Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Very Strawberry Shortcake

July 21, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, Diabetic Dessert of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | 2 Comments
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The Diabetic Dessert of the Week is an Very Strawberry Shortcake. included is recipes for the Strawberry Filling and the Shortcakes. This recipe for Shortcake is with a Biscuit instead of a Sponge Cake. Splenda replaces the Sugar in the recipe. The Very Strawberry Shortcake is 120 calories and 22 carbs per serving. So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

Very Strawberry Shortcake
Unlike the familiar sponge cake, this strawberry shortcake recipe features a sweet tender biscuit filled with fresh strawberries that are laced with a splash of balsamic vinegar. Recipe for Very Strawberry Shortcake from our Dessert recipe section.

Recipe Ingredients:
Strawberry Filling
3 cups sliced fresh strawberries
2 tablespoons Splenda® Granulated No Calorie Sweetener
2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

Shortcakes
2 1/2 cups reduced-fat biscuit mix
1 tablespoon Splenda® Granulated No Calorie Sweetener
1 cup plain fat-free yogurt
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
Fat-free frozen whipped topping, thawed (optional)
Mint sprigs (optional)

Cooking Directions:
1 – Strawberry Filling Directions: Stir together strawberries, 1/3 cup Splenda® Granulated Sweetener and balsamic vinegar; let stand 1 hour, stirring occasionally.
2 – Shortcake Directions: Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C).
3 – Combine biscuit mix and 1/3 cup Splenda® Granulated Sweetener in a large bowl.
4 – Stir together yogurt and vanilla; add to dry ingredients, stirring just until moistened.
5 – Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead 3 or 4 times. Pat dough to a 1/2-inch thickness. Cut with a 2 1/4-inch round cutter, reusing dough scraps, if necessary.
6 – Place shortcakes on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake 12 to 15 minutes.
7 – Serve warm with sliced strawberries. Garnish, if desired.
Makes 12 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/12 of recipe): Calories: 120; Calories from Fat: 5; Total Fat: 1g; Saturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 350mg; Total Carbs: 24g; Dietary Fiber: 2g; Sugars: 6g; Protein: 4g.
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/very-strawberry-shortcake

Turkey Bacon Biscuits

July 1, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Turkey Bacon Biscuits. Breakfast or Brunch makes no difference with these delicious and healthy Turkey Bacon Biscuits! Made using JENNIE-O® Turkey Bacon along with Cream Cheese, Eggs, Swiss Cheese, Green Onions, and served on Flaky Biscuits. They’re only 200 calories and 15 carbs per serving! You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Stay Safe and Make the SWITCH in 2022! https://www.jennieo.com/

Turkey Bacon Biscuits
Bake up these flakey biscuits topped with egg and cheese sandwiched between crisp turkey bacon. An easy breakfast or brunch recipe for your family that’s ready in just 30 minutes.
Total Time – 30 Minutes
Serving Size – 10 Servings

INGREDIENTS
½ (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened
3 eggs
2 tablespoons milk
½ cup shredded Swiss cheese
2 tablespoons chopped green onion
1 (10-ounce) can refrigerated flaky biscuits
5 slices JENNIE-O® Turkey Bacon, cooked and crumbled
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley leaves

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 350ºF. Grease 10 muffin cups.
2) In small bowl, beat cream cheese, eggs and milk on low speed until smooth. Stir in Swiss cheese and green onion.
3) Separate biscuit dough into 10 biscuits. Place 1 biscuit in each greased muffin cup; firmly press in bottom and up sides, forming a 1/4 -inch rim.
4) Place half of bacon in bottom of dough-lined muffin cups. Spoon cream cheese mixture over bacon. Top with remaining bacon and parsley.
5) Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until filling is set and biscuits are golden brown.
6) Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 200
Protein 6g
Carbohydrates 15g
Fiber 0g
Sugars 2g
Fat 12g
Cholesterol 70mg
Sodium 430mg
Saturated Fat 4.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/turkey-bacon-biscuits/

One of America’s Favorites – Bisque

June 6, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Lobster Bisque

Bisque is a smooth, creamy, highly seasoned soup of French origin, classically based on a strained broth (coulis) of crustaceans. It can be made from lobster, langoustine, crab, shrimp, or crayfish. Alongside chowder, bisque is one of the most popular seafood soups.

It is thought the name is derived from Biscay, as in Bay of Biscay, but the crustaceans are certainly bis cuites “twice cooked” (by analogy to a biscuit) for they are first sautéed lightly in their shells, then simmered in wine and aromatic ingredients, before being strained, followed by the addition of cream.

The term ‘bisque’ is also sometimes used to refer to cream-based soups that do not contain seafood, in which the pre-cooked ingredients are pureed or processed in a food processor or a food mill. Common varieties include squash, tomato, mushroom, and red pepper.

Bisque is a method of extracting flavor from imperfect crustaceans not good enough to send to market. In an authentic bisque, the shells are ground to a fine paste and added to thicken the soup. Julia Child even remarked, “Do not wash anything off until the soup is done because you will be using the same utensils repeatedly and you don’t want any marvelous tidbits of flavor losing themselves down the drain.” Bisques are thickened with rice, which can either be strained out, leaving behind the starch, or pureed during the final stages.

Seafood bisque is traditionally served in a low two-handled cup on a saucer or in a mug.

One of America’s Favorites – Breakfast Sandwich

March 28, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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A breakfast sandwich on sourdough bread

A breakfast sandwich is any sandwich filled with foods associated with the breakfast meal. Breakfast sandwiches are served at fast food restaurants (for example, the Burger King breakfast sandwiches) and delicatessens or bought as fast, ready to heat and eat sandwiches from a store. Breakfast sandwiches are commonly made at home. Different types of breakfast sandwich include the bacon sandwich, the egg sandwich, and the sausage sandwich; or various combinations thereof, like the bacon, egg and cheese sandwich. The breakfast sandwich is related to the breakfast roll.

Breakfast sandwiches are typically made using breakfast meats (generally cured meats such as sausages, patty sausages, bacon, country ham, scrapple, Spam, and pork roll), breads, eggs and cheese. These sandwiches were typically regional specialties until fast food restaurants began serving breakfast. Because the common types of bread, such as biscuits, bagels, and English muffin, were similar in size to fast food hamburger buns, they made an obvious choice for fast food restaurants. Unlike other breakfast items, they were perfect for the innovation of the drive-through. These sandwiches have also become a staple of many convenience stores.

A breakfast sandwich featuring eggs, bacon jam, and microgreens on a buttermilk biscuit

Although the ingredients for the breakfast sandwich have been common elements of breakfast meals in the English-speaking world for centuries, it was not until the 19th century in the United States that people began regularly eating eggs, cheese, and meat in a sandwich. What would later be known as “breakfast sandwiches” became increasingly popular after the American Civil War, and were a favorite food of pioneers during American westward expansion. The first known published recipe for a “breakfast sandwich” was in an 1897 American cookbook.

Types of bread used
There are several types of bread used to make breakfast sandwiches:

* Hard roll: The traditional breakfast sandwich of the northeast’s tri-state region of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. It is believed to be one of the earliest forms of the breakfast sandwich in the United States. It consists of a hard roll, eggs, cheese and sausage, bacon or ham. In New Jersey, a common breakfast sandwich is the Jersey breakfast which consists of pork roll, egg, and cheese on a hard Kaiser roll.
* Biscuit: Consists of a large, or cat-head biscuit, sliced, on which meat, cheese, or eggs are served. Popular biscuits include: Sausage biscuit, bacon, tomato, and country ham. Fast food restaurants have put smaller versions of fried chicken fillets on biscuits to create chicken biscuits. Scrambled eggs and/or American cheese are often added.
* Bagel sandwiches: Due to its connection with German and Jewish ethnic groups, Bagels often have foods popular in these communities. Deli meats, Canadian bacon, lox or other smoked fish, and cream cheese are popular on bagel sandwiches.
* English muffin: Generally contains egg and cheese with either breakfast sausage or ham. Often served in US fast food outlets such as McDonald’s and Starbucks.

A New-York-style bacon and egg sandwich on a roll

* Toast: Toasted bread is one of the oldest forms of breakfast sandwich in America, and the closest to the original sandwich in form. While any number of items might be served on toast, eggs and bacon are the ones most associated with breakfast.

* Specialty breads: Mostly served by restaurant chains,[citation needed] there are other breakfast sandwiches that do not use one of the common breakfast breads used in the United States. Burger King uses a croissant to make a breakfast sandwich called the Croissan’wich, or croissant sandwich, depending on the market. McDonald’s offers its traditional biscuit fillings on a sandwich made from maple flavored pancakes called a McGriddles. Dunkin’ Donuts has a waffle sandwich that is similar to the McGriddles. These can be found at American fast food franchises worldwide. Kangaroo Brands makes a variety of breakfast sandwiches made with pita bread.

One of America’s Favorites – Biscuits

January 24, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Biscuits

In the United States, a biscuit is a small piece of quick bread, which after baking usually has a somewhat firm, dry exterior and a soft, crumbly interior. They are actually made with baking powder as a chemical leavening agent rather than yeast, and may be called baking powder biscuits to differentiate them from other types. Like other forms of bread, they are often served with butter or other condiments, flavored with other ingredients, or combined with other types of food to make sandwiches or other dishes.

Biscuits, soda breads, cornbread, and similar breads are all considered quick breads, to indicate that they do not need time for the dough to rise before baking.

Biscuits developed from hardtack, which was first made from only flour and water, with later first lard and then baking powder being added. The long development over time and place explains why the word biscuit can, depending upon the context and the speaker’s English dialect, refer to very different baked goods.

 

Southern chefs may have had an advantage in creating biscuits. Northern American all-purpose flours, mainly grown in Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, are made from the hard spring wheats that grow in the North’s cold-winter climate. Southern American bleached all-purpose flours, originally grown in the Carolinas, Georgia and Tennessee before national food distribution networks, are made from the soft winter wheat that grows in the warm Southern summer. This summer growth results in wheat that has less protein, which is more suited to the creation of quick breads, as well as cookies, cakes and muffins.

Pre-shaped ready-to-bake biscuits can be purchased in supermarkets, in the form of small refrigerated cylindrical segments of dough encased in a cardboard can. These refrigerator biscuits were patented by Ballard and Ballard in 1931.

Open biscuit with honey being drizzled in it

A typical recipe will include baking powder or baking soda, flour, salt, shortening or butter, and milk or buttermilk. The percentages of these ingredients vary as historically the recipe would pass orally from family to family and generation to generation. Biscuits are almost always a savory food item. Sugar is rare or included only in small quantities, and was not part of the traditional recipe.

Biscuits can be prepared for baking in several ways. The dough can be rolled out flat and cut into rounds, which expand when baked into flaky-layered cylinders. If extra liquid is added, the dough’s texture changes to resemble stiff pancake batter so that small spoonfuls can be dropped into the baking sheet to produce drop biscuits, which are more amorphous in texture and shape.

Although most biscuits are made without yeast, a type of biscuit called an angel biscuit contains yeast as well, as do those made with a sourdough starter.

Biscuits may be eaten for breakfast. They are meant to be served warm with a choice of spread of butter, honey, cane syrup, or some fruit-based jam; otherwise, they are cut in half and become the Southern version of the breakfast sandwich, in which any combination of Country ham, tomato, scrambled eggs, bacon, or sausage is put in the biscuits halves as a filling.

For dinner, they are a popular accompaniment to fried chicken, nearly all types of Southern barbecue, and several Lowcountry dishes. They also often figure in to the Southern version of Thanksgiving dinner as well.

Sausage biscuit

Variations
* Large drop biscuits, because of their size and rough exterior texture, are sometimes referred to as cat head biscuits.

* Biscuits may be flavored with other ingredients. For example, the baker may add grated cheddar or American cheese to the basic recipe to produce cheese biscuits.

* Home cooks may use mass-produced, highly processed refrigerator biscuits for a quicker alternative to rolled or drop biscuits.

* Biscuits can even be cooked over a campfire on a stick.

* A sweet biscuit layered or topped with fruit (typically strawberries) and whipped cream is one type of shortcake.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 24, 2022 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Cold butter……

The secret to excellent biscuits is Cold Butter. Really cold. Many times the biscuit dough gets worked so much that the butter softens before the biscuits even go in the oven. Try cutting the butter into small pieces and stick back in the fridge pulling out only when ready to incorporate into the dough.

One of America’s Favorites – Cobbler

October 25, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Cobbler

Cobbler is a dessert consisting of a fruit (or less commonly savory) filling poured into a large baking dish and covered with a batter, biscuit, or dumpling (in the United Kingdom) before being baked. Some cobbler recipes, especially in the American South, resemble a thick-crusted, deep-dish pie with both a top and bottom crust. Cobbler is part of the cuisine of the United Kingdom and United States, and should not be confused with a crumble

Cobblers originated in the British American colonies. English settlers were unable to make traditional suet puddings due to lack of suitable ingredients and cooking equipment, so instead covered a stewed filling with a layer of uncooked plain biscuits or dumplings, fitted together.[citation needed] The origin of the name cobbler, recorded from 1859, is uncertain: it may be related to the archaic word cobbler, meaning “wooden bowl”.

North America

Grunts, pandowdy, and slumps are Canadian Maritimes and New England varieties of cobbler, typically cooked on the stovetop, or in an iron skillet or pan, with the dough on top in the shape of dumplings. They reportedly take their name from the grunting sound they make while cooking. Another name for the types of biscuits/dumplings used are called dough-boys. Dough-boys are used in stews and cobblers alike.
In the United States, additional varieties of cobbler include the apple pan dowdy (an apple cobbler whose crust has been broken and perhaps stirred back into the filling), the Betty, the buckle (made with yellow batter (like cake batter), with the filling mixed in with the batter), the dump (or dump cake), the grump, the slump, and the sonker. The sonker is unique to North Carolina: it is a deep-dish version of the American cobbler.
In the Deep South, cobblers most commonly come in single fruit varieties and are named as such, such as blackberry, blueberry, and peach cobbler. The Deep South tradition also gives the option of topping the fruit cobbler with a scoop or two of vanilla ice cream. Savory cobblers are less common in the region; for example, tomato cobbler, which may include onion and a biscuit topping that may include cheese or cornmeal, is one savoury variant that also resembles Southern tomato pie.

Peach cobbler with ice cream

Betty
The American variant known as the Betty or brown Betty dates from native times. In 1864, in the Yale Literary Magazine, it appeared with “brown” in lower case, thus making “Betty” the proper name. In 1890, however, a recipe was published in Practical Sanitary and Economic Cooking Adapted to Persons of Moderate and Small Means with the word “Brown” capitalised, making “Brown Betty” the proper name.
Brown Betties are made with breadcrumbs (or bread pieces, or graham cracker crumbs), and fruit, usually diced apples, in alternating layers. They are baked covered and have a consistency like bread pudding. In the midwestern United States, apple or strawberry Betty is often a synonym for apple crisp.

UK and British Commonwealth
In the UK and British Commonwealth, the scone-topped cobbler predominates, and is found in both sweet and savoury versions. Common sweet fillings include apple, blackberry, and peach. Savoury versions, such as beef, lamb, or mutton, consist of a casserole filling, sometimes with a simple ring of cobbles around the edge, rather than a complete layer, to aid cooking of the meat. Cheese or herb scones may also be used as a savory topping.
Cobblers and crumbles were promoted by the Ministry of Food during the Second World War, since they are filling, yet require less butter than a traditional pastry, and can be made with margarine.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 30, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Reheating rolls…………….

The quickest way to reheat biscuits or rolls is to sprinkle them lightly with water and wrap them in foil. It should take about 5 minutes in a preheated 350 degree oven.

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Very Strawberry Shortcake

February 11, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dessert of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | 4 Comments
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The Diabetic Dessert of the Week is an Very Strawberry Shortcake. included is recipes for the Strawberry Filling and the Shortcakes. This recipe for Shortcake is with a Biscuit instead of a Sponge Cake. Splenda replaces the Sugar in the recipe. The Very Strawberry Shortcake is 120 calories and 22 carbs per serving. So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

Very Strawberry Shortcake
Unlike the familiar little sponge cake, this is a sweet and tender biscuit filled with fresh strawberries that are laced with a splash of balsamic vinegar.

Recipe Ingredients:
Strawberry Filling
3 cups sliced fresh strawberries
2 tablespoons Splenda® Granulated No Calorie Sweetener
2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar

Shortcakes
2 1/2 cups reduced-fat biscuit mix
1 tablespoon Splenda® Granulated No Calorie Sweetener
1 cup plain fat-free yogurt
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
Fat-free frozen whipped topping, thawed (optional)
Mint sprigs (optional)

Cooking Directions:
1 – Strawberry Filling Directions: Stir together strawberries, 1/3 cup Splenda® Granulated Sweetener and balsamic vinegar; let stand 1 hour, stirring occasionally.
2 – Shortcake Directions: Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C).
3 – Combine biscuit mix and 1/3 cup Splenda® Granulated Sweetener in a large bowl.
4 – Stir together yogurt and vanilla; add to dry ingredients, stirring just until moistened.
5 – Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface, and knead 3 or 4 times. Pat dough to a 1/2-inch thickness. Cut with a 2 1/4-inch round cutter, reusing dough scraps, if necessary.
6 – Place shortcakes on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake 12 to 15 minutes.
7 – Serve warm with sliced strawberries. Garnish, if desired.
Makes 12 servings.
Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/12 of recipe): Calories: 120; Calories from Fat: 5; Total Fat: 1g; Saturated Fat: 0g; Cholesterol: 0mg; Sodium: 350mg; Total Carbs: 24g; Dietary Fiber: 2g; Sugars: 6g; Protein: 4g.
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/very-strawberry-shortcake

Wild Idea Recipe of the Week – Breakfast Sausage and Egg Buttermilk Biscuit Sandwiches

January 6, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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You can start your mornings off with not only a delicious Breakfast Sandwich but also a healthy one! It’s this week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Breakfast Sausage and Egg Buttermilk Biscuit Sandwiches. Made with Wild Idea Buffalo Breakfast Sausage. Add some Eggs, Cheese, and the Buttermilk Biscuit and you are set! Another delicious Buffalo recipe from Jill O’Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo. You can find this recipe and purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Breakfast Sausage along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

Breakfast Sausage and Egg Buttermilk Biscuit Sandwiches

My mothers buttermilk biscuits, made with fresh, homemade buttermilk, were a family favorite. What makes them even better is Wild Idea’s Buffalo Breakfast Sausage, a farm fresh egg, and cheddar cheese! You will have not only a tasty sandwich, but the energy to start your day. These are great for kids of all ages, and for when you are on the go!

Ingredients:
1 – pound Wild Idea Breakfast Sausage
1 – tablespoon oil
4 – ounces cheese, slice
4 – farm fresh or organic eggs
4 – buttermilk biscuits
salt & pepper
butter

Preparation:
1) Portion out Wild Idea Buffalo Breakfast Sausage into four patties.
2) Brush sauté pan with a little oil, over medium heat, and place patties into heated pan. Cook for about 4 minutes on each side. During the last two minutes of cooking, add the cheese slices and cover the pan to melt cheese.
3) While sausage is cooking, heat remaining oil in sauté pan, over medium heat and add your eggs. Season with salt and pepper, cover, and cook until the yolk is medium, about 4 minutes. This will make for a soft, but not runny or hard yolk.
4) To assemble, butter the warm biscuits with butter, top with cheesy sausage patty and egg.

Buttermilk Biscuits (makes about 12 biscuits, but is determined by size of biscuit cutter)
Terrific warm with butter & jam!

Ingredients:
2 – cups unbleached flour
1 – tablespoon sugar
4 – teaspoons baking powder
½ – teaspoon salt
½ – cup butter, chilled, sliced
1 – dollop real mayonnaise
½ – cup buttermilk

Preparation:
1) In mixing bowl, whisk together dry ingredients.
2) Cut in the butter, until mixture is course crumbles.
3) Add the mayonnaise and the buttermilk and mix until just incorporated.
4) Place dough on lightly floured surface and knead, about 20 times.
5) Roll out to 1” thick and cut with biscuit cutter, pressing down, but not twisting.
6) Bake at 450°, for 8 to 10 minutes, or until golden brown.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/93320513-breakfast-sausage-egg-buttermilk-biscuit-sandwiches

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Breakfast Sausage
Our prairie bison mixed with hints of sage and maple makes this a healthy breakfast meat alternative. Serve it up with sunny-side eggs and pancakes or use in stuffing and sauces. Available in a 12 oz. or 1 lb. package of ground breakfast sausage, not in links.

Ingredients: 100% Grass-Fed Buffalo, Water, Sea Salt, Organic Spices: Brown Sugar, Crushed Red Pepper, Sage, Garlic Powder, Onion Powder, Ground Allspice.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/brats-sausages-hot-dogs/products/breakfast-sausage-12-oz

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