Cast Iron Seared Buffalo Flat Iron Steak w/ Roasted Butternut Squash and Seasoned Blackeye Peas

June 25, 2019 at 6:38 PM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Cast Iron Seared Buffalo Flat Iron Steak w/ Roasted Butternut Squash and Seasoned Blackeye Peas

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I fried up a few slices of Kahn’s Bologna, used a 1/2 slice of Kraft Deli Style Sharp Cheddar Cheese, and toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin. And I had myself a Breakfast Sandwich. Also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Sunny and 82 degrees out today! That’s right, I said Sunny! They say no rain until sometime Saturday, I hope they are right. This area needs to dry out from all the rain. Got the cart out of the shed and did some yard work most of the day. Feels so good to be outside with sunshine! Yes, I had plenty of sunscreen on! So for Dinner tonight I had a Cast Iron Seared Buffalo Flat Iron Steak w/ Roasted Butternut Squash and Seasoned Blackeye Peas.

 

 

 

 

I had a Wild Idea Buffalo – 8 oz. Flat Iron Steak in the freezer, I sat it in the fridge overnight to thaw. I’m preparing it using a Cast Iron Skillet, my favorite way to prepare these Wild Idea Buffalo Steaks! I love the Cast Irons, from the stove straight into the oven! I love these Flat Iron Steaks, as I do all of the Wild Idea Buffalo Products. These are hand cut with no fat and so easy to prepare. I’ll need Extra Light Olive Oil, Dried Thyme, and McCormick Grinders of Sea Salt and Peppercorn Medley. I first rubbed the Steak with Olive Oil and then Seasoned it with the Thyme, Sea Salt, and Peppercorn Medley. I then cut the Steak in half, 1/2 for Dinner and the other 1/2 for Lunch tomorrow. Next I turned the oven on to 400°F.

 

 

 

 

 

I got my Cast Iron out and added a 1 tablespoon of Extra Light Olive Oil. Heated it on medium heat. When heated up I added the Flat Iron Steak to the skillet. I seared for 1 minute and flipped it over and cooked it another 2 minutes. Removed it from the heat and let it rest for 5 minutes. And Wow what a Steak! So juicy and tender, with that Wild Idea Buffalo taste that’s like no other. All their Buffalo are raised on the free range of the Great Plains grasslands. So good! I also Sauteed some Baby Bella Mushrooms. Sauteed in Extra Light Olive Oil and Blue Bonnet Light Butter. seasoned with Sea Salt, Pepper, Dried Thyme, and Parsley.

 

 

 

 

 

For one side dish I prepared Roasted Butternut Squash, easy recipe for some delicious Butternut Squash! I purchased 1 small package of Diced Butternut Squash at Kroger. They sell packages of it that they dice up. This is a lot easier than peeling and seeding one yourself, especially if you don’t have a good knife to cut it. I’ll need; 1 package of Diced Butternut Squash, Walnut Pieces, 1 tablespoons Extra Light Olive Oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons McCormick Grinder Sea Salt, and 1 teaspoon McCormick Grinder Peppercorn Medley.

 

 

 

 

 

To prepare it; Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Place the Squash on a sheet pan and drizzle with the Olive Oil, add the Walnut Pieces, Salt, and Peppercorn and toss well. Arrange the squash in one layer and roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until the Squash is tender, turning once with a spatula. And done, very easy to prepare. With the small amount of Seasoning and Olive Oil, it really brings out the flavor of Butternut Squash! The Walnuts work perfect with the Squash. I really love Butternut Squash! Then I also baked a loaf of La Baguetterie Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. For Dessert later Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding topped with Coll Whip Free.

 

 

 

 

Then for another side dish I heated up a can of Margaret Holmes Seasoned Blackeye Peas. If you are a fan of Blackeye Peas, like myself, you’ll love these! Just emptied the Peas into a small saucepan, covered, and heated to a boil. Reduced the heat, stirred. Simmer until ready to serve. Nice size Peas and Seasoned just right! I also baked a loaf of Italian Bread that I had purchased at Walmart Bakery. For Dessert later tonight a few slices of a Honey Crisp Apple.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo – FLAT-IRON STEAK 8 OZ.
We carefully fillet our flat irons from the upper shoulder blade of the primal chuck. The flat iron has recently become a favorite on restaurant menus due to its high quality and flavor. The flat iron steak is what many chefs consider a best-kept secret of steak cuts. 8 oz.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/steaks/products/flat-iron-steaks

 

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Healthy Frozen Dessert Recipes

June 25, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Frozen Dessert Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Frozen Dessert Recipes with recipes including; Watermelon Sherbet, Raspberry Mocha Ice Cream Brownie Cake, and Blackberry Frozen Yogurt with Toasted Almonds and Waffle Wedges. Find these Dessert recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Frozen Dessert Recipes
Find healthy, delicious frozen dessert recipes including homemade ice cream, ice cream cakes, sorbet, popsicles. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Watermelon Sherbet
The only difference between sorbet and sherbet is that the latter has a bit of dairy. In the case of this easy summer dessert, sweetened condensed milk adds sweetness plus a touch of creaminess…………

Raspberry Mocha Ice Cream Brownie Cake
Who doesn’t love a homemade ice cream cake? This dessert recipe is simple to make and so beautiful your guests won’t believe you made it yourself. A chocolate brownie crust layered with mocha ice cream and topped with raspberry sauce, fresh raspberries, and chocolate syrup—it’s so thick we recommend serving it with a long cake knife, a chef’s knife, or a bread knife……………..

Blackberry Frozen Yogurt with Toasted Almonds and Waffle Wedges
If you haven’t tried making frozen yogurt at home, you’ll want to experiment with this recipe! Fresh blackberries, honey and a little fresh mint are a powerful combination, and at serving time, this frozen treat is served with pieces of toasted multi-grain waffles and slivered almonds……..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Frozen Dessert Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/22800/desserts/frozen/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 25, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Using Cooking Spray in measuring cups before measuring sticky ingredients like honey and syrup, makes them slide right out. Making clean up a bit easier also.

Grilled BBQ Chicken Breasts w/ Roasted Butternut Squash and Green Beans

June 24, 2019 at 6:31 PM | Posted in BBQ, chicken | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Grilled BBQ Chicken Breasts w/ Roasted Butternut Squash and Green Beans

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I was starving so I made favorite of mine, Hash Browns and Diced Ham. I made some Simply Potatoes Shredded Hash Browns, heated up some Meijer Diced Ham, and had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. I made a bed of the Hash Browns in a bowl and sprinkled some Sargento Reduced Fat Sharp Cheddar Cheese. Next I put the Diced Ham over top the Hash Browns. Also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. After Breakfast I went to McDonald’s to pick up Breakfast for Mom. Rain and thunderstorms out today, high of 82 degrees. Not a lot going on today with the rain outside. Did a few things around the house. For Dinner tonight its Grilled BBQ Chicken Breasts w/ Roasted Butternut Squash and Green Beans.

 

 

 

 

I picked the Chicken up at Meijer, Katie’s Best Skinless and Boneless Chicken Breasts, and had the package in the freezer. Sat the package in the fridge overnight to thaw. I had the Dinner Trio a while back and it was so good having it again tonight. For the BBQ Sauce I’m using Kraft Hickory Smoke BBQ Sauce. I’m seasoning the Chicken with Morton’s Lite Salt and Ground Black Pepper. I went out and fired the grill up first. Next I sprayed the Chicken with Pam Non Stick Cooking Spray on both sides of the Chicken Breast, then seasoned them with the Salt and Pepper and waited for the Grill to heat.

 

 

 

 

 

With the Grill ready I started. Added the Chicken and shut the lid on the grill. I let the chicken cook for 7 minutes, then used the tongs to flip the breasts over. Grilled for another 7 minutes longer. With about 1 minute of cooking time left I basted the Chicken with the Kraft Hickory Smoke BBQ Sauce and finished cooking. Checked temperature of the Chicken with a thermometer reads it read just a tad over 165°. The Chicken came out fantastic! Moist and flavorful. Love that Kraft Sauce, and it was excellent! The Katie’s Best Skinless and Boneless Chicken Breasts has become our favorite Chicken Breasts.

 

 

 

 

 

Then for one side I prepared some Roasted Butternut Squash, easy recipe for some delicious Butternut Squash! I purchased 1 small package of Diced Butternut Squash at Kroger. They sell packages of it that they dice up. This is a lot easier than peeling and seeding one yourself, especially if you don’t have a good knife to cut it. I’ll need; 1 package of Diced Butternut Squash, Walnut Pieces, 1 tablespoons Extra Light Olive Oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons McCormick Grinder Sea Salt, and 1 teaspoon McCormick Grinder Peppercorn Medley.

 

 

 

 

 

To prepare it; Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Place the Squash on a sheet pan and drizzle with the Olive Oil, add the Walnut Pieces, Salt, and Peppercorn and toss well. Arrange the squash in one layer and roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until the Squash is tender, turning once with a spatula. And done, very easy to prepare. With the small amount of Seasoning and Olive Oil, it really brings out the flavor of Butternut Squash! The Walnuts work perfect with the Squash. I really love Butternut Squash!

 

 

 

 

 

As the Squash was roasting I had also opened up a Mason Jar of our Canned Green Beans, canned last summer, and had them cooking. Love these Beans, they taste just as fresh as the day we bought them. Just heat them up in a large sauce pan and serve. Fresh Green Beans any time you want. For Dessert/Snack later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn and a Diet Peach Snapple to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Katie’s Best
http://www.katiesbestchicken.com/

Katie’s Best is NON-GMO Verified!
Non GMO logo-300Yes, this is a BIG DEAL! We test every load of grain for this certification process

We take the Non-GMO verification very seriously! Our feed mill and farms go through the verification process and approval according to the Non-GMO Project verified specifications. Grains that do not pass this test are turned away and not labeled with the certification of Non-GMO. Katie’s Best is chicken has been raised on a diet of certified, non-genetically modified grains. The feed mill and farms go through a certification process to ensure that our grains meet the certification guidelines. Our chickens are raised on a complete non-genetically modified grain diet.
http://www.katiesbestchicken.com/non-gmo/

One of America’s Favorites – Salisbury Steak

June 24, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Salisbury steak with brown sauce

Salisbury steak is a dish, originating in the United States, made from a blend of ground beef and other ingredients and usually served with gravy or brown sauce. Hamburg steak is a similar product but differs in ingredients.

Prior to the popularity of minced or ground beef like Salisbury steak in the United States, similar foods already existed in the culinary tradition of Europe. The Apicius cookbook, a collection of ancient Roman recipes that may date to the early 4th century, details a preparation of beef called isicia omentata; served as a baked patty in which minced or chopped beef is mixed with pine kernels, black and green peppercorns, and white wine, isicia omentata may be the earliest precursor to the hamburger. In the 12th century, the nomadic Mongols carried food made of several varieties of milk (kumis) and meat (horse or camel). During the life of their leader Genghis Khan (1167–1227), the Mongol army occupied the western portions of the modern-day nations of Russia, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan, forming the so-called Golden Horde. This cavalry dominated army was fast moving and sometimes unable to stop for a meal, so they often ate while riding. They wrapped a few slices of meat under their saddles so it would crumble under pressure and motion and be cooked by heat and friction. This recipe for minced meat spread throughout the Mongol Empire until its split in the 1240s. It was common for Mongol armies to follow different groups of animals (such as herds of horses or oxen or flocks of sheep) that provided the necessary protein for the warriors’ diets. Marco Polo also recorded descriptions of the culinary customs of the Mongol warriors, indicating that the flesh of a single pony could provide one day’s sustenance for 100 warriors.

When Genghis Khan’s grandson Kublai Khan (1215–1294) invaded Moscow, he and his warriors introduced minced horsemeat to the Muscovites. This was later called steak tartare. The city states of what is now Germany took to this ground meat product and created many of their own dishes by adding capers, onions and even caviar to the blend and selling it on the streets. One of the oldest references to a Hamburgh Sausage appeared in 1763 in the cookbook entitled Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy by Hannah Glasse (1708–1770). Hamburg Sausage is made with minced meat and a variety of spices, including nutmeg, cloves, black pepper, garlic, and salt, and is typically served with toast. A wide variety of traditional European dishes are also made with minced meat, such as meatloaf, the Serbian pljeskavica, the Arab kofta, and meatballs.

Hamburg and its port
Minced meat was a delicacy in medieval cuisine, red meat usually being restricted to the higher classes. Very little mincing was done by medieval butchers or recorded in the cookbooks of the time, perhaps because it was not part of the sausage-making process that preserve meat. Russian ships brought recipes for steak tartare to the port of Hamburg during the 17th century, a time when there was such a great presence of Russian residents there that it was nicknamed “the Russian port”. Trade within the Hanseatic League between the 13th and 17th centuries made this port one of the largest in Europe, its commercial importance being further heightened as it became vital to early transatlantic voyages during the age of steam. In the period of European colonization of the Americas, immigrants to this port were a “bridge” between old European recipes and the future development of the hamburger in the United States.

During the first half of the 19th century, most of the northern European emigrants who traveled to the New World embarked on their transatlantic voyages from Hamburg. The German shipping company Hamburg America Line, also known as the Hamburg Amerikanische Packetfahrt Actien-Gesellschaft (HAPAG), was involved in Atlantic transport for almost a century. The company began operations in 1847 and employed many German immigrants, many of them fleeing the revolutions of 1848–9. New York City was the most common destination for ships traveling from Hamburg, and various restaurants in the city began offering the Hamburg-style steak in order to attract German sailors. The steak frequently appeared on the menu as a Hamburg-style American fillet, or even beefsteak à Hambourgeoise. Early American preparations of minced beef were therefore made to fit the tastes of European immigrants, evoking memories of the port of Hamburg and the world they left behind.

Hamburg steak

Hamburg steak is known by the name “Frikadelle” in Germany since (at least) the 17th century.

In the late 19th century, the Hamburg steak became popular on the menus of many restaurants in the port of New York. This kind of fillet was beef minced by hand, lightly salted and often smoked, and usually served raw in a dish along with onions and bread crumbs. The oldest document that refers to the Hamburg steak is a Delmonico’s Restaurant menu from 1873 which offered customers an 11-cent plate of Hamburg steak that had been developed by American chef Charles Ranhofer (1836–1899). This price was high for the time, twice the price of a simple fillet of beef steak. However, by the end of the century the Hamburg steak was gaining popularity because of its ease of preparation decreasing cost. This is evident from its detailed description in some of the most popular cookbooks of the day. Documents show that this preparation style was used by 1887 in some U.S. restaurants and was also used for feeding patients in hospitals; the Hamburg steak was served raw or lightly cooked and was accompanied by a raw egg.

The menus of many American restaurants during the 19th century included a Hamburg beefsteak that was often sold for breakfast.

Dr. Salisbury
Coming from this history of ground meat dishes is the Salisbury steak, which today is usually served with a gravy similar in texture to brown sauce. Dr. James Salisbury (1823–1905), an American physician and chemist, advocated for a meat-centered diet to promote health, and the term Salisbury steak has been used in the United States since 1897.[18]

Dr. Salisbury recommended this recipe (somewhat different from modern Salisbury steak recipes) for the treatment of alimentation (digestive problems):

“ Eat the muscle pulp of lean beef made into cakes and broiled. This pulp should be as free as possible from connective or glue tissue, fat and cartilage…previous to chopping, the fat, bones, tendons and fasciae should all be cut away, and the lean muscle cut up in pieces an inch or two square. Steaks cut through the centre of the round are the richest and best for this purpose. Beef should be procured from well fatted animals that are from four to six years old.
The pulp should not be pressed too firmly together before broiling, or it will taste livery. Simply press it sufficiently to hold it together. Make the cakes from half an inch to an inch thick. Broil slowly and moderately well over a fire free from blaze and smoke. When cooked, put it on a hot plate and season to taste with butter, pepper, salt; also use either Worcestershire or Halford sauce, mustard, horseradish or lemon juice on the meat if desired. Celery may be moderately used as a relish. ”

Salisbury steak remains popular in the United States, where it is traditionally served with gravy and mashed potatoes or pasta.

United States Department of Agriculture standards for processed, packaged “Salisbury steak” require a minimum content of 65% meat, of which up to 25% can be pork, except if de-fatted beef or pork is used, the limit is 12% combined. No more than 30% may be fat. Meat byproducts are not permitted; however, beef heart meat is allowed. Extender (bread crumbs, flour, oat flakes, etc.) content is limited to 12%, except isolated soy protein at 6.8% is considered equivalent to 12% of the others. The remainder consists of seasonings, fungi or vegetables (onion, bell pepper, mushroom or the like), binders (can include egg) and liquids (such as water, milk, cream, skim milk, buttermilk, brine, vinegar etc.). The product must be fully cooked, or else labeled “Patties for Salisbury Steak”.

The standards for hamburger limit the meat to beef only, and of skeletal origin only. Salt, seasonings and vegetables in condimental proportions can be used, but liquids, binders and/or extenders preclude the use of the term “hamburger” or “burger”. With these added, the product is considered “beef patties”.

Products not made in USDA-inspected establishments are not bound by these standards and may be bound by other standards which vary from country to country.

Hamburg steak is a very similar dish.

The “Hamburger Rundstück” was popular already 1869, and is believed to be a precursor to the modern hamburger.

In Sweden, Pannbiff is similar to a Salisbury steak and is often made by a mix of ground pork and beef, chopped onions, salt and pepper. It is served with boiled potatoes, gravy made from cream, caramelized onions and lingonberries. It is a very traditional dish that is common in the husman cuisine.[citation needed]

Minced cutlet (котлета рубленая, kotleta rublenaya), or, since the late 19th century, simply “cutlet”, is a staple of Russian cuisine. It is similar to a Salisbury steak, with the main difference being pure beef is rarely employed, usually pork or a beef-pork mixture is used. The meat is seasoned with salt and pepper, mixed with finely chopped onion (optionally fried), garlic, and a binder (eggs and breadcrumbs soaked in milk), divided into oval-shaped patties, lightly breaded and shallow-fried in a half-inch of vegetable oil. The transliterated Japanese dish, menchi katsu, is always deep-fried and heavily breaded, being essentially a mincemeat croquette, while the Russian version is always shallow-fried.

 

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Vegan Buffalo Cauliflower Wings

June 24, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Meatless Monday, PBS | 2 Comments
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is – Vegan Buffalo Cauliflower Wings. I was looking at several sites for a Buffalo Cauliflower Wings recipe to pass along and came across the one that sounded the best from the PBS Recipe website. Made using Cauliflower Florets along with several Spices, Celery, and a Vegan Ranch Dressing. You’ll never miss the meat with this week’s recipe! Again its off the PBS Food website which has a fantastic and large selection of Recipes for all Cuisines, Diets, and Tastes so check it out today and always support your local PBS Stations. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/

Vegan Buffalo Cauliflower Wings
A great finger food for sports events, these vegan buffalo cauliflower wings are even better when some of the hot sauce is mixed with the batter so that the cauliflower really marinates in it.
Ingredients
1 cup water
1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons hot sauce of choice (I used Frank’s red hot), divided
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon ground paprika
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 head of cauliflower, cut into florets
Handful of celery, trimmed and cleaned
Ranch dressing of choice (I used a store-bought vegan dressing)

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. To a measuring cup or small bowl, whisk together the water and 2 tablespoons of wing sauce. Set aside.
2 – In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, onion powder, paprika, salt and freshly ground pepper. Pour the water mixture into the flour mixture and mix until combined.
3 – Add the cauliflower and toss until combined. Transfer to a baking sheet and place in the oven to bake until cooked, about 15 minutes. (I used an air-fryer and it only needed about 10 minutes). Add the cauliflower to a bowl and toss with the additional wing sauce. Serve with slices of celery and ranch dressing.

http://www.pbs.org/food/recipes/vegan-buffalo-cauliflower-wings/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 24, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Going Vegetarian…….

Build meals around protein sources that are naturally low in fat, such as beans, lentils, and rice. Don’t overload meals with high-fat cheeses to replace the meat. Combining protein and fiber at meals will help you feel fuller longer. This rice bowl, for example, gets protein from the chickpeas and fiber from the brown rice and root vegetables.

Leftovers: Red Beans and Rice w/ Cajun Shrimp and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

June 23, 2019 at 6:42 PM | Posted in shrimp, Zatarain's | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Leftovers – Red Beans and Rice w/ Cajun Shrimp and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread

 

 

 

For Breakfast I just had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. I had another long and painful night of the Phantom Pains. Not sure why these have been coming back so frequently of late. But it was a very painful night and I was lucky to get an hours worth of sleep. So Tea was plenty this morning. Outside a passing shower, 86 degrees and humid. It really didn’t make a difference what it was outside today. After I got a few things done around the house it was back to bed for me, so very tired. For Dinner tonight leftover Red Beans and Rice w/ Cajun Shrimp and Baked Garlic Loaf Bread. I left the original post for the recipe and directions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Well nothing better than Red Beans and Rice w/ Cajun Shrimp to get rid of those rainy day blues! For the red Beans and Rice I used a box of Zatarain’s Reduced Sodium Red Beans and Rice Mix. For the Shrimp I used the Meijer Frozen Jumbo Shrimp and for the Garlic Loaf I used a loaf of La Baguetterie Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. Perfect Bread. This had the makings of a delicious Meal from the start! I got the bag of Shrimp out of the freezer last night and let it thaw overnight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

To prepare it I’ll need; 1 box of the Zatarain’s Red Beans and Rice Mix, 3 cups Water, Extra Light Olive Oil, and the Shrimp. Mixed 3 cups of water, Rice Mix and 2 tbsp. of Light Olive Oil in 2-quart saucepan until it was well blended. Brought to a boil. Then reduced the heat to low and covered. I got the Shrimp out of the fridge and seasoned them with Zatarain’s Creole Seasoning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simmered for 25 minutes, until the rice was tender. Stirred occasionally to prevent the Rice and Beans from sticking. With 4 minutes of cooking time left I added the Shrimp. When done I removed the skillet from heat. Let stand 5 minutes. And done ready to serve! Like the Sausage and Dirty Rice I had last week, this is one fantastic Meal! The Red Beans and Rice is Seasoned perfect. It made plenty of both the Red Beans and the Rice. And the Shrimp worked perfect with it. Plenty of great leftovers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then I also baked a loaf of La Baguetterie Roasted Garlic Oval Bread. Perfect Bread with any Dish! I loved this dish tonight, plenty leftover for tomorrow’s Dinner! For Dessert/Snack later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn with a Coke Zero to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ZATARAIN’S REDUCED SODIUM RED BEANS AND RICE
A quintessential New Orleans dish, traditionally prepared on Mondays when a long stove top simmer gave home cooks time to do laundry. Today, red bean lovers rely on Zatarain’s for classic flavor in a fraction of the time.

Enjoy Zatarain’s Reduced Sodium Red Beans & Rice with 25% less sodium than the original as a main course or side dish. Supplement with sausage, ham or pork chops, or hold the meat and have a tasty vegetarian meal. However you prepare it, Zatarain’s Reduced Sodium Red Beans & Rice is hearty but not heavy, packed full of flavor and an instant crowd-pleaser.
STOVE TOP DIRECTIONS
1. MIX 3 cups water, Rice Mix and 2 tbsp. butter, margarine or olive oil in 2-quart saucepan until well blended. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to low. Cover.
2. SIMMER 25 minutes or until rice is tender. Stir occasionally to prevent rice and beans from sticking.
3. REMOVE from heat. Let stand 5 minutes. Fluff with fork before serving.

Serving Suggestion: Add a half pound of sliced sausage to make a complete meal.

NUTRITION INFORMATION (PER SERVING)
CALORIES 230
TOTAL FAT 1g
SATURATED FAT 0g
TRANS FAT 0g
CHOLESTEROL 0mg
SODIUM 580
CARBOHYDRATES 45g
FIBER 5g
SUGAR <1g
PROTEIN 9g
https://www.mccormick.com/zatarains/products/dinner-and-side-mixes/rice-mixes-and-side-dishes/reduced-sodium-red-beans-and-rice

Healthy Stuffed Chicken Breast Recipes

June 23, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Stuffed Chicken Breast Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Stuffed Chicken Breast Recipes like; Provolone and Olive Stuffed Chicken Breasts, Jalapeño-Popper Stuffed Chicken, and Hasselback Caprese Chicken. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Stuffed Chicken Breast Recipes
Find healthy, delicious stuffed chicken breast recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

 

Provolone and Olive Stuffed Chicken Breasts
This is an elegant dish. Making a pocket in the chicken breast to hold the stuffing is easy, particularly if you use a good, sharp, thin-bladed knife. Browning the chicken in a skillet before baking gives it a beautiful golden color. Finishing it in the oven ensures that it cooks evenly throughout…………….

Jalapeño-Popper Stuffed Chicken
Stuff all the flavors of fried jalapeño poppers into a creamy filling for stuffed chicken breasts. This healthy baked chicken recipe is great with a side of green beans for an easy dinner…….

Hasselback Caprese Chicken
Using the hasselback technique (cutting crosswise slits every half-inch along the chicken breast) cooks the chicken faster and ensures you get a burst of flavorful gooey filling with each bite. This quick one-pan high-protein and veggie-packed dinner is easy to make and the whole family will love it……………..

 

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Stuffed Chicken Breast Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/20647/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/main-dish/stuffed/chicken-breast/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 23, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Freezer storage…………..

You can store butter in the freezer for up to six months. Plus to last longer, opened flour bags can be stored in the freezer also.

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