Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 18, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Preparing Mussels……………..

Soak mussels and clams in water with a few tablespoons of flour. They will open up to ingest the flour, and in doing so will expel any sand or grit still inside. Leave them in for 30 minutes to get the best possible results before cooking.

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Shrimp w/ Pasta Roni – Angel Hair Pasta with Herbs

July 12, 2019 at 6:38 PM | Posted in Pasta Roni, seafood, shrimp | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Shrimp w/ Pasta Roni – Angel Hair Pasta with Herbs

 

 


For Breakfast I toasted a Thomas Light 100% Multi Grain English Muffin that I lightly buttered with I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter and made a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Sunny and 87 degrees, not quite as humid out today. After Breakfast I went to Meijer to pick up a few items and stopped by McDonald’s and picked up Breakfast for Mom. Rested most of the day I’ve been dealing with some bad Sinus Headaches. For Dinner tonight a favorite of mine,Shrimp w/ Pasta Roni.

 

 

 

 


For the Shrimp part of the dish I used Meijer Brand Jumbo Shrimp. This is my frozen Shrimp of choice, best I’ve found. I had them in the freezer so I let them thaw overnight in the fridge. I love Shrimp and all Seafood. For the Shrimp; I started by rinsing the Shrimp off in cold water and letting it dry in a colander. Using a medium size skillet, that I sprayed with Pam Cooking Spray and a 1 tablespoon of Extra Virgin Olive Oil, that I heated on medium heat. I seasoned them with Old Bay Seasoning and a sprinkle of Morton’s Lite Salt and added the Shrimp to the skillet. Cooked them 2 minutes per side, turning the Shrimp once. And as the Shrimp was cooking I started to prepare the Pasta.

 

 

 

 


I love having Shrimp with the Pasta Roni – Angel Hair Pasta with Herbs. It comes with the Pasta Special Seasonings Packet and I added; 1 1/3 cups of water, 2/3 cups of 2% milk, and 2 tablespoons of Blue Bonnet Light Butter. Then to prepare it; In a medium saucepan bring water, milk, margarine or butter to a boil. Then slowly stir in pasta and Special Seasonings. Separate pasta with a fork, if needed. Return to a boil. Reduce heat to medium. Boil uncovered, 4-5 min. or until pasta is just tender, stirring frequently. Sauce will be thin. Let stand 3-5 min. to thicken. There’s 2 servings per box, leftovers coming tomorrow. Nice seasoning and the Parmesan Sauce is very flavorful. I topped the Pasta with some Kraft Reduced Fat Grated Parmesan Cheese and the Shrimp. Too good, this makes one delicious Shrimp and Pasta Dish! For Dessert/Snack later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn with Sprite Zero to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pasta Roni Angel Hair Pasta with Herbs

Our Pasta Roni Angel Hair Pasta with Herbs flavor blends delicate angel hair pasta in a creamy herb sauce with other natural flavors. This delicately flavored dish is the perfect complement to your family’s favorite Italian-inspired recipes.

What You’ll Do
1 – In a medium saucepan bring water, milk and butter or margarine to a boil. Then slowly stir in pasta and Special Seasonings. Separate pasta with a fork, if needed. Return to a boil.
2 – Reduce heat to medium. Boil uncovered, 4-5 min. or until pasta is just tender, stirring frequently.
3 – Sauce will be thin. Let stand 3-5 min. to thicken.

http://www.ricearoni.com/products/Pasta_Roni/Angel_Hair_Pasta_with_Herb

 

 

 

 

Shrimp Health Benefits……….
Shrimp may have a variety of health benefits. It is high in several vitamins and minerals, and is a rich source of protein. Eating shrimp may also promote heart and brain health due to its content of omega-3 fatty acids and the antioxidant astaxanthin ( 6 , 11 , 12 , 13 ).

Diabetic Appetizer Recipes

July 6, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Diabetic Appetizer Recipes. Healthy and Delicious Diabetic Appetizer Recipes with recipes including; Cuban Stromboli, Thai Chicken Wings with Peanut Sauce, and Toasted Crab and Scallion Ravioli with Sweet-and-Sour Dipping Sauce. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Diabetic Appetizer Recipes
Find healthy, delicious diabetic-friendly appetizer recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at Eating Well.

Cuban Stromboli
Inspired by the classic pressed Cuban sandwich, we’ve taken the pickle-meets-cold-cuts-and-Swiss-cheese combo and rolled it in pizza dough for a fun party snack that’s easy to make……..

Thai Chicken Wings with Peanut Sauce
Chicken wings are great for game night and a perfect appetizer for a party, but don’t get stuck in the rut of always serving BBQ wings. Add variety to game nights with this easy slow-cooker recipe for Thai wings with peanut sauce—and BBQ wings may just become a thing of the past!…….

Toasted Crab and Scallion Ravioli with Sweet-and-Sour Dipping Sauce
This Asian-inspired toasted ravioli appetizer is served with a yummy sweet-&-sour dipping sauce. It may seem time consuming to make this recipe from scratch but it takes just under an hour. You’ll be so proud to serve these homemade filled wontons to your guests that you won’t even fret about the prep time……………………

* Click the link below to get all the Diabetic Appetizer Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/23001/health-condition/diabetic/appetizers/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 6, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Buying Seafood………..

Buy fresh seafood that is refrigerated or displayed on a thick bed of fresh ice that is not melting. Fresh seafood should smell fresh and mild, not fishy or sour. A smell like ammonia means it’s spoiled and you shouldn’t eat it.

One of America’s Favorites – Barbecue in the United States

July 1, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A slab of barbecued pork ribs at Oklahoma Joe’s in Tulsa.

In the United States, barbecue refers to a technique of cooking meat outdoors over a fire; often this is called pit barbecue, and the facility for cooking it is the barbecue pit. This form of cooking adds a distinctive smoky taste to the meat; barbecue sauce, while a common accompaniment, is not required for many styles.

Often the proprietors of Southern-style barbecue establishments in other areas originate from the South. In the South, barbecue is more than just a style of cooking, but a subculture with wide variation between regions, and fierce rivalry for titles at barbecue competitions.

There are 3 ingredients to barbecue. Meat and wood smoke are essential. The use of a sauce or seasoning varies widely between regional traditions.

The first ingredient in the barbecue tradition is the meat. The most widely used meat in most barbecue is pork, particularly the pork ribs, and also the pork shoulder for pulled pork. The techniques used to cook the meat are hot smoking and smoke cooking. These cooking processes are distinct from the cold smoking preservation process. Hot smoking is where the meat is cooked with a wood fire, over indirect heat, at temperatures between 120 and 180 °F (50 and 80 °C), and smoke cooking (the method used in barbecue) is cooking over indirect fire at higher temperatures, often in the range of 250°F (121°C) ±50°F (±28°C). The long, slow cooking process take hours, as many as 18, and leaves the meat tender and juicy. Characteristically, this process leaves a distinctive line of red just under the surface, where the myoglobin in the meat reacts with carbon monoxide from the smoke, and imparts the smoky taste essential to barbecue.

The second ingredient in barbecue is the wood used to smoke the meat. Since the wood smoke flavors the food, the particular type of wood used influences the process. Different woods impart different flavors, so the regional availability of the various woods for smoking influences the taste of the region’s barbecue. Smoking the meat is the key, as otherwise cooking meat over an open flame is simply “grilling” the meat, whereas barbecue is the actual process of “smoking” it.

* Hard woods such as hickory, mesquite, pecan and the different varieties of oak impart a strong smoke flavor.
* Maple, alder, and fruit woods such as apple, pear, and cherry impart a milder, sweeter taste.
Stronger flavored woods are used for pork and beef, while the lighter flavored woods are used for fish and poultry. More exotic smoke generating ingredients can be found in some recipes; grapevine adds a sweet flavor, and sassafras, a major flavor in root beer, adds its distinctive taste to the smoke.

The last, and in many cases optional, ingredient is the barbecue sauce. There are no constants, with sauces running the gamut from clear, peppered vinegars to thick, sweet, tomato and molasses sauces to mustard-based barbecue sauces, which themselves range from mild to painfully spicy. The sauce may be used as a marinade before cooking, applied during cooking, after cooking, or used as a table sauce. An alternate form of barbecue sauce is the dry rub, a mixture of salt and spices applied to the meat before cooking.

Typical plate of chopped pork barbecue as served in a restaurant with barbecue beans, sauce and Texas toast

The origins of American barbecue date back to colonial times, with the first recorded mention in 1672 and George Washington mentions attending a “barbicue” in Alexandria, Virginia, in 1769. As the country expanded westwards along the Gulf of Mexico and north along the Mississippi River, barbecue went with it.

The core region for barbecue is the southeastern region of the United States, an area bordered on the west by Texas and Oklahoma, on the north by Missouri, Kentucky, and Virginia, on the south by the Gulf of Mexico, and on the east by the Atlantic Ocean. While barbecue is found outside of this region, the fourteen core barbecue states contain 70 of the top 100 barbecue restaurants, and most top barbecue restaurants outside the region have their roots there.

Barbecue in its current form grew up in the South, where cooks learned to slow-roast tough cuts of meat over fire pits to make them tender.

These humble beginnings are still reflected in the many barbecue restaurants that are operated out of “hole-in-the-wall” (or “dive”) locations; the rib joint is the purest expression of this. Many of these will have irregular hours, and remain open only until all of a day’s ribs are sold; they may shut down for a month at a time as the proprietor goes on vacation. Despite these unusual traits, rib joints will have a fiercely loyal clientele.

Barbecue is strongly associated with Southern cooking and culture due to its long history and evolution in the region. Indian corn cribs, predecessors to Southern barbecue, were described during the Hernando de Soto expedition in southwest Georgia, and were still around when English settlers arrived two centuries later. Early usage of the verb barbecue, derived from Spanish barbacoa, meant “to preserve (meat) by drying or slowly roasting”; the meaning became closer to that of its modern usage as a specific cooking technique by the time Georgia was colonized. Today, barbecue has come to embody cultural ideals of communal recreation and faithfulness in certain areas. These ideals were historically important in farming and frontier regions throughout the South and parts of the Midwest with influences from the South. As such, due to the strong cultural associations that it holds in these areas, barbecue has attained an important position in America’s culinary tradition.

Parts of the Midwest also incorporate their own styles of barbecue into their culinary traditions. For example, in Kansas City, barbecue entails a wide variety of meats, sweet and thick sauces, dry rubs, and sliced beef brisket. Kansas City barbecue is a result of the region’s history; a combination of the cooking techniques brought to the city by freed slaves and the Texas cattle drives during the late nineteenth century has led to the development of the region’s distinctive barbecue style. Barbecue as a cultural tradition spread from the South and was successfully incorporated into several Midwestern regions such as western Missouri, again owing to the cultural ideals that the barbecue tradition represents and the need for locals to express those ideals. Variations of these ideals by region are reflected in the great diversity of barbecue styles and traditions within the United States.

Barbecue has been a staple of American culture, especially Southern American culture, since colonial times. As it has emerged through the years many distinct traditions have become prevalent in the United States. The pig, the essential ingredient to any barbecue, became a fundamental part of food in the South in the 18th century because the pig requires little maintenance and is able to efficiently convert feed to meat (six times quicker than beef cattle). As a result of the prevalence of hogs in the South, the pig became synonymous with Southern culture and barbecue. The origins of the pig symbol with Southern Culture began as a result of its value as an economic commodity. By 1860, hogs and southern livestock were valued at double the cotton crop, at a price of half a billion dollars. The majority of pigs were raised by residents of the South and as a result the pigs contributed considerably to the economic well-being of many Southerners.

A barbecued pig

Pigs and barbecue were not only valuable for economic reasons but barbecue “scores of hog” were set aside for large gatherings and often used as an enticement for political rallies, church events, as well as harvest festival celebrations. Barbecues have been a part of American history and tradition from as early as the first Independence Day celebration. In the early years, Independence Day was celebrated as a formal civil gathering, in which egalitarian principles were reinforced. The traditions of Independence Day moved across the country as settlers traveled to western territories. By the 19th century, the role of barbecue in public celebration and political institutions increased significantly and it became the leading practice of communal celebrations in the South as well as the Midwest. The important social, political, and cultural gatherings of barbecues have spanned three centuries and its cultural significance remains important today.

While the wide variety of barbecue styles makes it difficult to break barbecue styles down into regions, there are four major styles commonly referenced, Carolina and Memphis, which rely on pork and represent the oldest styles, and Kansas City and Texas, which use beef as well as pork, and represent the later evolution of the original Deep South barbecue. Pork is the most common meat used, followed by beef and veal, often with chicken or turkey in addition. Lamb and mutton are found in some areas, such as Owensboro, Kentucky (International Bar-B-Q Festival), and some regions will add other meats…………..
(To be continued)

 

Healthy Linguine Recipes

June 30, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Linguine Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Linguine Recipes with recipes including; Turkey Meatballs with Linguine and Fresh Tomato Sauce, Linguine with Creamy White Clam Sauce, and Cheesy Vegetable Pasta Alfredo. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Linguine Recipes
Find healthy, delicious linguine recipes including seafood, shrimp and clam sauce linguini. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Turkey Meatballs with Linguine and Fresh Tomato Sauce
For this healthy turkey meatball recipe, lean ground turkey is mixed with fresh mushrooms, oats, garlic, spices and a little Parmesan cheese for a meatball that’s moist, delicious and has more fiber and less saturated fat than a traditional beef and pork version. Serve these tasty meatballs over whole-grain pasta with fresh tomato sauce for a satisfying take on spaghetti and meatballs, and save the leftovers to stuff into sandwiches………

Linguine with Creamy White Clam Sauce
Ripe tomato and fresh basil give this quick recipe tons of flavor. Serve this healthy pasta dinner with crusty garlic bread and steamed green beans……………..

Cheesy Vegetable Pasta Alfredo
This cheesy pasta recipe is made in a slow cooker but is relatively quick taking just 2½ hours from start-to-finish. It’s full of vegetables, whole-grain linguine and of course, lots of cheese!…….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Linguine Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19255/ingredients/pasta-noodle/pasta-by-shape/linguine/

Low-Cholesterol Fish and Seafood Recipes

June 29, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Low-Cholesterol Fish and Seafood Recipes. Find Delicious and Low-Cholesterol Fish and Seafood Recipes with recipes including; Peppery Barbecue-Glazed Shrimp with Vegetables and Orzo, Sweet and Spicy Roasted Salmon with Wild Rice Pilaf, and Sweet Chili and Pistachio Mahi Mahi. Find these delicious and healthy recipes and much more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Low-Cholesterol Fish and Seafood Recipes
Find Healthy Delicious Low-Cholesterol Fish & Seafood Recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Peppery Barbecue-Glazed Shrimp with Vegetables and Orzo
In this healthy BBQ shrimp recipe, shrimp are seasoned with a peppery spice blend and served with zucchini, peppers and whole-grain orzo for a delicious and easy dinner that’s ready in just 30 minutes. The shrimp and veggies are cooked in the same skillet, so cleanup is a snap too…….

Sweet and Spicy Roasted Salmon with Wild Rice Pilaf
Fresh jalapeños give this quick and easy roasted salmon dish its kick; honey and balsamic vinegar give it a sweet finish. A nutty-tasting wild rice pilaf completes this healthy dinner that comes together in just 30 minutes………….

Sweet Chili and Pistachio Mahi Mahi
Mild tasting mahi mahi gets a spicy and nutty infusion with this crunchy chili-pistachio coating. Served with a quinoa salad, this healthy meal is ready in just 45 minutes………..

* Click the link below toget all the Low-Cholesterol Fish and Seafood Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/22108/health-condition/low-cholesterol/dinner/fish-seafood/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 29, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Handling and Storage of Fish and Seafood………….

(From the About Seafood website)
When buying seafood, be certain to check the sell by or use by date.

* Fish should be stored in the coldest part of the refrigerator in its original packaging. Remember to keep raw products separated from cooked products.
* Molluscan shellfish such as oysters, clams and mussels should be stored in the refrigerator in open containers with clean, damp cloths placed atop the shellfish.
* Canned or pouched seafood like tuna, can be stored for years, though tastes best when used within one year of purchase.
To avoid cross contamination, do not use the same utensils or cutting boards with both raw and cooked seafood products.

Handling & Storage

Our Best Healthy Summer Recipes

June 26, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its – Our Best Healthy Summer Recipes. Farmer Markets and Garden Delicious Healthy Summer Recipes. Find recipes like; Summer Squash Pad Thai, Grilled Chicken Thighs with Summer Corn Salad, and Simple Grilled Salmon and Vegetables. So find these recipes and so much more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Our Best Healthy Summer Recipes
Farmers’ markets and gardens are full of fresh and delicious produce in summer. Prepare these healthy summer recipes with all those ripe summer fruits and vegetables for a delicious, fresh meal.

Summer Squash Pad Thai
In this “spiralized” vegetable noodle recipe inspired by pad thai, zucchini and summer squash replace the rice noodles, pumping up the vegetables while reducing calories. Top with stir-fried chicken, shrimp or tofu for added protein if desired…………

Grilled Chicken Thighs with Summer Corn Salad
Chicken thighs are easy on the budget and great for grilling because they stay moist in the heat. Here, they are paired with a fresh corn and tomato salad for a simple summer dinner. When grilling skin-on chicken thighs, watch for flare-ups. Move the chicken away from the flames and reduce heat, if necessary, to keep it from charring……………

Simple Grilled Salmon and Vegetables
Grilled salmon and veggies make for a colorful and balanced seafood dinner that’s ready in just minutes. The grill turns the salmon flaky and moist while tenderizing the crispy pepper and onion pieces. Round out the meal with brown rice or quinoa………..

* Click the link below to get all the – Our Best Healthy Summer Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/22214/seasonal/summer/best/slideshow/our-best-healthy-summer-recipes/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 21, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Fresh Fish and Seafood storage………

Fresh fish and seafood should be refrigerated at approximately 32°F at all times and not held for more than one or two days.

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