Healthy Sandwich Recipes

June 2, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Sandwich Recipes. Find Delicious and Healthy Sandwich Recipes with recipes like Beef and Bean Sloppy Joes, Philly Cheese Steak Sloppy Joes, and Chicken Shawarma with Yogurt Sauce. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Sandwich Recipes
Find healthy, delicious sandwich recipes including steak, French dip, cheese and ham sandwiches. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Beef and Bean Sloppy Joes
This healthy copycat recipe of the comfort food classic trades beans for some of the meat to bump up fiber by 7 grams. We also cut back on the sugar and ketchup in this Sloppy Joe recipe makeover to save you 12 grams of added sugar…………….

Philly Cheese Steak Sloppy Joes
Two of our favorite comfort-food sandwiches join forces in these family-friendly dinner sandwiches. We found that softer buns make this easier to eat, and it’s all the better when wrapped takeout-style in a sheet of foil………….

Chicken Shawarma with Yogurt Sauce
The key to cooking juicy chicken without a spit in this healthy recipe is high heat and dark meat. The yogurt in the marinade gives the chicken both its tender texture and its alluring char. More yogurt in the sauce, along with crunchy cucumbers and herbs, keeps the flavors bright………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Sandwich Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18229/main-dishes/sandwiches/

One of America’s Favorites – Steak Sandwich

May 10, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A steak sandwich with shredded steak, cheese, mushrooms, onions, peppers and tomatoes

A steak sandwich is a sandwich that is prepared with steak that has been broiled, fried, grilled, barbecued or seared using steel grates or gridirons then served on bread or a roll. Steak sandwiches are sometimes served with toppings of cheese, onions, mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes, and in some instances fried eggs, coleslaw, and French fries.

According to the Library of Congress, the first steak sandwich sold in the United States was at Louis’ Lunch of New Haven, Connecticut.

Cheesesteak
A cheesesteak, or steak and cheese, is made from thinly sliced pieces of steak and melted cheese in a long roll. The cheesesteak is one of the favorite foods of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It can be found in most parts of the U.S. outside the Philadelphia area, often sold as a “Philadelphia” or “Philly Cheesesteak”, even when prepared in a manner different from that customary in the city. Variations include the type of condiments, including grilled onions and peppers, the type of cheese used, or the type of roll.

Italian beef
An Italian beef sandwich features thin slices of seasoned roast beef, dripping with meat juices, on a dense, long Italian-style roll, believed to have originated in Chicago, where its history dates back at least to the 1930s. The bread itself is often dipped (or double-dipped) into the jus the meat is cooked in, and the sandwich is typically topped off with Chicago-style giardiniera or sauteed, green Italian sweet peppers. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in Italy.

French dip
A French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip (especially in Canada), is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats such as pastrami or corned beef) on a French roll or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Though it can be found in many parts of the U.S. and Canada, the sandwich originated in Los Angeles, California, in the first decades of the twentieth century. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in France.

A cheesesteak sandwich with Cheez Whiz

Beef on weck
A beef on weck is a variety of sandwich found primarily in Western New York. It is made with roast beef on a kummelweck roll. The meat on the sandwich is traditionally served rare, thin cut, with the top bun getting a dip au jus. Accompaniments include horseradish, a dill pickle spear, and French fries.

Steak bomb
A steak bomb is a hot submarine sandwich consisting of shaved steak and melted provolone or mozzarella cheese with grilled onions, sautéed red and green bell peppers, mushrooms, and peppered shaved steak all on a submarine sandwich roll. It is a variation on the steak submarine sandwich, as is the cheese steak. It is most closely associated with the New England region of the United States, where steak sandwiches are made by quickly grilling shaved steak on a griddle and then adding either cheese, or grilling the steak together with peppers and onions or mushrooms. If all three are combined together it becomes a steak bomb. The addition of salami or other preserved meats or pickles is optional and exact recipes and proportions vary widely. Nearly every pizzeria and sub shop in New England has their own version of the various steak sandwiches and the steak bomb.

 

Other variations
In Australia a steak sandwich is made much like a traditional Australian hamburger, with a piece of grilled steak or fried minute steak, fried onions, lettuce, tomato, tinned beetroot and barbecue sauce or tomato ketchup (known as tomato sauce in Australia). Cheese, a fried egg, bacon or pineapple might also be added. In some establishments the sandwich will be constructed on slices of bread, which are toasted on only one side while other establishments serve it on the same roll (bun) as is used for hamburgers. Some establishments call this a steak burger.

One of America’s Favorites – Steak Sandwich

October 24, 2016 at 5:23 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A steak sandwich with cheese and pickled peppers

A steak sandwich with cheese and pickled peppers

A steak sandwich is a sandwich that is prepared with steak that has been broiled, fried, grilled, barbecued or seared using steel grates or gridirons then served on bread or a roll. Steak sandwiches are sometimes served with toppings of cheese, onions, mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes, and in some instances fried eggs, coleslaw, and french fries.

According to the Library of Congress, the first steak sandwich sold in the United States was at Louis’ Lunch of New Haven, Connecticut.

 

 

 

 

 

A cheesesteak sandwich

A cheesesteak sandwich

Cheesesteak
A cheesesteak, or steak and cheese, is made from thinly sliced pieces of steak and melted cheese in a long roll. The cheesesteak is one of the favorite foods of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It can be found in most parts of the U.S. outside the Philadelphia area, often sold as a “Philadelphia” or “Philly Cheesesteak”, even when prepared in a manner different from that customary in the city. Variations include the type of condiments, including grilled onions and peppers, the type of cheese used, or the type of roll.

 
Italian beef
An Italian beef sandwich features thin slices of seasoned roast beef, dripping with meat juices, on a dense, long Italian-style roll, believed to have originated in Chicago, where its history dates back at least to the 1930s. The bread itself is often dipped (or double-dipped) into the jus the meat is cooked in, and the sandwich is typically topped off with Chicago-style giardiniera or sauteed, green Italian sweet peppers. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in Italy.

 
French dip
A French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip (especially in Canada), is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats such as pastrami or corned beef) on a French roll or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Though it can be found in many parts of the U.S. and Canada, the sandwich originated in Los Angeles, California, in the first decades of the twentieth century. Despite the name, it is almost completely unknown in France.

 
Beef on weck
A beef on weck is a variety of sandwich found primarily in Western New York. It is made with roast beef on a kummelweck roll. The meat on the sandwich is traditionally served rare, thin cut, with the top bun getting a dip au jus. Accompaniments include horseradish, a dill pickle spear, and french fries.

 
Steak bomb
A steak bomb is a hot submarine sandwich consisting of shaved steak and melted provolone or mozzarella cheese with grilled onions, sautéed red and green bell peppers, mushrooms, and peppered shaved steak all on a submarine sandwich roll. It is a variation on the steak submarine sandwich, as is the cheese steak. It is most closely associated with the New England region of the United States, where steak sandwiches are made by quickly grilling shaved steak on a griddle and then adding either cheese, or grilling the steak together with peppers and onions or mushrooms. If all three are combined together it becomes a steak bomb. The addition of salami or other preserved meats or pickles is optional and exact recipes and proportions vary widely. Nearly every pizzeria and sub shop in New England has their own version of the various steak sandwiches and the steak bomb.

 

 

An Arby's roast beef sandwich

An Arby’s roast beef sandwich

Other variations
In Australia a steak sandwich is made much like a traditional Australian hamburger, with a piece of grilled steak or fried minute steak, fried onions, lettuce, tomato, tinned beetroot and barbecue sauce or tomato ketchup (known as tomato sauce in Australia). Cheese, a fried egg, bacon or pineapple might also be added. In some establishments the sandwich will be constructed on slices of bread, which are toasted on only one side while other establishments serve it on the same roll (bun) as is used for hamburgers. Some establishments call this a steak burger.

 

One of America’s Favorites – French Dip

April 6, 2015 at 5:36 AM | Posted in BEEF | 1 Comment
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A French dip

A French dip

An American cuisine, the French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip, is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats) on a “French roll” or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Beef broth or beef consommé is sometimes substituted. Despite the name, this American specialty is almost completely unknown in France, the name seeming to refer to the style of bread rather than an alleged French origin.

Although the sandwich is most commonly served with a cup of jus or broth on the side of the plate, into which the sandwich is dipped as it is eaten, this is not how the sandwich was served when it was invented.

Two Los Angeles restaurants have claimed to be the birthplace of the French dip sandwich: Cole’s Pacific Electric Buffet and Philippe The Original. Philippe’s website describes the dish as a “specialty of the house”, and the words “Home Of The Original French Dip Sandwich” are present in the restaurant’s logo. At both of these restaurants, the roll is dipped in the hot beef juices before the sandwich is assembled, and is served “wet”. The sandwich can also be requested “double dipped” at either establishment. Philippe’s own brand of spicy mustard is traditionally used by patrons to complement the sandwich.

His controversy over who originated the sandwich remains unresolved. Both restaurants were established in 1908.

Roast Beef Dip au jus, with french fries

Roast Beef Dip au jus, with french fries

However, Cole’s claims to have originated the sandwich shortly after the restaurant opened in 1908, while Philippe’s claims that owner Philippe Mathieu invented it in 1918.

The story of the sandwich’s invention by Philippe’s has several variants: some sources say that the sandwich was first created by a cook or a server who, while preparing a sandwich for a police officer or fireman, accidentally dropped it into a pan of meat drippings. The patron liked it, and the dish surged in popularity shortly after its invention. Other accounts say that a customer who didn’t want some meat drippings to go to waste requested his sandwich be dipped in them. Still others say that a chef dipped a sandwich into a pan of meat drippings after a customer complained that the bread was stale. Cole’s account states that the sandwich was invented by a sympathetic chef, Jack Garlinghouse, for a customer who was complaining of sore gums. Some accounts tell Philippe’s version of events, but assign the location to Cole’s. The mystery of the sandwich’s invention might not be solved due to a lack of information and observable evidence.

The French dip is now served at a number of restaurant chains including fast food, diners, and standard restaurants.

 

 

 

Easy French Dip Sandwiches
From the http://allrecipes.com/ website, Easy French Dip Sandwiches.

“This sandwich made with sliced roast beef and provolone cheese is a crowd pleaser. The flavor is so rich, no one will know it only took 15 minutes to put together.”
INGREDIENTS:
1 (10.5 ounce) can beef consommeAll Recipes
1 cup water
1 pound thinly sliced deli roast beef
8 slices provolone cheese
4 hoagie rolls, split lengthwise

 
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Open the hoagie rolls and lay out on a baking sheet.
2. Heat beef consomme and water in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat to make a rich beef broth. Place the roast beef in the broth and warm for 3 minutes. Arrange the meat on the hoagie rolls and top each roll with 2 slices of provolone.
3. Bake the sandwiches in the preheated oven for 5 minutes, or until the cheese just begins to melt. Serve the sandwiches with small bowls of the warm broth for dipping.

 
Nutrition Information
Servings Per Recipe: 4
Calories: 548
Amount Per Serving
Total Fat: 22.6g
Cholesterol: 94mg
Sodium: 2310mg
Amount Per Serving
Total Carbs: 40.5g
Dietary Fiber: 2g
Protein: 44.6g

 
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/easy-french-dip-sandwiches/

One of America’s Favorites – French Dip

April 28, 2014 at 7:11 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
A French dip

A French dip

 

In American cuisine a French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip, is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats) on a “French roll” or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Beef broth or beef consommé is sometimes substituted. Despite the name, this American specialty is almost completely unknown in France, the name seeming to refer to the style of bread rather than an alleged French origin.

 

 

Although the sandwich is most commonly served with a cup of jus or broth on the side of the plate, into which the sandwich is dipped as it is eaten, this is not how the sandwich was served when it was invented.

 

 

Two Los Angeles restaurants have claimed to be the birthplace of the French dip sandwich: Cole’s Pacific Electric Buffet and Philippe The Original. Philippe’s website describes the dish as a “specialty of the house”, and the words “Home Of The Original French Dip Sandwich” are present in the restaurant’s logo. At both of these restaurants, the roll is dipped in the hot beef juices before the sandwich is assembled, and is served “wet”. The sandwich can also be requested “double dipped” at either establishment. Philippe’s own brand of spicy mustard is traditionally used by patrons to complement the sandwich.

 

 

This controversy over who originated the sandwich remains unresolved. Both restaurants were established in 1908. However, Cole’s claims to have originated the sandwich shortly after the restaurant opened in 1908, while Philippe’s claims that owner Philippe Mathieu invented it in 1918. Cole’s was the oldest restaurant or bar in Los Angeles to operate continuously since its opening at the same location. Its streak ended when it closed for remodeling on March 15, 2007. It reopened on December 4, 2008.

 

French dip, with bowl of jus for dipping

French dip, with bowl of jus for dipping

The story of the sandwich’s invention by Philippe’s has several variants: some sources say that the sandwich was first created by a cook or a server who, while preparing a sandwich for a police officer or fireman, accidentally dropped it into a pan of meat drippings. The patron liked it, and the dish surged in popularity shortly after its invention. Other accounts say that a customer who didn’t want some meat drippings to go to waste requested his sandwich be dipped in them. Still others say that a chef dipped a sandwich into a pan of meat drippings after a customer complained that the bread was stale. Cole’s account states that the sandwich was invented by a sympathetic chef, Jack Garlinghouse, for a customer who was complaining of sore gums. Some accounts tell Philippe’s version of events, but assign the location to Cole’s. The mystery of the sandwich’s invention might not be solved due to a lack of information and observable evidence.

 

 

The French dip is now served at a number of restaurant chains including fast food, diners and standard restaurants.

 

 

 

French Dip Sandwich Recipe
Ingredients:

1 (4-pound) beef rib eye, sirloin, or tenderloin roast
1/2 cup coarsely-ground black pepper
Dipping Sauce (recipe follows)
8 French rolls
Butter

 
Preparation:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Place beef roast onto a rack in a shallow baking pan; firmly press pepper onto roast. Bake, uncovered, 30 to 45 minutes or until thermometer in the thickest part of roast registers 135 degrees F. Remove from oven and transfer onto a cutting board; let stand 15 minute before carving; slice beef thinly.

Reserve juice and pour into a medium saucepan. Prepare Dipping Sauce.

For each sandwich: Cut French rolls in half. Toast and butter each French roll. Layer about 1/2 pound of sliced beef on bottom slice of each roll; place remaining tops of rolls on top of the beef. Slice sandwiches in half and serve on individual plates with a small bowl (1/4 cup) of hot Dipping Sauce.

Makes 8 sandwiches.

 

Dipping Sauce:
Drippings from cooking pan
1 (10.5 ounce) can beef broth
1/2 cup water
Salt and pepper to taste

In a medium saucepan, add beef drippings, beef broth, water, salt and pepper; bring just to a boil. turn off heat, cover, and let site 10 minutes before serving.

 

http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/Sandwiches/FrenchDipSandwich.htm

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