Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes

June 20, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes. Here’s some Delicious and Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes with recipes including Make-and-Take Breakfast Sausage Sandwich, Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya, and Whole-Grain Spaghetti with Italian Turkey Sausage, Arugula and Balsamic Tomato Sauce. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes
Find healthy, delicious turkey sausage recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Make-and-Take Breakfast Sausage Sandwich
Skip the fast-food take-out sandwich and pack your own the next time you’re in a hurry! This scrumptious cheesy breakfast sandwich mixes savory turkey sausage with sweet chutney and takes just minutes to make……………………………….

Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya
This catfish and sausage jambalaya recipe is one you might find in a neighborhood eatery in Creole country. Turkey sausage links have fewer calories and less fat than traditional pork sausage, but still deliver amazing taste to this dish……………………………..

Whole-Grain Spaghetti with Italian Turkey Sausage, Arugula and Balsamic Tomato Sauce
Total happiness in a bowl: pasta, sausage, tomatoes and herbs. The tomatoes get sweet and tender and turn into sauce with the stock and the pasta. Without ever adding any butter, the spaghetti sauce is rich and silky. Adding the herbs at the end gives the dish a fresh pop of color and flavor. This is one healthy pasta recipe we can definitely get behind!……………………………….

* Click the link below to getall the Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19059/ingredients/meat-poultry/sausage/turkey/

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 6:49 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Jambalaya

June 15, 2020 at 2:10 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Jambalaya with chicken, andouille sausage, rice, shrimp, celery and spices

Jambalaya (/ˌdʒæmbəˈlaɪ.ə/ JAM-bə-LY-ə, /ˌdʒʌm-/ JUM-) is a popular dish of West African, French (especially Provençal cuisine), Spanish and Native American influence, consisting mainly of meat and vegetables mixed with rice. Traditionally, the meat always includes sausage of some sort, often a smoked meat such as andouille, along with pork or chicken and seafood (less common), such as crawfish or shrimp. The vegetables are usually a sofrito-like mixture known as the “holy trinity” in Cajun cooking, consisting of onion, celery, and green bell pepper, though other vegetables such as okra, carrots, tomatoes, chilis and garlic are also used. After browning and sauteeing the meat and vegetables, rice, seasonings and broth are added and the entire dish is cooked together until the rice is done.

Jambalaya is similar to (but distinct from) other rice-and-meat dishes known in Louisiana cuisine. Gumbo uses similar sausages, meats, seafood, vegetables and seasonings. However, gumbo includes filé powder and okra, which are not common in jambalaya. Gumbo is also usually served over white rice, which is prepared separate from the rest of the dish, unlike jambalaya, where the rice is prepared with the other ingredients. Étouffée is a stew which always includes shellfish such as shrimp or crayfish, but does not have the sausage common to jambalaya and gumbo. Also, like gumbo, étouffée is usually served over separately prepared rice.

Jambalaya may have its origins in several rice-based dishes well attested in the Mediterranean cuisines of France or Spain especially, the Spanish dish paella (native to Valencia), and a French pilau dish in which the word jambalaia is native to Provence) Other seasoned rice-based dishes from other cuisines include pilaf, risotto and Hoppin’ John.

Chicken jambalaya at a restaurant

The first is Creole jambalaya (also called “red jambalaya”). First, meat is added to the trinity of celery, peppers, and onions; the meat is usually chicken and sausage such as andouille or smoked sausage. Next vegetables and tomatoes are added to cook, followed by seafood. Rice and stock are added in equal proportions at the very end. The mixture is brought to a boil and left to simmer for 20 to 60 minutes, depending on the recipe, with infrequent stirring. Towards the end of the cooking process, stirring usually ceases. Some versions call for the jambalaya to be baked after the cooking of all the ingredients.

The second style, more characteristic of southwestern and south-central Louisiana, is Cajun jambalaya, which contains no tomatoes (the idea being the farther away from New Orleans one gets, the less common tomatoes are in dishes). The meat is browned in a cast-iron pot. The bits of meat that stick to the bottom of the pot (sucs) are what give a Cajun jambalaya its brown color. A little vegetable oil is added if there is not enough fat in the pot. The trinity (of 50% onions, 25% celery, and 25% green or red bell pepper, although proportions can be altered to suit one’s taste) is added and sautéed until soft. Stock and seasonings are added in the next step, and then the meats are returned to the pot. This mixture is then simmered, covered, for at least one hour. Lastly, the mixture is brought to a boil and rice is added to the pot. It is then covered and left to simmer over very low heat for at least 1/2 hour without stirring. The dish is finished when the rice has cooked.

In a less common method, meat and vegetables are cooked separately from the rice. At the same time, rice is cooked in a savory stock. It is added to the meat and vegetables before serving. This is called “white jambalaya”. This dish is rare in Louisiana as it is seen as a “quick” attempt to make jambalaya, popularized outside the state to shorten cooking time.

Many people in the south, and typically in Louisiana, enjoy a simpler jambalaya style. This style is cooked the same as the Cajun style, but there are no vegetables. Many restaurants serve this style as opposed to the others, because it is more child-friendly, has a more consistent texture, and is easier to make.

Jambalaya is considered by most Louisianans to be a filling but simple-to-prepare rice dish; gumbos, étouffées, and creoles are considered more difficult to perfect. Most often a long grain white rice is used in making jambalaya.

Ingredients for jambalaya in a pot beginning to cook

Jambalaya is differentiated from gumbo and étouffée by the way in which the rice is included. In these dishes, the rice is cooked separately and is served as a bed on which the main dish is served. In the usual method of preparing jambalaya, a rich stock is created from vegetables, meat, and seafood; raw rice is then added to the broth and the flavor is absorbed by the grains as the rice cooks.

The origin states jambalaya originates from the French Quarter of New Orleans, in the original sector. It was an attempt by the Spanish to make paella in the New World, where saffron was not readily available due to import costs. Tomatoes became the substitute for saffron. As time went on, French influence became strong in New Orleans, and spices from the Caribbean changed this New World paella into a unique dish. In modern Louisiana, the dish has evolved along a variety of different lines. Creole jambalaya, or red jambalaya, is found primarily in and around New Orleans, where it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Creole jambalaya includes tomatoes, whereas Cajun jambalaya does not.

Cajun jambalaya originates from Louisiana’s rural, low-lying swamp country where crawfish, shrimp, oysters, alligator, duck, turtle, boar, venison, nutria and other game were readily available. Any variety or combination of meats, including chicken or turkey, may be used to make jambalaya. Cajun jambalaya is known as “brown jambalaya” in the New Orleans area; to Cajuns it is simply known as “jambalaya”. Cajun jambalaya has more of a smoky and spicy flavor than its Creole cousin.

Creole jambalaya with shrimp, ham, tomato, and andouille sausage

The first appearance in print of any variant of the word ‘jambalaya’ in any language occurred in Leis amours de Vanus; vo, Lou paysan oou théâtré, by Fortuné (Fortunat) Chailan, first published in Provençal dialect in 1837. The earliest appearance of the word in print in English occurs in the May 1849 issue of the American Agriculturalist, page 161, where Solon Robinson refers to a recipe for ‘Hopping Johnny (jambalaya)’. Jambalaya did not appear in a cookbook until 1878, when the Gulf City Cook Book, by the ladies of the St. Francis Street Methodist Episcopal Church, was printed in South Mobile, Alabama. It contains a recipe for “JAM BOLAYA”.

Jambalaya experienced a brief jump in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s because of its flexible recipe. The dish was little more than the rice and vegetables the populace could afford; the recipe grew from humble roots.

In 1968, Louisiana Governor John J. McKeithen proclaimed Gonzales, Louisiana, “the Jambalaya capital of the world”. Every spring, the annual Jambalaya Festival is held in Gonzales.

 

Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes

May 30, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes. Here’s some Delicious and Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes with recipes including Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya, Middle Eastern Lamb Stew, and Beef and Barley Soup. Spring is here, finally! Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes
Find healthy, delicious spring crockpot and slow-cooker recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya
The slow cooker makes easy work of this healthy jambalaya featuring brown rice and plenty of veggies. If you don’t want to make your own seasoning, just skip Step 1 and use 1 1/2 teaspoons purchased salt-free Cajun seasoning in Step 2……………………………….

Middle Eastern Lamb Stew
This brothy stew is boldly flavored with a blend of characteristic Middle Eastern spices and finished with fresh spinach and fiber-rich chickpeas. Economical lamb shoulder tenderizes beautifully when leisurely cooked in a slow cooker. If you can’t find boneless shoulder stew meat, do not substitute more-expensive lamb leg–it tends to dry out during slow cooking. Instead, purchase lamb shoulder chops and debone them. Serve over bulgur and accompany with a salad…………………………………………..

Beef and Barley Soup
There’s something so satisfying about a hearty bowl of beef and barley soup–especially when it’s one you’ve made from scratch with reduced-sodium broth and chunks of delicious sirloin steak. This slow-cooker recipe is simple to prepare, serves six, and is a great alternative to canned soup!……………………………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19797/seasonal/spring/crockpot-slow-cooker/

Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes

March 21, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 1 Comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes. Celebrate the up coming Spring Season with these Delicious and Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes. You’ll find recipes like Slow-Cooker Vietnamese Pulled Chicken, Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya, and Sloppy Pizza Joes. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Spring Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes
Find healthy, delicious spring crockpot and slow-cooker recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Slow-Cooker Vietnamese Pulled Chicken
Busy week coming up? Cook up these easy poached chicken breasts infused with the flavors of the ubiquitous Vietnamese sauce nuoc cham in your slow cooker on Sunday. Then enjoy the leftover chicken three different ways over the days to come–ladled with the broth over rice noodles, layered with vegetables on a sandwich and mixed with mayo to make a creamy chicken salad………………………………

Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya
The slow cooker makes easy work of this healthy jambalaya featuring brown rice and plenty of veggies. If you don’t want to make your own seasoning, just skip Step 1 and use 1 1/2 teaspoons purchased salt-free Cajun seasoning in Step 2……………………………….

Sloppy Pizza Joes
We’ve made a few tweaks to the original Sloppy Joe recipe for our easy slow-cooker version. We’ve replaced ground beef with ground turkey, added lots of vegetables and pizza sauce, and topped each sandwich with a thick slice of yummy mozzarella cheese. These pizza-flavored sandwiches will appeal to pizza lovers everywhere with a taste is out of this world!……………………………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Spring Recipes

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19797/seasonal/spring/crockpot-slow-cooker/

Family Slow-Cooker and Crockpot Recipes

February 29, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Family Slow-Cooker and Crockpot Recipes. Healthy, Delicious, Family Slow-Cooker and Crockpot Recipes. Find recipes like Smokin’ Jambalaya, Slow-Cooker Arroz con Pollo (Chicken and Rice), and Spicy Chicken Lasagna. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Family Slow-Cooker and Crockpot Recipes
Find healthy, delicious family slow-cooker and crockpot recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Smokin’ Jambalaya
The spicy Cajun favorite is lightened up with turkey sausage, chicken, shrimp, and plenty of vegetables………………………………..

Slow-Cooker Arroz con Pollo (Chicken and Rice)
This Mexican-inspired one-pot chicken dinner comes together easily in the crock pot. The instant brown rice is added near the end, to keep it from overcooking………………………

Spicy Chicken Lasagna
Instead of spending hours at the stove making an Italian tomato sauce for your lasagna, let your slow cooker do the work. Your family will love the chicken and mushrooms in this makeover recipe of traditional lasagna…………………………………………..

* Click the lnk below to get all the Family Slow-Cooker and Crockpot Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19367/cooking-methods-styles/slow-cooker-crockpot/family/

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes

January 8, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 1 Comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes with recipes including Slow-Cooker Jambalaya, Grilled Cajun Chicken Salad, and Smoky Seafood Etouffee. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
Find healthy, delicious Cajun and Creole recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Slow-Cooker Jambalaya
This hearty jambalaya is bursting with chicken, smoked turkey sausage, and shrimp. It takes just 25 minutes to prep in the morning and then your slow cooker will work its magic and deliver a tasty meal at the end of the day……………………

Grilled Cajun Chicken Salad
A spicy rub on the chicken adds a robust complement to the cool salad greens in this low-calorie main dish………………….

Smoky Seafood Etouffee
Enjoy the flavors of Louisiana Cajun cooking with this lightened-up version of the famous shrimp and rice dish………………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19698/cuisines-regions/usa/cajun-creole/

Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes

November 16, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes with recipes including Slow-Cooker Italian Turkey Sausage and Squash Lasagna, Make-and-Take Breakfast Sausage Sandwich, and Slow-Cooker Jambalaya. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes
Find healthy, delicious turkey sausage recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Slow-Cooker Italian Turkey Sausage and Squash Lasagna
Kids will love this lasagna made with turkey sausage in the Crock Pot—and parents will love that it’s packed with vitamin-rich zucchini and squash! The veggies also add moisture to the slow-cooker lasagna, which keeps it from drying out. Serve with garlic toast, if desired……………

Make-and-Take Breakfast Sausage Sandwich
Skip the fast-food take-out sandwich and pack your own the next time you’re in a hurry! This scrumptious cheesy breakfast sandwich mixes savory turkey sausage with sweet chutney and takes just minutes to make………………….

Slow-Cooker Jambalaya
This hearty jambalaya is bursting with chicken, smoked turkey sausage, and shrimp. It takes just 25 minutes to prep in the morning and then your slow cooker will work its magic and deliver a tasty meal at the end of the day……………………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Turkey Sausage Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19059/ingredients/meat-poultry/sausage/turkey/

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes

October 8, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes with recipes including Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya, Slow-Cooker Jambalaya, and Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Also don’t forget to subscribe to the EatingWell Magazine, packed full of delicious and healthy recipes in every issue! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
Find healthy, delicious Cajun and Creole recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya
This catfish and sausage jambalaya recipe is one you might find in a neighborhood eatery in Creole country. Turkey sausage links have fewer calories and less fat than traditional pork sausage, but still deliver amazing taste to this dish……………….

Slow-Cooker Jambalaya
This hearty jambalaya is bursting with chicken, smoked turkey sausage, and shrimp. It takes just 25 minutes to prep in the morning and then your slow cooker will work its magic and deliver a tasty meal at the end of the day…………………

Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya
The slow cooker makes easy work of this healthy jambalaya featuring brown rice and plenty of veggies. If you don’t want to make your own seasoning, just skip Step 1 and use 1½ teaspoons purchased salt-free Cajun seasoning in Step 2……………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19698/cuisines-regions/usa/cajun-creole/

Healthy Summer Slow-Cooker and Crockpot Recipes

August 17, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Summer Slow-Cooker and Crockpot Recipes. Delicious Healthy Summer Slow-Cooker and Crockpot Recipes with recipes like; Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya, Slow-Cooker Quinoa-Summer Squash Casserole, and Slow-Cooker Brisket Sandwiches with Quick Pickles. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Summer Slow-Cooker and Crockpot Recipes
Find healthy, delicious summer slow-cooker and crockpot recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya
The slow cooker makes easy work of this healthy jambalaya featuring brown rice and plenty of veggies. If you don’t want to make your own seasoning, just skip Step 1 and use 1½ teaspoons purchased salt-free Cajun seasoning in Step 2…………

Slow-Cooker Quinoa-Summer Squash Casserole
As this layered slow-cooker squash casserole recipe cooks, the liquid from the tangy tomatillo salsa and summer squash is absorbed by the quinoa, adding tons of flavor to the final dish…….

Slow-Cooker Brisket Sandwiches with Quick Pickles
Make your BBQ or cookout easy with this slow-cooker beef brisket recipe. Rauchbier, a smoky German beer, gives this fork-tender brisket real pit-barbecue flavor, but you can use any beer that suits your taste, or even substitute beef broth, to achieve mouthwatering results. While the brisket is cooking, whip up the quick pickle recipe and stir together a garlic mayo to top off the sandwiches…………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Summer Slow-Cooker and Crockpot Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19811/seasonal/summer/slow-cooker-crockpot/

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