Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – BUFFALO ITALIAN SAUSAGE PIADINA

June 23, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is a BUFFALO ITALIAN SAUSAGE PIADINA. To make this week’s recipe some of the ingredients you’ll be needing are Yeast, Flour, Olive Oil, Sliced Mozzarella, Mushrooms, Wild Idea Buffalo Italian Sausage, Roma Tomatoes, Fresh Basil, Grated Parmesan Cheese and more! You can find this recipe and purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Italian Sausage along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

BUFFALO ITALIAN SAUSAGE PIADINA

Piadina is an Italian flatbread that is delicious by itself or used in place of bread to make a sandwich or pizza. The dough is wonderful to work with and the aroma when it cooks will bring volunteer taste testers to your door. It’s great for making ahead of time for easy entertaining or casual family meals. Simply prepare your crust in advance, have toppings ready to go and have your guests create their own!

(Serves 8 )
Piadina Dough

Ingredients:

1 pkg. quick yeast
½ cup warm water
½ cup flour
3 ½ cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup cold water
2 tablespoons olive oil

Buffalo Piadina Toppings:

8 oz. fresh mozzarella, sliced
1 portabella mushroom, sliced
1 lb. Wild Idea Buffalo Italian Sausage, coarse crumbled and sautéed
4 Roma Tomatoes, sliced, sprinkle with salt & pepper
1 cup fresh basil, julienned
4 oz. parmesan, grated + more for passing

Directions

1 – Mix yeast, water and ½ cup flour together.
2 – Cover and let rest for 20 minutes. Mixture will be double in size and bubble.
3 – Add remaining flour, salt, water and olive oil, knead together for 5 minutes.
4 – Place in lightly oiled bowl, cover and allow dough to double in size. About 2 hours.
5 – Divide dough into 8 pieces and roll out on a lightly floured surface into 8 inch circles.
6 – Place grill tiles or bricks on grill grates and turn heat to 400*.
7 – Place rolled dough on tiles and grill for 1 minute each side, or until dough has puffed slightly and become lightly browned. Keep grill lid closed during cooking.
8 – Place crust on pizza stone or make individual pans of foiled parchment and top with favorite toppings. Keep toppings in balance so all flavors are equally represented.
9 – Return prepared pizza to 400* grill. Close lid and continue to cook for 5 minutes or until cheese is melted.
* Remove from grill. Cut each pizza into 4. Serve with green salad for a complete meal.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/93472961-buffalo-italian-sausage-piadina

One of America’s Favorites – Calas

February 24, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Plate of calas at a New Orleans restaurant

Plate of calas at a New Orleans restaurant

Calas are dumplings composed primarily of cooked rice, yeast, sugar, eggs, and flour; the resulting batter is deep-fried. It is traditionally a breakfast dish, served with coffee or cafe au lait, and has a mention in most Creole cuisine cookbooks. Calas are also referred to as Creole rice fritters or rice doughnuts.

The origin of calas is most often credited to slaves who came from rice-growing regions of Africa. A 1653 French recipe, beignets de riz, lends support to a French origin as well. The name “calas” is said to have come from the Nupe word kara (“fried cake”). According to The Dictionary of American Food & Drink, the word calas was first printed in 1880.

Creole street vendors, typically women, sold the fresh hot calas in the city’s French Quarter, with the cry, “Bel calas tout chauds!” (Creole for “Beautiful calas, still hot”). These vendors, called “calas women”, would sell their pastries in the early morning from covered baskets or bowls carried upon their heads.

Writers in the first decade of the 20th century refer to the increasing rarity of calas as street food. Though not widely sold, calas continued to be made at home using leftover rice, and was a typical breakfast food in early 20th-century New Orleans.

After World War II, while the beignet remained popular, the calas became more and more obscure. From a breakfast food it evolved into a Mardi Gras and First Communion treat among Louisiana Creole families. It could be specially requested at some restaurants. Through the efforts of food preservationists, interest in calas was revived and it began to appear on the menus of some restaurants.

In early recipes for calas, rice was boiled and cooled, then yeast added to make a sponge that was allowed to proof overnight. From this a batter was made by adding eggs, sugar and a little flour for binding. Rice flour was preferable but difficult to obtain, according to Eustis. A dash of salt might be included, and a grating of nutmeg was a typical addition. The batter was dropped by spoonfuls into deep, boiling lard and fried until browned. Modern recipes reflect the changes in available ingredients, cooking practices, and taste. Baking powder is sometimes used in place of yeast; vegetable oil is substituted for lard; savory variations have been developed.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Bear Claws

July 10, 2017 at 5:32 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Bear claw

A bear claw is a sweet, yeast-raised pastry, similar to a Danish, originating in the United States during the mid-1920s. A bear claw is usually filled with almond paste, and sometimes raisins, and often shaped in a semicircle with slices along the curved edge, or rectangular with partial slices along one side. As the dough rises, the sections separate, evoking the shape of a bear’s toes.

A bear claw may also be a yeast doughnut in a shape similar to that of the pastry. Such doughnuts may have an apple pie-style filling, or other fillings such as butter pecan, dates, cream cheese, grape or cherry. Bear claw may also refer to an apple fritter.

The name bear claw as used for a pastry is first attested in 1936. The phrase is more common in Western American English, and is included in the U.S. Regional Dialect Survey Results, Question #87, “Do you use the term ‘bear claw’ for a kind of pastry?”

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – Doughnut

December 28, 2015 at 5:53 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A glazed yeast-raised ring doughnut

A glazed yeast-raised ring doughnut

A doughnut or donut (/ˈdoʊnət/ or /ˈdoʊnʌt/; see spelling differences) is a type of fried dough confectionery or dessert food. The doughnut is popular in many countries and prepared in various forms as a sweet snack that can be homemade or purchased in bakeries, supermarkets, food stalls, and franchised specialty outlets. Doughnuts are usually deep-fried from a flour dough, and typically either ring-shaped or without a hole, and often filled. Other types of batters can also be used, and various toppings and flavorings are used for different types, such as sugar, chocolate, or maple glazing. In addition to flour, doughnuts may also include such ingredients as water, leavening, eggs, milk, sugar, oil/shortening, natural flavors and/or artificial flavors.

The two most common types are the toroidal ring doughnut and the filled doughnut—which is injected with fruit preserves, cream, custard, or other sweet fillings. A small spherical piece of dough may be cooked as a doughnut hole. Other shapes include rings, balls, and flattened spheres, as well as ear shapes, twists and other forms. Doughnut varieties are also divided into cake and risen type doughnuts.

 

 
Shapes
Rings
Ring doughnuts are formed by joining the ends of a long, skinny piece of dough into a ring or by using a doughnut cutter, which simultaneously cuts the outside and inside shape, leaving a doughnut-shaped piece of dough and a doughnut hole from dough removed from the center. This smaller piece of dough can be cooked or added back to the batch to make more doughnuts. A disk-shaped doughnut can also be stretched and pinched into a torus until the center breaks to form a hole. Alternatively, a doughnut depositor can be used to place a circle of liquid dough (batter) directly into the fryer.

There are two types of ring doughnuts, those made from a yeast-based dough for raised doughnuts or made from a special type of cake batter. Yeast-raised doughnuts contain about 25% oil by weight, whereas cake doughnuts’ oil content is around 20%, but they have extra fat included in the batter before frying. Cake doughnuts are fried for about 90 seconds at approximately 190 °C (374 °F) to 198 °C (388 °F), turning once. Yeast-raised doughnuts absorb more oil because they take longer to fry, about 150 seconds, at 182 °C (359 °F) to 190 °C (374 °F). Cake doughnuts typically weigh between 24 g and 28 g (0.85 oz to 0.99 oz), whereas yeast-raised doughnuts average 38 g (1.34 oz) and are generally larger, and taller (due to rising) when finished.

Topping
After frying, ring doughnuts are often topped. Raised doughnuts are generally covered with a glaze (icing). Cake doughnuts can also be glazed, or powdered with confectioner’s sugar, or covered with cinnamon and granulated sugar. They are also often topped with cake frosting (top-side only) and sometimes sprinkled with coconut, chopped peanuts, or sprinkles (also called jimmies).

Holes

A variety of doughnuts

A variety of doughnuts

Doughnut holes are small, bite-sized doughnuts that were traditionally made from the dough taken from the center of ring doughnuts. Before long, doughnut sellers saw the opportunity to market “holes” as a novelty and many chains offer their own variety, some with their own brand names such as “Munchkins” from Dunkin’ Donuts and “Timbits” from Tim Hortons.

Traditionally, doughnut holes are made by frying the dough removed from the center portion of the doughnut. Consequently, they are considerably smaller than a standard doughnut and tend to be spherical. Similar to standard doughnuts, doughnut holes may be topped with confections, such as glaze or powdered sugar.

Originally, most varieties of doughnut holes were derivatives of their ring doughnut (yeast-based dough or cake batter) counterparts. However, doughnut holes can also be made by dropping a small ball of dough into hot oil from a specially shaped nozzle or cutter. This production method has allowed doughnut sellers to produce bite-sized versions of non-ring doughnuts, such as filled doughnuts, fritters and Dutchies.

Filled
The filled doughnut is a flattened sphere injected with fruit preserves, cream, custard, or other sweet fillings, and often dipped into powdered sugar or topped off with frosting. Common varieties include the Boston cream, coconut, key lime, and jelly.

Other shapes
Others include the fritter and the Dutchie, which are usually glazed. These have been available on Tim Hortons’ doughnut menu since the chain’s inception in 1964, and a 1991 Toronto Star report found out that these two were the chain’s most popular type of fried dough in Canada.

There are many other specialized doughnut shapes such as old-fashioned, bars or Long Johns (a rectangular shape), or with the dough twisted around itself before cooking. In the northeast U.S., bars and twists are usually referred to as crullers. Another is the beignet, which is square-shaped, covered with powdered sugar.

 

 

 

Glazed doughnuts rolling on a conveyor belt at a Krispy Kreme doughnut shop

Glazed doughnuts rolling on a conveyor belt at a Krispy Kreme doughnut shop

Doughnuts have a disputed history. One theory suggests they were invented in North America by Dutch settlers, and in the 19th century, doughnuts were sometimes referred to as one kind of oliekoek (a Dutch word literally meaning “oil cake”), a “sweetened cake fried in fat.”

Hanson Gregory, an American, claimed to have invented the ring-shaped doughnut in 1847 aboard a lime-trading ship when he was 16 years old. Gregory was dissatisfied with the greasiness of doughnuts twisted into various shapes and with the raw center of regular doughnuts. He claimed to have punched a hole in the center of dough with the ship’s tin pepper box, and to have later taught the technique to his mother. Smithsonian Magazine states that his mother, Elizabeth Gregory, “made a wicked deep-fried dough that cleverly used her son’s spice cargo of nutmeg and cinnamon, along with lemon rind,” and “put hazelnuts or walnuts in the center, where the dough might not cook through”, and called the food ‘doughnuts’.

According to anthropologist Paul R. Mullins, the first cookbook mentioning doughnuts was an 1803 English volume which included doughnuts in an appendix of American recipes. By the mid-19th century, the doughnut looked and tasted like today’s doughnut, and was viewed as a thoroughly American food.

Another theory on their origin came to light in 2013, appearing to predate all previous claims, when a recipe for “dow nuts” was found in a book of recipes and domestic tips written in 1800 by the wife of Baron Thomas Dimsdale, the recipe being given to the dowager Baroness by an acquaintance who transcribed for her the cooking instructions of a local delicacy, the “Hertfordshire nut”.

 

 
National Doughnut Day, also known as National Donut Day, celebrated in the United States of America, is on the first Friday of June each year, succeeding the Doughnut Day event created by The Salvation Army in 1938 to honor those of their members who served doughnuts to soldiers during World War I. About 250 Salvation Army volunteers went to France. Because of the difficulties of providing freshly baked goods from huts established in abandoned buildings near the front lines, the two Salvation Army volunteers (Ensign Margaret Sheldon and Adjutant Helen Purviance) came up with the idea of providing doughnuts. These are reported to have been an “instant hit”, and “soon many soldiers were visiting The Salvation Army huts”. Margaret Sheldon wrote of one busy day: “Today I made 22 pies, 300 doughnuts, 700 cups of coffee.” Soon, the women who did this work became known by the servicemen as “Doughnut Dollies”.

 

 
Frosted, glazed, powdered, Boston cream, coconut, sour cream, cinnamon, chocolate, and jelly are some of the varieties eaten in the United States and Canada. Sweetening, filling, and fancy toppings are now so common that plain doughnuts are now commonly labeled and sold as “old fashioned”.

There are also potato doughnuts (sometimes referred to as spudnuts). Doughnuts are ubiquitous in the United States and can be found in most grocery stores, as well as in specialty doughnut shops.

A popular doughnut in Hawaii is the malasada. Malasadas were brought to the Hawaiian Islands by early Portuguese settlers, and are a variation on Portugal’s filhós. They are small eggy balls of yeast dough deep-fried and coated in sugar.

Immigrants have brought various doughnut varieties to the United States. To celebrate Fat Tuesday in eastern Pennsylvania, churches sell a potato starch doughnut called a Fastnacht (or Fasnacht). The treats are so popular there that Fat Tuesday is often called Fastnacht Day. The Polish doughnut, the pączki, is popular in U.S. cities with large Polish communities such as Chicago, Milwaukee, and Detroit.

In regions of the country where apples are widely grown, especially the Northeast and Midwest states, cider doughnuts are a harvest season specialty, especially at orchards open to tourists, where they can be served fresh. Cider doughnuts are a cake doughnut with apple cider in the batter. The use of cider affects both the texture and flavor, resulting in a denser, moister product. They are often coated with either granulated or powdered sugar or cinnamon sugar.

In Southern Louisiana, a popular variety of the doughnut is the beignet, a fried, square doughnut served traditionally with powdered sugar. Perhaps the most famous purveyor of beignets is New Orleans restaurant Cafe Du Monde.

In Quebec, homemade doughnuts called beignes de Noël are traditional Christmas desserts.

 

 

Chocolate-frosted doughnut

Chocolate-frosted doughnut

Within the United States, the Providence metropolitan area was cited as having the most donut shops per capita (25.3 doughnut shops per 100,000 people) as of January 13, 2010.

National Doughnut Day celebrates the doughnut’s history and role in popular culture. There is a race in Staunton, Illinois, featuring doughnuts, called Tour de Donut.

In film, the doughnut has inspired Dora’s Dunking Doughnuts (1933), The Doughnuts (1963) and Tour de Donut: Gluttons for Punishment. In video games, the doughnut has appeared in games like The Simpsons Game and Donut Dilemma. In the cartoon Mucha Lucha, there are four things that make up the code of mask wrestling: honor, family, tradition, and doughnuts. Also, in the popular television sitcom The Simpsons, Homer Simpson’s love affair with doughnuts makes a prominent ongoing joke as well as the focal point of more than a few episodes. There is also a children’s book Arnie the Doughnut and music albums The Doughnut in Granny’s Greenhouse and Desert Doughnuts.

In several media, doughnuts are frequently presented as enjoyed by police officers during coffee break. This cliché has been parodied in the film Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol, where Officer Zed is instructing new recruits how to “properly” consume their doughnut with coffee. It is also parodied in the television series Twin Peaks, where the police station is always in large supply. In the video game Neuromancer there is a Donut World shop, where only policemen are allowed. During a city-wide “lockdown” after the Boston Marathon bombings, a handful of selected Dunkin’ Donuts locations were ordered to remain open to serve police and first responders despite the closing of the vast majority of city businesses.

 

One of America’s Favorites – the Muffin

October 20, 2014 at 5:18 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Muffin

Muffins

The term muffin typically refers to an individual sized quick bread product which can be sweet or savory. The typical American muffin is similar to a cupcake in size and cooking methods. These can come in both savory varieties, such as corn or cheese muffins, or sweet varieties such as blueberry or banana.

Muffin also refers to a flatter disk-shaped bread of English origin, commonly referred to as an English muffin outside the United Kingdom. These muffins are also popular in Commonwealth countries and the United States.

 

 

 

 

American Muffins

Recipes for quick bread muffins are common in 19th-century American cookbooks. Recipes for yeast-based muffins, which were sometimes called “common muffins” or “wheat muffins” in 19th-century American cookbooks, can be found in much older cookbooks. In her Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, Fannie Farmer gave recipes for both types of muffins, both those that used yeast to raise the dough and those that used a quick bread method, using muffin rings to shape the English muffins. Farmer indicated that stove top “baking”, as is done with yeast dough, was a useful method when baking in an oven was not practical.

 

 

 

 

English Muffins

English Muffins

English muffin

The English muffin is a type of yeast-leavened bread; generally about 4 in (10 cm) round and 1.5 in (3.8 cm) tall. Rather than being oven-baked, they are cooked in a griddle on the stove top and flipped from side-to-side, which results in their typical flattened shape rather than the rounded top seen in baked rolls or cake-type muffins.

History
The name is first found in print in 1703, spelled moofin; it is of uncertain origin but possibly derived from the Low German Muffen, the plural of Muffe meaning a small cake, or possibly with some connection to the Old French moufflet meaning soft as said of bread.

 

 

 

A blueberry muffin in a paper muffin cup.

A blueberry muffin in a paper muffin cup.

Muffin cups

Muffin cups or cases are usually round sheets of paper, foil, or silicone with scallop-pressed edges, giving the muffin a round cup shape. They are used in the baking of muffins to line the bottoms of muffin tins, to facilitate the easy removal of the finished muffin from the tin.

A variety of sizes for muffin cases are available. Slightly different sizes are considered “standard” in different countries. Miniature cases are commonly 1 to 1.25 in (25 to 32 mm) in diameter at the base and .75 in (19 mm) tall. Standard-size cases range from 1.75 to 2 millimetres (0.069 to 0.079 in) in diameter at the base and are 1.25 to 1.5 in (32 to 38 mm) tall. Some jumbo-size cases can hold more than twice the size of standard cases. Australian and Swedish bakers are accustomed to taller paper cases with a larger diameter at the top than American and British bakers.

The advantage to cooks is easier removal and cleanup, more precise form, and moister muffins; however, using them will prevent a crust from forming.

 

“Meatless Monday” Recipe – Garden Pizzas

July 7, 2014 at 10:44 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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Individual homemade pizza crusts, enriched with oats, are topped with sliced bell pepper, onions, plum tomatoes, garlic, fresh basil, mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses. The recipe can be found the CooksRecipes website! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/

 

Garden Pizzas
Recipe Ingredients:Cooksrecipes 2

2/3 cup lukewarm water
1 (0.25-ounce) package quick-rise yeast or 2 1/4 teaspoons
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 teaspoons granulated sugar
1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cups quick or old fashioned oats
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1 1/2 cups (6-ounces) shredded mozzarella cheese – divided use
1/2 cup sliced cherry tomatoes
1/2 cup thinly sliced bell pepper, any color
1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion
1/4 cup chopped fresh basil or 4 teaspoons dried basil leaves
2 cloves garlic, minced
4 plum tomatoes, thinly sliced

 

Cooking Directions:

Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C).
In small bowl, combine warm water, yeast, oil and sugar; mix. Let stand 10 minutes or until foamy.
In large bowl, combine flour and oats. Add yeast mixture; blend on low speed of electric mixer until dry ingredients are moistened. Increase speed to medium; beat 2 minutes.
Turn dough out onto lightly floured surface. Knead 1 minute.
Shape dough into ball; place in greased bowl, turning once. Cover; let rise in warm place 20 minutes or until nearly doubled in size.
Punch dough down; divide into four portions.
On a greased cookie sheet, pat each portion of dough into 6-inch circle. Top with Parmesan cheese, 3/4 cup mozzarella cheese, cherry tomatoes, bell pepper, onion, basil, garlic, and cherry tomatoes in that order, dividing evenly.
Sprinkle with remaining 3/4 cup mozzarella cheese.
Bake 20 minutes or until crust is golden brown.
Makes 4 individual servings.
http://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/garden_pizzas_recipe.html

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 10, 2013 at 9:53 AM | Posted in baking, Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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One of the most frequent problems bread bakers encounter is yeast dough that doesn’t rise adequately. If your dough don’t rise, check out the following tips to see if you can pinpoint the cause.

 
* Your dough may be too cool, which reduces the level of yeast activity. Dough can rise at lower temperatures – even higher in the refrigerator – but it takes several hours or overnight to attain the same volume that it can in an hour or two at 80 – 90 degrees.

 

 

* The yeast may have been prepared with water that was too hot, which can kill it. The water must be under 120 degrees for optimum results.

 
* The yeast may have been too old. Proof your yeast before using it to be sure it’s not ready for retirement. Dissolve a little sugar in some warm water, then sprinkle in the yeast. The mixture should begin bubbling within 5 – 7 minutes. If it doesn’t, the yeast is too inactive to provide proper leavening and should be thrown away.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 1, 2013 at 10:40 AM | Posted in baking, Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Where should you store yeast, you ask? Always keep it in the refrigerator, because the cold will slow down deterioration. Bring the yeast back up to room temperature to help it dissolve at the normal rate.

Flatbread Pizza!

October 22, 2012 at 5:52 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, low calorie, low carb, pizza | 3 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Flatbread Pizza

“Ready for the oven!”

Homemade Flatbread pizza for dinner tonight! While at Walmart I came across a new item from Flatout Bread, Flatout Flatbread Thin Crust Flatbread Heritage Wheat. I love all their products all are fresh, low calorie, and low carb, and they taste great! An entire Flatbread Pie/Crust is only 150 calories and 27 carbs! That’s fantastic for those watching your calories or those with diabetes. I’ve left the link to Flatout’s web site at the end of the post along with another link that has Flatbread Pizza recipes. I used Classico Traditional Pizza Sauce for my sauce. Nice thick sauce that’s well seasoned, 40 calories and 7 carbs per serving (1/2 Cup).

For my toppings I used sliced Black Olives, Hormel Sliced Turkey Pepperoni, Mezzetta Deli Style Tamed Sliced Jalapenos, and topped it all with some fresh grated Dutch Gouda. It turned out fantastic! The flatbread toasted up just perfect. I baked it at 350 degrees for 5 minutes. I’ve found a new pizza, plus it’s a healthier version. For dessert later a bought a small block of Kraft 2% Sharp Cheddar so I’ll slice some off to cracker size pieces and have the Cheese on Ritz Whole Grain Crackers.

“We have pizza”

Flatout Flatbread Thin Crust Flatbreads Heritage Wheat

NEW!
7g Protein
Good Source of Fiber
Easy to make… Grill it! Bake it!

INGREDIENTS: ENRICHED FLOUR (WHEAT FLOUR, MALTED BARLEY FLOUR, NIACIN, IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WATER, PRETZEL CRUMB: ENRICHED FLOUR (WHEAT FLOUR, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), WATER, YEAST, SODA, VITAL WHEAT GLUTEN, SOYBEAN OIL, LESS THAN 2% OF EACH OF THE FOLLOWING: YEAST, OAT FIBER, SODIUM ACID PYROPHOSPHATE, BAKING SODA, CARAMEL COLOR, DEXTROSE, SALT, FUMARIC ACID, PRESERVATIVES (POTASSIUM SORBATE AND SODIUM PROPIONATE), CELLULOSE GUM, GUAR GUM, XANTHAN GUM, MALTODEXTRIN, WHEAT PROTEIN ISOLATE, CALCIUM SULFATE, ENZYMES. CONTAINS: WHEAT AND SOYBEANS. MANUFACTURED IN A FACILITY THAT ALSO PROCESSES PRODUCTS CONTAINING MILK.

http://www.flatoutbread.com/products/thin-crust-artisan-pizza/heritage-wheat/

http://www.flatoutbread.com/category/recipes/thin-crust-flatbread-artisan-pizza/

Classico Traditional Pizza Sauce

Traditional Pizza Sauce

Centuries ago in Naples, baked flatbread with toppings was first called “pizza.” Its sauce was crafted from simple ingredients like ripened tomatoes, olive oil, basil and garlic. Here, these same ingredients are combined with a hint of oregano and fennel to form a timeless classic.

Ingredients:

Tomato Puree (Water, Tomato Paste), Diced Tomatoes in Tomato Juice, Sugar, Olive Oil, Salt, Spices, Granulated Garlic.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1/4 cup (60g)
Servings per Container about 7
Amount Per Serving
Calories 40
Calories from Fat 10
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 1g 2%
Saturated Fat 0g 0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 320mg 13%
Total Carbohydrates 7g 2%
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%
Sugars 5g
Protein 1g

http://www.classico.com/pizza-sauces/traditional-pizza-sauce.aspx

Chicken Wrap for Lunch

April 2, 2012 at 12:09 PM | Posted in chicken, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Flatout Flatbread, Food, leftovers, low calorie, low carb | Leave a comment
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Lunch: Chicken Wrap

Had a healthy and delicious lunch this afternoon. I had a Chicken Breast leftover from the other night so I warmed it up for my wrap. I then sliced it into thin pieces and placed them in the wrap. The wrap I used was a new one and one I’ll be using quite often from now on, the Flatout Light Flatbread. It’s 100% Whole Wheat and it’s only 90 calories and 16 carbs! These would make a great Thin Crust Pizza, looking forward to making that. I left the link and info for the Flatbread at the end of the post. I added Fat Boy J B’s Sticky Stuff Sauce to the Chicken to give that delicious BBQ taste and added Shredded Lettuce and sliced Black Olives also. This made one delicious lunch!

Flatout Flatbread Light Original

NEW Even Better Taste!
90 Calories
High Fiber
60% Less Net Carbs than sliced bread
100% WholeWheat
Low Fat
0g Sugar
The Best Life Diet Approved
Whole Grain approved, 8g or more per serving
INGREDIENTS: WATER, WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR, OAT FIBER, WHEAT GLUTEN, SOYBEAN OIL, contains less than 2% of each of the following: MALTITOL, WHEAT PROTEIN ISOLATE, SODIUM ACID PYROPHOSPHATE, BAKING SODA, YEAST, PRESERVATIVES (POTASSIUM SORBATE, SODIUM PROPIONATE, SORBIC ACID), FUMARIC ACID, WHEAT FLOUR, CELLULOSE GUM, GUAR GUM, CALCIUM SULFATE, XANTHAN GUM, SALT, ANNATTO COLOR, CALCIUM PEROXIDE, L-CYSTEINE, ENZYMES.CONTAINS: WHEAT AND SOYBEANS. MANUFACTURED IN A FACILITY THAT ALSO PROCESSES PRODUCTS CONTAINING MILK AND CHEESE.

http://www.flatoutbread.com/

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