One of America’s Favorites – Club Sandwich

July 26, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Club Sandwich

A club sandwich, also called a clubhouse sandwich, is a sandwich of bread (occasionally toasted), sliced cooked poultry, or fried bacon, lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise. It is often cut into quarters or halves and held together by cocktail sticks. Modern versions frequently have two layers which are separated by an additional slice of bread.

The club sandwich may have originated at the Union Club of New York City. The earliest known reference to the sandwich, an article that appeared in The Evening World on November 18, 1889, is also an early recipe; “Have you tried a Union Club sandwich yet? Two toasted pieces of Graham bread, with a layer of turkey or chicken and ham between them, served warm. Several other early references also credit the chef of the Union Club with creating the sandwich.

Other sources, however, find the origin of the club sandwich to be up for debate. Another theory is that the club sandwich was invented in an exclusive Saratoga Springs, New York, gambling club in the late 19th century.

The sandwich is known to have appeared on U.S. restaurant menus as far back as 1899. The earliest reference to the sandwich in published fiction is from Conversations of a Chorus Girl, a 1903 book by Ray Cardell. Historically, club sandwiches featured slices of chicken, but with time, turkey has become increasingly common.

As with a BLT, toasted white bread is standard, along with iceberg lettuce, bacon, and tomatoes. The sandwich is traditionally dressed with mayonnaise. Variations, however, on the traditional club sandwich abound. Some vary the protein, for example, a “breakfast club” that includes eggs or a “roast beef club.” Others include ham (instead of, or in addition to bacon) and/or cheese slices. Vegetarian club sandwiches often include hummus, avocado or spinach, as well as substitute the real bacon with a vegetarian alternative. Mustard and sometimes honey mustard are common condiments. Upscale variations include, for example, the oyster club, the salmon club, and Dungeness crab melt.

The sandwich is commonly served with an accompaniment of either coleslaw, or potato salad, and often garnished with a pickle. The coleslaw or potato salad is often reduced to a “garnish” portion, when the primary accompaniment is an order of french fries or potato chips. Due to high fat and carb content from the bread, bacon and dressing, club sandwiches have sometimes been criticized as unhealthy. In 2000, Burger King came under fire for its chicken club, which contained 700 calories, 44 grams of fat (nine of them saturated), and 1,300 milligrams of sodium, as well as the trans fat from the fryer shortening.

One of America’s Favorites – Italian Beef Sandwich

December 7, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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An Italian beef is a sandwich, originating in Chicago, composed of thin slices of seasoned roast beef, simmered and served au jus (known by locals as ‘gravy’) on a long Italian-style roll. The sandwich’s history dates back at least to the 1930s. The bread itself is, at the diner’s preference, often dipped (or double-dipped) into the jus the meat is cooked in, and the sandwich is typically

An Italian beef sandwich

topped off with Chicago-style giardiniera (called “hot”) or sauteed, green Italian sweet peppers (called “sweet”).

Italian beef sandwiches are commonly found at many area hot dog stands, pizzerias and Italian-American restaurants in northeastern Illinois, southeast Wisconsin (notably Kenosha), Northwest Indiana, Fort Wayne, and Indianapolis. In recent years, Chicago expatriates have opened restaurants across the country serving Italian beef.

 

Italian beef is made using cuts of beef from the sirloin rear or the top/bottom round wet-roasted in broth with garlic, oregano and spices until cooked throughout. The meat is roasted at ≤ 350 °F (177 °C); this results in up to a 45% reduction in weight, but also yields the sandwich’s famous ‘jus’ or gravy. The beef is then cooled, sliced thin using a deli slicer, and then reintroduced to its reheated beef broth. The beef then sits in the broth, typically for hours. The inefficiency of this process, however, has started to concern many larger Italian beef producers and retailers. In response, some attempt to achieve higher yields by lowering the cooking temperature and placing the beef into food-grade polyester and nylon cook bags, which changes the outer appearance of the beef. Though this reduced time is sufficient for cooking the beef all the way through, it does not allow the jus to be harvested fully. Because traditional Italian beefs are dipped in the jus from their own roast, when this more efficient method is used, the sandwich’s potency is affected. Some companies add MSG, phosphates and other additives in attempts to reach for higher yields.

 

The exact origin is unknown, but many believe it was created by Italian immigrants who worked for Chicago’s old Union Stock Yards in the early 1900s. They often would bring home some of the tougher, less desirable cuts of beef sold by the company. To make the meat more palatable, it was slow-roasted to make it more tender, then slow-simmered in a spicy broth for flavor. Both the roasting and the broth used Italian-style spices and herbs. The meat was then thinly sliced across the grain and stuffed into fresh Italian bread.

According to Scala’s Original Beef and Sausage Company (formed in 1925), this meal was originally introduced at weddings and banquets where the meat was sliced thinly so there would be enough to feed all the guests. It rapidly grew in popularity and eventually became one of Chicago’s most famous ethnic foods: the original Italian beef sandwich.

The recipe was popularized by Pasquale Scala, and a group of his associates who started small beef stands in Chicago and used similar recipes, perfecting Chicago’s original Italian beef sandwich. Al Ferreri and his sister and brother-in-law, Frances and Chris (Baba) Pacelli, founded Al’s Beef in 1938, and Mr. Beef on Orleans co-founders Carl Buonavolanto Jr. and his Tony (“Uncle Junior” to the Buonavolantos) Ozzauto each set up shop.

Other Italian beef purveyors likewise set up shop in the 40s, many obtaining their beef from Scala Packing Company of Chicago. Chris Pacelli (Baba) (founder of Al’s Beef in 1938), Carl Bonavolanto Jr. and Tony Ozzauto (co-founders, Mr. Beef on Orleans in 1961), were among the group.

By 1954, a local restaurant Al’s Beef was advertising its “Pizza, Spaghetti, Ravioli, and Italian Beef Sandwiches” in the Chicago Tribune.

Mr. Beef’s founder helped his brother, Joe Buonavolanto, open one of the first Italian beef stands outside of the city limits.

 

There are varying degrees of juiciness, depending on taste. Nomenclature varies from stand to stand, but wet or dipped means the bread is quickly dunked in the juice; juicy even wetter; and soaked is dripping wet.

Most Chicago beef restaurants also offer a “combo,” adding a grilled Italian sausage to the sandwich. Different eateries offer hot or mild sausage, or both.

Typical beef orders are:

* Hot dipped: Italian beef on gravy-wetted bread and giardiniera.
* Hot dipped combo: Italian beef and sausage on gravy-wetted bread with giardiniera.
* Sweet dry: Italian beef placed on dry bread, topped with sweet peppers.
* Gravy bread: meatless Italian bread soaked in the juice of Italian beef, often served with peppers or giardiniera. Also known in some places as “Soakers” or “Juice-ons”.
* Cheesy beef or cheef: Italian beef with cheese (Provolone, Mozzarella or, rarely, Cheddar); not all stands offer this.
* Cheesy beef on garlic: Italian beef with cheese (Provolone, Mozzarella or, rarely, Cheddar) and the bread being pre-cooked and seasoned like traditional garlic bread; not all stands offer this.
Some order the “triple double,” which consists of double cheese, double sausage and double beef. Other even less common variations include substituting Italian bread with a large croissant or topping with marinara sauce.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Po’ boy

October 21, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A po’ boy (also po-boy, po boy) is a traditional sandwich from Louisiana. It almost always consists of meat, which is usually roast beef or fried seafood, often shrimp, crawfish, fish, oysters or crab. The meat is served on baguette-like New Orleans French bread, known for its crisp crust and fluffy center.

Roast beef was New Orleans’ most popular po’boy filler up to the 1970s and fried oyster po’boys are popular enough that they are sometimes called an oyster loaf, but the fillings can be almost anything, according to Sarah Rohan who in her book Gumbo Tales mentions fried shrimp, catfish, crawfish, Louisiana hot sausage, fried chicken, baked ham, duck, and rabbit.

A “dressed” po’ boy has lettuce, tomato, pickles, and mayonnaise. Fried seafood po’ boys are often dressed by default with melted butter and sliced pickle rounds. A Louisiana style hot sauce is optional. Non-seafood po’ boys will also often have Creole mustard.

The New Orleans sloppy roast beef po’ boy is generally served hot with gravy and resembles a Chicago Italian beef sandwich in appearance and method of preparation, although the size, bread, and toppings differ. To make it, a cut of beef (usually chuck or shoulder) is typically simmered in beef stock with seasonings such as garlic, pepper, thyme, and bay for several hours. The beef can be processed into “debris” by cutting it to shreds when done (folklore says that a po’ boy roast is done when it “falls apart with a hard stare”) and simmering the shredded beef in the pot for a longer time to absorb more of the juice and seasoning.

A roast beef po' boy

A roast beef po’ boy

In the late 1800s fried oyster sandwiches on French loaves were known in New Orleans as “oyster loaves”, a term still in use. A sandwich containing both fried shrimp and fried oysters is often called a “peacemaker” or La Médiatrice.

The origin of the name is unknown. A popular local theory claims that “po’ boy”, as specifically referring to a type of sandwich, was coined in a New Orleans restaurant owned by Benny and Clovis Martin (originally from Raceland, Louisiana), former streetcar conductors. In 1929, during a four-month strike against the streetcar company, the Martin brothers served their former colleagues free sandwiches. The Martins’ restaurant workers jokingly referred to the strikers as “poor boys”, and soon the sandwiches themselves took on the name. In Louisiana dialect, this is naturally shortened to “po’ boy”.

One New Orleans historian finds the Martin claim suspicious for several reasons, starting with the fact that it wasn’t described by the local press until 40 years after the strike, and that prior to 1969 the story from the Martin brothers themselves was that they had created the po-boy for farmers, dock workers and other “poor boys” who frequented their original location near the French Market. (The Martin brothers did write a letter, reprinted in local newspapers in 1929, promising to feed the streetcar workers, but it referenced “our meal” and made no mention of sandwiches.)

Fried shrimp po' boy at Middendorf's

Fried shrimp po’ boy at Middendorf’s

New Orleans
New Orleans is known for its grand restaurants (see Louisiana Creole cuisine), but more humble fare like the po’ boy is very popular. Po’ boys may be made at home, sold pre-packaged in convenience stores, available at deli counters and most neighborhood restaurants. One of the most basic New Orleans restaurants is the po’ boy shop, and these shops often offer seafood platters, red beans and rice, jambalaya, and other basic Creole dishes.

The two primary sources of po’boy bread are the Leidenheimer Baking Company and Alois J. Binder. There is fierce competition between po’ boy shops, and resident opinions of the best po’ boy shop varies widely.

Each year there is a festival in New Orleans dedicated to the po’ boy, the Oak Street Po’Boy Festival. It is a one-day festival that features live music, arts, and food vendors with multiple types of po’ boys. It is held in mid-November along a commercial strip of Oak Street in the city’s Carrollton neighborhood. The festival gives “best-of” awards, which gives the chefs an incentive to invent some of the most creative po’ boys.

Authentic versions of Louisiana-style po’ boys can be found along the Gulf Coast, from Houston through the Florida Panhandle. The term “po’ boy” has spread further and can be found in the South Atlantic States and in California, where it may instead refer to local variations on the submarine sandwich.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Club Sandwich

November 12, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Club sandwich

Club sandwich

A club sandwich, also called a clubhouse sandwich, is a sandwich of bread (occasionally toasted), sliced cooked poultry, or fried bacon, lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise. It is often cut into quarters or halves and held together by cocktail sticks. Modern versions frequently have two layers which are separated by an additional slice of bread.

The club sandwich may have originated at the Union Club of New York City. The earliest known reference to the sandwich, an article that appeared in The Evening World on November 18, 1889, is also an early recipe; “Have you tried a Union Club sandwich yet? Two toasted pieces of Graham bread, with a layer of turkey or chicken and ham between them, served warm.”Several other early references also credit the chef of the Union Club with creating the sandwich.

Other sources, however, find the origin of the club sandwich to be up for debate. Another theory is that the club sandwich was invented in an exclusive Saratoga Springs, New York, gambling club in the late 19th century.

The sandwich is known to have appeared on U.S. restaurant menus as far back as 1899. The earliest reference to the sandwich in published fiction is from Conversations of a Chorus Girl, a 1903 book by Ray Cardell. Historically, club sandwiches featured slices of chicken, but with time, turkey has become increasingly common.

Club sandwich with tater tots

As with a BLT, toasted white bread is standard, along with iceberg lettuce, bacon, and tomatoes. The sandwich is traditionally dressed with mayonnaise. Variations, however, on the traditional club sandwich abound. Some vary the protein, for example, a “breakfast club” that includes eggs or a “roast beef club.” Others include ham (instead of, or in addition to bacon) and/or cheese slices. Vegetarian club sandwiches often include hummus, avocado or spinach, as well as substitute the real bacon with a vegetarian alternative. Mustard and sometimes honey mustard are common condiments. Upscale variations include, for example, the oyster club, the salmon club, and Dungeness crab melt.

The sandwich is commonly served with an accompaniment of either coleslaw, or potato salad, and often garnished with a pickle. The coleslaw or potato salad is often reduced to a “garnish” portion, when the primary accompaniment is an order of french fries or potato chips. Due to high fat and carb content from the bread, bacon and dressing, club sandwiches have sometimes been criticized as unhealthy. In 2000, Burger King came under fire for its chicken club, which contained 700 calories, 44 grams of fat (nine of them saturated), and 1,300 milligrams of sodium, as well as the trans fat from the fryer shortening.

 

Roast Beef, Ham, Bacon, and Cheddar Cheese Double Decker w/ Chips

November 7, 2017 at 5:52 PM | Posted in Boar's Head | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Roast Beef, Ham, Bacon, and Cheddar Cheese Double Decker w/ Chips

 

For Breakfast this morning I made some Simply Potatoes Shredded Hash Browns, Heated up some Meijer Diced Ham, fried an Egg Sunnyside Up, made a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. I made a bed of the Hashbrowns in a bow and sprinkled some Sargento Reduced Fat Sharp Cheddar Cheese. Next I put the Diced Ham over top the Hash Browns then put the Sunnyside Up Egg on to top it off. One of my favorite Breakfasts! After Breakfast I went up to the local Kroger for a couple of items and stopped by the ATM machine at the Bank on the way back home. Cloudy and a high of 48 degrees out. Got the leaf blower out and did the usual cleaning of the deck and driveway areas. Trimmed down Mom’s Rose Bushes and gave a final trim to a couple of the hedges. Not a whole lot else going on today. For Dinner tonight its Sandwich Night, I prepared a Roast Beef, Ham, Bacon, and Cheddar Cheese Double Decker w/ Chips.

 

 

I went to Jungle Jim’s International Market yesterday and purchased several Boar’s Head Meats and Cheese. Jungle Jim’s carries all of Boar’s Head products along with some test items from Boar’s Head. I purchased Boar’s Head London Broil Roast Beef (Rare), Sweet Sliced Ham, and Boar’s Head Vermont Cheddar (sliced). I used these3 items along with Simple Truth Hickory Smoked Bacon, Bib Lettuce, Kraft Reduced Fat Mayo w/ Olive Oil, Emeril’s Deli Style Mustard, and Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread (3 slices) to make my Double Decker.

 

 

 

To start I gathered everything up. I first fried my Bacon 4 slices. And as always when frying Bacon you always make double the amount you need because it’s near impossible not to snack on it as your making it! With the Bacon fried I started making my Double Decker. I first toasted my 3 slices of Bread. On the bottom slice of Toast I first spread Mayo across it, next a slice of the Vermont Cheddar, 2 slices of Bacon, Bib Lettuce, then slices of the Sweet Sliced Ham, topped it with the Deli Mustard, and my bottom half of the Decker was done.

 

 

Topped everything with another slice of the Toast. I then topped that with Mayo, a slice of the Cheese, 2 slices of Bacon, Bib Lettuce, next slices of the Roast Beef, Deli Mustard, and the last slice of Toast. And the Double Decker is ready! Wow, what a Sandwich! Love the Boar’s Head Meat and Cheese. Then the Mayo and Mustard give perfect flavor. Excellent Sandwich!

 

 

 

 

 

I had some Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Potato Chips to go with the Sandwich I also had a Diet Dr. Pepper to drink. For Dessert later a Weight Watcher’s Cookies and Cream Ice Cream Bar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boar’s Head – Sweet Slice Boneless Smoked Ham
With Natural Juices.

Enjoy the exceptional flavor of a traditional bone-in ham without the bone. Available in the Deli retail case as a center of the plate item or at the Service Deli sliced by the pound for a sandwich of note.
https://boarshead.com/products/ham/11018-sweet-slice-brand-boneless-smoked-ham

 

 


Boar’s Head London broil cap-off top round oven roasted beef
Enjoy a rich, smooth flavor like nothing you’ve ever had before. Boar’s Head London Broil Oven Roasted Beef is seasoned with black pepper, garlic and a hint of lemon and slow roasted for a truly authentic taste.
https://boarshead.com/products/beef/12011-london-broil

 

Boar’s Head – Vermont Cheddar Cheese
Crafted in the Green Mountain state with whole milk sourced from regional family dairy farms, this classic cheese has a mild flavor and creamy texture. Vermont Cheddar skewered with seedless grapes and Boar’s Head Ovengold Turkey makes an elegant kabob-style appetizer.
https://boarshead.com/products/cheese/15012-pre-cut-vermont-cheddar-cheese-white

Healthy 30-Minute Meals

August 6, 2017 at 5:24 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its Healthy 30-Minute Meals. Diabetic Friendly Meals made in 30 minutes or less. Delicious meals like; Open-Face Reubens, Cheesesteaks with Peppers and Onions, and Italian Meatball Rolls. Find these recipes and more all at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

Healthy 30-Minute Meals

Fast, delicious, and healthful? You really can have it all with these yummy meals that come together in 30 minutes or less!

 

Open-Face Reubens

Cut out calories and fat by whipping up a flavorful slaw to top this quick-fix classic. Ask for lower-sodium roast beef at your deli counter…..

 

Cheesesteaks with Peppers and Onions

Lean sirloin steak smothered in Monterey Jack cheese and topped with four types of veggies make this classic well worth the extra 4 minutes (34 minutes total) in cooking time……

 

Italian Meatball Rolls

Replace beef with lean, low-fat turkey and enjoy this all-time favorite any day of the week. Make it a 30-minute meal by using refrigerated Italian-style turkey meatballs……..

 

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy 30-Minute Meals
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/30-minute/healthy-30-minute-meals

Chips, Dips, and Roast Beef!

August 31, 2016 at 5:01 PM | Posted in Boar's Head | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Chips, Dips, and Roast Beef!

 

French Toast and Turkey Sausage Links 001
It was French Toast and Turkey Sausage Links for my Breakfast this morning! For the French Toast I used Egg Beater’s, Ground Nutmeg, Ground Cinnamon, and Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. Just mix the first three ingredients together, amount depends on how many slices you are making. Preheat a skillet, add butter, and preheat on medium. Dip your bread in the mixture and grill in the pan until done, flipping once. I love the combo of the Nutmeg and Cinnamon for his! Topped it with some Maple Groves Sugarless Maple Syrup. For the Links I used Jennie – O Turkey Breakfast sausage Links. Also had the morning cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea.

 

 

Chips, Dips, and Roast Beef! 003

After Breakfast Mom wanted to go to Jungle Jim’s International Market, which was fine by me! Love shopping there! The store is so huge and just packed with items from Ground Kangaroo to Quail Eggs. The best Deli, Produce, Meat, and Seafood Departments you can find. We ended up the rest of the morning there! Still fairly hot and humid but we have some days coming in the 70’s and no humidity! Can’t wait. So for Dinner tonight – Chips, Dips, and Roast Beef!

 

 

 

Chips, Dips, and Roast Beef! 002

So tonight I kept it light and simple. A Roast Beef Sandwich along with Chips and Dips sounded good for Dinner. To make the Sandwich I’ll be using; Boar’s Head Deluxe Low Sodium Oven Roasted Beef – Cap-Off Top Round, Private Selection Sweet Hot Stone Ground Mustard, and Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. The Roast Beef is always so fresh and the Beef is cooked to a perfect Rare and seasoned just right. I picked up the Boar’s Head Roast Beef while at Jungle Jim’s International Market earlier today. The Deli Department carries every Boar’s Head Meat and Cheese that’s available. Love that store!

 

 

Chips, Dips, and Roast Beef! 005_crop
For the Chips I used Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Potato Chips and for the Dip I used Heluva Good Dip – Bacon Horseradish Dip. I don’t have a lot of Chips and Dips but when I do I try to have Reduced Chips and keep it light on the Dips. To drink I had an ice-cold Diet Dr. Pepper. For dessert later a Weight Watcher’s Cookies and Cream Ice Cream Bar.

 

 

 
Boar’s Head Deluxe Low Sodium Oven Roasted Beef – Cap-Off Top Round

Top round beef that is coated with salt, pepper and garlic and then oven roasted until tender and delicious. This product is sugar-free and a good source of iron. We suggest pairing with our Lacey Swiss Cheese.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 2 oz (56g)
Servings Per Container VariedBoar's Head Deluxe Low Sodium Oven Roasted Beef - Cap-Off Top Round
Amount Per Serving
Calories 90 Calories from Fat 25
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 3g 4%
Saturated Fat 1g 6%
Trans Fat 0g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.5g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 35mg 12%
Sodium 80mg 3%
Potassium 180mg 5%
Total Carbohydrate <1g 0%
Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
Sugars 0g
Protein 15g 30%

http://boarshead.com/products/beef/235-deluxe-low-sodium-cap-off-choice-top-round-half

One of America’s Favorites – French Dip

April 6, 2015 at 5:36 AM | Posted in BEEF | 1 Comment
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A French dip

A French dip

An American cuisine, the French dip sandwich, also known as a beef dip, is a hot sandwich consisting of thinly sliced roast beef (or, sometimes, other meats) on a “French roll” or baguette. It is usually served au jus (“with juice”), that is, with beef juice from the cooking process. Beef broth or beef consommé is sometimes substituted. Despite the name, this American specialty is almost completely unknown in France, the name seeming to refer to the style of bread rather than an alleged French origin.

Although the sandwich is most commonly served with a cup of jus or broth on the side of the plate, into which the sandwich is dipped as it is eaten, this is not how the sandwich was served when it was invented.

Two Los Angeles restaurants have claimed to be the birthplace of the French dip sandwich: Cole’s Pacific Electric Buffet and Philippe The Original. Philippe’s website describes the dish as a “specialty of the house”, and the words “Home Of The Original French Dip Sandwich” are present in the restaurant’s logo. At both of these restaurants, the roll is dipped in the hot beef juices before the sandwich is assembled, and is served “wet”. The sandwich can also be requested “double dipped” at either establishment. Philippe’s own brand of spicy mustard is traditionally used by patrons to complement the sandwich.

His controversy over who originated the sandwich remains unresolved. Both restaurants were established in 1908.

Roast Beef Dip au jus, with french fries

Roast Beef Dip au jus, with french fries

However, Cole’s claims to have originated the sandwich shortly after the restaurant opened in 1908, while Philippe’s claims that owner Philippe Mathieu invented it in 1918.

The story of the sandwich’s invention by Philippe’s has several variants: some sources say that the sandwich was first created by a cook or a server who, while preparing a sandwich for a police officer or fireman, accidentally dropped it into a pan of meat drippings. The patron liked it, and the dish surged in popularity shortly after its invention. Other accounts say that a customer who didn’t want some meat drippings to go to waste requested his sandwich be dipped in them. Still others say that a chef dipped a sandwich into a pan of meat drippings after a customer complained that the bread was stale. Cole’s account states that the sandwich was invented by a sympathetic chef, Jack Garlinghouse, for a customer who was complaining of sore gums. Some accounts tell Philippe’s version of events, but assign the location to Cole’s. The mystery of the sandwich’s invention might not be solved due to a lack of information and observable evidence.

The French dip is now served at a number of restaurant chains including fast food, diners, and standard restaurants.

 

 

 

Easy French Dip Sandwiches
From the http://allrecipes.com/ website, Easy French Dip Sandwiches.

“This sandwich made with sliced roast beef and provolone cheese is a crowd pleaser. The flavor is so rich, no one will know it only took 15 minutes to put together.”
INGREDIENTS:
1 (10.5 ounce) can beef consommeAll Recipes
1 cup water
1 pound thinly sliced deli roast beef
8 slices provolone cheese
4 hoagie rolls, split lengthwise

 
DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Open the hoagie rolls and lay out on a baking sheet.
2. Heat beef consomme and water in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat to make a rich beef broth. Place the roast beef in the broth and warm for 3 minutes. Arrange the meat on the hoagie rolls and top each roll with 2 slices of provolone.
3. Bake the sandwiches in the preheated oven for 5 minutes, or until the cheese just begins to melt. Serve the sandwiches with small bowls of the warm broth for dipping.

 
Nutrition Information
Servings Per Recipe: 4
Calories: 548
Amount Per Serving
Total Fat: 22.6g
Cholesterol: 94mg
Sodium: 2310mg
Amount Per Serving
Total Carbs: 40.5g
Dietary Fiber: 2g
Protein: 44.6g

 
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/easy-french-dip-sandwiches/

One of America’s Favorites – Beef on Weck

February 2, 2015 at 6:29 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A traditional beef on weck

A traditional beef on weck

A beef on weck is a sandwich found primarily in Western New York. It is made with roast beef on a kummelweck roll. The meat on the sandwich is traditionally served rare, thin cut, with the top bun getting a dip au jus. Accompaniments include horseradish, a dill pickle spear, and french fries.

 

 

The kummelweck roll gives the sandwich its name and a distinctive taste. A kummelweck (sometimes pronounced “kimmelweck” or “kümmelweck”) is topped with kosher salt and caraway seeds. Kümmel is the German word for caraway, and weck means “roll” in the south-western German dialects of the Baden and Swabia areas (northern Germans generally say Brötchen), although the kind of weck used for this sandwich in America tends to be much softer and fluffier than a standard German Kümmelbrötchen or Kümmelweck. The sandwich has been introduced to new areas of the United States with population movement. In Austria, a similar type of small white-bread is known as Kümmelweckerl (diminutive from Wecken, which refers to a whole big bread, i.e. Brotwecken)

 
The origin and history of the beef on weck sandwich is not well established. It is believed that a German baker named William Wahr, who is thought to have emigrated from the Black Forest region of Germany, created the kummelweck roll while living in Buffalo, New York. A local pub owner is said to have used the roll to create the beef on weck, with the thought that the salty top of the roll would make his patrons purchase more drinks.
A typical beef on weck is made from slow-roasted rare roast beef that is hand carved in thin slices to provide about 1⁄2 inch (13 mm) of meat on the bottom half of the roll. The cut face of the top half of the roll may be dipped in the jus from the roast. Prepared horseradish is usually provided for the diner to spread on the top half of the roll to taste. The traditional side dishes for a beef on weck are french fries and a kosher dill pickle spear.

 
The beef on weck has long been popular regionally, and has gained a following in other areas of the United States where it has been introduced. Expatriates from Western New York have taken the dish and brought it to other areas after relocating. It has also been featured by chefs on cooking shows including the PBS special Sandwiches That You Will Like. Bobby Flay, Anthony Bourdain and other chefs have featured the beef on weck, or a variant, on their television programs.

The American restaurant chain Buffalo Wild Wings was started by former residents of the Western New York area and the original name of the restaurant was “Buffalo Wild Wings and Weck” or as “BW3”, the third W referring to weck. The chain no longer serves weck outside of the Western New York area and no longer uses the original name, but some still refer to the company with the extra “W” in its abbreviation.

 

 

Beef on Weck Sandwich – Beef on Weck Sandwich Recipe:

I came across this recipe for Beef on Weck off one of my favorite sites What’s Cooking America. http://whatscookingamerica.net/

Whats Cooking America

 

Some people consider Beef on Weck (thinly sliced slow-roasted rare roast beef piled as high as 6 inches) on a freshly baked kummelweck roll, the Best Roast Beef Sandwich in America. Also called Beef on Wick, an alternative spelling usually used by older people from Buffalo and eastern suburbanites.

This sandwich is a tradition and a staple of Buffalo, New York, as it is Buffalo’s signature sandwich. The key to a good Beef on Weck is freshness and freshly-carved beef! In Buffalo, the beef must be on the rare side, preferably carved right off the bone and served on a salty kimmelweck roll. In fact, it is this roll that makes the sandwich unique. Few, if any, restaurants outside the Buffalo area serve this sandwich or even know what it is.
Beef on Weck Sandwich – Beef on Weck Sandwich Recipe:

Yields: 8 sandwiches
Prep time: 15 min
Cook time: 50 minutes
Ingredients:

1 (3- to 4-pounds) beef roast (tenderloin, Prime Rib, or eye of round)
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Coarse salt and coarsely-ground black pepper
Cornstarch Glaze (see recipe below)
8 Kimmelweck or Kaiser rolls*
2 tablespoons caraway seeds
2 tablespoons coarse salt**
Prepared horseradish

* Kimmelweck roll is a salty roll that is similar to a Kaiser roll.

** Rock salt (like the kind used for pretzels) is the preferred salt used in Buffalo. If you can’t get this, any salt with granules larger than table salt will do. I used coarse salt.
Preparation:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Rub roast with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Place roast on rack in a shallow baking pan, tucking the thin end under to make it as thick as the rest of the roast. Bake, uncovered, 40 to 45 minutes or until thermometer registers 130 to 135 degrees F. Remove from oven and transfer to a cutting board; let stand 15 minutes before carving. Reserve meat juice, and carve meat into very thin slices (as thin as you can slice).

Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees F.

Brush the prepared Cornstarch Glaze on the top of each kimmelweck or Kaiser roll; sprinkle equal amounts of caraway seeds and heat in the oven for 3 minutes or until tops of the rolls get crusty and the caraway seeds and salt begin to stick. Remove from oven and cut each roll in half lengthwise.

To assemble sandwiches, divide sliced beef on the bottom half of each roll, spoon with reserved beef juice, and top with the top half of each roll. Serve with horseradish on the side.

Makes 8 sandwiches.

Cornstarch Glaze:
1/2 cup cold water
1 tablespoon cornstarch

In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, stir together water and cornstarch. Heat mixture to a gentle boil. Reduce heat to low, and stir until mixture thickens and is translucent. Remove from heat and let cool.

 
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Sandwich/BeefOnWeck.htm

Dinner by Subway!

July 6, 2013 at 5:16 PM | Posted in Ball Park Smoked Turkey Franks, Subway | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Subway 6″ Sub on 9 Grain Bun w/ Turkey and Black Forest Hamsubway-turkey-ham-003

 

 

Heavy rains all day and more to come, a lot of flooding and roads closed. Just seems like it’s been a long week and really had no desire to cook tonight. So it was Subway tonight! I got myself and my parents 6″ Subs for dinner.

 

 

For my parents I got 2 6″ Subway Clubs. Comes on a 6″ 9 Grain Wheat Hoagie Bun with Turkey, Roast Beef, and Black Forest Ham and topped with Cucumbers, Black Olives, Tomato, Red Onion, and Green Peppers. For myself I had 6″ 9 Grain Wheat Hoagie Bun with Turkey and Black Forest Ham with toppings of Black Olives, Lettuce, and Jalapenos. I added a slice of Sargento Ultra Thin Swiss Cheese, 40 calories. My Sub had 310 calories (With the Cheese) and 44 carbs. We also had Ruffle’s Light potato Chips, 80 calories and 17 carbs per serving (About 18 Chips). For dessert later a Healthy Choice Vanilla Bean Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

Subway Club®Subway3
Tender sliced turkey, lean roast beef and tasty Black Forest ham come together with your choice of fresh veggies for a low-fat flavor fiesta. Try it today on freshly baked bread and experience all the deliciousity for 6 grams of fat.
Turkey Breast & Black Forest Ham
A sandwich so deliciously hearty, you won’t know you’re eating low fat. Enjoy the flavor of tender sliced turkey breast and Black Forest ham with your favorite veggies from juicy tomatoes to sweet red onions served on your favorite freshly baked bread.

 

http://www.subway.com/menu/MenuCategoryItems.aspx?CC=USA&LC=ENG&MenuTypeId=1&MenuId=54

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