One of America’s Favorites – Steak Sandwich

May 10, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A steak sandwich with shredded steak, cheese, mushrooms, onions, peppers and tomatoes

A steak sandwich is a sandwich that is prepared with steak that has been broiled, fried, grilled, barbecued or seared using steel grates or gridirons then served on bread or a roll. Steak sandwiches are sometimes served with toppings of cheese, onions, mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes, and in some instances fried eggs, coleslaw, and French fries.

According to the Library of Congress, the first steak sandwich sold in the United States was at Louis’ Lunch of New Haven, Connecticut.

Cheesesteak
A cheesesteak, or steak and cheese, is made from thinly sliced pieces of steak and melted cheese in a long roll. The cheesesteak is one of the favorite foods of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It can be found in most parts of the U.S. outside the Philadelphia area, often sold as a “Philadelphia” or “Philly Cheesesteak”, even when prepared in a manner different from that customary in the city. Variations include the type of condiments, including grilled onions and peppers, the type of cheese used, or the type of roll.

Italian beef
An Italian beef sandwich features thin slices of seasoned roast beef, dripping with meat juices, on a dense, long Italian-style roll, believed to have originated in Chicago, where its history dates back at least to the 1930s. The bread itself is often dipped (or double-dipped) into the jus the meat is cooked in, and the sandwich is typically topped off with Chicago-style giardiniera or sauteed, green Italian sweet peppers. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in Italy.

French dip
A French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip (especially in Canada), is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats such as pastrami or corned beef) on a French roll or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Though it can be found in many parts of the U.S. and Canada, the sandwich originated in Los Angeles, California, in the first decades of the twentieth century. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in France.

A cheesesteak sandwich with Cheez Whiz

Beef on weck
A beef on weck is a variety of sandwich found primarily in Western New York. It is made with roast beef on a kummelweck roll. The meat on the sandwich is traditionally served rare, thin cut, with the top bun getting a dip au jus. Accompaniments include horseradish, a dill pickle spear, and French fries.

Steak bomb
A steak bomb is a hot submarine sandwich consisting of shaved steak and melted provolone or mozzarella cheese with grilled onions, sautéed red and green bell peppers, mushrooms, and peppered shaved steak all on a submarine sandwich roll. It is a variation on the steak submarine sandwich, as is the cheese steak. It is most closely associated with the New England region of the United States, where steak sandwiches are made by quickly grilling shaved steak on a griddle and then adding either cheese, or grilling the steak together with peppers and onions or mushrooms. If all three are combined together it becomes a steak bomb. The addition of salami or other preserved meats or pickles is optional and exact recipes and proportions vary widely. Nearly every pizzeria and sub shop in New England has their own version of the various steak sandwiches and the steak bomb.

 

Other variations
In Australia a steak sandwich is made much like a traditional Australian hamburger, with a piece of grilled steak or fried minute steak, fried onions, lettuce, tomato, tinned beetroot and barbecue sauce or tomato ketchup (known as tomato sauce in Australia). Cheese, a fried egg, bacon or pineapple might also be added. In some establishments the sandwich will be constructed on slices of bread, which are toasted on only one side while other establishments serve it on the same roll (bun) as is used for hamburgers. Some establishments call this a steak burger.

One of America’s Favorites – Steak Sandwich

October 24, 2016 at 5:23 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A steak sandwich with cheese and pickled peppers

A steak sandwich with cheese and pickled peppers

A steak sandwich is a sandwich that is prepared with steak that has been broiled, fried, grilled, barbecued or seared using steel grates or gridirons then served on bread or a roll. Steak sandwiches are sometimes served with toppings of cheese, onions, mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes, and in some instances fried eggs, coleslaw, and french fries.

According to the Library of Congress, the first steak sandwich sold in the United States was at Louis’ Lunch of New Haven, Connecticut.

 

 

 

 

 

A cheesesteak sandwich

A cheesesteak sandwich

Cheesesteak
A cheesesteak, or steak and cheese, is made from thinly sliced pieces of steak and melted cheese in a long roll. The cheesesteak is one of the favorite foods of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It can be found in most parts of the U.S. outside the Philadelphia area, often sold as a “Philadelphia” or “Philly Cheesesteak”, even when prepared in a manner different from that customary in the city. Variations include the type of condiments, including grilled onions and peppers, the type of cheese used, or the type of roll.

 
Italian beef
An Italian beef sandwich features thin slices of seasoned roast beef, dripping with meat juices, on a dense, long Italian-style roll, believed to have originated in Chicago, where its history dates back at least to the 1930s. The bread itself is often dipped (or double-dipped) into the jus the meat is cooked in, and the sandwich is typically topped off with Chicago-style giardiniera or sauteed, green Italian sweet peppers. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in Italy.

 
French dip
A French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip (especially in Canada), is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats such as pastrami or corned beef) on a French roll or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Though it can be found in many parts of the U.S. and Canada, the sandwich originated in Los Angeles, California, in the first decades of the twentieth century. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in France.

 
Beef on weck
A beef on weck is a variety of sandwich found primarily in Western New York. It is made with roast beef on a kummelweck roll. The meat on the sandwich is traditionally served rare, thin cut, with the top bun getting a dip au jus. Accompaniments include horseradish, a dill pickle spear, and french fries.

 
Steak bomb
A steak bomb is a hot submarine sandwich consisting of shaved steak and melted provolone or mozzarella cheese with grilled onions, sautéed red and green bell peppers, mushrooms, and peppered shaved steak all on a submarine sandwich roll. It is a variation on the steak submarine sandwich, as is the cheese steak. It is most closely associated with the New England region of the United States, where steak sandwiches are made by quickly grilling shaved steak on a griddle and then adding either cheese, or grilling the steak together with peppers and onions or mushrooms. If all three are combined together it becomes a steak bomb. The addition of salami or other preserved meats or pickles is optional and exact recipes and proportions vary widely. Nearly every pizzeria and sub shop in New England has their own version of the various steak sandwiches and the steak bomb.

 

 

An Arby's roast beef sandwich

An Arby’s roast beef sandwich

Other variations
In Australia a steak sandwich is made much like a traditional Australian hamburger, with a piece of grilled steak or fried minute steak, fried onions, lettuce, tomato, tinned beetroot and barbecue sauce or tomato ketchup (known as tomato sauce in Australia). Cheese, a fried egg, bacon or pineapple might also be added. In some establishments the sandwich will be constructed on slices of bread, which are toasted on only one side while other establishments serve it on the same roll (bun) as is used for hamburgers. Some establishments call this a steak burger.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Italian Beef Sandwich

March 17, 2014 at 8:25 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 3 Comments
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Italian beef

Italian beef

An Italian beef is a sandwich of thin slices of seasoned roast beef, dripping with meat juices, on a dense, long Italian-style roll, which originated in Chicago where its history dates back at least to the 1930s. The bread itself is often dipped (or double-dipped) into the juices the meat is cooked in, and the sandwich is typically topped off with Chicago-style giardiniera (called “hot”) or sauteed, green Italian sweet peppers (called “sweet”).
Italian beef sandwiches can be found at most hot dog stands and small Italian-American restaurants in northeastern Illinois, Northwest Indiana and Indianapolis. However, Chicago expatriates have opened restaurants across the country serving Italian beef, Chicago-style hot dogs, and other foods original to the Chicago area.

 

 

 
Italian beef is made using cuts of beef from the sirloin rear or the top/bottom round wet-roasted in broth with garlic, oregano and spices until medium rare or medium. The roast is then cooled, shaved using a deli slicer, and then reintroduced to its reheated beef broth. The beef then sits in the broth, typically for hours. Once a sandwich is ordered, the beef is then drawn from the broth and placed directly on the bread. Because the meat is served dripping wet it is necessary to use a chewy bread, as a softer bread would disintegrate. The typical bread used is long, Italian style loaves without seeds sliced from six to eight inches in length. Italian beef can also be shredded instead of sliced.
Many retailers purchase pre-seasoned, pre-cooked, and pre-sliced Italian beef with separate cooking broth (“au jus”), and then heat and serve, while the most acclaimed Chicago beef places typically prepare the beef on their own premises according to their own recipes. Some produce their own homemade giardiniera as well.

 

 

 
Origins of the sandwich are disputed, but one early vendor, Al’s No. 1 Italian Beef, opened its first stand in 1938.
One story has it that the Italian Beef sandwich was started by Italian immigrants who worked for the old Union Stock Yards. They often would bring home some of the tougher, less desirable cuts of beef sold by the company. To make the meat more palatable, it was slow-roasted to make it more tender, then slow-simmered in a spicy broth for flavor. Both the roasting and the broth used Italian-style spices and herbs. The meat was then thinly sliced across the grain and stuffed into fresh Italian bread.
According to Scala’s Original Beef and Sausage Company (formed in 1925), this meal was originally introduced at weddings and banquets where the meat was sliced thinly so there would be enough to feed all the guests. It rapidly grew in popularity and eventually became one of Chicago’s most famous ethnic foods: the original Italian beef sandwich.
By 1954, a local restaurant Al’s Beef was advertising its “Pizza, Spaghetti, Ravioli, [and] Italian Beef Sandwiches” in the Chicago Tribune.

 

 

 
There are varying degrees of juiciness, depending on taste. Nomenclature varies from stand to stand, but wet or dipped means the bread is quickly dunked in the juice; juicy even wetter; and soaked is dripping wet.
Most Chicago beef joints also offer a “combo,” adding a grilled Italian sausage to the sandwich. Different eateries offer hot or mild sausage, or both.

 
Typical beef orders are:
* Hot dipped: Italian beef on gravy-wetted bread and giardiniera.
* Hot dipped combo: Italian beef and sausage on gravy-wetted bread with giardiniera.
* Sweet dry: Italian beef placed on dry bread, topped with sweet peppers.
* Gravy bread: meatless Italian bread soaked in the juice of Italian beef, often served with peppers or giardiniera. Also known in some places as “Soakers” or “Juice-ons”.
* Cheesy beef or cheef: Italian beef with cheese (Provolone, Mozzarella or, rarely, Cheddar); not all stands offer this.
* Cheesy beef on garlic: Italian beef with cheese (Provolone, Mozzarella or, rarely, Cheddar) and the bread being pre-cooked and seasoned like traditional garlic bread; not all stands offer this.
Some order the “triple double,” which consists of double cheese, double sausage and double beef. Other even less common variations include substituting Italian bread with a large croissant or topping with marinara sauce.

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – Po’ boy

July 9, 2012 at 10:10 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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A po’ boy (also po-boy, po boy, or poor boy) is a traditional submarine sandwich from Louisiana. It almost always consists of meat, usually roast beef, or fried seafood. The meat is served on baguette-like New Orleans French bread, known for its crisp crust and fluffy

Shrimp po’ boy

center.

A key ingredient that differentiates po’ boys from other submarine sandwiches is the bread. Typically, the French bread comes in two-foot-long “sticks”. Standard sandwich sizes might be a half po’ boy, about six inches long (called a “Shorty”) and a full po’ boy, at about a foot long. The traditional versions are served hot and include fried shrimp, and oysters. Soft shell crab, catfish, crawfish, Louisiana hot sausage, fried chicken breast, roast beef, and French fries are other common variations. The last two are served with gravy.
A “dressed” po’ boy has lettuce, tomato, pickles, and mayonnaise; onions are optional. Non-seafood po’ boys will also usually have mustard; the customer is expected to specify “hot” or “regular”—the former being a coarse-grained Creole mustard and the latter being American yellow mustard.
The New Orleans roast beef po’ boy is generally served hot with gravy and resembles a Chicago Italian beef sandwich in appearance and method of preparation, although the size, bread, and toppings differ. To make it, a cut of beef (usually chuck or shoulder) is typically simmered in beef stock with seasonings such as garlic, pepper, thyme, and bay for several hours. The beef can be processed into “debris” by cutting it to shreds when done (folklore says that a po’ boy roast is done when it “falls apart with a hard stare”) and simmering the shredded beef in the pot for a longer time to absorb more of the juice and seasoning.
The sandwich was featured on the PBS special Sandwiches That You Will Like.

In the late 1800s fried oyster sandwiches on French loaves were known in New Orleans and San Francisco as “oyster loaves”, a term still in use. The sandwich was alternately called a “peacemaker” or “La Mediatrice”.
There are countless stories as to the origin of the term po’ boy. The more popular theory claims that “po’ boy” was coined in a New Orleans restaurant owned by Benny and Clovis Martin (originally from Raceland, LA), former streetcar conductors. In 1929, during a four-month strike against the streetcar company, the Martin brothers served their former colleagues free sandwiches. The Martins’ restaurant workers jokingly referred to the strikers as “poor boys”, and soon the sandwiches themselves took on the name. In Louisiana dialect, this is naturally shortened to “po’ boy.”

New Orleans is known for its grand restaurants, but more humble fare like the po’boy is very popular. Po’ boys may be made at home, sold pre-packaged in convenience stores, available at deli counters and most neighborhood restaurants. One of the most basic New Orleans restaurants is the po’ boy shop, and these shops often offer other dishes like red beans and rice and jambalaya. Many New Orleans neighborhood restaurants are in this mold offering po’ boys, seafood platters, and a number of basic Creole dishes: Tracie’s, Parkway Bakery, Maspero’s, Liuzza’s, Acme’s, Domilise’s, Parasol’s, Frankie and Johnnie’s, and Casamento’s.
In 1896, George Leidenheimer founded his bakery, Leidenheimer Baking Company, on Dryades Street. In 1904, the bakery moved to Simon Bolivar Avenue where the family business still operates, and is one of the primary sources of po’boy bread. There is fierce competition between po’boy shops, and resident opinions of the best po’boy shop varies widely.
Each year there is a festival in New Orleans dedicated to the po’boy, The Oak Street Po’Boy Festival. It is a one day festival that features live music, arts, and food vendors with multiple types of po’ boys. It is held in mid-November along a commercial strip of Oak Street in the city’s Carrollton neighborhood. The festival gives away “best-of” awards, which gives the chefs incentive to invent some of the most creative po’ boys.

Authentic versions of Louisiana style po’ boys can be found along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast—from Houston through the Florida panhandle. The term “po’ boy” has spread further and can be found on the Southeastern seaboard and in California, but may refer to variations on the local submarine sandwich.
In New Orleans a “Vietnamese Po’ boy” is another name for a Bánh mì sandwich. This variation can be found throughout the city owing to the influence of Vietnamese immigrants, who brought with them Vietnamese-French bakeries.

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