One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 6:49 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 2:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

Diabetic Dish of the Week – Spanish Paella with Shrimp and Scallops TUESDAY

June 9, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is – Spanish Paella with Shrimp and Scallops. Some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are Onions, Short Grain White Rice, Dry White Wine, Paprika, Saffron, Roasted Red Peppers, Scallops, Shrimp and more! Dinner is served! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Spanish Paella with Shrimp and Scallops
Ingredients
Preparation time: 35 minutes

1 tablespoon olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 cups chopped onions
1 cup short-grain white rice
1 cup low-sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup water
1 1/2 tablespoons fresh-squeezed lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon saffron
1/4 cup boiling water
4 small plum tomatoes, chopped
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
1 jar (4 ounces) roasted red peppers, drained and chopped
1/2 cup frozen peas, defrosted
10 large scallops
20 large shrimp, shelled and cleaned

Directions
Yield: 7 cups
Serving size: 1 cup

* Heat olive oil in a large skillet or sauté pan. Add garlic, onions, and rice and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes. Stir in broth, wine, water, lemon juice, and paprika. Stir saffron into boiling water and add to mixture. Stir in tomatoes, parsley, and roasted red peppers. Cook uncovered for approximately 10 minutes on medium-low heat, stirring occasionally. Stir in peas, scallops, and shrimp and cook for additional 7–10 minutes until scallops and shrimp are done and rice is tender. Serve immediately.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 198 calories, Carbohydrates: 12 g, Protein: 28 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 0 g, Sodium: 89 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/spanish-paella-with-shrimp-and-scallops/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

One of America’s Favorites – Old Bay Seasoning

June 8, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Old Bay Seasoning’s distinctive yellow can, with a mound of the seasoning in front.

Old Bay Seasoning is a blend of herbs and spices that is marketed in the United States by McCormick & Company and originally created in Baltimore, Maryland.

The seasoning mix includes celery salt, black pepper, crushed red pepper flakes, and paprika. It is regionally popular, specifically in Maryland, the Mid-Atlantic States, the Southern States, and parts of New England and the Gulf Coast.

Old Bay Seasoning is named after the Old Bay Line, a passenger ship line that plied the waters of the Chesapeake Bay from Baltimore to Norfolk, Virginia, in the early 1900s. In 1939, a Jewish-German immigrant named Gustav Brunn started the Baltimore Spice Company. There, in his new company on Market Place in downtown Baltimore, and having fled the Bavarian town of Bastheim, Germany in 1937 at the outset of the second World War with only a small spice grinder, Brunn created what would later become known to the world as Old Bay seasoning. He produced the “Delicious Brand Shrimp and Crab Seasoning”, as he first named it, to service the needs and tastes of the nearby seafood market. A catchier name was later suggested and Old Bay seasoning was born.

For many years, the Baltimore Spice Company produced Old Bay until the legal rights to the seasoning brand were purchased by McCormick & Co in 1990 and the rights to the Baltimore Spice Company itself were purchased by the Fuchs Group, a German spice company. McCormick continued to offer Old Bay in the classic yellow can. Gustav Brunn had worked for McCormick for a short time before starting his own spice business.

McCormick has a number of other products under the Old Bay banner, including seasoning packets for crab cakes, salmon patties and tuna, tartar sauce, cocktail sauce, and seafood batter mix. They also make other seasoning blends that mix Old Bay seasoning with garlic, lemon, brown sugar, herbs and blackened seasonings. McCormick has offered a lower-sodium version of Old Bay Seasoning.

In 2017, McCormick changed the packaging from metal cans to plastic containers in an effort to reduce the packaging costs.

Putting Old Bay on crab legs.

The seasoning is chiefly used to season crab and shrimp. It is also used in various clam chowder and oyster stew recipes. The seasoning is also used as a topping on popcorn, salads, eggs, fried chicken, french fries, tater tots, corn on the cob, boiled peanuts, dips, chipped beef, baked potatoes, potato salad, potato chips, and guacamole. Several movie theaters in the Chesapeake region offer it in the condiment section.

Potato chip manufacturer Utz created the original “Crab Chip” based on a similar mix of spices. The popular potato chip variety was later copied and marketed by Herr’s Snacks (however, Herr’s uses Old Bay seasoning and it is sold as “Herr’s Old Bay Chips”). Lay’s introduced its own Old Bay-seasoned “Chesapeake Bay Crab Spice” flavored chips in 2018.

Early in its history, the Subway sandwich shop used Old Bay when mixing their seafood and crab salad. Many local Subway shops still have Old Bay for use on sandwiches.

Old Bay is also occasionally used around the Chesapeake Bay region as an ingredient in Bloody Marys, and even in places as far south as The Breakers Hotel in Palm Beach, Florida. Some bars in the Baltimore region also often sell what is known as a ‘Crabby Bo’, which is National Bohemian beer where the lip of the glass or mug that is being used is moistened and dipped into a container of Old Bay seasoning. In 2014, the Maryland-based brewery Flying Dog created an Old Bay-inspired summer ale named Dead Rise to celebrate the seasoning’s 75th anniversary.

.

Healthy 20 Minute Dinner Recipes

June 7, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy 20 Minute Dinner Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy 20 Minute Dinner Recipes with recipes including Potato Hash with Sausage and Fried Egg, Skillet Buffalo Chicken, and Salt and Pepper Shrimp with Snow Peas. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy 20 Minute Dinner Recipes
Find healthy, delicious 20 minute dinner recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Potato Hash with Sausage and Fried Egg
Leftover cooked potatoes and peppers form the base of this quick weeknight meal for one. Alternatively, use frozen cubed hash browns and and bell pepper-onion stir-fry mix………………………….

Skillet Buffalo Chicken
If you like Buffalo wings, you’ll love this quick skillet Buffalo chicken recipe. Chicken cutlets are sautéed, then smothered in a creamy-spicy sauce. A side-salad garnish of carrots, celery and blue cheese pulls it all together…………………………….

Salt and Pepper Shrimp with Snow Peas
In China, salt and pepper shrimp is traditionally made with tongue-numbing Sichuan peppercorns. If you have some in the pantry, feel free to use them here; we opted for a combo of easier-to-find white and black pepper. The white pepper adds earthy flavor, while black kicks up the heat…………………………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy 20 Minute Dinner Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/20535/cooking-methods-styles/quick-easy/dinner/20-minute/

Leftover Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

May 31, 2020 at 6:34 PM | Posted in Zatarain's | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Leftover Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

 

 

For Breakfast on this Saturday Morning I toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin that I topped with Smucker’s Sugar Free Blackberry Jam. I also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. 72 degrees and mostly sunny, and no rain! After Breakfast I grabbed my mask and gloves and went to the local Kroger for a few items. They seem to be better stocked, that’s a good thing. Did some yard work, just enjoying the beautiful day out there! For Dinner tonight I heated up the Leftover Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread. I couldn’t let these Leftovers go to waste! I’ve left the original post from yesterday for the recipe and Dinner description.

I love Gumbo and Cajun Cuisine, looking forward to this meal tonight! So for Dinner tonight I’m preparing a Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo. Using the Zatrain’s Gumbo Mix, Butterball Hardwood Smoked Turkey Sausage, and a bag of Meijer Frozen Shrimp (Large Size). Add all together and I’ve one Delicious Meal coming!

 

 

 

 

To prepare it I got a large saucepan and sprayed it with Pam Non Stick Cooking Spray. Then added 6 cups of Water, bite sized sliced 1 1/2 Sausages of the Butterball Smoked Turkey Sausage, and the Gumbo Mix. Mixed until well blended together. I brought it to a boil; covered and simmered for 25 minutes.

 

 

 

 

Next as the Gumbo was cooking I got the Shrimp out of the fridge washed then and let then drain in a colander. Then with 15 minutes of cooking time left I added the Shrimp to the Gumbo, stirring again until well mixed. Continued for 15 minutes. Removed the pot from the heat and let it stand for 5 minutes before serving.

 

 

 

 

This made one excellent Gumbo Dish! The Mix itself was flavored perfect, spicy but not over powering. Then with the added Sausage and Shrimp, it just capped everything off! I added a few shakes of Frank’s Hot Sauce to the Dish also. Lots of delicious leftovers!

 

 

 

 

Then I also baked a loaf of La Baguette Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. Perfect Bread for Gumbo. For Dessert later a bowl of Breyer’s Carb Smart Chocolate Ice Cream.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZATARAIN’S® GUMBO MIX WITH RICE
In New Orleans, there are as many different varieties of gumbo as there are people who make it. Zatarain’s Gumbo Mix with Rice is a flavorful foundation, making it easy to create classics like shrimp and okra or chicken and sausage gumbo – or to invent a new signature gumbo of your own!

Gumbo is the quintessential dish of New Orleans, a city of diverse influences that formed a new culture greater than the sum of its parts. Those same influences are reflected in every bowl of gumbo. The dish is a rich and flavorful melting pot, just like its hometown.

Gumbo can be prepared with your choice of 1 lb. of cooked chicken, smoked sausage or seafood, cut into bite-size pieces.

STOVE TOP DIRECTIONS
1. MIX 6 cups water and Gumbo Mix in 4-quart saucepan until well blended.
2. For Chicken or Sausage Gumbo: Stir in chicken or sausage. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 25 minutes or until rice is tender.
For Seafood Gumbo: Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in seafood. Cover and simmer 10 minutes longer or until rice is tender.

MICROWAVE DIRECTIONS
1. MIX 6 cups water and Gumbo Mix in 4-quart microwavable bowl until well blended.
2. For Chicken or Sausage Gumbo: Stir in chicken or sausage. Cover. Microwave on HIGH 30 minutes or until rice is tender, stirring occasionally.
For Seafood Gumbo: Cover. Microwave on HIGH 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in seafood. Cover. Microwave on HIGH 10 minutes longer or until rice is tender, stirring occasionally. Let stand in microwave 5 minutes.

80 CALORIES
0g TOTAL FAT
0mg CHOLESTEROL
750mg SODIUM
18g CARBOHYDRATES
<1g FIBER
0g SUGAR
2g PROTEIN
https://www.mccormick.com/zatarains/products/dinner-and-side-mixes/rice-mixes-and-side-dishes/gumbo-mix-with-rice

It’s time for Gumbo! Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

May 30, 2020 at 7:14 PM | Posted in Butterball Smoked Turkey Sausage, shrimp, Zatarain's | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

 

 

For Breakfast on this Saturday Morning I toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin that I topped with Smucker’s Sugar Free Blackberry Jam. I also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. 72 degrees and mostly sunny, and no rain! After Breakfast I grabbed my mask and gloves and went to the local Kroger for a few items. They seem to be better stocked, that’s a good thing. Did some yard work, just enjoying the beautiful day out there! For Dinner tonight I prepared a Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread.

 

I love Gumbo and Cajun Cuisine, looking forward to this meal tonight! So for Dinner tonight I’m preparing a Smoked Turkey Sausage and Shrimp Gumbo. Using the Zatrain’s Gumbo Mix, Butterball Hardwood Smoked Turkey Sausage, and a bag of Meijer Frozen Shrimp (Large Size). Add all together and I’ve one Delicious Meal coming!

 

 

 

To prepare it I got a large saucepan and sprayed it with Pam Non Stick Cooking Spray. Then added 6 cups of Water, bite sized sliced 1 1/2 Sausages of the Butterball Smoked Turkey Sausage, and the Gumbo Mix. Mixed until well blended together. I brought it to a boil; covered and simmered for 25 minutes.

 

 

 

Next as the Gumbo was cooking I got the Shrimp out of the fridge washed then and let then drain in a colander. Then with 15 minutes of cooking time left I added the Shrimp to the Gumbo, stirring again until well mixed. Continued for 15 minutes. Removed the pot from the heat and let it stand for 5 minutes before serving.

 

 

 

 

This made one excellent Gumbo Dish! The Mix itself was flavored perfect, spicy but not over powering. Then with the added Sausage and Shrimp, it just capped everything off! I added a few shakes of Frank’s Hot Sauce to the Dish also. Lots of delicious leftovers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I also baked a loaf of La Baguette Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. Perfect Bread for Gumbo. For Dessert later a bowl of Breyer’s Carb Smart Chocolate Ice Cream.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZATARAIN’S® GUMBO MIX WITH RICE
In New Orleans, there are as many different varieties of gumbo as there are people who make it. Zatarain’s Gumbo Mix with Rice is a flavorful foundation, making it easy to create classics like shrimp and okra or chicken and sausage gumbo – or to invent a new signature gumbo of your own!

Gumbo is the quintessential dish of New Orleans, a city of diverse influences that formed a new culture greater than the sum of its parts. Those same influences are reflected in every bowl of gumbo. The dish is a rich and flavorful melting pot, just like its hometown.

Gumbo can be prepared with your choice of 1 lb. of cooked chicken, smoked sausage or seafood, cut into bite-size pieces.

STOVE TOP DIRECTIONS
1. MIX 6 cups water and Gumbo Mix in 4-quart saucepan until well blended.
2. For Chicken or Sausage Gumbo: Stir in chicken or sausage. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 25 minutes or until rice is tender.
For Seafood Gumbo: Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 15 minutes. Stir in seafood. Cover and simmer 10 minutes longer or until rice is tender.

MICROWAVE DIRECTIONS
1. MIX 6 cups water and Gumbo Mix in 4-quart microwavable bowl until well blended.
2. For Chicken or Sausage Gumbo: Stir in chicken or sausage. Cover. Microwave on HIGH 30 minutes or until rice is tender, stirring occasionally.
For Seafood Gumbo: Cover. Microwave on HIGH 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in seafood. Cover. Microwave on HIGH 10 minutes longer or until rice is tender, stirring occasionally. Let stand in microwave 5 minutes.

80 CALORIES
0g TOTAL FAT
0mg CHOLESTEROL
750mg SODIUM
18g CARBOHYDRATES
<1g FIBER
0g SUGAR
2g PROTEIN
https://www.mccormick.com/zatarains/products/dinner-and-side-mixes/rice-mixes-and-side-dishes/gumbo-mix-with-rice

Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes

May 30, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes. Here’s some Delicious and Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes with recipes including Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya, Middle Eastern Lamb Stew, and Beef and Barley Soup. Spring is here, finally! Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes
Find healthy, delicious spring crockpot and slow-cooker recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya
The slow cooker makes easy work of this healthy jambalaya featuring brown rice and plenty of veggies. If you don’t want to make your own seasoning, just skip Step 1 and use 1 1/2 teaspoons purchased salt-free Cajun seasoning in Step 2……………………………….

Middle Eastern Lamb Stew
This brothy stew is boldly flavored with a blend of characteristic Middle Eastern spices and finished with fresh spinach and fiber-rich chickpeas. Economical lamb shoulder tenderizes beautifully when leisurely cooked in a slow cooker. If you can’t find boneless shoulder stew meat, do not substitute more-expensive lamb leg–it tends to dry out during slow cooking. Instead, purchase lamb shoulder chops and debone them. Serve over bulgur and accompany with a salad…………………………………………..

Beef and Barley Soup
There’s something so satisfying about a hearty bowl of beef and barley soup–especially when it’s one you’ve made from scratch with reduced-sodium broth and chunks of delicious sirloin steak. This slow-cooker recipe is simple to prepare, serves six, and is a great alternative to canned soup!……………………………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19797/seasonal/spring/crockpot-slow-cooker/

Healthy Parmesan Cheese Recipes

May 13, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Parmesan Cheese Recipes. Find delicious and Healthy Parmesan Cheese Recipes with recipes like Zucchini Noodle Primavera, Roasted Mushrooms with Brown Butter and Parmesan, and Shrimp Pasta Salad. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Parmesan Cheese Recipes
Find healthy, delicious Parmesan cheese recipes from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Zucchini Noodle Primavera
This primavera recipe cuts carbs by swapping out the pasta for zucchini “noodles.” This quick vegetarian dinner is chock-full of colorful vegetables smothered in a light, creamy sauce. We like using prepackaged spiralized zucchini noodles to keep this recipe ultra-fast, but if you have a spiralizer and zucchini on hand, you can easily make your own………………………

Roasted Mushrooms with Brown Butter and Parmesan
Brown butter lends a toasty note to these savory roasted mushrooms. Enjoy them as a side dish alongside steak or chicken………………………………

Shrimp Pasta Salad
This fresh and bright cold shrimp pasta salad features classic shrimp scampi flavors. Lemon and Dijon mustard brighten the dressing, and asparagus adds a nice crunch. Farfalle pasta works well with this dish, but any medium pasta shape will work………………………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Parmesan Cheese Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/21596/ingredients/dairy/cheese/parmesan/

Healthy Bacon Recipes

May 10, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Bacon Recipes. Here’s some Delicious and Healthy Bacon Recipes with recipes including Cheesy Baked Potato Skins, Eggs Benedict Casserole, and Baked Stuffed Shrimp. There’s always room for Bacon! So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/


Healthy Bacon Recipes
Find healthy, delicious bacon recipes including bacon and brussels sprouts. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Cheesy Baked Potato Skins
Serve these crispy baked potato skins as a side or cut them into 1-inch pieces and serve as an appetizer. Refrigerate or freeze the potato flesh to make mashed potatoes another night………………

Eggs Benedict Casserole
An eggs benedict casserole is not only delicious, hearty and filling, but it also gives you the ingredients and taste you love from eggs Benedict in an easy, make-ahead form. We suggest making the sauce while your casserole cooks and serving the final product with some fresh fruit………………

Baked Stuffed Shrimp
Stuffed shrimp make a quick and easy appetizer perfect for holiday parties. The trick to great stuffed shrimp? Make sure your shrimp are large enough to hold the filling. We recommend jumbo shrimp, which easily encase the savory filling of scallions, breadcrumbs and bacon with just a hint of spice from cayenne pepper………………………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Bacon Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19270/ingredients/meat-poultry/pork/bacon/

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Boricua in the Midwest

A latino's food journey

Faded Harbor

A Different Kind of Rabbit Hole

Remodelaholic

Let us help you remodel your house from builder grade to BEAUTIFUL! DIY projects that reduce, reuse, recycle, repurpose, and remodel on a budget!

Cheap & Easy student recipes

learning to cook can save you money

What's Prue Cooking

Wholesome balanced recipes for the whole family

Geraldine's decadent and savoury adventure

Tasty has never been this fun!

I'd Rather Cook

I'm not a foodie, and I'm not into fine dining. I'm just someone who loves the challenge of cooking.

LA Rox Life!

A Tangential Journey

The Funky Oven

Thinnes Family Recipes from Fort worth

Life Just Happens... When You Cook With Love

Adventures in food, travels, and life

Spoons n Spades

A journey through kitchens and gardens

OlverIndulgence

Make Food Your Own

fudgingahead

Making Life Sweeter