One of America’s Favorites – Danish Pastry

June 19, 2017 at 5:34 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A typical Spandauer-type Danish with apple filling and glazing

A Danish pastry or just Danish (especially in American English) is a multilayered, laminated sweet pastry in the viennoiserie tradition. The concept was brought to Denmark by Austrian bakers and has since developed into a Danish specialty. Like other viennoiserie pastries, such as croissants, they are a variant of puff pastry made of laminated yeast-leavened doughs, creating a layered texture.

Danish pastries were exported with immigrants to the United States, and are today popular around the world.

 

Danish pastry is made of yeast-leavened dough of wheat flour, milk, eggs, sugar and large amounts of butter or margarine.

A yeast dough is rolled out thinly, covered with thin slices of butter between the layers of dough, and then the dough is folded and rolled several times, creating 27 layers. If necessary, the dough is chilled between foldings to ease handling. The process of rolling, buttering, folding and chilling is repeated multiple times to create a multilayered dough that becomes airy and crispy on the outside, but also rich and buttery.

Butter is the traditional fat used in Danish pastry, but in industrial production, less expensive fats are often used, such as hydrogenated sunflower oil (known as “pastry fat” in the UK).

 

In Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, the term for Danish pastry is wienerbrød/wienerbröd, “Viennese bread”. The same etymology is also the origin of the Finnish viineri. Danish pastry is referred to as facturas in some Spanish speaking countries. In Vienna, the Danish pastry, referring to Copenhagen, is called Kopenhagener Plunder or Dänischer Plunder.

 

The origin of the Danish pastry is often ascribed to a strike amongst bakery workers in Denmark in 1850. The strike forced bakery owners to hire workers from abroad, among them several Austrian bakers, who brought along new baking traditions and pastry recipes. The Austrian pastry of Plundergebäck soon became popular in Denmark and after the labour disputes ended, Danish bakers adopted the Austrian recipes, adjusting them to their own liking and traditions by increasing the amount of egg and fat for example. This development resulted in what is now known as the Danish pastry.

One of the baking techniques and traditions that the Austrian bakers brought with them was the Viennese lamination technique. Due to such novelties the Danes called the pastry technique “wienerbrød” and, as mentioned above, that name is still in use in Northern Europe today. At that time, almost all baked goods in Denmark were given exotic names.

 

A cinnamon Danish with chocolate

Danish pastries as consumed in Denmark have different shapes and names. Some are topped with chocolate, pearl sugar, glacé icing and/or slivered nuts and they may be stuffed with a variety of ingredients such as jam or preserves (usually apple or prune), remonce, marzipan and/or custard. Shapes are numerous, including circles with filling in the middle (known in Denmark as “Spandauers”), figure-eights, spirals (known as snails), and the pretzel-like kringles.

 

 

In Sweden, Danish pastry is typically made in the Spandauer-style, often with vanilla custard.

In the UK, various ingredients such as jam, custard, apricots, cherries, raisins, flaked almonds, pecans or caramelized toffee are placed on or within sections of divided dough, which is then baked. Cardamom is often added to increase the aromatic sense of sweetness.

In the US, Danishes are typically given a topping of fruit or sweet baker’s cheese prior to baking. Danishes with nuts on them are also popular there and in Sweden, where chocolate spritzing and powdered sugar are also often added.

In Argentina, they are usually filled with dulce de leche or dulce de membrillo.

 

A slice of an American apple crumb Danish

Danish pastry was brought to the United States by Danish immigrants. Lauritz C. Klitteng of Læsø popularized “Danish pastry” in the US around 1915–1920. According to Klitteng, he made Danish pastry for the wedding of President Woodrow Wilson in December 1915. Klitteng toured the world to promote his product and was featured in such 1920s periodicals as the National Baker, the Bakers’ Helper, and the Bakers’ Weekly. Klitteng briefly had his own Danish Culinary Studio at 146 Fifth Avenue in New York City.

Herman Gertner owned a chain of New York City restaurants and had brought Klitteng to New York to sell Danish pastry. Gertner’s obituary appeared in the January 23, 1962 New York Times:

“At one point during his career Mr. Gertner befriended a Danish baker who convinced him that Danish pastry might be well received in New York. Mr. Gertner began serving the pastry in his restaurant and it immediately was a success.”

 

 

Garlic-Herb Roasted Hasselback Baby Potatoes

June 2, 2017 at 5:33 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Passing along a delicious side dish off the Jennie – O website, Garlic-Herb Roasted Hasselback Baby Potatoes. At the Jennie – O website you’ll not only find a fantastic selection of Turkey recipes but also selections of side dishes and desserts. So don’t wait check it out today. Enjoy and Make the Switch! https://www.jennieo.com/

 

 

Garlic-Herb Roasted Hasselback Baby Potatoes
These delicious sliced potatoes are a dream come true—lightly seasoned and roasted until crisp on the outside and tender on the inside.

 

INGREDIENTS

½ cup butter
3 cloves garlic, sliced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary leaves
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves
1 teaspoon chopped fresh tarragon leaves
16 small Yukon Gold potatoes
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
DIRECTIONS

1) Heat oven to 400°F.
2) In small saucepan, over medium-low heat, melt butter. Add garlic and herbs and cook 2 minutes or until fragrant.
3) Make ⅛-inch slices in top of potatoes, making sure not to cut through. Place potatoes in 13-x 9 inch baking pan. Spoon butter mixture over potatoes. Sprinkle evenly with salt and pepper. Bake 40 minutes or until tender. Serve with Horseradish Cream Sauce, if desired.
4) Horseradish Cream Sauce: Stir 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish into 1 cup sour cream. Season with salt to taste.

 

 

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING
Calories 340
Protein 6g
Carbohydrates 54g
Fiber 8g
Sugars 4g
Fat12g
Cholesterol 30mg
Sodium 260mg
Saturated Fat 7g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1061-garlic-herb-roasted-hasselback-baby-potatoes

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 9, 2017 at 5:33 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Making your own pie………

 
Keep all ingredients cold to slow the development of gluten in the flour. Use butter right out of the refrigerator and add ice-cold water to the dough.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 26, 2017 at 5:28 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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A Food Storage Hint, did you know…..

 
The butter compartment in the door is not the best for butter, an egg keeper in the door not the best for eggs. Keepthem inside the fridge, with butter well wrapped and the eggs covered.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 17, 2017 at 5:30 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Dora M. for passing this hint along……

 
Cheese won’t harden if you butter the exposed edges before storing.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 12, 2017 at 6:44 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Did you know that you can freeze…….

 
All these ingredients will freeze well……
* Butter and margarine can be frozen for 3 months.
* Grated cheese can be frozen for up to 4 months and can be used straight from the freezer.
* Most bread, except crusty varieties such as French bread, will freeze well for up to 3 months. Sliced bread can be toasted from frozen.
* Milk will freeze for 1 month. Defrost in the fridge and shake well before using.
* Raw pastry will freeze for for 6 months and takes just 1 hour to thaw.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

February 16, 2017 at 5:55 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Carol V. for passing this Hint along…..

 
If measuring out both oil/butter and honey put the oil or butter in your measuring cup first then the honey will slide right out. Makes for an easier clean up.

One of America’s Favorites – Buttermilk

January 30, 2017 at 6:33 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 4 Comments
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buttermilk-right-compared-to-fresh-milk-left-the-thicker-buttermilk-leaves-a-more-visible-residue-on-the-glass

Buttermilk right compared to fresh milk left the thicker buttermilk leaves a more visible residue on the glass

Buttermilk refers to a number of dairy drinks. Originally, buttermilk was the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cream. This type of buttermilk is known as traditional buttermilk.

The term buttermilk also refers to a range of fermented milk drinks, common in warm climates (e.g., the Balkans, the Middle East, Turkey, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, India, Sri Lanka, Nicaragua and the Southern United States) where unrefrigerated fresh milk sours quickly, as well as in colder climates, such as Scandinavia, Ireland, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia and the Czech Republic. This fermented dairy product known as cultured buttermilk is produced from cow’s milk and has a characteristically sour taste caused by lactic acid bacteria. This variant is made using one of two species of bacteria—either Lactococcus lactis or Lactobacillus bulgaricus, which creates more tartness.

The tartness of buttermilk is due to acid in the milk. The increased acidity is primarily due to lactic acid produced by lactic acid bacteria while fermenting lactose, the primary sugar in milk. As the bacteria produce lactic acid, the pH of the milk decreases and casein, the primary milk protein, precipitates, causing the curdling or clabbering of milk. This process makes buttermilk thicker than plain milk. While both traditional and cultured buttermilk contain lactic acid, traditional buttermilk tends to be less viscous, whereas cultured buttermilk is more viscous.

Buttermilk can be drunk straight, and it can also be used in cooking. Soda bread is a bread in which the acid in buttermilk reacts with the rising agent, sodium bicarbonate, to produce carbon dioxide which acts as the leavening agent. Buttermilk is also used in marination, especially of chicken and pork, whereby the lactic acid helps to tenderize, retain moisture, and allows added flavors to permeate throughout the meat.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 7, 2016 at 6:13 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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Butter up that spud……

 
To bake the perfect potato, rub butter over potatoes before baking to prevent skin from cracking and to improve the taste.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 3, 2016 at 5:53 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When baking….

 
Unless otherwise specified in the recipe, all ingredients should be at room temperature, normally around 70 degrees. If ingredients have been refrigerated, such as milk, eggs, and butter, let them sit out at room temperature for 15 to 25 minutes before using. When ingredients are at room temperature, butter and sugar will cream properly and hold more air, eggs will blend well into the batter to act as an emulsifier, egg whites are easier to beat, and dry ingredients will combine easier. Now Bake!

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