Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 16, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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How to tell if the Dogs are done on the grill…….

Place the hot dogs over the heat and don’t walk away. Keep turning them to get grill marks all around and watch them carefully. When they start to expand but before they start sputtering, they’re done.

One of America’s Favorites – Chicago-Style Hot Dog

April 12, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Chicago-style hot dog

A Chicago-style hot dog, Chicago Dog, or Chicago Red Hot is an all-beef frankfurter on a poppy seed bun, originating from the city of Chicago, Illinois. The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard, chopped white onions, bright green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt. The complete assembly of a Chicago hot dog is said to be “dragged through the garden” due to the many toppings. The method for cooking the hot dog itself varies depending on the vendor’s preference. Most often they are steamed, water-simmered, or less often grilled over charcoal (in which case they are referred to as “char-dogs”).

The canonical recipe does not include ketchup, and there is a widely shared, strong opinion among many Chicagoans and aficionados that ketchup is unacceptable. A number of Chicago hot dog vendors do not offer ketchup as a condiment.

Many sources attribute the distinctive collection of toppings on a Chicago-style wiener to historic Maxwell Street and the “Depression Sandwich” reportedly originated by Fluky’s in 1929 The founders of Vienna Beef frankfurters—the most common brand served today, first sold at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago—and the proprietors of Fluky’s were both Jewish, which may account for the wieners’ pork-free, kosher-style character.

A char-dog with ends cut cervelat-style

The “dragged through the garden” style is heavily promoted by Vienna Beef and Red Hot Chicago, the two most prominent Chicago hot dog manufacturers, but exceptions are common, with vendors adding cucumber slices or lettuce, omitting poppyseeds or celery salt, or using plain relish or a skinless hot dog. Several popular hot dog stands serve a simpler version: a steamed natural-casing dog with only mustard, onions, plain relish and sport peppers, wrapped up with hand-cut french fries, while the historic Superdawg drive-ins notably substitute a pickled tomato for fresh. Many vendors, including Portillo’s, offer a Chicago-style dog with cheese sauce, known as a cheese-dog.

Chicago-style hot dogs are cooked in hot water or steamed before adding the toppings. A less common style is cooked on a charcoal grill and referred to as a “char-dog”. Char-dogs are easily identifiable because very often the ends of the dog are sliced in crisscross fashion before cooking, producing a distinctive cervelat-style “curled-x” shape as the dog cooks. Some hot dog stands, such as the Wieners Circle, only serve char-dogs.

The typical beef hot dog weighs 1/8 of a pound or 2 ounces (57 g) and the most traditional type features a natural casing, providing a distinctive “snap” when bitten.

The buns are a high-gluten variety made to hold up to steam warming, typically the S. Rosen’s Mary Ann brand from Alpha Baking Company.

Chicago-style hot dog at Portillo’s

The Chicago area has more hot dog restaurants than McDonald’s, Wendy’s, and Burger King restaurants combined. A “hot dog stand” in Chicago may serve many other items, including the Maxwell Street Polish, gyros, pork chop and Italian beef sandwiches, corn dogs, tamales, pizza puffs and Italian ice. The restaurants often have unique names, such as The Wieners Circle, Gene & Jude’s, Gold Coast Dogs or Mustard’s Last Stand; or architectural features, like Superdawg’s two giant rooftop hot dogs (Maurie and Flaurie, named for the husband-and-wife team who own the drive-in). One of the most popular vendors of the Chicago-style dog are Chicago’s professional sports teams; in fact, those sold at Wrigley Field are affectionately known as “Wrigley Dogs”.

Portillo’s is the top vendor of this variation of hot dog regionally. After Portillo’s, Boz Hot Dogs (aka Bozo’s) and Scooby’s Red Hots have the most locations and thus also are top vendors of Chicago Style Red Hots.

Mozzarella Pesto Turkey Franks

October 2, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Kick up that Grill out with this recipe from Jennie – O Turkey, Mozzarella Pesto Turkey Franks! It’s made with JENNIE-O® Bun Length Uncured Turkey Franks. I recently grilled a couple of the JENNIE-O® Bun Length Uncured Turkey Franks and they were delicious! You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the Switch in 2020! https://www.jennieo.com/

Mozzarella Pesto Turkey Franks
When you think of turkey frank toppings, you might not think of melted mozzarella cheese, roasted bell peppers, pesto and marinara… but you will after you try this recipe! Mozzarella Pesto Turkey Franks are under 500 calories per serving.
Total Time – 30 Minutes
Serving Size – 4 Servings

Ingredients
4 JENNIE-O® Bun Length Uncured Turkey Franks
4 hot dog buns, split
½ cup marinara sauceMozzarella
½ (8-ounce) ball fresh mozzarella cheese, torn
½ cup roasted red bell peppers strips
⅓ cup basil pesto

Directions
1) Prepare grill for medium heat. Grill franks according to package direction. Grill buns, cut side down until golden brown.

2) Spread inside buns with marinara sauce.

3) Add mozzarella and bell peppers. Place on grill, close lid. Grill 2 minutes or until cheese is melted.

4) Remove from grill. Add franks. Top with pesto.

Nutritional Information
Calories 330
Fat 20g
Protein 15g
Cholesterol 75mg
Carbohydrates 25g
Sodium 770mg
Fiber 4g
Saturated Fat 7g
Sugars 6g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/mozzarella-pesto-turkey-franks/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 3, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Keep the tongs handy…………………….

Use tongs to turn your sausage; not a fork. You don’t want to poke the casing and let out all the juices. Grill low and slow; fast and hot will cause the juices in the sausage to boil, making the casing burst open, resulting in a burnt outside and a raw inside.

Kitchen Hint of the Week!

October 18, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Slow Cooker Hot Dogs…………………

Slow cooker hot dogs –
You can make hot dogs for up to 60 people in a 5-quart slow cooker. You just have to add them to the slow cooker, standing on their ends, and then cover and cook. They cook in their own steaming juices. Perfect idea for your next party or large gathering. There’s several different recipes for this on line so check them out!

NATIONAL CHILI DOG DAY………..

July 25, 2019 at 12:27 PM | Posted in National Day | Leave a comment
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NATIONAL CHILI DOG DAY
On the last Thursday of July hot dog lovers across the United States start topping their hot dogs with delicious chili to celebrate National Chili Dog Day.

Wrapping up National Hot Dog Month, the chili dog brings the heat. Add onions, cheese or chili sauce for more variety. With a hot dog, the condiments are endless.

Also known as a coney dog or chili con carne, the first person to make a chili dog probably tried it around the turn of the 20th century. Even then it was probably a meat and tomato sauce, not the full-on firehouse chili we know today.

Even now, the chili dog gains gourmet status depending on where you go. Add the best ingredients, all-beef franks and pretzel bun. Experiment with the sausage seasonings or the type of chili. For example, switch to a flavorful brat seasoned with chipotle and top it with buffalo chili. Let your imagination go wild. Of course, a traditional chili dog is always an option, too.

https://nationaldaycalendar.com/national-chili-dog-day-last-thursday-in-july/

https://nationaldaycalendar.com/

WILD IDEA BUFFALO – PREMIUM BUFFALO HOT DOGS

January 31, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Here’s all the info you need about the Buffalo Hot Dogs that make the Wild Idea Buffalo Chili Dogs. Wild Idea Buffalo’s casing-free hot dogs are incredible – one bite and you’ll be hooked. *Nitrite free, and made from our 100% grass-fed buffalo – no filler, no junk. Just mouth-watering flavor in every bite. You won’t find these premium Buffalo Hot Dogs in your supermarket cooler. Our hot dogs are meaty, seasoned, smoked, 100% delicious, and they’ll change the way you think about hot dogs. https://wildideabuffalo.com/

1 lb. package

Ingredients: 100% Grass-fed Buffalo, Water, Free Binder (modified potato starch, trehalose, carrot fiber), Sea Salt; Organic: Pure Cane Sugar, Paprika, Onion Powder, Garlic Powder. Cultured Celery Powder, Organic: Ground Mustard, Coriander and Black Pepper

*All products are made without the use of added nitrites or nitrates, except for those naturally occurring in sea salt and celery powder.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/brats-sausages-hot-dogs/products/buffalo-hot-dogs

One of America’s Favorites – Michigan Hot Dog

January 28, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 4 Comments
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Michigan Hot Dog

A Michigan hot dog, or simply “Michigan”, is a steamed hot dog on a steamed bun topped with a meaty sauce, generally referred to as “Michigan sauce”. The sauce may be tomato-based, depending on where the Michigan is purchased. Michigans can be served with chopped onions. If served with onions, the onions can either be buried under the sauce, under the hot dog itself, or sprinkled on top of the sauce.

Michigans are particularly popular in the North Country of New York State, and have been so for many decades. Their popularity soon spread to New York City where they remain a fast food staple. One of the earliest known advertisements for Michigans appeared in the Friday, May 27, 1927, Plattsburgh Daily Republican.

Michigans are also very popular in Montreal and other parts of Quebec, where the sauce is often tomato-based. Lafleur Restaurants, a Quebec fast food chain, is known for its Michigans and poutine.

Oddly enough, “Michigan hot dogs” are never referred to by that name in Michigan itself, nor anywhere else in the Midwest. A similar food item, the Coney Island hot dog or “Coney dog”, is natural-casing beef or beef and pork European-style Frankfurter Würstel (Vienna sausage) of German origin having a natural lamb or sheep casing, and topped with a beef heart-based Coney sauce. Conversely, the “Coney Island” is not referred to as such on Coney Island, or anywhere else in New York State, instead called either a “Michigan” or a “Red Hot.”

There is no consensus on the origin of the Michigan. Although there are many different varieties of Michigan sauce available today, the original Michigan sauce was possibly created by George Todoroff in Jackson, Michigan. The sauce was originally created to be used as a topping on Coney Island hot dogs. In 1914, Mr. Todoroff founded the Jackson Coney Island restaurant and created his Coney Island chili sauce recipe. He retired in 1945.

How and when Michigan sauce arrived in upstate New York is somewhat of a mystery. The earliest known advertisement for Michigans appeared in the Friday, May 27, 1927, Plattsburgh Daily Republican. The ad announced the opening of “the Michigan Hot-Dog Stand Tuesday May 24, located between the two dance halls”. That hot dog stand may be the same one mentioned in the Plattsburgh Sentinel on Sept. 16, 1927, as being owned by a Mr. Garth C. Otis:

“Garth C. Otis has leased the quarters in the Plattsburgh Theatre building formerly occupied as the Locomobile salesroom in which place he will conduct an eating place under the name of the Michigan Hot Dog and Sandwich Shop opening Saturday. Mexican chili con carne will be one of the specialties. Mr. Otis promises a first class place for those who desire short order lunches.”

The origin of the “Michigan” name may have come from Plattsburgh residents Jack Rabin and his wife, who fell in love with the Jackson Coney Island hot dog while vacationing in Coney Island and subsequently recreated the sauce at Nitzi’s, their Michigan hot dog stand on Route 9 just outside Plattsburgh. However, a 1984 Sentinel article indicates that Nitzi’s was established in 1935, and says Jack Rabin indicated “his sauce came from Mrs. Eula Otis, who first coined the name ‘Michigans’ for her hot dog and sauce.” Otis was originally from Nashville and met her husband in Detroit, Michigan, where she learned to make meat sauce. They moved to Plattsburgh in the 1920s.

The Nitzi/Otis recipe is currently in use at Michigans Plus, located in the former IHOP building on Route 3.

In Vermont, the Michigan dog is almost always split and cooked on a grill before the meat sauce onions and mustard are added. Often, the bun (or a slice of bread) is also grilled. The first ones sold around the Burlington area were called Charlie’s Red Hots and the small shop was started during World War II by a well-known and respected restaurateur. The family closely guarded the sauce recipe. The originals are no longer sold, but there are many Michigan copies around and many local families claim to have the “Charlie’s” sauce recipe.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Coney Island Hot Dog

January 21, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A Coney Dog

A Coney Island Hot Dog (or Coney Dog or Coney) is a hot dog in a bun topped with a savory meat sauce and sometimes other toppings. It is often offered as part of a menu of dishes of Greek origin and classic American ‘diner’ dishes and often at Coney Island restaurants. It is largely a phenomenon related to immigration from Greece and Macedonia to the United States in the early 20th century.

“Virtually all” Coney Island variations were developed, apparently independently, by Greek or Macedonian immigrants in the early 1900s, many fleeing the Balkan Wars, who entered the US through Ellis Island in New York City. Family stories of the development of the dishes often included anecdotes about visits to Coney Island.

In 1913 the Coney Island Chamber of Commerce in New York had banned the use of the term “hot dog” on restaurant signs on Coney Island, an action prompted by concerns about visitors taking the term literally and assuming there was dog meat in the sausage. Because of this action by the Chamber of Commerce, immigrants passing through the area didn’t know the sausage in a bun by the American moniker “hot dog.” Instead, the handheld food would have been known to immigrants as a “coney island.”

The name coney can be traced back over a hundred years as a 48 acre peninsula in County Down, Northern Ireland inhabited by small rabbits called conies. The hamlet was later called Coney Island albeit was not really an island. It eventually became a park and offered many amenities for entertainment and food. As Irish immigrants moved to the United States some entrepreneurs wanted to copy the same type of park. As the original Coney Island started in New York other unrelated Coney Islands opened in Michigan and Ohio.

As the legend goes, one particular vender of Vienna sausage sandwiches, later called Weiners then hot dogs decided to dress up the hand held sandwiches with chili, onions and several other items. They came to be know as coney islands. While chili dogs are known throughout the country, it seems the original name has stuck in the Cincinnati, Ohio area as several hundred chili parlors sells what is simply called a coney today.

 

Regional and local varieties
Indiana

Coney Islands at Ft. Wayne’s Famous Coney Island Wiener Stand
Ft. Wayne’s Famous Coney Island Wiener Stand was opened in 1914 by three now-unknown Macedonian immigrants. Vasil Eschoff, another Macedonian immigrant, purchased an interest from one of the original owners in 1916. Eschoff’s descendants have operated the restaurant since. The Coney Island in Fort Wayne is described as a small, fatty pink hot dog with a “peppery-sweet” coney sauce on a soft bun. However, the ground beef-based coney sauce at Ft. Wayne’s Famous Coney Island Wiener Stand has the flavor and consistency of a mild peppered savory pork sausage, reflecting its Macedonian heritage. The small hot dog is grilled on a flattop, placed in a steamed bun, yellow mustard applied, then a few teaspoonfuls of the savory chili sauce are added which is then topped with chopped yellow onion.

A Flint-style coney (with dry coney sauce) at Rio’s Coney Island in Flint

Michigan
Jane and Michael Stern, writing in 500 Things to Eat Before it’s Too Late, note that “there’s only one place to start [to pinpoint the top Coney Islands], and that is Detroit. Nowhere is the passion for them more intense.”: James Schmidt, in a debate at the 2018 National Fair Food Summit, noted that “Detroit is synonymous with the Coney Dog: you simply cannot have one without the other.”

The Coney Island developed in Michigan is a natural-casing beef or beef and pork European-style Wiener Würstchen (Vienna sausage) of German origin, topped with a beef heart-based sauce, one or two stripes of yellow mustard and diced or chopped onions. The variety is a fixture in Flint, Detroit, Jackson, Kalamazoo, and southeastern Michigan. The style originated in the early 20th century, with competing claims from American and Lafayette Coney Islands (1917) in Detroit, and Todoroff’s Original Coney Island (1914) in Jackson. The longest continuously operated Coney Island (in the same location) is in Kalamazoo (1915).

Detroit style

Competing neighboring Coney restaurants in Detroit
In Detroit historically many Greek and Macedonian immigrants operated Coney islands, or restaurants serving Detroit Coney dogs. By 2012 many Albanians began operating them as well. The Greeks established Onassis Coney Island, which has closed. Greek immigrants established the Coney chains Kerby’s Koney Island, Leo’s Coney Island, and National Coney Island during the 1960s and early 1970s. All three chains sell some Greek food items with Coney dogs. Detroit style sauce is a bean-less chili sauce, differing from the chili dogs they offer only in the lack of beans. National has most of its restaurants on the east side of the city, and Kerby’s and Leo’s have the bulk of their restaurants on the west side of the Detroit area.

Flint style

A Flint-style coney (with dry coney sauce) at Rio’s Coney Island in Flint
Flint style is characterized by a dry hot dog topping made with a base of ground beef heart, which is ground to a consistency of fine-ground beef. Some assert that in order to be an “authentic” Flint coney, the hot dog must be a Koegel coney and the sauce by Angelo’s, which opened in 1949. However, the sauce was originally developed by a Macedonian in 1924, Simion P. (Sam) Brayan, for his Flint’s Original Coney Island restaurant. Brayan was the one who contracted with Koegel Meat Company to make the coney they still make today, also contracting with Abbott’s Meat to provide the fine-grind beef heart sauce base. Abbott’s still makes Brayan’s 1924 sauce base available to restaurants and the public through the Koegel Meat Company and Abbott’s Meats. Restaurants then add chopped onions sautéed in beef tallow, along with their own spice mix and other ingredients, to Abbott’s sauce base to make their sauce.

Popular folklore perpetuates a myth that a Flint coney sauce recipe containing ground beef and ground hot dogs is the “original” Flint Coney sauce recipe. Variations on this story include either that a relative of the storyteller knew or worked with the former owner of Flint’s Original and received the recipe from them, or that the wife of the owner of Flint’s Original allowed the publication of the recipe in the Flint Journal after his death. Ron Krueger, longtime food writer of the Flint Journal, included it in a collection of recipes from the newspaper but without a cited source, unlike the rest of the recipes in the collection. When asked about this Mr. Krueger replied, “That recipe appeared in The Journal several times over the years. [I don’t] think I ever saw it in the context of a story or ever saw any attribution. It always included the word ‘original’ in the title, but anybody who knows anything knows otherwise.” As to the second myth of Brayan’s wife later allowing the publication of the recipe, Velicia Brayan died in 1976, while Simion Brayan lived until the age of 100 and died in 1990. The actual source of this recipe appears to be an earlier Flint Journal Food Editor, Joy Gallagher, who included the recipe in her column of May 23, 1978. In that column she stated she had included the recipe in an even earlier column. Her apparent source was “a woman who said she was the wife of a chef at the original Coney Island, and that she copied the recipe from his personal recipe book.” Gallagher stated “I believe her”. However, Gallagher also wrote, “I’m not making any claims”. In the same column she also included a second recipe that used beef heart, which she wrote “came to me recently from a reader who swears it is the sauce served at Angelo’s.” The folklore has mixed the supposed sources of the two recipes in this column from Gallagher, with people claiming the ground hot dog recipe is reportedly from Angelo’s. In his column published in the Flint Journal on April 18, 1995, Food Editor Ron Krueger reported taking Gallagher’s ground hot dog recipe directly to Angelo’s co-owner Tom V. Branoff, who refuted the recipe line-by-line. Gallagher’s pre-1978 column is still being researched.

Jackson style
Jackson style uses a topping of either ground beef or ground beef heart, onions and spices. The sauce is traditionally a thick hearty one whether ground beef or ground beef heart is used. This meat sauce is applied on a quality hotdog in a steamed bun and then topped with diced or chopped onions and a stripe of mustard. The Todoroffs’ restaurants were some of the earlier locations for Jackson coneys beginning in 1914. However, those locations are now closed. The company currently manufactures and distribute their coney sauce for retail purchase at supermarkets or other restaurants. There are several other coney restaurants in the area, most notably Jackson Coney Island and Virginia Coney Island, both of which are located on East Michigan Avenue in front of the train station near where the original Todoroff’s restaurant was located. These restaurants all use a blend of onion and spices similar to Todoroff’s but use ground beef heart instead of ground beef for the coney sauce. The Jackson style was late to the usage of beef heart in the sauce, using ground beef prior to converting to ground beef heart in the early 1940s. Jackson takes their coneys very seriously. Each year Jackson Magazine or the Jackson Citizen Patriot have a best coney contest voted on by residents for all the restaurants in the area.

Kalamazoo style

Hot dogs from the Original Coney Island Restaurant and Bar in St. Paul, Minnesota

Coney Island Kalamazoo was founded in 1915, and is the longest continuously operated Coney Island in the state. Their coney island is made up of a topping made from their own recipe served on a Koegel’s Skinless Frankfurter. Koegel’s wasn’t founded until 1916, and it’s unknown which hot dog Coney Island Kalamazoo used prior to the Skinless Frankfurter’s development.

Minnesota

Hot dogs from the Original Coney Island Restaurant and Bar in St. Paul, Minnesota
Greek immigrant Gus Saites opened his Original Coney Island in Duluth in 1921. The hot dog used is the Vienna Beef from Chicago, which is topped with the restaurant’s own coney sauce, with options of mustard, onion, and for a small fee, cheese. The Superior Street location also offers sport peppers as a topping. The decor includes a copy of their 1959 menu showing coney islands were 25 cents each.

The Original Coney Island Restaurant and Bar, operated by the Arvanitis Family since 1923 in a former Civil War armory, is the oldest remaining business in St. Paul, though now open only on special occasions.

North Dakota
In Grand Forks, North Dakota the three location Red Pepper taco chain (including one in Fargo, North Dakota) offer their Coney Dogg (spelled with two ‘g’s). The hot dog is relatively large at 4.0 ounces (110 g). It’s topped with a ground beef-based topping known as a “mexi meat” which, unlike most coney island toppings, is a thick and mildly sweet Mexican chili. It’s then finished with a pile of finely-shredded Colby cheese.

Ohio

Cheese coneys Cincinnati

In Cincinnati, a “coney” is a hot dog topped with Cincinnati chili, usually with mustard and chopped onions. A “cheese coney” adds a final topping of shredded cheddar cheese. The dish was developed by Macedonian immigrants Tom and John Kardjieff, founders of Empress Chili, in 1922. The coney topping is also used as a topping for spaghetti, a dish called a “two-way” or chili spaghetti. As of 2013 there were over 250 “chili parlors” in Cincinnati serving coneys. The two largest chains today are Skyline Chili and Gold Star Chili. Arguably the most famous is Camp Washington Chili, which is called out by Jane and Michael Stern as their top pick in Cincinnati.

Tony Packo’s Cafe in Toledo, OH serves their own style of coney dog, the “Hungarian dog.” This was made famous on the television show MASH. It is actually not made with a hot dog, but half of a Hungarian sausage.

Oklahoma
Coneys are on restaurant menus throughout Tulsa and were originally created there by Greek immigrants. Jane and Michael Stern write that “Oklahoma is especially rich in classic coneys” and call out the Coney I-Lander, writing they “perfectly deliver the cheap-eats ecstasy that is the Coney’s soul.”Oklahoma coneys are small hot dogs on steamed buns with a spicy-sweet dark brown chili sauce, onions, and optional cheese and hot sauce.

Texas
James Coney Island operates a number of locations in the area of Houston, Texas. The company was founded in 1923 by two Greek immigrant brothers, James and Tom Papadakis; the former being the company’s namesake. The town of Grand Prairie in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex also has a Michigan-style Coney Island restaurant, D-Town Coney Island, which serves both the Detroit and Flint-style coneys.

 

It’s Chili, Soup, or Stew Saturday….Home-Style Meat and Potato Soup

November 3, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday | Leave a comment
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This Saturday’s Chili, Soup, or Stew is a Home-Style Meat and Potato Soup. Made using Mashed Potatoes and for the Meat your choice of Ham, Sandwich Meat, or Low Fat Hot Dogs. The recipe comes from one of my favorite recipe sites, the Diabetes Self Management. Full of Delicious and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. Plus don’t forget to subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine! Every issues contains Diabetic Management Tips, Diabetes News, and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Home-Style Meat and Potato Soup
Ingredients
2 tablespoons light margarine
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups skim milk or 1 can (15 ounces) fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth
1 cup leftover mashed potatoes
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
One of the following: 1 ounce leftover diced lean ham, 1 ounce chopped lean sandwich meat, or 1 regular-size, low-fat hot dog, diced
1 ounce low-fat cheese (Cheddar, Swiss, or American), shredded

Directions
In a small saucepan, melt margarine over medium heat. Add flour and whisk to make a paste. Add skim milk and stir constantly over medium heat and bring to a slow boil to thicken slightly. Add mashed potato, black pepper, onion powder, and chopped meat. Bring to a boil, then cover and reduce heat to simmer. Simmer 2 minutes. Spoon soup into bowls, then top each with a quarter of the shredded cheese.

Yield: 4 servings. Serving size: about 6 ounces.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 138 calories, Carbohydrates: 15 g, Protein: 6 g, Fat: 6 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 6 mg, Sodium: 361 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/soups-stews/home-style-meat-and-potato-soup/

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