thought I would give it a try. I bought a package at Meijer. I found many recipes for it online. I combined a few of them and came up with this recipe for Fried Okra. I’ll be needing fresh Okra (cut into 1/4 or 1/2 inch slices), Cornmeal, Flour, Cayenne Pepper, Black Pepper, Sea Salt, Egg, Low Fat Buttermilk, and Extra Light Olive Oil. I’ll be preparing them in a small Dutch Oven. To prepare it; Heat about 2 inches of Olive Oil in a small Dutch Oven, to about 350 F. As the skillet was heating, using a pie pan, whisk together the Cornmeal, Flour, Cayenne, Black Pepper, and Salt. Then in another bowl, beat the egg into the buttermilk. Next I dipped the Okra slices in the Buttermilk, then the cornmeal mix, tossing to coat. Added the Okra slices to the hot oil and cooked until Golden Brown. After they turned Golden Brown I removed them to a paper towel lined plate, to drain on paper the towels, added a sprinkle of the Sea Salt and served. Well Okra has a new fan! I really enjoyed these and can’t wait to have them again!

 

I also opened up a can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans. I heated them up in a small sauce pan on medium heat. Stirred often until heated, then served.I also baked a slice of the New York Bakery Light Texas Toast. For Dessert/Snack later a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Snyder’s of Hanover Stick Pretzels along with a Sprite Zero to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Wild Idea Buffalo – 5 oz. Petite Top Sirloin Steak

Famous for their flavor, these juicy steaks are perfect for the grill. The steaks are cut from the middle and upper part of the primal sirloin and their smaller size makes a great meal for one. 5 oz.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/steaks/products/petite-top-sirloin-steaks

 

 

 

 

 

Okra sliced

Okra…………

Okra the Superfood. Okra looks like a ridged pepper, but actually belongs to the same plant family as hibiscus and cotton. … It is also a good source of potassium and calcium and is high in antioxidants, fiber, and vitamin C. The oil from okra is high in good fat (unsaturated) such as oleic and linoleic acids.
Okra is a nutritious food with many health benefits. It’s rich in magnesium, folate, fiber, antioxidants, and vitamin C, K1, and A. Okra may benefit pregnant women, heart health, and blood sugar control. It may even have anticancer properties.

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – BUFFALO GUMBO

January 1, 2020 at 9:19 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | 1 Comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is BUFFALO GUMBO. Gumbo is delicious so many ways and using different ingredients, and here’s another using Wild Idea BUFFALO ANDOUILLE SAUSAGE. Also there’s a description of the BUFFALO ANDOUILLE SAUSAGE along with a web link back to the ordering page for the Sausage.You can find this recipe along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes and order any of the Wild Idea Products. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

BUFFALO GUMBO
Ingredients: (serves 8)
1 – Tb. olive oil
1 – lb. organic chicken, pheasant, or grouse, cut into bite size pieces
1 – cup onion, diced
4 – celery stalks – sliced
1 – green or red pepper – diced
3 – clove garlic – chopped
1 – tsp. black pepper
2 – tsp. salt
2 – tsp. paprika
1 – tsp. oregano
½ – tsp. thyme
½ – tsp. cayenne *optional
2 – Tb. olive oil
¼ – cup flour
2 – quarts organic chicken broth
2 – cups tomatoes, diced with juices
1 – 14 oz. Buffalo Andouille Sausage, cut into 1” slices on the bias
12 – Shrimp, peeled & deveined
½ – lb. Okra, fresh or frozen, sliced *optional lightly brown in butter
¼ – cup chopped parsley

Ingredients:
1.) In heavy soup pot over medium high heat, heat 1 Tb. oil. Add fowl of choice, sauté to slightly brown, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes.
2.) Add vegetables and stir to incorporate, along with all dry spices and cook until tender and slightly browned. Transpose meat and vegetables from pot to other bowl, cover and set aside.
3.) Return pot to low heat and add additional oil and flour, whisking to incorporate. Increase heat to medium, whisking constantly until roux is dark brown. About 15 minutes.
4.) Add meat, vegetables and any juices that have accumulated in bowl back to kettle, stirring to incorporate.
5.) Add, organic chicken broth and bring to boil. Reduce heat to a low and simmer for 1 hour uncovered, stirring occasionally. *(Optional: Remove from heat, cool & refrigerate. Remove oil from top before reheating. Reheat over med high, bringing to a boil.)
6.) Increase heat to medium. Add tomatoes, and Buffalo Andouille, stir to incorporate and continue cooking for 10 minutes.
7.) Add shrimp and, cook for 5 minutes.
8.) Add Okra and cook until heated through.
9.) Stir in chopped parsley before serving.
Season to taste. To serve, place a medium scoop of sticky sushi rice or brown rice in center of shallow bowl, ladle Gumbo around rice and garnish with a parsley sprig.
An excellent make ahead and reheat dinner! The flavor just gets better!
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/86982785-buffalo-gumbo

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo – 12 OZ. BUFFALO ANDOUILLE SAUSAGE

Buffalo Andouille Sausage. We did our homework and tested many recipes until we landed on the perfect recipe. Coarse ground, seasoned with traditional Andouille spices, hand stuffed and lightly smoked true cajun flavor. Great on the grill as a brat, or use in soups, stews and casseroles. Jill’s recipe for Gumbo included with purchase.

Ingredients: 100% Grass-fed Buffalo, Water, “Free” Binder (Modified Potato Starch, Trehalose, Carrot Fiber) Sea Salt, Organic: Minced Onion, Minced Garlic, Smoked Paprika, Crushed Red Pepper, Cultured Celery Powder, Organic: Oregano, Black Pepper, Parsley. Encased in an Organic Pork Casing.

*All products are made without the use of added nitrites or nitrates, except for those naturally occurring in sea salt and celery powder.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/brats-sausages-hot-dogs/products/14-oz-buffalo-andouille-sausage-14-oz

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes

October 8, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes with recipes including Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya, Slow-Cooker Jambalaya, and Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Also don’t forget to subscribe to the EatingWell Magazine, packed full of delicious and healthy recipes in every issue! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
Find healthy, delicious Cajun and Creole recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya
This catfish and sausage jambalaya recipe is one you might find in a neighborhood eatery in Creole country. Turkey sausage links have fewer calories and less fat than traditional pork sausage, but still deliver amazing taste to this dish……………….

Slow-Cooker Jambalaya
This hearty jambalaya is bursting with chicken, smoked turkey sausage, and shrimp. It takes just 25 minutes to prep in the morning and then your slow cooker will work its magic and deliver a tasty meal at the end of the day…………………

Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya
The slow cooker makes easy work of this healthy jambalaya featuring brown rice and plenty of veggies. If you don’t want to make your own seasoning, just skip Step 1 and use 1½ teaspoons purchased salt-free Cajun seasoning in Step 2……………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19698/cuisines-regions/usa/cajun-creole/

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – BUFFALO GUMBO

January 1, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is BUFFALO GUMBO. Gumbo is delicious, especially when the weather turns colder. The recipe uses the Wild Idea Buffalo Andouille Sausage. Heat up these cold Winter days and nights with this week’s recipe of Buffalo Gumbo. You can find this recipe or purchase any of the Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

BUFFALO GUMBO
Ingredients: (serves 8)
1 – Tb. olive oil
1 – lb. organic chicken, pheasant, or grouse, cut into bite size pieces
1 – cup onion, diced
4 – celery stalks – sliced
1 – green or red pepper – diced
3 – clove garlic – chopped
1 – tsp. black pepper
2 – tsp. salt
2 – tsp. paprika
1 – tsp. oregano
½ – tsp. thyme
½ – tsp. cayenne *optional
2 – Tb. olive oil
¼ – cup flour
2 – quarts organic chicken broth
2 – cups tomatoes, diced with juices
1 – 14 oz. Buffalo Andouille Sausage, cut into 1” slices on the bias
12 – Shrimp, peeled & deveined
½ – lb. Okra, fresh or frozen, sliced *optional lightly brown in butter
¼ – cup chopped parsley

Ingredients:
1.) In heavy soup pot over medium high heat, heat 1 Tb. oil. Add fowl of choice, sauté to slightly brown, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes.
2.) Add vegetables and stir to incorporate, along with all dry spices and cook until tender and slightly browned. Transpose meat and vegetables from pot to other bowl, cover and set aside.
3.) Return pot to low heat and add additional oil and flour, whisking to incorporate. Increase heat to medium, whisking constantly until roux is dark brown. About 15 minutes.
4.) Add meat, vegetables and any juices that have accumulated in bowl back to kettle, stirring to incorporate.
5.) Add, organic chicken broth and bring to boil. Reduce heat to a low and simmer for 1 hour uncovered, stirring occasionally. *(Optional: Remove from heat, cool & refrigerate. Remove oil from top before reheating. Reheat over med high, bringing to a boil.)
6.) Increase heat to medium. Add tomatoes, and Buffalo Andouille, stir to incorporate and continue cooking for 10 minutes.
7.) Add shrimp and, cook for 5 minutes.
8.) Add Okra and cook until heated through.
9.) Stir in chopped parsley before serving.
Season to taste. To serve, place a medium scoop of sticky sushi rice or brown rice in center of shallow bowl, ladle Gumbo around rice and garnish with a parsley sprig.

An excellent make ahead and reheat dinner! The flavor just gets better!
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/86982785-buffalo-gumbo

 

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo – 12 OZ. BUFFALO ANDOUILLE SAUSAGE

Buffalo Andouille Sausage. We did our homework and tested many recipes until we landed on the perfect recipe. Coarse ground, seasoned with traditional Andouille spices, hand stuffed and lightly smoked true cajun flavor. Great on the grill as a brat, or use in soups, stews and casseroles. Jill’s recipe for Gumbo included with purchase.

Ingredients: 100% Grass-fed Buffalo, Water, “Free” Binder (Modified Potato Starch, Trehalose, Carrot Fiber) Sea Salt, Organic: Minced Onion, Minced Garlic, Smoked Paprika, Crushed Red Pepper, Cultured Celery Powder, Organic: Oregano, Black Pepper, Parsley. Encased in an Organic Pork Casing.

*All products are made without the use of added nitrites or nitrates, except for those naturally occurring in sea salt and celery powder.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/brats-sausages-hot-dogs/products/14-oz-buffalo-andouille-sausage-14-oz

It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – BUFFALO GUMBO

November 23, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday, Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

BUFFALO GUMBO
This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday Recipe is BUFFALO GUMBO. Gumbo is delicious so many ways and using many different ingredients, and here’s another using Wild Idea BUFFALO ANDOUILLE SAUSAGE. Below I’ve left the recipe and instructions. Also there’s a description of the BUFFALO ANDOUILLE SAUSAGE along with a web link back to the ordering page for the Sausage.You can find this recipe along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes at the Wild Idea Buffalo website (https://wildideabuffalo.com/). You can also purchase any of the wild Idea Buffalo Products! So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018!

BUFFALO GUMBO
Ingredients: (serves 8)
1 – Tb. olive oil
1 – lb. organic chicken, pheasant, or grouse, cut into bite size pieces
1 – cup onion, diced
4 – celery stalks – sliced
1 – green or red pepper – diced
3 – clove garlic – chopped
1 – tsp. black pepper
2 – tsp. salt
2 – tsp. paprika
1 – tsp. oregano
½ – tsp. thyme
½ – tsp. cayenne *optional
2 – Tb. olive oil
¼ – cup flour
2 – quarts organic chicken broth
2 – cups tomatoes, diced with juices
1 – 14 oz. Buffalo Andouille Sausage, cut into 1” slices on the bias
12 – Shrimp, peeled & deveined
½ – lb. Okra, fresh or frozen, sliced *optional lightly brown in butter
¼ – cup chopped parsley

Ingredients:
1.) In heavy soup pot over medium high heat, heat 1 Tb. oil. Add fowl of choice, sauté to slightly brown, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes.
2.) Add vegetables and stir to incorporate, along with all dry spices and cook until tender and slightly browned. Transpose meat and vegetables from pot to other bowl, cover and set aside.
3.) Return pot to low heat and add additional oil and flour, whisking to incorporate. Increase heat to medium, whisking constantly until roux is dark brown. About 15 minutes.
4.) Add meat, vegetables and any juices that have accumulated in bowl back to kettle, stirring to incorporate.
5.) Add, organic chicken broth and bring to boil. Reduce heat to a low and simmer for 1 hour uncovered, stirring occasionally. *(Optional: Remove from heat, cool & refrigerate. Remove oil from top before reheating. Reheat over med high, bringing to a boil.)
6.) Increase heat to medium. Add tomatoes, and Buffalo Andouille, stir to incorporate and continue cooking for 10 minutes.
7.) Add shrimp and, cook for 5 minutes.
8.) Add Okra and cook until heated through.
9.) Stir in chopped parsley before serving.
Season to taste. To serve, place a medium scoop of sticky sushi rice or brown rice in center of shallow bowl, ladle Gumbo around rice and garnish with a parsley sprig.
An excellent make ahead and reheat dinner! The flavor just gets better!
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/86982785-buffalo-gumbo

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – BUFFALO GUMBO

February 21, 2018 at 6:03 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is BUFFALO GUMBO. Gumbo is delicious so many ways and using different ingredients, and here’s another using Wild Idea BUFFALO ANDOUILLE SAUSAGE. Below I’ve left the recipe and instructions. Also there’s a description of the BUFFALO ANDOUILLE SAUSAGE along with a web link back to the ordering page for the Sausage.You can find this recipe along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes at the Wild Idea Buffalo website (https://wildideabuffalo.com/). You can also purchase any of the wild Idea Buffalo Products! So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018!

BUFFALO GUMBO
Ingredients: (serves 8)
1 – Tb. olive oil
1 – lb. organic chicken, pheasant, or grouse, cut into bite size pieces
1 – cup onion, diced
4 – celery stalks – sliced
1 – green or red pepper – diced
3 – clove garlic – chopped
1 – tsp. black pepper
2 – tsp. salt
2 – tsp. paprika
1 – tsp. oregano
½ – tsp. thyme
½ – tsp. cayenne *optional
2 – Tb. olive oil
¼ – cup flour
2 – quarts organic chicken broth
2 – cups tomatoes, diced with juices
1 – 14 oz. Buffalo Andouille Sausage, cut into 1” slices on the bias
12 – Shrimp, peeled & deveined
½ – lb. Okra, fresh or frozen, sliced *optional lightly brown in butter
¼ – cup chopped parsley

Ingredients:
1.) In heavy soup pot over medium high heat, heat 1 Tb. oil. Add fowl of choice, sauté to slightly brown, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes.
2.) Add vegetables and stir to incorporate, along with all dry spices and cook until tender and slightly browned. Transpose meat and vegetables from pot to other bowl, cover and set aside.
3.) Return pot to low heat and add additional oil and flour, whisking to incorporate. Increase heat to medium, whisking constantly until roux is dark brown. About 15 minutes.
4.) Add meat, vegetables and any juices that have accumulated in bowl back to kettle, stirring to incorporate.
5.) Add, organic chicken broth and bring to boil. Reduce heat to a low and simmer for 1 hour uncovered, stirring occasionally. *(Optional: Remove from heat, cool & refrigerate. Remove oil from top before reheating. Reheat over med high, bringing to a boil.)
6.) Increase heat to medium. Add tomatoes, and Buffalo Andouille, stir to incorporate and continue cooking for 10 minutes.
7.) Add shrimp and, cook for 5 minutes.
8.) Add Okra and cook until heated through.
9.) Stir in chopped parsley before serving.
Season to taste. To serve, place a medium scoop of sticky sushi rice or brown rice in center of shallow bowl, ladle Gumbo around rice and garnish with a parsley sprig.
An excellent make ahead and reheat dinner! The flavor just gets better!
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/86982785-buffalo-gumbo

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo – 12 OZ. BUFFALO ANDOUILLE SAUSAGE

Buffalo Andouille Sausage. We did our homework and tested many recipes until we landed on the perfect recipe. Coarse ground, seasoned with traditional Andouille spices, hand stuffed and lightly smoked true cajun flavor. Great on the grill as a brat, or use in soups, stews and casseroles. Jill’s recipe for Gumbo included with purchase.

Ingredients: 100% Grass-fed Buffalo, Water, “Free” Binder (Modified Potato Starch, Trehalose, Carrot Fiber) Sea Salt, Organic: Minced Onion, Minced Garlic, Smoked Paprika, Crushed Red Pepper, Cultured Celery Powder, Organic: Oregano, Black Pepper, Parsley. Encased in an Organic Pork Casing.

*All products are made without the use of added nitrites or nitrates, except for those naturally occurring in sea salt and celery powder.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/brats-sausages-hot-dogs/products/14-oz-buffalo-andouille-sausage-14-oz

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