One of America’s Favorites – Banana Pudding

July 27, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Banana pudding served in a bowl with vanilla wafers

Banana pudding is a dessert generally consisting of layers of sweet vanilla flavored custard, cookies (usually Vanilla Wafers or ladyfingers) and sliced fresh bananas placed in a dish and served, topped with whipped cream or meringue.

It is commonly associated with Southern American cuisine, however, it can be found around the country. Furthermore, it closely resembles an English Trifle in that it is assembled in layers and includes custard, fruit, sponge cake, and whipped cream.

Banana pudding can be prepared using a baked or refrigerated method, with the latter being the more popular, particularly among home cooks. Moreover, many recipes have been adapted using vanilla or banana pudding instead of a true custard. Other recipes omit the wafers. An early Banana pudding recipe was published in “The Kentucky Receipt Book,” by Mary Harris Frazer, in 1903. However, even this recipe does not include wafers.

Banana pudding

A typical method for making Banana pudding is to repeatedly layer the bananas, custard, and wafers into a dish and top with whipped cream or meringue. Over time, the wafers will absorb the custard and the layers will press together causing the flavors to intermingle.

The National Banana Pudding Festival is held at the Centerville River Park in Centerville, Tennessee. It is a 2-day event held on the first weekend of October.

 

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Peach-Ginger Crumble

April 23, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | 1 Comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is a Peach-Ginger Crumble. Made using Frozen Sliced Peaches, Pears, Dried Apricots, Dark Brown Sugar, Cornstarch, Vanilla, Gingersnaps, Canola Oil, Ground Cinnamon, and Whipped Cream. Bring on Dessert! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Peach-Ginger Crumble

Ingredients
1 pound frozen sliced peaches, thawed
2 ripe pears, sliced
3/4 cup dried apricots, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
4 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar, divided
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 teaspoon vanilla
12 gingersnaps, finely crushed
1 tablespoon canola oil
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Whipped cream (optional)

Directions
Yield: 6 servings
Serving size: 1/2 cup

1 – Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray 9-inch deep-dish pie plate with nonstick cooking spray.

2 – Combine peaches, pears, apricots, 2 tablespoons brown sugar, cornstarch, and vanilla in large bowl; toss to coat evenly. Transfer to prepared pie plate.

3 – Combine crushed gingersnaps, remaining 2 tablespoons brown sugar, oil, and cinnamon in small bowl; mix well. Sprinkle evenly over peach mixture.

4 – Bake 30 minutes or until bubbly. Cool in pan on wire rack 10 minutes. Serve with whipped cream, if desired.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 210 calories, Carbohydrates: 45 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 4 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 1 mg, Sodium: 97 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/peach-ginger-crumble/

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Sweet Potato Pie

October 3, 2013 at 11:36 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly | Leave a comment
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This week’s pass along Diabetic Friendly Recipe is from Beth and Conrad, thanks to both of you! If you would have any Diabetic Friendly recipes or Low Calorie recipes you would like to share just email them to me and I’ll post them for you.

 

 

 

Sweet Potato Pie

Ingredients:

Pastry for single-crust 9-inch pie
2 cups cooked, mashed sweet potatoes (about 2 pounds)
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 cup Equal Spoonful
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 (12-ounce) can evaporated fat-free milk
Light whipped topping

 
Directions:

Roll pastry on floured surface into a circle 1-inch larger than inverted 9-inch pie plate. Ease pastry into plate; trim and flute edge. Set aside.
Blend sweet potatoes in mixing bowl on medium speed of mixer until smooth. Stir in eggs, Equal®, flour, lemon juice, vanilla, spices, salt and evaporated milk. Pour mixture over pastry shell.
Bake in preheated 400°F (205°C) oven 40 to 45 minutes or until filling is set and sharp knife inserted into center comes out clean.
Cool pie completely on wire rack. Cover and refrigerate. Garnish top of pie with whipped topping and grated nutmeg, if desired. Cut pie into wedges.
Makes 8 servings.

 

* May substitute 24 packets Equal sweetener

 

Nutrition Information Per Serving: calories 197, protein 7 g, carbohydrate 28 g, fat 6 g, cholesterol 58 mg, sodium 316 mg.

One of America’s Favorites – Whipped Cream

September 23, 2013 at 10:43 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A cup of hot chocolate topped with whipped cream from a pressurized can

A cup of hot chocolate topped with whipped cream from a pressurized can

Whipped cream is cream that has been beaten by a mixer, whisk, or fork until it is light and fluffy. Whipped cream is often sweetened and sometimes flavored with vanilla, and is often called Chantilly cream.

 

 

Cream containing 30% or more butterfat can be mixed with air, and the resulting colloid is roughly double the volume of the original cream as air bubbles are captured into a network of fat droplets. If, however, the whipping is continued, the fat droplets will stick together destroying the colloid and forming butter. Confectioner’s (icing) sugar is sometimes added to the colloid in order to stiffen the mixture and to reduce the risk of overwhipping.
Lower-fat cream (or milk) does not whip well, while higher-fat cream produces a more stable foam.

 

 

Cream is usually whipped with a whisk, an electric or hand mixer, or (with some effort) a fork.
Whipped cream is often flavored with sugar, vanilla, coffee, chocolate, orange, and so on. Many 19th-century recipes recommend adding gum tragacanth to stabilize whipped cream; a few include whipped egg whites.
Whipped cream may also be made in a whipping siphon, typically using nitrous oxide rather than carbon dioxide as the gas in the cartridges. Ready-to-use in pressurized containers are also sold at retail.

 

 

Whipped cream, often sweetened and aromatised, was popular in the 16th century, with recipes in the writings of Cristoforo di Messisbugo (Ferrara, 1549), Bartolomeo Scappi (Rome, 1570), and Lancelot de Casteau (Liège, 1604). It was called milk snow (neve di latte, neige de lait). A 1545 English recipe, “A Dyschefull of Snow”, includes whipped egg whites as well, and is flavored with rosewater and sugar. In these recipes, and until the end of the 19th century, naturally separated cream is whipped, typically with willow or rush branches, and the resulting foam on the surface would from time to time be skimmed off and drained, a process taking an hour or more. By the end of the 19th century, centrifuge-separated, high-fat cream made it much faster and easier to make whipped cream The French name crème fouettée ‘whipped cream’ is attested in 1629, and the English name “whipped cream” in 1673. The name “snow cream” continued to be used in the 17th century.
Various desserts consisting of whipped cream in pyramidal shapes with coffee, liqueurs, chocolate, fruits, and so on either in the mixture or poured on top were called crème en mousse ‘cream in a foam’, crème fouettée, crème mousseuse ‘foamy cream’, mousse ‘foam’, and fromage à la Chantilly ‘Chantilly-style cheese’. Modern mousses, including mousse au chocolat, are a continuation of this tradition.

 

 

Crème Chantilly is another name for whipped cream. The difference between “whipped cream” and “crème Chantilly” is not systematic.

Crème Chantilly

Crème Chantilly

Some authors distinguish between the two, with crème Chantilly being sweetened, and whipped cream not. However, most authors treat the two as synonyms, with both being sweetened, neither being sweetened, or treating sweetening as optional. Many authors use only one of the two names (for the sweetened or unsweetened version), so it is not clear if they distinguish the two.
The invention of crème Chantilly is often credited incorrectly, and without evidence, to Francois Vatel, maître d’hôtel at the Château de Chantilly in the mid-17th century.[citation needed] But the name Chantilly is first connected with whipped cream in the mid-18th century, around the time that the Baronne d’Oberkirch praised the “cream” served at a lunch at the Hameau de Chantilly — but did not call it Chantilly cream.
The names “crème Chantilly”, “crème de Chantilly”, “crème à la Chantilly”, or “crème fouettée à la Chantilly” only become common in the 19th century. In 1806, the first edition of Viard’s Cuisinier Impérial mentions neither “whipped” nor “Chantilly” cream but the 1820 edition mentions both.
The name Chantilly was probably used because the château had become a symbol of refined food.

 

 

Imitations of whipped cream, often sold under the name whipped topping or squirty cream, are commercially available. They may be used

A slice of pumpkin pie topped with a whipped cream rose

A slice of pumpkin pie topped with a whipped cream rose

for various reasons:
* To exclude dairy ingredients to avoid milk allergies.
* To support lifestyles such as veganism or food restrictions such kosher meat and milk rules.

* To provide extended shelf life (often in the freezer).

* To reduce the price—though some popular brands cost twice as much as whipped cream.
* For convenience.
Whipped topping normally contains some mixture of partially hydrogenated oil, sweeteners, water, and stabilizers and emulsifiers added to prevent syneresis, similar to margarine instead of the butter fat in the cream used in whipped cream. “Cool Whip“, a well-known U.S. brand of whipped topping, is a term sometimes used by Americans as a genericized trademark to refer to any brand of topping. Cool Whip comes in two formats: either in a tub or in an aerosol can pressurized with nitrous oxide.

 

 

Whipped cream or Crème Chantilly is a popular topping for desserts such as pie, ice cream, cupcakes, cake, milkshakes and puddings.

 

 

 

Pumpkin Roll

September 19, 2013 at 9:33 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Carol for passing along this Fall Diabetic Friendly Dessert!

 

Pumpkin Roll

Cake (Roll):

3 large eggs or 3/4 cup of Egg Beater‘s (Equal of 3 Eggs)
1/2 cup Splenda Sugar Blend for Baking
1 tablespoon Splenda Sugar Blend for Baking
1 cup canned pumpkin
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 cup self-rising flour
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 cup pecans, finely chopped

Filling:

4 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese, softened
1 1/2 to 2 cups light whipped topping, thawed, if frozen
1 tbs Splenda Sugar Blend for Baking

 

* Note – I haven’t tried this yet but the Pecans should work as part of the filling instead of the Roll if you prefer.

 

Directions:

For Cake: Beat eggs (or Egg Beater’s) and 1/2 cup Splenda Sugar Blend for Baking for 5 minutes in mixing bowl on medium speed of mixer.
Stir in 1 cup pecans (finely chopped), pumpkin, and lemon juice. Blend in flour, cinnamon and nutmeg until well combined.
Line a jelly roll pan with waxed paper. Spread batter evenly in pan. Bake in preheated 350°F oven 5 to 8 minutes or until woodenpick comes out clean. Cool 3 minutes in pan; turn out onto a cloth and roll up from the narrow end.
Chill in refrigerator until completely cool.
For Filling: Beat cream cheese, whipped topping and 1 tablespoon Splenda Sugar Blend for Baking in mixing bowl on medium speed of mixer until smooth and spreadable.
Unroll pumpkin roll and spread with filling. Re-roll. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Slice cake into pinwheels.
Makes 8 servings.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 17, 2013 at 9:42 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Whipping up some heavy cream? Heavy cream will set up faster if you add seven drops of lemon juice for each pint of cream. But you don’t necessarily need heavy cream to make whipped cream. Light cream can be whipped to a firm, mousse – like consistency if you add a tablespoon unflavored gelatin dissolved in 1 tablespoon hot water for every 2 cups of cream. After whipping refrigerate it for two hours.

 

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

April 25, 2013 at 8:05 AM | Posted in baking, dessert, Kitchen Hints | 1 Comment
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Even if your pie’s filling is near perfect, you won’t win any accolades for your creation unless its crust is up to par. Here are a few tips

Apple pie crust

Apple pie crust

for making perfectly flaky pie crusts.

 

 

* Be sure the liquid used in your pie crust dough is ice cold. In fact, anything hot going into a pie crust will affect it.

 

 

* Add a teaspoon of vinegar to the water for an even flakier crust, or substitute sour cream or whipping cream for the entirety of the water.

 

 

* Low gluten flour such as pastry flour is your best bet. Cake flour is too soft and won’t give the crust the body it needs, and bread flour has too high a gluten content and would make a tough crust. As a substitute for pastry flour, combine two parts all-purpose flour and one part cake flour or instant flour.

 

 

*Replace the shortening or butter with lard. Lard has larger fat crystals and three times the polyunsaturates as butter, making the crust flakier.

Wild Idea Buffalo Dessert: Mousse au Chocolate

April 10, 2013 at 9:29 AM | Posted in dessert | Leave a comment
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Mousse au Chocolate
By: Jill O’Brien
This is my own concoction. I use both a high quality bittersweet chocolate as well as a high quality milk chocolate. The addition of beaten egg whites gives it an extra lightness with out compromising its rich creaminess!

Ingredients:

6 oz. Bittersweet Chocolate
6 oz. Milk Chocolate
1 pint Heavy Whipping Cream
1 Tb Cointreau
4 Eggs, separated
Directions:

1 – In heavy saucepan over low heat, add 1 cup cream and chocolate. Melt together stirring occasionally. Mixture should never become hot.
2 – Meanwhile, in electric mixer, beat remaining cream until stiff, scrape into other bowl and place in refrigerator until needed.
3 – Place egg yolks into mixing bowl and beat until pale.
4 – While mixer is running slowly add in chocolate mixture. Mix thoroughly to incorporate and aerate.
5 – Transfer chocolate mixture to a large bowl, cover and refrigerate until mixture is slightly cool, but not set.
6 – Gently fold whipped cream into chocolate mixture in 3 small batches.
7 – In a well chilled mixing bowl, beat egg whites until stiff.
8 – Gently fold in beaten egg whites to chocolate mixture until well incorporated.
9 – Spoon mousse mixture into steamed glassware and refrigerate until set. (3 hours or up to 3 days in advance.)
10 – Garnish mousse with additional whipped cream, dark chocolate shavings or fresh fruit.
http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/mousse-au-chocolate/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 20, 2012 at 9:59 AM | Posted in cooking, Food | Leave a comment
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Making waffles is so much less fun when you have to beg and plead for the waffles to come out of the iron. Here’s a quick fix if the nonstick material on your waffle maker has worn out: Place a sheet of wax paper in the iron, close, and heat up. Remove and now give it a try:Thanks to the transferred wax, the waffles should pop out.

Bunyan’s Diabetic Sweet Potato Gingersnap Cheesecake with Maple-Whipped Cream

August 27, 2011 at 2:16 PM | Posted in baking, dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, sweet potatoes | 2 Comments
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Came across this one from Just A Pinch web site and had to pass it along, Thank you Chef Paul! I left the link at the end of the post where you can see this recipe and more of Paul Bushay “Cooked to Perfection”.

Bunyan’s Diabetic Sweet Potato Gingersnap Cheesecake with Maple-Whipped Cream

Ingredients
CRUST:
1 1/2 c     crushed gingersnap cookie crumbs
1 1/2 Tbsp     splenda blend
4 Tbsp     melted butter (don’t use margarine. it doesn’t work.)
CHEESECAKE:
4, 8 oz     packages of neufchatel cream cheese (1/3 less fat), room temperature
1/2 c     splenda blend
2 tsp     pumpkin pie spice mixture
1, 15 oz     can of sweet potatoes in light syrup
3 lg     eggs
1 Tbsp     vanilla
MAPLE-WHIPPED CREAM:
2 tsp     sugar-free maple syrup
1 c     whipping cream

Directions
1
To make the Crust:
2
Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Get out your 9-inch springform pan. Put the crumbs, Splenda blend and margarine in the pan. Mix with a fork until the butter is completely mixed into the crumbs and the Splenda sort of disappears into the mixture. Pat this mixture with your fingers into the bottom of the pan and partially up the sides of the pan. It should come up the side a half inch or more. You don’t have to be too precise. Bake for 8 to 9 minutes until set. Let cool.
3
To make the Filling:
4
First drain the sweet potatoes in a colander. Put the sweet potatoes in a food processor and whiz them to make a puree. You can add up to a half cup of water to make the potato puree smooth. Sometimes you need a little liquid to get the processor started in its chopping process.
5
In a large bowl, put in your cream cheese, Splenda blend, sweet potato puree mixture, spice, and one egg. Mix for one minute, stopping the mixer to scrape down the sides. Add the next egg and mix another minute. Add the last egg and the vanilla and mix one more minute. This makes your filling nice and fluffy. Pour this over your crust. Level it with your spatula
6
Wrap your cheesecake pan in two layers of aluminum foil. You want to seal it good and tight so no water will get in. Wrap the bottom and up the sides. Set the pan in a larger roasting pan and then add water so the water level will be one inch up the side of the cheesecake. Bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour and 45 minutes until the cheesecake is set. Remove the cheesecake from the water pan and put it back in the oven (now turned off) with the door open for 15 more minutes so the cheesecake cools down slowly. Then let it cool on the counter. Take off the aluminum foil side cover. Finally, chill the cheesecake in the refrigerator overnight before serving. You can put a loose covering of plastic wrap on top of the cheesecake after it has cooled on the counter so it doesn’t soak up any refrigerator flavors.
7
To make Whipped Cream:
8
Whip your cream as usual. Instead of adding vanilla or sugar when the cream reaches soft peaks, add the syrup and continue beating until stiff peaks form. Make the whipped cream right before you serve.
9
To serve
10
Take a sharp knife and slide it along the edge of the cheesecake to make sure it is loosened from the pan edge. Place it on your platter and unlock the springform to release the cheesecake. Gently lift off the outer ring. Clean up any little crumbs or messy edges. Slice your cheesecake with a very sharp knife that has been dipped in warm water and wiped off with a towel. This will make a very smooth cut.
11
The cheesecake will taste best on days 2 through 4. As the days progress, the cheesecake flavor intensifies. Depending on the humidity in your refrigerator, your crust might start to get soggy, but the cheesecake will still taste good. As with all cheesecakes, I recommend taking it out of the refrigerator at least 15 to 30 minutes or even longer before you serve it. The colder it is, the less the flavors come through. Savor each bite by rolling it over on your tongue. Yum!

http://www.justapinch.com/recipe/chefbunyan/bunyans-diabetic-sweet-potato-gingersnap-cheesecake-with-maple-whipped-cream/cake?k=Bunyan%27s+Diabetic+Sweet+Potato+Gingersnap+Cheesecake+with+Maple+Whipped+Cream&p=1&o=r

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