New Product – Aunt Millie’s Live Carb Smart Bread

April 12, 2021 at 2:06 PM | Posted in Aunt Millie's | Leave a comment
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I’ve cut back my Bread quite a bit here lately due to my Diabetes2. I was saving back on carbs and calories. But with the new Aunt Millie’s Live Carb Smart Bread I can have Bread more often! They have 3 different kinds; Wheat, 5 Seed, and White. All have 1 net carb and all low in calories! The calories vary in all 3 kinds, the wheat for example is 30 caories a slice. Plus they are perhaps the freshest and the moist bread I’ve ever had. So if you’re looking for a Healthy and Delicious Bread try the New Aunt Millie’s Live Carb Smart Breads!

Aunt Millie’s Live Carb Smart Bread

Aunt Millie’s Bakeries is adding to its bread portfolio with the introduction of Live Carb Smart and Live Organic bread.
Live Carb Smart contains one net carb per slice and is considered an excellent source of fiber. The product also is keto-friendly, vegan and contains no high-fructose corn syrup.

The Carb Smart product line includes white, wheat and 5-Seed bread varieties.
Live Carb Smart Wheat
Live Carb Smart is delicious wheat bread with only 1 net carb. The Live breads help consumers to achieve health goals with great tasting bread for Keto and diabetic diets.

Live Carb Smart 5 Seed
Aunt Millie’s Live Carb Smart One Net Carb Bread is a low carb, low sugar bread that’s perfect for those following a low carb lifestyle. Aunt Millie’s Live Carb Smart Bread is an excellent source of fiber and contains no high fructose corn syrup.

Live Carb Smart White
Live Carb Smart is delicious white bread with only 1 net carb. The Live breads help consumers to achieve health goals with great tasting bread for Keto and diabetic diets.
http://products.auntmillies.com/

One of America’s Favorites – Cream of Wheat

July 28, 2014 at 7:20 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Cream of Wheat Logo

Cream of Wheat Logo

 

Cream of Wheat is a brand of farina, a type of breakfast porridge mix made from wheat semolina. It looks similar to grits, but is smoother in texture since it is made with ground wheat kernels instead of ground corn. It was first manufactured in the United States in 1893 by wheat millers in Grand Forks, North Dakota. The product made its debut at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois. Until January 2007, it was a Nabisco brand made by Kraft Foods. The brand and rights to market the cereal was acquired by B&G Foods.

In addition to its wheat-based products, the rice-based Cream of Rice is also produced as part of the product line, and is often a recommended early food for infants and toddlers and for people who can’t have wheat or gluten.

 
Cream of Wheat is made by boiling water, then pouring in the farina while stirring. As it is stirred, the farina starts to thicken, creating a mixture that thickens depending on the ratio of liquid to farina. Some choose to use milk instead of, or in addition to, water in order to give the food a creamier taste. Currently there are three available original mixes: 10-minute, 2 ½-minute, and 1-minute. Cream of Wheat is also sold in single-serving instant packets. These are prepared by mixing with hot water and allowing to set in a bowl (about two minutes).

It is common to customize the hot cereal with the addition of sugar, fruit, or nuts. As a result, several flavors are sold of the instant variety: Original, Apples ‘N’ Cinnamon, Maple Brown Sugar, Strawberries ‘N’ Cream, and Cinnamon Swirl.

In October 2012, Cream of Wheat added a new chocolate flavor to their instant line.

Their most recent addition to the varieties of instant Cream of Wheat Cereals is Bananas & Cream.

 
The original boxes of Cream of Wheat were handmade and lettered, and emblazoned with the image of an African-American chef produced by Emery Mapes. The character was named Rastus, and was developed by artist Edward V. Brewer. Rastus was included on all boxes and advertisements and continues to be used today with only very slight changes. A stereotypical African-American icon was fairly common for U.S. commercial brands at the time of the cereal’s creation; for other examples, see Aunt Jemima and Uncle Ben. It has long been thought that a chef named Frank L. White was the model for the chef shown on the Cream of Wheat box. White, who died in 1938 and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Leslie, Michigan, had claimed to be the model for the Cream of Wheat box. In June 2007, a headstone was erected for Mr. White. The headstone contains his name and an etching taken from the man depicted on the Cream of Wheat box.

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Turkey Sliders and Baked Fries

May 5, 2014 at 5:20 PM | Posted in JB's Fatboy Sauces and Rub, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Ore - Ida | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Turkey Sliders and Baked Fries

 

 

 

Turkey Burger Sliders 006
A windy and cool Spring Day out there today. Rain and only in the 50’s or 60. When something needs repaired in the house it seems like it’s just never one thing, it all breaks down in bunches! Went to the hardware store and picked up everything needed and have someone coming over tomorrow to install them for me. Just another disadvantage of being in a wheelchair, some things you just have to have help. For dinner tonight it’s Turkey Sliders and Baked Fries.

 

 

 
Walmart had some Pepperidge Farm Wheat Slider Buns on sale, so it seemed like a perfect time for some sliders! I used Jennie – O Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast for my Burgers. If you’re having Sliders they might as well be healthy Sliders. The Jennie – O Turkey is only 120 calories with the Buns being 100 calories. To prepare them I formed the Ground Turkey into Slider Bun size patties. Seasoned them with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn with just a pinch of Sage in each. I pan fried them in Canola Oil. Served them on the Pepperidge Farm Wheat Slider Buns and topped with a quarter slice of Cracker Barrel Sharp Cheddar, and just a dab of JB’s Stick Stuff BBQ Sauce. Love these Turkey Sliders!

 

 

 
For one side I baked some Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries and had a Side Salad. For dessert/snack later some Turkey Spam and Ritz Whole Grain Crackers.

 

 

 

 

 
Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style FriesOre Ida Simply

 

You can take the potatoes out of the country.
But you can’t take the country out of our delicious Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style French Fries. Simple ingredients like potatoes, olive oil and sea salt – simply prepared. That’s Ore-Ida style.
Ore-Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style French Fries:
* French fried potatoes seasoned with cracked black pepper, olive oil and sea salt
* All natural
* Made with Grade A potatoes
* 0 grams trans fat per serving
* Gluten free
* Kosher
SERVING SIZE: 84g
CALS 130
FAT 4 1/2g
SODIUM 290mg
CARBS 22g

 
http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/S/Simply-Olive-Oil-and-Sea-Salt-Country-Style-Fries#.UhecmRvOk20

 

 

 

 

 

Pepperidge Farm Wheat Slider BunsPepperidge Farms Wheat Slider Buns

Timeless and without pretense, our “Bakery Classics” stand for quality, with premium ingredients, perfectly orchestrated with a baker’s touch. Make your barbecues a little more special with our delicious buns. We hope you agree that our bakers have created a delicious, premium quality bun.
Pepperidge Farm® Fresh Breads & Rolls
Sliders Wheat Buns
Nutrition Facts*
Amount per Serving (serving size) = 1 bun

Calories 100
Fat Calories 15
Total Fat 2g
Sat. Fat 0g
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsat. Fat 1g
Monounsat. Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 130mg
Total Carb. 17g
Dietary Fiber 1g
Sugars 3g
Protein 5g

% Daily Values**
Vitamin A 0%
Vitamin C 0%
Thiamin 6%
Riboflavin 6%
Niacin 8%
Folic Acid 10%
Calcium 4%
Iron 0%

 
http://www.pepperidgefarm.com/ProductDetail.aspx?catID=757&prdID=120929

Cheap Low-Calorie Dinner Recipes

April 22, 2014 at 9:03 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Saving money while eating healthier, thanks to the EatingWell web site for this one!

 

Cheap Low-Calorie Dinner RecipesEating Well

 

Save money and slim down with these cheap diet recipes.
If you’re hoping to lose weight and save money, we have just the solution for you with our cheap low-calorie dinner recipes. These budget-friendly diet recipes are perfect for shedding pounds and saving money. Each recipe is less than $3.50 per serving, which is cheaper and healthier than eating out. Try one of our cheap low-calorie dinner recipes tonight for a satisfying and healthy homemade meal.

 

 

Butternut Squash & Tomato Posole
Posole is a traditional Mexican stew most often made with pork and hominy (dried corn kernels that have been treated to soften the hull) cooked in a fragrant chile-based sauce. In this quick vegetarian recipe, we rely on the meatiness of pinto beans and butternut squash combined with hand-crushed whole tomatoes to make a satisfying stew….

 
Smoked Turkey, Kale & Rice Bake
This hearty one-skillet dinner is loaded with celery, kale, tomatoes and quick-cooking brown rice. It’s easy to make the recipe vegetarian by substituting smoked tofu for the turkey….

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the the great Cheap Low-Calorie Dinner Recipes

 

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/cheap_low_calorie_dinner_recipes?sssdmh=dm17.731349&utm_source=EWDNL&esrc=nwewd040714

Grain of the Week – Wheat

April 10, 2014 at 5:45 AM | Posted in Grain of the Week | 1 Comment
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Wheat

Wheat

Wheat (Triticum spp.) is a cereal grain, originally from the Levant region of the Near East and Ethiopian Highlands, but now cultivated worldwide. In 2010, world production of wheat was 651 million tons, making it the third most-produced cereal after maize (844 million tons) and rice (672 million tons). Wheat was the second most-produced cereal in 2009; world production in that year was 682 million tons, after maize (817 million tons), and with rice as a close third (679 million tons).

This grain is grown on more land area than any other commercial food. World trade in wheat is greater than for all other crops combined. Globally, wheat is the leading source of vegetable protein in human food, having a higher protein content than other major cereals, maize (corn) or rice. In terms of total production tonnages used for food, it is currently second to rice as the main human food crop and ahead of maize, after allowing for maize’s more extensive use in animal feeds. Along with this wheat can be used in cement

Wheat was a key factor enabling the emergence of city-based societies at the start of civilization because it was one of the first crops that could be easily cultivated on a large scale, and had the additional advantage of yielding a harvest that provides long-term storage of food. Wheat contributed to the emergence of city-states in the Fertile Crescent, including the Babylonian and Assyrian empires. Wheat grain is a staple food used to make flour for leavened, flat and steamed breads, biscuits, cookies, cakes, breakfast cereal, pasta, noodles, couscous and for fermentation to make beer, other alcoholic beverages, or biofuel.

Wheat is planted to a limited extent as a forage crop for livestock, and its straw can be used as a construction material for roofing thatch. The whole grain can be milled to leave just the endosperm for white flour. The by-products of this are bran and germ. The whole grain is a concentrated source of vitamins, minerals, and protein, while the refined grain is mostly starch.

 

 
Wheat is one of the first cereals known to have been domesticated, and wheat’s ability to self-pollinate greatly facilitated the selection of many distinct domesticated varieties. The archaeological record suggests that this first occurred in the regions known as the Fertile Crescent. Recent findings narrow the first domestication of wheat down to a small region of southeastern Turkey, and domesticated Einkorn wheat at Nevalı Çori, 40 mi (64 km) northwest of Gobekli Tepe in Turkey—has been dated to 9,000 BCE. However evidence for the exploitation of wild barley has been dated to 23,000 BCE and some say this is also true of pre-domesticated wheat.

 

 
Technological advances in soil preparation and seed placement at planting time, use of crop rotation and fertilizers to improve plant growth, and advances in harvesting methods have all combined to promote wheat as a viable crop. Agricultural cultivation using horse collar leveraged plows (at about 3000 BCE) was one of the first innovations that increased productivity. Much later, when the use of seed drills replaced broadcasting sowing of seed in the 18th century, another great increase in productivity occurred.

Yields of pure wheat per unit area increased as methods of crop rotation were applied to long cultivated land, and the use of fertilizers became widespread. Improved agricultural husbandry has more recently included threshing machines and reaping machines (the ‘combine harvester’), tractor-drawn cultivators and planters, and better varieties (see Green Revolution and Norin 10 wheat). Great expansion of wheat production occurred as new arable land was farmed in the Americas and Australia in the 19th and 20th centuries.

 

 

 

Wheat harvest on the Palouse, Idaho, United States

Wheat harvest on the Palouse, Idaho, United States

Major cultivated species of wheat
Hexaploid Species

Common wheat or Bread wheat (T. aestivum) – A hexaploid species that is the most widely cultivated in the world.
Spelt (T. spelta) – Another hexaploid species cultivated in limited quantities. Spelt is sometimes considered a subspecies of the closely related species common wheat (T. aestivum), in which case its botanical name is considered to be Triticum aestivum subsp. spelta.
Tetraploid Species

* Durum (T. durum) – The only tetraploid form of wheat widely used today, and the second most widely cultivated wheat.
* Emmer (T. dicoccum) – A tetraploid species, cultivated in ancient times but no longer in widespread use.
Diploid Species

* Einkorn (T. monococcum) – A diploid species with wild and cultivated variants. Domesticated at the same time as emmer wheat, but never reached the same importance.
Classes used in the United States:

* Durum – Very hard, translucent, light-colored grain used to make semolina flour for pasta & bulghur; high in protein, specifically, gluten protein.
* Hard Red Spring – Hard, brownish, high-protein wheat used for bread and hard baked goods. Bread Flour and high-gluten flours are commonly made from hard red spring wheat. It is primarily traded at the Minneapolis Grain Exchange.
* Hard Red Winter – Hard, brownish, mellow high-protein wheat used for bread, hard baked goods and as an adjunct in other flours to increase protein in pastry flour for pie crusts. Some brands of unbleached all-purpose flours are commonly made from hard red winter wheat alone. It is primarily traded on the Kansas City Board of Trade. One variety is known as “turkey red wheat”, and was brought to Kansas by Mennonite immigrants from Russia.[45]
* Soft Red Winter – Soft, low-protein wheat used for cakes, pie crusts, biscuits, and muffins. Cake flour, pastry flour, and some self-rising flours with baking powder and salt added, for example, are made from soft red winter wheat. It is primarily traded on the Chicago Board of Trade.
* Hard White – Hard, light-colored, opaque, chalky, medium-protein wheat planted in dry, temperate areas. Used for bread and brewing.
* Soft White – Soft, light-colored, very low protein wheat grown in temperate moist areas. Used for pie crusts and pastry. Pastry flour, for example, is sometimes made from soft white winter wheat.
Red wheats may need bleaching; therefore, white wheats usually command higher prices than red wheats on the commodities market.

 

 

 

Wheat is used in a wide variety of foods.

Wheat is used in a wide variety of foods.

Raw wheat can be ground into flour or, using hard durum wheat only, can be ground into semolina; germinated and dried creating malt; crushed or cut into cracked wheat; parboiled (or steamed), dried, crushed and de-branned into bulgur also known as groats. If the raw wheat is broken into parts at the mill, as is usually done, the outer husk or bran can be used several ways. Wheat is a major ingredient in such foods as bread, porridge, crackers, biscuits, Muesli, pancakes, pies, pastries, cakes, cookies, muffins, rolls, doughnuts, gravy, boza (a fermented beverage), and breakfast cereals (e.g., Wheatena, Cream of Wheat, Shredded Wheat, and Wheaties).

 
Nutrition

100 g (3.5 oz) of hard red winter wheat contain about 12.6 g (0.44 oz) of protein, 1.5 g (0.053 oz) of total fat, 71 g (2.5 oz) of carbohydrate (by difference), 12.2 g (0.43 oz) of dietary fiber, and 3.2 mg (0.00011 oz) of iron (17% of the daily requirement); the same weight of hard red spring wheat contains about 15.4 g (0.54 oz) of protein, 1.9 g (0.067 oz) of total fat, 68 g (2.4 oz) of carbohydrate (by difference), 12.2 g (0.43 oz) of dietary fiber, and 3.6 mg (0.00013 oz) of iron (20% of the daily requirement).

Much of the carbohydrate fraction of wheat is starch. Wheat starch is an important commercial product of wheat, but second in economic value to wheat gluten. The principal parts of wheat flour are gluten and starch. These can be separated in a kind of home experiment, by mixing flour and water to form a small ball of dough, and kneading it gently while rinsing it in a bowl of water. The starch falls out of the dough and sinks to the bottom of the bowl, leaving behind a ball of gluten.

In wheat, phenolic compounds are mainly found in the form of insoluble bound ferulic acid and be relevant to resistance to wheat fungal diseases. Alkylresorcinols are phenolic lipids present in high amounts in the bran layer (e.g. pericarp, testa and aleurone layers) of wheat and rye (0.1-0.3% of dry weight).

Grain of the Week – Durum

February 13, 2014 at 10:16 AM | Posted in Grain of the Week | Leave a comment
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Durum wheat

Durum wheat

Durum wheat or macaroni wheat (Triticum durum or Triticum turgidum subsp. durum is the only tetraploid species of wheat of commercial importance that is widely cultivated today. It was developed by artificial selection of the domesticated emmer wheat (like emmer, durum wheat is awned) strains formerly grown in Central Europe and the Near East around 7000 BC, which developed a naked, free-threshing form. Durum in Latin means “hard”, and the species is the hardest of all wheats. Its high protein content, as well as its strength, make durum good for special uses, the most well-known being pasta which in Italy is exclusively made from durum wheat. Durum wheat is used extensively in breadmaking. However, it is unusual in that, despite very high protein content, it is low in desirable gluten needed to form a glutinous web necessary for bread to rise. As a result, although 100 percent durum wheat breads do exist, such as pagnotte di Enna from Sicily, as well as others, in most instances bread doughs contain only a portion of durum wheat and are supplemented substantially with commercial white flours, often those higher in gluten necessary to offset the poor gluten contribution of durum flour. When durum flour is used as the sole flour in bread, substantial additions of isolated wheat gluten are necessary to effect rising. Without it, 100 percent durum wheat breads are often heavy, with very close grain, and will split easily when risen for baking.

 

 

 
Commercially produced dry pasta, or pasta secca, is made almost exclusively from durum semolina. Certain home made fresh pastas (pasta fresca), such as orecchiette, cavatelli, and malloreddus, also utilize durum wheat, while others, such as tagliatelle, utilize only soft wheat, often “00,” or a combination of soft and hard wheats.
Husked but unground, or coarsely ground, it is used to produce the semolina in the couscous of North Africa and the Levant. It is also used for Levantine dishes such as tabbula, kishk, kibba, bitfun and the bulghur for pilafs. In North African cuisine and Levantine cuisine, it forms the basis of many soups, gruels, stuffings, puddings and pastries. When ground as fine as flour, it is used for making bread. In the Middle East, it is used for flat round breads, and in Europe and elsewhere, it can be used for pizza, torte, etc. It is not, however, good for cakes, which are made from soft wheat to ensure softness.
The use of wheat to produce pasta was described as early as the 10th century by Ibn Wahshīya of Cairo. The North Africans called the product itrīya, from which Italian sources derived the term tria (or aletria in the case of Spanish sources) during the 15th century.
Another type of pasta, al-fidawsh (called “dry pasta”), was popular in al-Andalus. From there it was transmitted to Christian Spain, and it frequently appears in Hispano-Muslim cookbooks. From al-fidawsh was derived the Spanish word for noodles, fideos, and the Italian fidelli or fidellini.
In the American Great Plains, durum wheat is used almost exclusively for making pasta products such as spaghetti and macaroni.

 

 

 
Most of the durum grown today is amber durum, the grains of which are amber-colored and larger than those of other types of wheat. Durum has a yellow endosperm, which gives pasta its color. When durum is milled, the endosperm is ground into a granular product called semolina. Semolina made from durum is used for premium pastas and breads. There is also a red durum, used mostly for livestock feed.
The cultivation of durum generates greater yield than other wheats in areas of low precipitation (3–5 dm). Good yields can be obtained by irrigation, but this is rarely done. In the first half of the 20th century, the crop was widely grown in Russia. Durum is one of the most important food crops in West Asia. Although the variety of the wheat there is diverse, it is not extensively grown there, and thus must be imported. West amber durum produced in Canada is used mostly as semolina/pasta, but some is also exported to Italy for bread production.
In the Middle East and North Africa, local bread-making accounts for half the consumption of durum. Some flour is even imported. On the other hand, many countries in Europe produce durum in commercially significant quantities.

 

 

 
Durum wheat is subject to four processes: cleaning, tempering, milling and purifying. First, durum wheat is cleaned to remove foreign material and shrunken and broken kernels. Then it is tempered to a moisture content, toughening the seed coat for efficient separation of bran and endosperm. Durum milling is a complex procedure involving repetitive grinding and sieving. Proper purifying results in maximum semolina yield and the least amount of bran powder.
To produce bread, durum wheat is ground into flour. The flour is mixed with water to produce dough. The quantities mixed vary, depending on the acidity of the mixture. The dough is mixed with yeast and lukewarm water, and then fermented for hours. The quality of the bread produced depends on the viscoelastic properties of gluten, the protein content and protein composition.

 

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 18, 2013 at 8:45 AM | Posted in baking, Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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If you make bread with 100% whole-wheat-flour, it will be moister if you add the flour to the water slowly and mix gently. Whole-wheat-flour absorbs water at a slower rate than do other types of flour. Reserve 1/4 cup flour and knead in a tablespoon or so at a time as needed.

A little history about Bread

January 25, 2012 at 12:55 PM | Posted in baking, Food | Leave a comment
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Bread is a staple food prepared by cooking a dough of flour and water and often additional ingredients. Doughs are usually baked, but

Various leavened breads

in some cuisines breads are steamed (e.g., mantou), fried (e.g., puri), or baked on an unoiled frying pan (e.g., tortillas). It may be leavened or unleavened (e.g. matzo). Salt, fat and leavening agents such as yeast and baking soda are common ingredients, though bread may contain other ingredients, such as milk, egg, sugar, spice, fruit (such as raisins), vegetables (such as onion), nuts (such as walnuts) or seeds (such as poppy). Referred to colloquially as the “staff of life“, bread has been prepared for at least 30,000 years. The development of leavened bread can probably also be traced to prehistoric times. Sometimes, the word bread refers to a sweetened loaf cake, often containing appealing ingredients like dried fruit, chocolate chips, nuts or spices, such as pumpkin bread, banana bread or gingerbread.

Fresh bread is prized for its taste, aroma, quality, appearance and texture. Retaining its freshness is important to keep it appetizing. Bread that has stiffened or dried past its prime is said to be stale. Modern bread is sometimes wrapped in paper or plastic film or stored in a container such as a breadbox to reduce drying. Bread that is kept in warm, moist environments is prone to the growth of mold. Bread kept at low temperatures, in a refrigerator for example, will develop mold growth more slowly than bread kept at room temperature, but will turn stale quickly due to retrogradation.

The soft, inner part of bread is known to bakers and other culinary professionals as the crumb, which is not to be confused with small bits of bread that often fall off, called crumbs. The outer hard portion of bread is called the crust.

Bread is one of the oldest prepared foods. Evidence from 30,000 years ago in Europe revealed starch residue on rocks used for pounding plants. It is possible that during this time, starch extract from the roots of plants, such as cattails and ferns, was spread on a flat rock, placed over a fire and cooked into a primitive form of flatbread. Around 10,000 BC, with the dawn of the Neolithic age and the spread of agriculture, grains became the mainstay of making bread. Yeast spores are ubiquitous, including the surface of cereal grains, so any dough left to rest will become naturally leavened. There were multiple sources of leavening available for early bread. Airborne yeasts could be harnessed by leaving uncooked dough exposed to air for some time before cooking. Pliny the Elder reported that the Gauls and Iberians used the foam skimmed from beer to produce “a lighter kind of bread than other peoples.” Parts of the ancient world that drank wine instead of beer used a paste composed of grape juice and flour that was allowed to begin fermenting, or

White bread (left) and brown bread.

wheat bran steeped in wine, as a source for yeast. The most common source of leavening was to retain a piece of dough from the previous day to use as a form of sourdough starter.

A major advance happened in 1961 with the development of the Chorleywood bread process, which used the intense mechanical working of dough to dramatically reduce the fermentation period and the time taken to produce a loaf. The process, whose high-energy mixing allows for the use of lower protein grain, is now widely used around the world in large factories. As a result, bread can be produced very quickly and at low costs to the manufacturer and the consumer.

Recently, domestic bread machines that automate the process of making bread have become popular.

Bread is the staple food in Europe, European-derived cultures such as the Americas, and the Middle East and North Africa, as opposed to East Asia whose staple is rice. Bread is usually made from a wheat-flour dough that is cultured with yeast, allowed to rise, and finally baked in an oven. Owing to its high levels of gluten (which give the dough sponginess and elasticity), common wheat (also known as bread wheat) is the most common grain used for the preparation of bread, but bread is also made from the flour of other wheat species (including durum, spelt and emmer), rye, barley, maize (corn), and oats, usually, but not always, in combination with wheat flour. Spelt bread (Dinkelbrot) continues to be widely consumed in Germany, and emmer bread was a staple food in ancient Egypt. Canadian bread is known for its heartier consistency due to high protein levels in Canadian flour.

White bread is made from flour containing only the central core of the grain (endosperm).

Brown bread is made with endosperm and 10% bran. It can also refer to white bread with added colouring (often caramel colouring) to make it brown; this is commonly labeled in America as wheat bread (as opposed to whole-wheat bread).

Wholemeal bread contains the whole of the wheat grain (endosperm and bran). It is also referred to as “whole-grain” or “whole-wheat bread”, especially in North America.

Wheat germ bread has added wheat germ for flavoring.

Whole-grain bread can refer to the same as wholemeal bread, or to white bread with added whole grains to increase its fibre content, as in “60% whole-grain bread”.

Roti is a whole-wheat-based bread eaten in South Asia. Chapatti is a larger variant of roti. Naan is a leavened equivalent to these.

Granary bread is made from flaked wheat grains and white or brown flour. The standard malting process is modified to maximise the maltose or sugar content but minimise residual alpha amylase content. Other flavour components are imparted from partial fermentation due to the particular malting process used and to Maillard reactions on flaking and toasting.

Rye bread is made with flour from rye grain of varying levels. It is higher in fiber than many common types of bread and is often darker in color and stronger in flavor. It is popular in Scandinavia, Germany, Finland, the Baltic States, and Russia.

Breads and bread rolls at a bakery

Unleavened bread or matzo, used for the Jewish feast of Passover, does not include yeast, so it does not rise.

Sourdough bread is made with a starter.

Flatbread is often simple, made with flour, water, and salt, and then formed into flattened dough; most are unleavened, made without yeast or sourdough culture, though some are made with yeast.

Hempbread Hemp seeds do not mill into flour because of their high oil content (~30%). Hemp flour is the by-product after pressing the oil and milling the residue. Hemp flour doesn’t rise, and is best mixed with other flours. A 3:1 ratio produces a hearty, heavy, nutritious loaf high in protein and essential fatty acids.

The term quick bread usually refers to a bread chemically leavened, usually with both baking powder and baking soda, and a balance of acidic ingredients and alkaline ingredients. Examples include pancakes and waffles, muffins and carrot cake, Boston brown bread, and zucchini and banana bread.

The proportion of water to flour is the most important measurement in a bread recipe, as it affects texture and crumb the most. Professional bakers use a system of percentages known as baker’s percentage in their recipe formulations. They measure ingredients by weight instead of by volume, because measurement by weight is much more accurate and consistent than measurement by volume, especially for the dry ingredients.

The amount of flour is always stated as 100%, and the amounts of the rest of the ingredients are expressed as a percent of that amount by weight. Common table bread in the U.S. uses about 50% water, resulting in a finely textured, light bread. Most artisan bread formulas contain anywhere from 60 to 75% water. In yeast breads, the higher water percentages result in more CO2 bubbles and a coarser bread crumb. One pound (450 g) of flour will yield a standard loaf of bread or two French loaves.

Calcium propionate is commonly added by commercial bakeries to retard the growth of molds.

Traditional breads in the United States include cornbreads and various quick breads, such as biscuits. Cornbread is made from cornmeal and can differ significantly in taste and texture from region to region. In general, the South prefers white cornmeal with little to no wheat flour or sweeteners added. It is traditionally baked in a cast-iron skillet and ideally has a crunchy outside and moist inside. The North usually prefers yellow cornmeal with sometimes as much as half wheat flour in its composition, as well as sugar, honey, or maple syrup. This results in a bread that is softer and sweeter than its southern counterpart. Homemade wheat breads are made in a rectangular tin similar to those in the United Kingdom. Rolls, made from wheat flour and yeast, are another popular and traditional bread, eaten with the dinner meal. Sourdough biscuits are traditional “cowboy food” in the West. The San Francisco Bay Area is known for its crusty sourdough. Spoon bread, also called batter bread or egg bread, is made of cornmeal with or without added rice and hominy, and is mixed with milk, eggs, shortening and leavening to such a consistency that it must be served from the baking dish with a spoon. This is popular chiefly in the South. Up until the 20th century (and even later in certain regions), any flour other than cornmeal was considered a luxury; this would explain the greater variety in cornbread types compared to that of wheat breads. In terms of commercial manufacture, the most popular bread has been a soft-textured type with a thin crust that is usually made with milk and is slightly sweet; this is the type that is generally sold ready-sliced in packages. It is usually eaten with the crust, but some eaters or preparers may remove the crust due to a personal preference or style of serving, as with finger sandwiches served with afternoon tea. Some of the softest bread, including Wonder Bread, is referred to as “balloon bread”. Though white “sandwich bread” is the most popular, Americans are trending toward more artisanal breads. Different regions of the country feature certain ethnic bread varieties including the French baguette, the Ashkenazi Jewish bagel, scali (an Italian-style bread made in New England), Native American frybread (a product of hardship, developed during the Indian resettlements of the 19th century), and Jewish rye, a bread commonly associated with delicatessen cuisine.

Hungry Girl 100% Whole Wheat w/Flax Foldit Flatbread

October 30, 2011 at 1:15 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Kraft Cheese | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

I am hopelessly addicted to pasta, bread, and rice. So I’m always looking for new and healthier products.
I found a new product, well new to me, called Hungry Girl Foldit Flatbread. There are different types and I tried the 100% Whole Wheat w/Flax Foldit Flatbread. You can put anything you want inside and then fold one end over, kind of like a taco shell but bread.  I made mine for lunch and put some Jennie – O Turkey Tenders I had left over from the other night and a half piece of Kraft 2% Deli Style Sliced Sharp Cheddar. I then warmed it up in my Panini Maker. Tasted fantastic and browned up beautifully! Another new product to keep on hand. One serving is one piece – 100 calories, 0 fat, 290 mg sodium, 19 g carbs, 3 g fiber, and 6 g protein.

Hungry Girl 100% Whole Wheat with Flax

90 Calories
Excellent Source of ALA Omega 3

Excellent Source of Fiber
43% Less Net Carbs than sliced bread
Tasty!
INGREDIENTS: WATER, WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR, VITAL WHEAT GLUTEN, OAT FIBER, GRAIN BLEND (CUT WHEAT, WHEAT BRAN, CUT RYE, CORN MEAL, BARLEY GRITS, BULGAR WHEAT, STEEL CUT OATS, OAT FLAKES, YELLOW CORN GRITS, BARLEY FLAKES, RYE CHOPS, HULLED MILLET, WHEAT FLAKES), FLAX SEED MEAL, SOYBEAN OIL, YEAST, CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF EACH OF THE FOLLOWING: MALTITOL, SUGAR, MOLASSES, SODIUM ACID PYROPHOSPHATE, BAKING SODA, WHEAT PROTEIN ISOLATE, FUMARIC ACID, PRESERVATIVES (POTASSIUM SORBATE, SODIUM PROPIONATE), CELLULOSE GUM, GUAR GUM, CALCIUM SULFATE, XANTHAN GUM, SALT, L-CYSTEINE, CALCIUM PEROXIDE, ENZYMES. CONTAINS: WHEAT AND SOYBEANS. MANUFACTURED IN A FACILITY THAT ALSO PROCESSES PRODUCTS CONTAINING MILK AND CHEESE.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 flatbread (43g)

Amount Per Serving
Calories from Fat 25
Calories 90

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 2.5g     4%
Saturated Fat 0g     0%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg     0%
Sodium 360mg     15%
Total Carbohydrate 15g     5%
Dietary Fiber 7g     28%
Sugars –
Protein 7g

Vitamin A –         Vitamin C –
Calcium –         Iron –
*    Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

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