Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – GRILLED STEAK BURGERS WITH HARISSA MAYONNAISE

August 10, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is GRILLED STEAK BURGERS WITH HARISSA MAYONNAISE. To prepare this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Wild Idea Buffalo Sirloin Steaks, Chili Powder, Caraway Seeds, Coriander, Cumin, Salt, Garlic Cloves, Jarred Roasted Red Peppers, Olive Oil, Lemon, and Buns. This Burger sounds and looks incredible! You can find this recipe and purchase any of the Wild Idea Buffalo Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

GRILLED STEAK BURGERS WITH HARISSA MAYONNAISE
Living in the country, an hour away from the closest grocery, I often substitute ingredients in recipes, which can sometimes lead to a whole new recipe. My rendition of Harissa Sauce is one of those recipes. It’s my new favorite sauce and although it is terrific on everything (including a spoon), it is particularly great on Wild Idea Bison Sirloin Steaks (or any of our cuts)!

Ingredients: (Makes 2 to 4 servings)

2 – 6 ounce Wild Idea Buffalo Sirloin Steaks
1 – teaspoon chili powder
½ – teaspoon caraway seeds
½ – teaspoon coriander
½ – teaspoon cumin
½ – teaspoon salt
3 – garlic cloves
1/3 – cup roasted red peppers (I always keep a jar on hand in my pantry)
1 – tablespoon olive oil
1 – lemon, juiced
2 to 4 – quality buns, brushed with oil and lightly toasted

Preparation:
1 – Rinse the steaks under cold water and pat dry with paper towels.
2 – Using a fine tine fork, pierce the steaks at an angle a few times on each side. This will assist with getting the flavors of the Harissa Sauce into the meat.
3 – Mix the spices, roasted red peppers, olive oil, and lemon juice together in a blender and puree until smooth.
4 – Rub half of the Harissa Sauce into the prepped steaks, cover and allow them to rest for 2 hours before cooking, or make ahead of time and place in refrigerator to marinade, removing 2 hours before cooking to allow steaks to come to room temperature. Reserve and refrigerate the other half of the Harissa Sauce for the mayonnaise.
5 – Preheat grill to 500°. Shake off excess marinade and grill over hot heat for 2 minutes on each side. Remove steaks from the grill, cover, and allow them to rest for 5 minutes.
6 – Slice steaks thin and pile on to toasted buns. Top with Harissa Mayonnaise, recipe listed below. Fabulous!
7 – Roasted Red Pepper Harissa Mayonnaise
This tasty condiment will keep in a sealed jar in your refrigerator for up to a month.

Ingredients:

½ – batch Harissa Sauce
2 – tablespoons mayonnaise
2 – tablespoons cider or rice vinegar
¼ – cup onions, finely diced
¼ – cup cilantro, chopped
1 – Gently mix all of the ingredients together in a bowl with a fork. Place in a sealed jar and refrigerate until needed. Pull the mayonnaise out about an hour before using to let it come to room temperature.

Jill O’Brien
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/grilled-steak-burgers-with-harissa-mayonnaise

One of America’s Favorites – Steak Sandwich

June 13, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A steak sandwich with shredded steak, cheese, mushrooms, onions, peppers and tomatoes

A steak sandwich is a sandwich that is prepared with steak that has been broiled, fried, grilled, barbecued or seared using steel grates or gridirons then served on bread or a roll. Steak sandwiches are sometimes served with toppings of cheese, onions, mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes, and in some instances fried eggs, coleslaw, and french fries.

According to the Library of Congress, the first steak sandwich sold in the United States was at Louis’ Lunch of New Haven, Connecticut.

Cheesesteak
A cheesesteak, or steak and cheese, is made from thinly sliced pieces of steak and melted cheese in a long roll. The cheesesteak is one of the favorite foods of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It can be found in most parts of the U.S. outside the Philadelphia area, often sold as a “Philadelphia” or “Philly Cheesesteak”, even when prepared in a manner different from that customary in the city. Variations include the type of condiments, including grilled onions and peppers, the type of cheese used, or the type of roll.

Italian beef
An Italian beef sandwich features thin slices of seasoned roast beef, dripping with meat juices, on a dense, long Italian-style roll, believed to have originated in Chicago, where its history dates back at least to the 1930s. The bread itself is often dipped (or double-dipped) into the jus the meat is cooked in, and the sandwich is typically topped off with Chicago-style giardiniera or sauteed, green Italian sweet peppers. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in Italy.

A cheesesteak sandwich

French dip
A French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip (especially in Canada), is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats such as pastrami or corned beef) on a French roll or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Though it can be found in many parts of the U.S. and Canada, the sandwich originated in Los Angeles, California, in the first decades of the twentieth century. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in France.

Beef on weck
A beef on weck is a variety of sandwich found primarily in Western New York. It is made with roast beef on a kummelweck roll. The meat on the sandwich is traditionally served rare, thin cut, with the top bun getting a dip au jus. Accompaniments include horseradish, a dill pickle spear, and French fries.

Roast beef
A roast beef sandwich is a sandwich that is made out of sliced roast beef or sometimes beef loaf. It is sold at many diners in the U.S., as well as fast food chains, such as Arby’s and Roy Rogers Restaurants. This style of sandwich often comes on a hamburger bun and may be topped with barbecue sauce and/or melted American cheese.

An Arby’s roast beef sandwich

Steak bomb
A steak bomb is a hot submarine sandwich consisting of shaved steak and melted provolone or mozzarella cheese with grilled onions, sautéed red and green bell peppers, mushrooms, and peppered shaved steak all on a submarine sandwich roll. It is a variation on the steak submarine sandwich, as is the cheese steak. It is most closely associated with the New England region of the United States, where steak sandwiches are made by quickly grilling shaved steak on a griddle and then adding either cheese, or grilling the steak together with peppers and onions or mushrooms. If all three are combined together it becomes a steak bomb. The addition of salami or other preserved meats or pickles is optional and exact recipes and proportions vary widely. Nearly every pizzeria and sub shop in New England has their own version of the various steak sandwiches and the steak bomb.

Other variations
In Australia a steak sandwich is made much like a traditional Australian hamburger, with a piece of grilled steak or fried minute steak, fried onions, lettuce, tomato, tinned beetroot and barbecue sauce or tomato ketchup (known as tomato sauce in Australia). Cheese, a fried egg, bacon or pineapple might also be added. In some establishments the sandwich will be constructed on slices of bread, which are toasted on only one side while other establishments serve it on the same roll (bun) as is used for hamburgers. Some establishments call this a steak burger.

Healthy Burger Recipes

April 6, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Burger Recipes. Find a great selection of some Delicious and Healthy Burger Recipes with recipes including Mushroom-Swiss Turkey Burgers, Classic Hamburger, and Better-Than-Takeout Burgers with Sweet Potato Fries. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Burger Recipes
Find healthy, delicious burger recipes including classic hamburgers, turkey burgers and chicken burgers. Healthier Recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Mushroom-Swiss Turkey Burgers
In this gluten-free turkey burger recipe, lean ground turkey stands in for ground beef, and portobello mushrooms produce a juicy, flavorful alternative to the traditional bun. Melted Swiss cheese, sliced tomato and arugula top off this delicious low-carb dinner!…..

Classic Hamburger
Slow-cooked onions add moisture and flavor to these lean beef burgers. A quick blend of mayonnaise, ketchup, relish and vinegar makes a perfect tangy, sweet and creamy “special sauce” for this burger. We love the dill relish here, but use sweet relish if you prefer it. Serve with sweet potato fries……

Better-Than-Takeout Burgers with Sweet Potato Fries
This healthy take on burgers and fries swaps in chopped mushrooms for some of the meat in the burger patties, to cut back on calories and saturated fat.

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Burger Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/17919/main-dishes/burgers/

One of America’s Favorites – Breakfast Sandwich

March 28, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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A breakfast sandwich on sourdough bread

A breakfast sandwich is any sandwich filled with foods associated with the breakfast meal. Breakfast sandwiches are served at fast food restaurants (for example, the Burger King breakfast sandwiches) and delicatessens or bought as fast, ready to heat and eat sandwiches from a store. Breakfast sandwiches are commonly made at home. Different types of breakfast sandwich include the bacon sandwich, the egg sandwich, and the sausage sandwich; or various combinations thereof, like the bacon, egg and cheese sandwich. The breakfast sandwich is related to the breakfast roll.

Breakfast sandwiches are typically made using breakfast meats (generally cured meats such as sausages, patty sausages, bacon, country ham, scrapple, Spam, and pork roll), breads, eggs and cheese. These sandwiches were typically regional specialties until fast food restaurants began serving breakfast. Because the common types of bread, such as biscuits, bagels, and English muffin, were similar in size to fast food hamburger buns, they made an obvious choice for fast food restaurants. Unlike other breakfast items, they were perfect for the innovation of the drive-through. These sandwiches have also become a staple of many convenience stores.

A breakfast sandwich featuring eggs, bacon jam, and microgreens on a buttermilk biscuit

Although the ingredients for the breakfast sandwich have been common elements of breakfast meals in the English-speaking world for centuries, it was not until the 19th century in the United States that people began regularly eating eggs, cheese, and meat in a sandwich. What would later be known as “breakfast sandwiches” became increasingly popular after the American Civil War, and were a favorite food of pioneers during American westward expansion. The first known published recipe for a “breakfast sandwich” was in an 1897 American cookbook.

Types of bread used
There are several types of bread used to make breakfast sandwiches:

* Hard roll: The traditional breakfast sandwich of the northeast’s tri-state region of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. It is believed to be one of the earliest forms of the breakfast sandwich in the United States. It consists of a hard roll, eggs, cheese and sausage, bacon or ham. In New Jersey, a common breakfast sandwich is the Jersey breakfast which consists of pork roll, egg, and cheese on a hard Kaiser roll.
* Biscuit: Consists of a large, or cat-head biscuit, sliced, on which meat, cheese, or eggs are served. Popular biscuits include: Sausage biscuit, bacon, tomato, and country ham. Fast food restaurants have put smaller versions of fried chicken fillets on biscuits to create chicken biscuits. Scrambled eggs and/or American cheese are often added.
* Bagel sandwiches: Due to its connection with German and Jewish ethnic groups, Bagels often have foods popular in these communities. Deli meats, Canadian bacon, lox or other smoked fish, and cream cheese are popular on bagel sandwiches.
* English muffin: Generally contains egg and cheese with either breakfast sausage or ham. Often served in US fast food outlets such as McDonald’s and Starbucks.

A New-York-style bacon and egg sandwich on a roll

* Toast: Toasted bread is one of the oldest forms of breakfast sandwich in America, and the closest to the original sandwich in form. While any number of items might be served on toast, eggs and bacon are the ones most associated with breakfast.

* Specialty breads: Mostly served by restaurant chains,[citation needed] there are other breakfast sandwiches that do not use one of the common breakfast breads used in the United States. Burger King uses a croissant to make a breakfast sandwich called the Croissan’wich, or croissant sandwich, depending on the market. McDonald’s offers its traditional biscuit fillings on a sandwich made from maple flavored pancakes called a McGriddles. Dunkin’ Donuts has a waffle sandwich that is similar to the McGriddles. These can be found at American fast food franchises worldwide. Kangaroo Brands makes a variety of breakfast sandwiches made with pita bread.

Healthy Hot Sandwich Recipes

February 2, 2022 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Hot Sandwich Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Hot Sandwich Recipes with recipes including Beef and Bean Sloppy Joes, Philly Cheese Steak Sloppy Joes, and Italian-Herbed Chicken and Mozzarella Melts. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2022! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Hot Sandwich Recipes
Find healthy, delicious hot sandwich recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Beef and Bean Sloppy Joes
This healthy copycat recipe of the comfort food classic trades beans for some of the meat to bump up fiber by 7 grams. We also cut back on the sugar and ketchup in this Sloppy Joe recipe makeover to save you 12 grams of added sugar……

Philly Cheese Steak Sloppy Joes
Two of our favorite comfort-food sandwiches join forces in these family-friendly dinner sandwiches. We found that softer buns make this easier to eat, and it’s all the better when wrapped takeout-style in a sheet of foil……

Italian-Herbed Chicken and Mozzarella Melts
Chicken thighs are slowly cooked with Italian-style sauce and herbs, then served on crusty bread slices with olives and two savory cheeses……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Hot Sandwich Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19030/main-dishes/sandwiches/hot/

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – SMASHED BACON DOUBLE BUFFALO CHEESEBURGERS

September 29, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is, SMASHED BACON DOUBLE BUFFALO CHEESEBURGERS. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Wild Idea Buffalo Premium Ground, Olive Oil, Salt, Ground Pepper, Honey Bourbon, Onion, Wild Idea Buffalo Bacon, Sliced Cheese, and Buns. Get ready to Enjoy one Delicious Burger! You can find this recipe and purchase any of the Wild Idea Buffalo Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

SMASHED BACON DOUBLE BUFFALO CHEESEBURGERS
We had to get in on the “Smashed Burger” craze… But, I knew we could make it better… It’s a whole new way to get loaded! Enjoy!

Ingredients: (Serves 3 to 4)

1 – pound Wild Idea Buffalo Premium Ground
1 – tablespoon olive oil
1 – teaspoon salt
1/2 – teaspoon black pepper
1/2 – cup Honey Bourbon
1/2 – onion, diced
8 – strips Wild Idea Buffalo Bacon or organic bacon, chopped
6 to 8 – slices cheese
Buns, lightly toasted or grilled

Preparations:

1 – Divide ground into 3 to 4 portions and then split portions in half.
2 – On a baking sheet, pour half of the bourbon.
3 – Smash the portions as flat as you can on the pan.
4 – Sprinkle the burgers with salt and pepper and pour the remaining bourbon over the burgers.
5 – In a skillet, over medium high heat, sauté the bacon and the onions until brown. Drain and reserve.
6 – On a flat top griddle or in a large pan, over medium high heat, add olive oil to griddle and push around.
7 – Place smashed burgers on griddle and sear for 1 minute. Flip and top with cheese and sear for another minute.
8 – Place one smashed burger on the bun, top with bacon & onions, repeat with a second layer.
Top with your favorite condiments! Soooooo good! : )

Photo Credit: Jill O’Brien
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/smashed-bacon-double-buffalo-cheeseburger

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – HOT DOG DAYS OF SUMMER

July 14, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is, HOT DOG DAYS OF SUMMER. Here’s some great ideas for the next time you fire the grill for Wild Idea Buffalo BRATS, HOT DOGS, and SAUSAGES. You can find this recipe and purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Hot Dogs and Sausages along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

HOT DOG DAYS OF SUMMER
No matter how you like to top your dog, the key ingredient is still the hot dog itself. Wild Idea’s skinless Buffalo Hot Dogs are made from our 100% premium grass-fed buffalo meat and organic seasonings. So, fire up the grill and spread out your favorite toppings.

Pizza Dog Topping: Pizza Sauce and melted Mozzarella. You might also want to add some Wild Idea’s Buffalo Pepperoni!

HLT: Hot Dog, Lettuce and Tomato with Mayo. Wild Idea Buffalo Bacon might be an additional tasty topping too!

Relish and Onion Dog: Pickled Relish and Chopped Onions.

Keep it Simple: Ketchup and Mustard.

Pickled Dog: Peperoncini, Pickled Jalapeños and Red Onions.

Chili Cheese Dog: Hot Dog smothered in Chili and Cheese!

Other favorite toppings: Coleslaw, Sauerkraut, and B.B.Q Sauce.
Photo Credit: Jill O’Brien
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/93332481-hot-dog-days-of-summer

 

Wild Idea Buffalo – BRATS, HOT DOGS, and SAUSAGES
All of our brats, hot dogs and sausages are made in-house from our 100% free-roaming grass-fed buffalo meat, with just the right amount of spice! The result: delicious-tasting products that are good and good for you too! What a Wild Idea! *All products are made without the use of added nitrites or nitrates, except for those naturally occurring in sea salt and celery powder.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/brats-sausages-hot-dogs

Healthy Sandwich Recipes

June 2, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Sandwich Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Sandwich Recipes with recipes like Beef and Bean Sloppy Joes, Philly Cheese Steak Sloppy Joes, and Chicken Shawarma with Yogurt Sauce. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Sandwich Recipes
Find healthy, delicious sandwich recipes including steak, French dip, cheese and ham sandwiches. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Beef and Bean Sloppy Joes
This healthy copycat recipe of the comfort food classic trades beans for some of the meat to bump up fiber by 7 grams. We also cut back on the sugar and ketchup in this Sloppy Joe recipe makeover to save you 12 grams of added sugar…………….

Philly Cheese Steak Sloppy Joes
Two of our favorite comfort-food sandwiches join forces in these family-friendly dinner sandwiches. We found that softer buns make this easier to eat, and it’s all the better when wrapped takeout-style in a sheet of foil………….

Chicken Shawarma with Yogurt Sauce
The key to cooking juicy chicken without a spit in this healthy recipe is high heat and dark meat. The yogurt in the marinade gives the chicken both its tender texture and its alluring char. More yogurt in the sauce, along with crunchy cucumbers and herbs, keeps the flavors bright………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Sandwich Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18229/main-dishes/sandwiches/

One of America’s Favorites – Chili Dog

November 30, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A chili-cheese dog with fries

Chili dog is the generic name for a hot dog served in a bun and topped with some sort of meat sauce, such as chili con carne. Often other toppings are also added, such as cheese, onions, and mustard. The style has multiple regional variations in the United States, many calling for specific and unique sauce ingredients, types of hot dogs, or types of buns and referred to regionally under region-specific names.

Texas weiner
In New Jersey and Pennsylvania, the “Texas hot dog”, “Texas chili dog.” “Texas hot’,” or “Texas wiener” is a hot dog with chili or hot sauce; it is served in variations with assorted condiments. The Texas wiener was created in Paterson, New Jersey, before 1920 and in Altoona, Pennsylvania, by Peter “George” Koufougeorgas in 1918 and originally called Texas Hot Wieners. The “Texas” reference is to the chili sauce used on the dogs, which actually has a stronger Greek cuisine influence due to the ethnicity of the cooks who invented it. It is considered a unique regional hot dog style. From its origins, the invention spread to the Pennsylvania cities of Scranton and Philadelphia. By the 1920s, it had reached Western New York, where numerous long standing hot dog stands still remain, including a stand run by the Rigas Family (dating to 1921) and Ted’s Hot Dogs (which opened in 1927).

Coney Island hot dog
In southeastern Michigan, a Coney Island hot dog is a European-style Frankfurter Würstel (Vienna sausage) of German origin with a natural lamb or sheep casing, topped with a beef heart-based sauce, which was developed by Macedonian and Greek immigrants in the area. It has several local variations, including Detroit style, Flint style, and Jackson style.

A Flint-style Coney Island hot dog

Hot wiener
In Rhode Island the hot wiener or New York System wiener is a staple of the food culture and is served at “New York System” restaurants. The traditional wiener is made with a small, thin hot dog made of veal and pork, giving it a different taste from a traditional beef hot dog, served in a steamed bun, and topped with celery salt, yellow mustard, chopped onions, and a seasoned meat sauce.

Michigan hot dog
In the North Country of New York State, a Michigan hot dog, or “Michigan”, is a steamed hot dog on a steamed bun topped with a meaty sauce, generally referred to as “Michigan sauce.”

Cheese coneys

Cheese coneys
In Greater Cincinnati, Cheese coneys or Coney Islands (without the cheese) are hot dogs in buns topped with Cincinnati chili (a Greek-inspired meat sauce), onions, mustard, and cheese.

Carolina style
In North Carolina, hot dogs topped with chili, onions, and either mustard or slaw are referred to as “Carolina style”, which is also used to refer to hamburgers with similar toppings.

Half-smoke

In Washington, D.C., the half-smoke is similar to a hot dog, but usually larger, spicier, and with more coarsely-ground meat, the sausage is often half-pork and half-beef, smoked, and served with herbs, onion, and chili sauce.

A half smoke

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – Hot Dog

October 1, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A cooked hot dog in a bun with mustard

The hot dog or dog (also spelled hotdog) is a grilled or steamed link-sausage sandwich where the sausage is served in the slit of a special hot dog bun, a partially sliced bun. It can also refer to just the sausage (the wurst or wörst) of its composition. Typical sausages include wiener (Vienna sausage), frankfurter (or frank), or knackwurst. The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled sandwiches. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and relish, and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, chili, cheese, coleslaw, and olives. Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog’s cultural traditions include the Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile. Although schnitzel does not commonly refer to a link sausage, the fast food restaurant Wienerschnitzel is famous for its hot dogs.

These types of sausages and their sandwiches were culturally imported from Germany and popularized in the United

Carts selling frankfurters in New York City, circa 1906.

States, where the “hot dog” became a working-class street food sold at hot dog stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Hot dog preparation and condiments vary regionally in the US. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century, and emerged as an important part of other regional cuisines (notably Chicago street cuisine).

Claims about the invention of the hot dog are difficult to assess, as different stories assert different origin points for the distinction between hot dogs and other similar foods. The history of the dish may begin with the creation of the sausage, with the placing of the sausage on bread or a bun as finger food, with the popularization of the existing dish, or with the application of the name “hot dog” to a sausage and bun combination most commonly used with ketchup or mustard and sometimes relish.

The word “frankfurter” comes from Frankfurt, Germany, where pork sausages similar to hot dogs originated. These sausages, Frankfurter Würstchen, were known since the 13th century and given to the people on the event of imperial coronations, starting with the coronation of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor as King. “Wiener” refers to Vienna, Austria, whose German name is “Wien”, home to a sausage made of a mixture of pork and beef. Johann Georg Lahner, an 18th/19th century butcher from the Franconian city of Coburg, is said to have brought the Frankfurter Würstchen to Vienna, where he added beef to the mixture and simply called it Frankfurter. Nowadays, in German-speaking countries, except Austria, hot dog sausages are called Wiener or Wiener Würstchen (Würstchen means “little sausage”), in differentiation to the original pork-only mixture from Frankfurt. In Swiss German, it is called Wienerli, while in Austria the terms Frankfurter or Frankfurter Würstel are used.

Others are credited with first serving hot dogs on rolls. A German immigrant named Feuchtwanger, from Frankfurt, in Hesse, allegedly pioneered the practice in the American midwest; there are several versions of the story with varying

Grilled hot dogs

details. According to one account, Feuchtwanger’s wife proposed the use of a bun in 1880: Feuchtwanger sold hot dogs on the streets of St. Louis, Missouri, and provided gloves to his customers so that they could handle the sausages without burning their hands. Losing money when customers did not return the gloves, Feuchtwanger’s wife suggested serving the sausages in a roll instead. In another version, Antoine Feuchtwanger, or Anton Ludwig Feuchtwanger, served sausages in rolls at the World’s Fair – either at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, or, earlier, at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, in Chicago – again, allegedly because the white gloves provided to customers to protect their hands were being kept as souvenirs.

Another possible origin for serving the sausages in rolls is the pieman Charles Feltman, at Coney Island in New York City. In 1867 he had a cart made with a stove on which to boil sausages, and a compartment to keep buns fresh in which they were served. In 1871 he leased land to build a permanent restaurant, and the business grew, selling far more than just the “Coney Island Red Hots” as they were known.

In 1916, a Polish American employee of Feltman’s named Nathan Handwerker was encouraged by Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante, both working as waiters/musicians, to go into business in competition with his former employer. Handwerker undercut Feltman’s by charging five cents for a hot dog when his former employer was charging ten.

At an earlier time in food regulation, when the hot dog was suspect, Handwerker made sure that men wearing surgeon’s smocks were seen eating at Nathan’s Famous to reassure potential customers.

Common hot dog ingredients include:

Meat trimmings and fat, e.g. mechanically separated meat, pink slime, meat slurry

Hot dog garnished with ketchup and onions

Flavorings, such as salt, garlic, and paprika
Preservatives (cure) – typically sodium erythorbate and sodium nitrite
Pork and beef are the traditional meats used in hot dogs. Less expensive hot dogs are often made from chicken or turkey, using low-cost mechanically separated poultry. Typical hot dog ingredients contain sodium, saturated fat and nitrite, which when consumed in excess have been linked to health problems. Changes in meat technology and dietary preferences have led manufacturers to use turkey, chicken, vegetarian meat substitutes, and to lower the salt content.

Commercial preparation
Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.

Natural-casing hot dogs
As with most sausages, hot dogs must be in a casing to be cooked. Traditional casing is made from the small

A hot dog bun toaster

intestines of sheep. The products are known as “natural casing” hot dogs or frankfurters. These hot dogs have firmer texture and a “snap” that releases juices and flavor when the product is bitten.

Kosher casings are expensive in commercial quantities in the US, so kosher hot dogs are usually skinless or made with reconstituted collagen casings.

Skinless hot dogs
“Skinless” hot dogs must use a casing in the cooking process when the product is manufactured, but the casing is usually a long tube of thin cellulose that is removed between cooking and packaging. This process was invented in Chicago in 1925 by Erwin O. Freund, founder of Visking which would later become Viskase Companies.

The first skinless hot dog casings were produced by Freund’s new company under the name “Nojax”, short for “no jackets” and sold to local Chicago sausage makers.

Skinless hot dogs vary in the texture of the product surface but have a softer “bite” than natural casing hot dogs. Skinless hot dogs are more uniform in shape and size than natural casing hot dogs and less expensive.

Home consumption
A hot dog (wiener) is prepared and served in various ways. Reheated (for food safety purposes) by any of several

A “home-cooked” hot dog with ketchup, mustard, raw onion, fried onion, artificial bacon bits, and pickle relish

methods, it is boiled, grilled, fried, steamed, broiled, baked, microwaved, toasted, and even electro-shocked (Presto Hot Dogger). Typically it is served on a hot-dog bun with prepared mustard (and optionally with choices of many other condiments), or several may be sliced laterally into bite-size pieces and used for protein in other dishes, such as rice, beans, soup or a casserole. There are many appliances dedicated (or that lend themselves) to the reheating of wieners and the warming of hot-dog buns.

In the US, the term “hot dog” refers to both the sausage by itself and the combination of sausage and bun. Many nicknames applying to either have emerged over the years, including frankfurter, frank, wiener, weenie, coney, and red hot. Annually, Americans consume 20 billion hot dogs.

Hot dog restaurants
Hot dog stands and trucks sell hot dogs at street and highway locations. Wandering hot dog vendors sell their product in baseball parks. At convenience stores, hot dogs are kept heated on rotating grills. 7-Eleven sells the most grilled hot dogs in North America — 100 million annually. Hot dogs are also common on restaurants’ children’s menus.

Hot dogs are commonly served with one or more condiments. In 2005, the US-based National Hot Dog and Sausage Council (part of the American Meat Institute) found mustard to be the most popular, preferred by 32% of respondents; 23% favored ketchup; 17% chili con carne; 9% pickle relish, and 7% onions. Other toppings include sauerkraut, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, cheese, and chili peppers.

Condiment preferences vary across the U.S.. Southerners showed the strongest preference for chili, while Midwesterners showed the greatest affinity for ketchup.

Variations
An endless list of hot dog variations has emerged. The original king, known today as a “New York dog” or “New York style”, is a natural casing all-beef frank topped with sauerkraut and spicy brown mustard, onions optional. Sauteed bell peppers, onions, and potatoes find their way into New Jersey’s deep-fried Italian hot dog. In the midwest, the Chicago-style hot dog reigns, served on a poppyseed bun and topped with mustard, fresh tomatoes, onions, “sport peppers”, bright green relish, dill pickles, and celery salt.

Many variations are named after regions other than the one in which they are popular. Meaty Michigan hot dogs are popular in upstate New York (as are white hots), while beefy Coney Island hot dogs are popular in Michigan. Hot wieners, or weenies, are a staple in Rhode Island where they are sold at restaurants with the misleading name “New York System.” Texas hot dogs are spicy variants found in upstate New York and Pennsylvania (and as “all the way dogs” in New Jersey), but not Texas.

Some baseball parks have signature hot dogs, such as Dodger Dogs at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, and Fenway Franks at Fenway Park in Boston, which are boiled then grilled,[citation needed] and served on a New England-style bun.

The world’s longest hot dog created was 197 ft), which rested within a 198 ft bun. The hot dog was prepared by Shizuoka Meat Producers for the All-Japan Bread Association, which baked the bun and coordinated the event, including official measurement for the world record. The hot dog and bun were the center of a media event in celebration of the Association’s 50th anniversary on August 4, 2006, at the Akasaka Prince Hotel, Tokyo, Japan.

A hot dog prepared by head chef Joe Calderone in Manhattan sold for $69 during the National Hot Dog Day in 2010, making it the most expensive hot dog sold at the time. The hot dog was topped with truffle oil, duck foie gras, and truffle butter.

On May 31, 2012, Guinness World Records certified the world record for most expensive hot dog at $145.49. The

A Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion, and mustard

“California Capitol City Dawg”, served at Capitol Dawg in Sacramento, California, features a grilled 18 in all-beef in natural casing frank from Chicago, served on a fresh baked herb and oil focaccia roll, spread with white truffle butter, then grilled. The record breaking hot dog is topped with a whole grain mustard from France, garlic and herb mayonnaise, sauteed chopped shallots, organic mixed baby greens, maple syrup marinated/fruitwood smoked uncured bacon from New Hampshire, chopped tomato, expensive moose cheese from Sweden, sweetened dried cranberries, basil olive oil/pear-cranberry-coconut balsamic vinaigrette, and ground peppercorn. Proceeds from the sale of each 3 lb super dog are donated to the Shriners Hospitals for Children.

 

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