Healthy Cinnamon Recipes

March 7, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Cinnamon Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Cinnamon Recipes with recipes including; Pork Tenderloin with Sweet-Spiced Onions, Apple Dutch Baby Pancake, and Cinnamon Streusel Rolls. Find these recipes and more at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Cinnamon Recipes
Find healthy, delicious cinnamon recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Pork Tenderloin with Sweet-Spiced Onions
A cinnamon-allspice rub adds intriguing flavor to the pork tenderloin in this one-dish meal. Served alongside an easy couscous, pea, and sliced almond mixture, the pork is topped with an orange-onion sauce that your family will love………

Apple Dutch Baby Pancake
This one-pan puffy oven-baked pancake recipe will wow brunch guests. Make it your own by swapping out the apple for pear slices, or switch up the spices and try cardamom or ginger in place of the cinnamon……….

Cinnamon Streusel Rolls
You don’t have to make a special trip to the bakery when you can whip up a batch of these heavenly cinnamon streusel rolls at home…….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Cinnamon Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/21643/ingredients/herbs-spices/spices/cinnamon/

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Healthy Diabetic Recipes

November 23, 2018 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Diabetic Recipes. i have Diabetes 2 myself and I love this website! So here’s some Delicious and Healthy Diabetic Recipes with recipes like; Turkey and Brown Rice Chili, Sweet Potato Hash Browns, and Whole-Wheat Cranberry Dinner Rolls. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Looking for a good recipe Magazine, look no further the EatingWell Magazine. I’m a long time subscriber and have found so many recipes through the years. So subscribe today! Well Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Diabetic Recipes
Find healthy, delicious diabetic recipes including main dishes, drinks, snacks and desserts from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Turkey and Brown Rice Chili
This hearty turkey chili recipe takes just 35 minutes to prep. While its cooking, you’ll have time to throw together a green salad and warm up some crusty bread to complete the meal…..

Sweet Potato Hash Browns
Colorful, fiber-packed shredded sweet potatoes stand in for regular potatoes in this crispy hashbrown recipe. Want to take it up a notch? Jazz them up by adding jalapeños or herbs. Or, serve them with fried eggs for a complete and satisfying meal………….

Whole-Wheat Cranberry Dinner Rolls
These buttery thyme-seasoned knotted dinner rolls have a sweet and tangy cranberry-ginger topping baked right in. The prep time is only 20 minutes thanks to frozen whole-wheat bread dough, so you can make these any night of the week…………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Diabetic Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/17899/health-condition/diabetic/

One of America’s Favorites – Hot Dog

October 1, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A cooked hot dog in a bun with mustard

The hot dog or dog (also spelled hotdog) is a grilled or steamed link-sausage sandwich where the sausage is served in the slit of a special hot dog bun, a partially sliced bun. It can also refer to just the sausage (the wurst or wörst) of its composition. Typical sausages include wiener (Vienna sausage), frankfurter (or frank), or knackwurst. The names of these sausages also commonly refer to their assembled sandwiches. Typical condiments include mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and relish, and common garnishes include onions, sauerkraut, chili, cheese, coleslaw, and olives. Hot dog variants include the corn dog and pigs in a blanket. The hot dog’s cultural traditions include the Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest and the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile. Although schnitzel does not commonly refer to a link sausage, the fast food restaurant Wienerschnitzel is famous for its hot dogs.

These types of sausages and their sandwiches were culturally imported from Germany and popularized in the United

Carts selling frankfurters in New York City, circa 1906.

States, where the “hot dog” became a working-class street food sold at hot dog stands and carts. The hot dog became closely associated with baseball and American culture. Hot dog preparation and condiments vary regionally in the US. Although particularly connected with New York City and its cuisine, the hot dog eventually became ubiquitous throughout the US during the 20th century, and emerged as an important part of other regional cuisines (notably Chicago street cuisine).

Claims about the invention of the hot dog are difficult to assess, as different stories assert different origin points for the distinction between hot dogs and other similar foods. The history of the dish may begin with the creation of the sausage, with the placing of the sausage on bread or a bun as finger food, with the popularization of the existing dish, or with the application of the name “hot dog” to a sausage and bun combination most commonly used with ketchup or mustard and sometimes relish.

The word “frankfurter” comes from Frankfurt, Germany, where pork sausages similar to hot dogs originated. These sausages, Frankfurter Würstchen, were known since the 13th century and given to the people on the event of imperial coronations, starting with the coronation of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor as King. “Wiener” refers to Vienna, Austria, whose German name is “Wien”, home to a sausage made of a mixture of pork and beef. Johann Georg Lahner, an 18th/19th century butcher from the Franconian city of Coburg, is said to have brought the Frankfurter Würstchen to Vienna, where he added beef to the mixture and simply called it Frankfurter. Nowadays, in German-speaking countries, except Austria, hot dog sausages are called Wiener or Wiener Würstchen (Würstchen means “little sausage”), in differentiation to the original pork-only mixture from Frankfurt. In Swiss German, it is called Wienerli, while in Austria the terms Frankfurter or Frankfurter Würstel are used.

Others are credited with first serving hot dogs on rolls. A German immigrant named Feuchtwanger, from Frankfurt, in Hesse, allegedly pioneered the practice in the American midwest; there are several versions of the story with varying

Grilled hot dogs

details. According to one account, Feuchtwanger’s wife proposed the use of a bun in 1880: Feuchtwanger sold hot dogs on the streets of St. Louis, Missouri, and provided gloves to his customers so that they could handle the sausages without burning their hands. Losing money when customers did not return the gloves, Feuchtwanger’s wife suggested serving the sausages in a roll instead. In another version, Antoine Feuchtwanger, or Anton Ludwig Feuchtwanger, served sausages in rolls at the World’s Fair – either at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, or, earlier, at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, in Chicago – again, allegedly because the white gloves provided to customers to protect their hands were being kept as souvenirs.

Another possible origin for serving the sausages in rolls is the pieman Charles Feltman, at Coney Island in New York City. In 1867 he had a cart made with a stove on which to boil sausages, and a compartment to keep buns fresh in which they were served. In 1871 he leased land to build a permanent restaurant, and the business grew, selling far more than just the “Coney Island Red Hots” as they were known.

In 1916, a Polish American employee of Feltman’s named Nathan Handwerker was encouraged by Eddie Cantor and Jimmy Durante, both working as waiters/musicians, to go into business in competition with his former employer. Handwerker undercut Feltman’s by charging five cents for a hot dog when his former employer was charging ten.

At an earlier time in food regulation, when the hot dog was suspect, Handwerker made sure that men wearing surgeon’s smocks were seen eating at Nathan’s Famous to reassure potential customers.

Common hot dog ingredients include:

Meat trimmings and fat, e.g. mechanically separated meat, pink slime, meat slurry

Hot dog garnished with ketchup and onions

Flavorings, such as salt, garlic, and paprika
Preservatives (cure) – typically sodium erythorbate and sodium nitrite
Pork and beef are the traditional meats used in hot dogs. Less expensive hot dogs are often made from chicken or turkey, using low-cost mechanically separated poultry. Typical hot dog ingredients contain sodium, saturated fat and nitrite, which when consumed in excess have been linked to health problems. Changes in meat technology and dietary preferences have led manufacturers to use turkey, chicken, vegetarian meat substitutes, and to lower the salt content.

Commercial preparation
Hot dogs are prepared commercially by mixing the ingredients (meats, spices, binders and fillers) in vats where rapidly moving blades grind and mix the ingredients in the same operation. This mixture is forced through tubes into casings for cooking. Most hot dogs sold in the US are “skinless” as opposed to more expensive “natural casing” hot dogs.

Natural-casing hot dogs
As with most sausages, hot dogs must be in a casing to be cooked. Traditional casing is made from the small

A hot dog bun toaster

intestines of sheep. The products are known as “natural casing” hot dogs or frankfurters. These hot dogs have firmer texture and a “snap” that releases juices and flavor when the product is bitten.

Kosher casings are expensive in commercial quantities in the US, so kosher hot dogs are usually skinless or made with reconstituted collagen casings.

Skinless hot dogs
“Skinless” hot dogs must use a casing in the cooking process when the product is manufactured, but the casing is usually a long tube of thin cellulose that is removed between cooking and packaging. This process was invented in Chicago in 1925 by Erwin O. Freund, founder of Visking which would later become Viskase Companies.

The first skinless hot dog casings were produced by Freund’s new company under the name “Nojax”, short for “no jackets” and sold to local Chicago sausage makers.

Skinless hot dogs vary in the texture of the product surface but have a softer “bite” than natural casing hot dogs. Skinless hot dogs are more uniform in shape and size than natural casing hot dogs and less expensive.

Home consumption
A hot dog (wiener) is prepared and served in various ways. Reheated (for food safety purposes) by any of several

A “home-cooked” hot dog with ketchup, mustard, raw onion, fried onion, artificial bacon bits, and pickle relish

methods, it is boiled, grilled, fried, steamed, broiled, baked, microwaved, toasted, and even electro-shocked (Presto Hot Dogger). Typically it is served on a hot-dog bun with prepared mustard (and optionally with choices of many other condiments), or several may be sliced laterally into bite-size pieces and used for protein in other dishes, such as rice, beans, soup or a casserole. There are many appliances dedicated (or that lend themselves) to the reheating of wieners and the warming of hot-dog buns.

In the US, the term “hot dog” refers to both the sausage by itself and the combination of sausage and bun. Many nicknames applying to either have emerged over the years, including frankfurter, frank, wiener, weenie, coney, and red hot. Annually, Americans consume 20 billion hot dogs.

Hot dog restaurants
Hot dog stands and trucks sell hot dogs at street and highway locations. Wandering hot dog vendors sell their product in baseball parks. At convenience stores, hot dogs are kept heated on rotating grills. 7-Eleven sells the most grilled hot dogs in North America — 100 million annually. Hot dogs are also common on restaurants’ children’s menus.

Hot dogs are commonly served with one or more condiments. In 2005, the US-based National Hot Dog and Sausage Council (part of the American Meat Institute) found mustard to be the most popular, preferred by 32% of respondents; 23% favored ketchup; 17% chili con carne; 9% pickle relish, and 7% onions. Other toppings include sauerkraut, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, cheese, and chili peppers.

Condiment preferences vary across the U.S.. Southerners showed the strongest preference for chili, while Midwesterners showed the greatest affinity for ketchup.

Variations
An endless list of hot dog variations has emerged. The original king, known today as a “New York dog” or “New York style”, is a natural casing all-beef frank topped with sauerkraut and spicy brown mustard, onions optional. Sauteed bell peppers, onions, and potatoes find their way into New Jersey’s deep-fried Italian hot dog. In the midwest, the Chicago-style hot dog reigns, served on a poppyseed bun and topped with mustard, fresh tomatoes, onions, “sport peppers”, bright green relish, dill pickles, and celery salt.

Many variations are named after regions other than the one in which they are popular. Meaty Michigan hot dogs are popular in upstate New York (as are white hots), while beefy Coney Island hot dogs are popular in Michigan. Hot wieners, or weenies, are a staple in Rhode Island where they are sold at restaurants with the misleading name “New York System.” Texas hot dogs are spicy variants found in upstate New York and Pennsylvania (and as “all the way dogs” in New Jersey), but not Texas.

Some baseball parks have signature hot dogs, such as Dodger Dogs at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, and Fenway Franks at Fenway Park in Boston, which are boiled then grilled,[citation needed] and served on a New England-style bun.

The world’s longest hot dog created was 197 ft), which rested within a 198 ft bun. The hot dog was prepared by Shizuoka Meat Producers for the All-Japan Bread Association, which baked the bun and coordinated the event, including official measurement for the world record. The hot dog and bun were the center of a media event in celebration of the Association’s 50th anniversary on August 4, 2006, at the Akasaka Prince Hotel, Tokyo, Japan.

A hot dog prepared by head chef Joe Calderone in Manhattan sold for $69 during the National Hot Dog Day in 2010, making it the most expensive hot dog sold at the time. The hot dog was topped with truffle oil, duck foie gras, and truffle butter.

On May 31, 2012, Guinness World Records certified the world record for most expensive hot dog at $145.49. The

A Coney Island hot dog with chili, onion, and mustard

“California Capitol City Dawg”, served at Capitol Dawg in Sacramento, California, features a grilled 18 in all-beef in natural casing frank from Chicago, served on a fresh baked herb and oil focaccia roll, spread with white truffle butter, then grilled. The record breaking hot dog is topped with a whole grain mustard from France, garlic and herb mayonnaise, sauteed chopped shallots, organic mixed baby greens, maple syrup marinated/fruitwood smoked uncured bacon from New Hampshire, chopped tomato, expensive moose cheese from Sweden, sweetened dried cranberries, basil olive oil/pear-cranberry-coconut balsamic vinaigrette, and ground peppercorn. Proceeds from the sale of each 3 lb super dog are donated to the Shriners Hospitals for Children.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 13, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Reheating biscuits or rolls…………

The quickest way to reheat biscuits or rolls is to sprinkle them lightly with water and wrap them in foil. Then reheat them for about 5 minutes in a 350 degree preheated oven.

Our Favorite Spring Recipes

March 29, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its – Our Favorite Spring Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Spring Recipes like; Hazelnut Coffee Cake, Cinnamon Streusel Rolls, and Chicken and Mushroom Manicotti. Find these Diabetic Friendly recipes and more all at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

Our Favorite Spring Recipes
It’s time to spring clean your eating routine. Enjoy recipes for breakfasts, lunches, appetizers, and restaurant-style dinners all using delicious seasonal ingredients.

Hazelnut Coffee Cake
Guests will gush over this luscious sour cream breakfast bread that’s spiced up with cinnamon and hazelnut. Serve it for brunch or as an after-dinner treat……..

Cinnamon Streusel Rolls
Stop swearing off cinnamon rolls and dig into these gooey streusel-filled rolls with only 5 grams of fat per serving……..

Chicken and Mushroom Manicotti
Dish up two of these rolls per serving! Lean chicken, reduced-fat cheese, and light spaghetti sauce make this Italian dish low in fat and diabetes-friendly………..

* Click the link below to get all the the – Our Favorite Spring Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/popular/our-favorite-spring-recipes

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 7, 2017 at 5:49 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Make your own Bread Crumb toppings……

 

Save all kinds of leftover bagels, bread loaves, rolls, crackers, biscuits, and make them into bread crumbs in a food processor. Then you can freeze them in self-sealing plastic bags or containers and use for stuffings and toppings later.

One of America’s Favorites – Italian Sandwich

February 20, 2017 at 6:26 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A close-up view of an Italian sandwich

A close-up view of an Italian sandwich

The Italian sandwich, sometimes referred to as the Maine Italian sandwich, is an American submarine sandwich in Italian-American cuisine prepared on a long bread roll or bun with meats, cheese and various vegetables. The ingredients serve to counterbalance one-another, creating an equilibrium of flavors and texture. The Italian sandwich was invented in Portland, Maine, in 1903 by Giovanni Amato, a baker. It is known as a submarine sandwich or a sub in Boston, Massachusetts, and as a spuckie in East Boston.

 
The Italian sandwich is prepared using a long bread roll or bun with meats such as salami, mortadella, capicolla and ham along with provolone or American cheese, tomato, onion, sour pickle, green bell pepper, black olives, olive oil or salad oil, salt and black pepper. Additional ingredients, such as pepperoni, banana pepper, lettuce and mustard, may be added, and the sandwich is often cut in half to make it easier to handle. The flavors and texture of the sandwich are counterbalanced by the ingredients used, creating an equilibrium of flavors, and the fats and acids in the ingredients also serve to counterbalance one another.

 

 

An Italian sandwich

An Italian sandwich

The Italian sandwich was invented in Portland, Maine, by baker Giovanni Amato in 1903. While selling his bread on his street cart, Amato received requests from dockworkers to slice his long bread rolls and add sliced meat, cheese and vegetables to them. Amato later opened a sandwich shop named Amato’s, and today the sandwich continues to be prepared by Amato’s sandwich shops in Portland. The Amato’s version is traditionally prepared using fresh-baked bread, ham, American cheese, slices of tomato, green pepper and sour pickle, black olives and salad oil.

The Italian sandwich is known as a submarine sandwich or a sub in Boston, Massachusetts, and in east Boston it is referred to as a spuckie, which may be named after the spuccadella, an Italian bread roll with a pointed shape. In Philadelphia and South Jersey it is known as a “hoagie” or a “grinder”. It is the first name that has given the designation to “Subway Sandwich Shops” around the world.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 3, 2016 at 4:59 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to D.L. for sharing this hint…..

 
A good way to reheat biscuits or rolls is to sprinkle them lightly with water and wrap them in foil. Reheat them in preheated oven at 350 degrees for about 5 minutes, and done!

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 2, 2016 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Make those Rolls Special…..

 
Before you put rolls in the oven, make a delicious glaze for their tops. Lightly beat an egg white with a tablespoon of milk and brush on each roll. Everyone will love them!

Steak Hoagie Patties w/ Baked Crinkle Fries

July 14, 2016 at 4:58 PM | Posted in BEEF, Ore - Ida | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Steak Hoagie Patties w/ Baked Crinkle Fries

 

Steak Hoagie Patties w Baked Crinkle Fries 010
For Breakfast this morning I fried up a couple of Jennie – O Turkey Breakfast Sausage Links. Love these Sausage Links,only 65 calories for 2 links. Then I made some Simply Potatoes Hash Browns, toasted 2 slices of healthy Life Whole Grain Bread, and a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Another really humid day out there again! Not quite as hot, 84 degrees, but it was humid early in the morning and had a couple of passing showers. Not a whole lot to do today, just got caught up on some small jobs around the house. So for Dinner tonight I prepared Steak Hoagie Patties w/ Baked Crinkle Fries.

 

Steak Hoagie Patties w Baked Crinkle Fries 002

While at Kroger yesterday I was in the frozen foods and spotted some J.T.M. Beef Hoagie Patties. It had been quite some time since I’ve had these and they looked good and I grabbed a package of them. Growing up we would have the J.T.M. Burger Patties all the time, and it’s been even longer since I’ve had the Burgers. So after getting a package of the Hoagie Patties I picked up a package of Kroger Whole Wheat Hoagie Rolls. I’ll also need some Baby Bella Mushrooms, Sargento Ultra Thin Sliced Provolone Cheese, and Ragu Original Pizza Sauce. I’ll also be baking some Ore Ida Crinkle Fries.

 

 

I started by preheating the oven at 400 degrees, I’ll be baking the Fries and toasting the Hoagie Buns. The Fries take 18 minutes and the Buns about 3 minutes.

 

Steak Hoagie Patties w Baked Crinkle Fries 003
As I said I’ll be using the J.T.M. Beef Steak Hoagies. They come pre-cooked and frozen so all you have to do is warm them back up. You can bake them, pan fry them, or grill them, I pan fried mine. It took about 3– 4 minutes per side, after flipping them over I added the Provolone Cheese with a minute of cooking time left. As the Hoagies were cooking I sliced up some Mushrooms and sauteed them and in a small sauce pan and I heated up the Sauce in another small sauce pan on medium low.

 

 

Steak Hoagie Patties w Baked Crinkle Fries 004
With everything getting done at the same time I assembled the Hoagie. Started by placing the Cheese covered Hoagie Pattie on the bottom Bun. Next added the Sauce and topped it with the Mushrooms and the top half of the Bun. I’m not a big Beef eater anymore but these are really good! Nice flavor and cook up very easy.

 

 

 

Ore Ida Crinkle Fries4_crop (1)

Served it with the baked Ore Ida Crinkle Fries along with a side of Hunt’s Ketchup for dipping. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

 

 

 

 

 

J.T.M. Beef Hoagie Patties

* Great on the grill
* Fully cooked, ready in minutesJTM HOAGIES
* Microwaveable

Directions:
Instructions: Hoagie patties are fully cooked, so all you need To do is heat and serve. Keep patties frozen until ready To serve. For best results,prepare patties on a grill. Refrigerate or freeze any leftover product.Grill: place frozen patties on a grill over white hot coals. Heat for 2 minutes on each side. On a gas grill, heat on high for 2 minutes on each side. Stove top/skillet: place frozen patties in a skillet on medium high heat (about 375 degrees). Heat for 2-1/2 minutes on each side.Microwave: (microwave ovens vary; heating times are approximate). Place one frozen patty on a microwave safe plate. Heat on medium power for 2-1/2 minutes, flip, And heat for another 2-1/2 minutes. For multiple patties, add one minute heating time per side for each additional patty.
Ingredients:
Ingredients: Beef, Water, Textured Soy Protein (Soy Flour, Caramel Colored), Soy Protein Concentrate, Salt, Soy Flour, Seasoning (Onion Powder, Dextrose, Spices, Hydrolyzed Corn Gluten/Soy Protein/Wheat Gluten [With Partially Hydrogenated Soybean And Cottoneseed Oils], Garlic Powder), Sodium Phosphates, Seasoning (Hydrolyzed Soy And Corn Protein, Salt With Partially Hydrogenated Vegetable Oil [Cottonseed, Soybean] Added), Caramel Color.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 113 G
Servings Per Container 6
Amount Per Serving
Calories 290
Calories From Fat 200
% Daily Value
Total Fat 22 G 33
Saturated Fat 9 G 44
Trans Fat 1.5 G
Cholesterol 45 Mg 15
Sodium 930 Mg 39
Total Carbohydrate 5 G 2
Dietary Fiber 2 G 10
Sugars 2 G
Protein 20 G

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