Kitchen Closed – Penn Station

November 28, 2020 at 7:07 PM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Penn Station Subs

 

 

I had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea to start the morning. Only 35 degrees out there this morning. We had a high of 47 degrees and sunny for the afternoon. Went to Meijer after my Tea about 7:00 this morning. I wanted to get there early, get what I needed and get out before it got crowded. With this Virus running wild it’s best to go early before a lot of people get there. I have 3 friends, 1 cousin, and Aunt and an Uncle all with the Virus. So I just stay in with my Mom. She’s 92 so I really can’t get out much and take a chance of passing something along to her. But she is in excellent health so that’s a plus for her. Anyway did some work around the house and watched some College Football. Kitchen Closed Again, Penn Station tonight!

 

 

I ordered a couple of Subs for us. Mom had the Reuben Footlong with Fresh Cut Fries and I had the Dagwood on Multi Grain Bun with Turkey, Salami, Ham, and American Cheese. First time in a very long time we had Penn Station. We’ll have to go back more often, they were Delicious! Mom’s Fresh Cut Fries were good too! Great Job Penn Station!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Penn Station


OUR PRODUCT
Enjoy The Grill Thing.
Penn Station has developed a unique product line that demonstrates, in full customer view, the true quality of our products. Our menu features an array of mouth watering grilled submarine sandwiches, fresh-cut fries and hand-squeezed lemonade. All sandwiches are prepared fresh in full view of the customer using delicious hearth-baked bread, USDA steak and the finest meats, cheeses and vegetables. The potatoes are hand selected, fresh-cut and flash-fried in cholesterol-free peanut oil. The lemonade is made from scratch every day using hand-squeezed lemons.

Our franchisees and their crew are happy to serve you and ensure your dining experience meets our high standards for the quality that produces the finest grilled subs and fresh-cut fries around. Come visit a Penn Station® to see why “It’s all about good taste”.

Dagwood
Cold, Grilled, Wrap or Salad
Your choice of meats, cheese, toppings and condiments.
MEATS: Smoked ham, hard salami, pepperoni, oven-roasted turkey, slow-roasted corned beef.
CHEESES: Provolone, Swiss, American.
TOPPINGS: Lettuce, Roma tomatoes, red onions, peppers, pickles.
CONDIMENTS: Spicy brown mustard, honey mustard, mayo, olive oil & red wine vinegar, salt & pepper, oregano.

Reuben
Grilled, Cold, Wrap or Salad
Slow-roasted corned beef, sauerkraut, Swiss
YOUR CHOICE: Thousand Island dressing
https://www.penn-station.com/index.php

Healthy Cabbage Recipes

October 14, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Cabbage Recipes. Here’s some Delicious and Healthy Cabbage Recipes with recipes including Smothered Cabbage with Ham, BBQ Chicken Bowls, and Honey-Mustard Roasted Cabbage. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Cabbage Recipes
Find healthy, delicious cabbage recipes including boiled, roasted and stuffed cabbage. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Smothered Cabbage with Ham
Use up your leftover ham in this comforting one-pot dish made with cabbage and potatoes. The simple flavors get brightened at the end with a splash of cider vinegar. Serve alongside roast chicken or pork……………………….

BBQ Chicken Bowls
These BBQ chicken bowls are perfect for weeknight dinners. They come together in just 15 minutes and are chock-full of the classic barbecue flavors you love, including saucy beans, coleslaw and potatoes……………………..

Honey-Mustard Roasted Cabbage
Roasting cabbage brings out its sweet and savory side. Caraway seed is a natural pairing with this cruciferous veggie, and a combination of honey and Dijon mustard deepens the flavor. Serve as a side to pork chops, burgers or roasted chicken………………………

* Click the link below to get all Healthy Cabbage Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19294/ingredients/vegetables/cabbage/

One of America’s Favorites – Red Beans and Rice

June 29, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Red beans and rice at a restaurant in California

Red beans and rice is an emblematic dish of Louisiana Creole cuisine (not originally of Cajun cuisine) traditionally made on Mondays with red beans, vegetables (bell pepper, onion, and celery), spices (thyme, cayenne pepper, and bay leaf) and pork bones as left over from Sunday dinner, cooked together slowly in a pot and served over rice. Meats such as ham, sausage (most commonly andouille), and tasso ham are also frequently used in the dish. The dish is customary – ham was traditionally a Sunday meal and Monday was washday. A pot of beans could sit on the stove and simmer while the women were busy scrubbing clothes. The dish is now fairly common throughout the Southeast. Similar dishes are common in Latin American cuisine, including moros y cristianos, gallo pinto and feijoada.

Red beans and rice is one of the few New Orleans style dishes to be commonly served both in people’s homes and in restaurants. Many neighborhood restaurants and even schools continue to serve it as a Monday lunch or dinner special, usually with a side order of cornbread and either smoked sausage or a pork chop. While Monday washdays are largely a thing of the past, red beans remain a staple for large gatherings such as Super Bowl and Mardi Gras parties. Indeed, red beans and rice is very much part of the New Orleans identity. New Orleanian Louis Armstrong’s favorite food was red beans and rice – the musician would sign letters “Red Beans and Ricely Yours, Louis Armstrong”. And in 1965, the R&B instrumental group Booker T. & the M.G.’s wrote and recorded a song titled “Red Beans and Rice” that was originally a B-side but later became popular in its own right.

The similar vegetarian dish Rajma chawal (which translates literally to red beans and rice) is popular in North India. Red beans and rice is also a dietary staple in Central America, where it is known as “arroz con habichuelas”. The dish is popular in Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican, Haitian and Jamaican cuisine as well.

A plate of red beans and rice with sausage from The Chimes restaurant in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Red kidney beans or small red beans are used and they are usually (but not always) soaked beforehand. Add celery, onion, and peppers to the pot along with a ham hock. Add water. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer for several hours or until the beans are soft.

The dish is highly nutritious. Rice is rich in starch, an excellent source of energy. Rice also has iron, vitamin B and protein. Beans also contain a good amount of iron and an even greater amount of protein than rice. Together they make up a complete protein, which provides each of the amino acids the body cannot make for itself.

In addition, rice and beans are common and affordable ingredients, often available in difficult economic times.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Salad

June 22, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A garden salad consisting of lettuce, cucumber, scallions, cherry tomatoes, olives, sun-dried tomatoes, and feta

A salad is a dish consisting of a mixture of small pieces of food, usually vegetables or fruit. However, different varieties of salad may contain virtually any type of ready-to-eat food. Salads are typically served at room temperature or chilled, with notable exceptions such as south German potato salad which can be served warm.

Garden salads use a base of leafy greens such as lettuce, arugula/rocket, kale or spinach; they are common enough that the word salad alone often refers specifically to garden salads. Other types include bean salad, tuna salad, fattoush, Greek salad (vegetable-based, but without leafy greens), and sōmen salad (a noodle-based salad). The sauce used to flavor a salad is commonly called a salad dressing; most salad dressings are based on either a mixture of oil and vinegar or a fermented milk product like kefir.

Salads may be served at any point during a meal:

* Appetizer salads—light, smaller-portion salads served as the first course of the meal.
* Side salads—to accompany the main course as a side dish, examples include potato salad and Caesar salad.
* Main course salads—usually containing a portion of a high-protein foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, legumes, or cheese.
* Dessert salads—sweet versions containing fruit, gelatin, sweeteners or whipped cream.

Green leaf salad with salmon and bread

The Romans, ancient Greeks and Persians ate mixed greens with dressing, a type of mixed salad. Salads, including layered and dressed salads, have been popular in Europe since the Greek and Roman imperial expansions. In his 1699 book, Acetaria: A Discourse on Sallets, John Evelyn attempted with little success to encourage his fellow Britons to eat fresh salad greens. Mary, Queen of Scots, ate boiled celery root over greens covered with creamy mustard dressing, truffles, chervil, and slices of hard-boiled eggs.

Oil used on salads can be found in the 17th-century colony of New Netherland (later called New York, New Jersey and Delaware). A list of common items arriving on ships and their designated prices when appraising cargo included “a can of salad oil at 1.10 florins” and “an anker of wine vinegar at 16 florins”. In a 1665 letter to the Director of New Netherland from the Island of Curaçao there is a request to send greens: “I request most amicably that your honors be pleased to send me seed of every sort, such as cabbage, carrots, lettuce, parsley, etc. for none can be acquired here and I know that your honor has plenty,…”.

Salads may be sold in supermarkets, at restaurants and at fast food chains. In the United States, restaurants will often have a salad bar with salad-making ingredients, which the customers will use to put together their salad. Salad restaurants were earning more than $300 million in 2014. At-home salad consumption in the 2010s was rising but moving away from fresh-chopped lettuce and toward bagged greens and salad kits, with bag sales expected to reach $7 billion per year.

Types of salads

American-style potato salad with egg and mayonnaise

A salad can be a composed salad (with the ingredients specifically arranged on the serving dish) or a tossed salad (with the ingredients placed in a bowl and mixed). An antipasto plate, the first dish of a formal Italian meal, is similar to a composed salad, and has vegetables, cheese, and meat.

Green salad
A green salad or garden salad is most often composed of leafy vegetables such as lettuce varieties, spinach, or rocket (arugula). If non-greens make up a large portion of the salad it may instead be called a vegetable salad. Common raw vegetables (in the culinary sense) used in a salad include cucumbers, peppers, tomatoes, onions, carrots, celery, radishes, mushrooms, avocado, olives, artichoke hearts, heart of palm, watercress, parsley, garden beets, and green beans. Nuts, berries, seeds, and flowers are less common components. Hard-boiled eggs, bacon, shrimp, and cheeses may be used as garnishes, but large amounts of animal-based foods would be more likely in a dinner salad.

Wedge salad
A wedge salad is a specific type of green salad made from a head of lettuce (often iceberg), halved or quartered, with other ingredients on top.

Fruit salad
Fruit salads are made of fruit (in the culinary sense), which may be fresh or canned. Examples include fruit cocktail.

Rice and pasta salads
Rice and pasta may be used as the key ingredient to making a salad. Pasta salads are more common. Some examples of rice salads come from Thai cuisine, like Nasi ulam.

Bound salads
Bound salads are assembled with thick sauces such as mayonnaise. One portion of a bound salad will hold its shape when placed on a plate with a scoop. Examples of bound salad include tuna salad, chicken salad, egg salad, coleslaw, and potato salad. Some bound salads are used as sandwich fillings. Some pasta salads, i.e. macaroni salad, are bound salads. They are popular at picnics and barbecues.

Dinner salads

Ambrosia

Main course salads (known as dinner salads or as entrée salads in the United States) may contain small pieces of poultry, seafood, or steak. Caesar salad, Chef salad, Cobb salad, Chinese chicken salad and Michigan salad are dinner salads.

A wider variety of cheeses are used in dinner salads, including Roquefort blue cheese (traditional for a Cobb salad), and Swiss, Cheddar, Jack, and Provolone (for Chef and Cobb salads).

Dessert salads
Dessert salads rarely include leafy greens and are often sweet. Common variants are made with gelatin or whipped cream; e.g. jello salad, pistachio salad, and ambrosia. Other forms of dessert salads include snickers salad, glorified rice, and cookie salad.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 6:49 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 2:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

Healthy Bean Side Dish Recipes

June 14, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Bean Side Dish Recipes. Here’s some Delicious and Healthy Bean Side Dish Recipes with recipes including Charred Sugar Snap Peas with Sesame-Chili Sauce, Smoky Slow-Cooker Black Beans with Collard Greens, and Steamed Green Beans with Rosemary-Garlic Vinaigrette and Fried Shallots. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Bean Side Dish Recipes
Find healthy, delicious bean side dish recipes including black bean, chickpea, lentil and edamame side dishes. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Charred Sugar Snap Peas with Sesame-Chili Sauce
Be sure to let these sugar snap peas get some at-the-edge-of-burnt color in the skillet. It’s the secret to the knockout flavor of this easy and healthy side dish………………………

Smoky Slow-Cooker Black Beans with Collard Greens
Cooking black beans in a slow cooker with a ham hock gives them a wonderful smoky flavor. Don’t forget to soak your beans overnight for the creamiest, most luscious results. Serve over brown rice with lemon-curry collard greens for an easy healthy dinner that’s super-satisfying…………………………..

Steamed Green Beans with Rosemary-Garlic Vinaigrette and Fried Shallots
Here’s a new way to delight your green-bean-loving guests. The genius of this easy green bean recipe is in the dressing, which is made with savory oil that has also been used to fry shallots and garlic…………………………………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Bean Side Dish Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/17895/side-dishes/beans/

Ham and Swiss Sandwich w/ Mashed Potatoes and Deviled Egg

April 13, 2020 at 6:27 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, Ham, leftovers | 4 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Ham and Swiss Sandwich w/ Mashed Potatoes and Deviled Egg

 

 

I toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin and topped it with Smucker’s Sugarless Blackberry Jam and heated up 2 Johnsonville Turkey Breakfast Sausage Links. Also had morning cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Rain and windy out today. We had a high of 58 degrees in the morning but the temps dropped through out the day to the 40’s. I’m not real active today. My sinuses are really bothering me today. This weather doesn’t help! So just a lot of rest today. For Dinner it’s Easter Dinner Leftovers. I made a Ham and Swiss Sandwich w/ Mashed Potatoes and Deviled Egg. Stay safe everyone!

 

Plenty of leftovers from the Easter Dinner Feast! And thank goodness for leftovers because after my night and I really didn’t feel like cooking. We almost always use Cook’s Ham when we bake a Ham. So with the Ham we baked yesterday, we made some into some delicious Ham Sandwiches. Just took a few slices and serving it on Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. The Ham is so delicious and moist. And as always with Cook’s Ham, perfect seasoning! We’ll have quite a few Breakfasts and Lunches out of this. To make the Sandwich I used Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. Topped it with a bit Kraft Light Mayo with Olive Oil, French’s Yellow Mustard, and a slice of Boar’s Head Swiss Cheese. Love this Sandwich!

 

For a side I heated up the leftover Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes and I had a leftover Deviled Eggs. Just love these leftovers! It’s sometimes better the second time around! For Dessert/Snack a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn with a Coke Zero to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cook’s Hams

Semi-Boneless Hams
Classic Reduced Sodium Half (Serves: 15-20)
Half (Serves: 15-20)
Whole (Serves: 30-40)
Semi-Boneless Hams

Cook’s Semi-Boneless Hams are now fully cooked! This means they may be eaten cold or heated. The ham only needs to be heated through if serving warm.
With fewer bones and less fat, Cook’s Semi-Boneless Hams are a great value. With two of the three bones removed, carving and serving are much easier. With only the center bone remaining, your family can still can enjoy the great taste and flavor that only a Cook’s bone-in ham can offer, plus the added value of more lean meat and the convenience of less bone.

Ingredients
CURED WITH: Water, Dextrose, Salt, Sodium Phosphate, Sodium Nitrite.
http://www.mycooksham.com/product/bone-in-premium-semi-boneless

Healthy Scrambled Egg Recipes

March 17, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Scrambled Egg Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Scrambled Egg Recipes with recipes including Mexican Breakfast Scramble, Scrambled Eggs with Sausage, and Salsa Scrambled Eggs. Healthy ways to start your day! Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Scrambled Egg Recipes
Find healthy, delicious scrambled egg recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Mexican Breakfast Scramble
In this zesty Mexican-inspired recipe, queso fresco cheese, peppers, onion, chicken sausage, and eggs are cooked up with crisp corn tortilla pieces, and garnished with jalapeño and cilantro. You may not be able to eat this with your hands like a breakfast tortilla wrap, but trust us–you’ll enjoy every forkful!…………………………………

Scrambled Eggs with Sausage
Start your day off right with these scrambled eggs. This recipe includes eggs, turkey sausage, and cheese; packing 14 grams of protein per serving. Quick and easy to make, this is the perfect breakfast solution…………………………………..

Salsa Scrambled Eggs
Breakfast tacos are a great gluten-free alternative to the classic eggs and toast. Serve this easy scrambled egg recipe with a banana for a boost of potassium………………………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Scrambled Egg Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/21527/ingredients/eggs/scrambled/

It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday – Wild Rice Soup

January 18, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Diabetes Self Management, It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday, rice, Soups | Leave a comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Chowder, or Stew Saturday is a recipe for Wild Rice Soup. I love Wild Rice and here’s the perfect recipe to use for Wild Rice, Wild Rice Soup. Made using Olive Oil, Onion, Celery, Carrots, Flour, Reduced Sodium Chicken Broth, Wild Rice, Ham, Almonds, Turmeric, Skim Milk, and Dry White Table Wine. Put it all together and the Soup is on! You can find this recipe at the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes Management Tips, Diabetes News and more! You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Wild Rice Soup
Preparation time: 15 minutes. Cooking time: 1 hour, including rice cooking time.

Ingredients
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 cup minced onion
1 cup minced celery
1 cup grated carrots
1/2 cup flour
4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
2 cups cooked wild rice*
1/3 cup ham, chopped
3 tablespoons chopped slivered almonds
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 cup evaporated skim milk
2 tablespoons dry white table wine

Directions
Heat the olive oil in a large pan over medium heat. Sauté the onion, celery, and carrots until tender. Whisk the flour into the broth until there are no lumps. Add the broth to the sautéed vegetables and cook over medium to high heat, stirring constantly. Boil for one minute or until the mixture has thickened. Reduce heat and stir in rice, ham, almonds, and turmeric. Simmer for about 5 minutes. Add the evaporated skim milk and wine, then heat to desired serving temperature.

* To make 2 cups of cooked wild rice, combine 1/2 cup wild rice with 1 1/2 cups water in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, stir once, then cover and simmer over low heat until the water is absorbed and the rice is fluffy, about 45 minutes.

Yield: 5 servings.

Serving size: about 1 1/2 cups.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 240 calories, Carbohydrates: 36 g, Protein: 12 g, Fat: 6 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 5 mg, Sodium: 640 mg, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/soups-stews/wild-rice-soup/

 

 

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