“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Potato-Zucchini Pancakes

March 9, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Diabetes Self Management, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is Potato-Zucchini Pancakes. Made using Medium Baking Potato, Zucchini, Green Onion, Egg White, Flour, Vegetable Oil, and Sour Cream. Excellent for any Meal of the day! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Potato-Zucchini Pancakes
Save time preparing these Potato-Zucchini Pancakes by shredding both the potato and the zucchini in a food processor fitted with a shredding disc.

Ingredients
1 medium baking potato, unpeeled and shredded
1/2 small zucchini, shredded
1 green onion, thinly sliced, plus additional for garnish
1 egg white
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
Sour cream (optional)

Directions
Yield: 2 servings
Serving size: 3 pancakes

1 – Combine potato, zucchini, 1 green onion, egg white, and flour in medium bowl; mix well.

2 – Heat oil in large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Drop 1/3 cupfuls potato mixture into skillet; flatten slightly. Cook 5 minutes per side or until browned.

3 – Serve with sour cream, if desired. Garnish with additional green onion.

Tip: Save time by shredding both the potato and zucchini in a food processor fitted with a shredding disc. There’s no need to wash the bowl in between because all the ingredients are mixed together before cooking.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 190 calories, Carbohydrates: 27 g, Protein: 6 g, Fat: 7 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 40 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/potato-zucchini-pancakes/

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Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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Diabetic Dish of the Week – Chicken Jambalaya

February 18, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is a Chicken Jambalaya. I’ve got a Chicken Jambalaya for this week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week. Made using Cubed and Cooked Chicken, Vegetable Oil, Onions, Green Pepper, Garlic, Rice, Seasoning, Hot Pepper Sauce, Tomatoes, and Unsalted Chicken Broth. Jambalaya, I love it! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Chicken Jambalaya
Craving authentic Louisiana fare? You can’t go wrong with this one-pot Creole jambalaya!

Ingredients
Preparation time:
1 hour
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 onions, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 cups cubed, cooked chicken
1 cup uncooked rice
1 bay leaf, crumbled
1/2 teaspoon thyme
1/2 teaspoon salt-free Creole seasoning
3–4 drops hot pepper sauce
1 can (16 ounces) tomatoes
1/2 cup unsalted chicken broth

Directions
Yield: 6 servings

Serving size: 1 1/4 cups

1 – Heat vegetable oil in a large pot, then sauté onions, green pepper, and garlic until tender. Add chicken and rice, stirring until well coated with oil. Add bay leaf, thyme, Creole seasoning, hot pepper sauce, tomatoes, and broth. Cover and simmer until rice is tender and liquid is absorbed, about 30–40 minutes.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 283 calories, Carbohydrates: 33 g, Protein: 16 g, Fat: 10 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Sodium: 60 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/chicken-jambalaya/

Subscribe to Diabetes Self-Management Magazine
Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more!Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/subscribe/

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Frozen Chocolate Banana Pops

July 4, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is a Frozen Chocolate Banana Pops. Who doesn’t like Frozen Bananas Dessert, especially when dipped in Chocolate! You’ll need Bananas, Semisweet Chocolate Chips, Vegetable Oil, and Sprinkles. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website. At the Diabetes Self Management site you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more, so check it out today! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Frozen Chocolate Banana Pops
Ingredients
3 bananas,* peeled
6 ice cream sticks or wooden skewers
1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chips
1 1/2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1/4 cup sprinkles, coconut, chopped peanuts or crushed cookies (optional)

Directions
1 – Line baking sheet with waxed paper or foil; set aside. Cut each banana in half. Insert ice cream stick halfway into each banana. Place on prepared baking sheet; freeze 1 hour.

2 – Stir chocolate chips and oil in small saucepan over low heat until melted and smooth. Place toppings on individual plate, if using; set aside.

3 – Remove pops from freezer. Spoon chocolate over each banana while holding over saucepan. Roll in toppings. Return to freezer to harden, about 1 hour. Store in airtight container or resealable freezer food storage bag.

Note: If desired, bananas can be cut into 1-inch pieces, frozen, then dipped in chocolate for individual bites.

*Note: You may substitute 6 baby bananas.

Yield: 6 servings.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 132 calories, Carbohydrates: 23 g, Protein: 1 g, Fat: 6 g, Saturated Fat: 3 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 2 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/frozen-chocolate-banana-pops/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 9, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 4 Comments
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Here’s a handy hint I had not heard of…………

Before chopping chillies, rub your hands with veg oil to prevent them from absorbing the chilli oils.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 4, 2018 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 4 Comments
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Thank you to Dee for passing this hint along………

Before chopping chillies, rub your hands with veg oil to prevent them from absorbing the chilli oils.

Condiment of the Week – Sesame Oil

June 16, 2016 at 5:13 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | Leave a comment
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Sesame seed oil in clear glass vial

Sesame seed oil in clear glass vial

Sesame oil is an edible vegetable oil derived from sesame seeds. Besides being used as a cooking oil in South India, it is often used as a flavor enhancer in Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Middle Eastern, and Southeast Asian cuisine. It has a distinctive nutty aroma and taste.

The oil from the nutrient-rich seed is popular in alternative medicine, from traditional massages and treatments to the modern day.

The oil is popular in Asia and is also one of the earliest-known crop-based oils, but world-wide mass modern production continues to be limited even today due to the inefficient manual harvesting process required to extract the oil.

 

 
Sesame oil is composed of the following fatty acids: linoleic acid (41% of total), oleic acid (39%), palmitic acid (8%), stearic acid (5%) and others in small amounts.

Sesame seeds are protected by a capsule which only bursts when the seeds are completely ripe. The ripening time tends to vary, so farmers cut plants by hand and place them together in an upright position to continue ripening until all the capsules have opened. The discovery of an indehiscent (nonshattering) mutant by Langham in 1943 began the work towards development of a high yielding, shatter-resistant variety. Although researchers have made significant progress in sesame breeding, harvest losses due to shattering continue to limit domestic US production.

Sesame seeds are primarily produced in developing countries, a factor that has played a role in limiting the creation

White sesame seeds, mostly unshelled.

White sesame seeds, mostly unshelled.

of large-scale, fully automated oil extraction and processing techniques. Sesame oil can be extracted by a number of methods, depending on the materials and equipment available.

In developing countries, sesame oil is often extracted with less-expensive and manually intensive techniques such as hot water flotation, bridge presses, ram presses, the ghani process, or by using a small-scale expeller. In developed countries sesame oil is often extracted using an expeller press, larger-scale oil extraction machines, or by pressing followed by chemical solvent extraction.

Sesame oil can also be extracted under low-temperature conditions using an expeller press in a process called cold pressing. This extraction method is popular among raw food adherents because it avoids exposing the oil to chemical solvents or high temperatures during extraction.

 
There are many variations in the color of sesame oil: cold-pressed sesame oil is pale yellow, while Indian sesame oil (gingelly or til oil) is golden, and East Asian sesame oils are commonly a dark brown color. This dark color and flavor are derived from roasted/toasted sesame seeds. Cold pressed sesame oil has a different flavor than the toasted oil, since it is produced directly from raw, rather than toasted, seeds.

Sesame oil is traded in any of the forms described above: Cold-pressed sesame oil is available in Western health shops. Unroasted (but not necessarily cold pressed) sesame oil is commonly used for cooking in the Middle East and can often be found in halal markets. In East Asian countries, different kinds of hot-pressed sesame oil are preferred.

 
The only essential nutrient having significant content in sesame oil is vitamin K, providing 17% of the Daily Value per 100 grams (ml) consumed supplying 884 calories. For fats, sesame oil is approximately equal in monounsaturated (oleic acid) and polyunsaturated (linoleic acid) fats, totaling together 80% of the fat content. The remaining oil content is primarily the saturated fat, palmitic acid (about 9% of total, table).

 

 

Bottling sesame oil

Bottling sesame oil

Despite sesame oil’s high proportion (41%) of polyunsaturated (Omega-6) fatty acids, it is least prone, among cooking oils with high smoke points, to turn rancid when kept in the open. This is due to the natural antioxidants present in the oil.

Light sesame oil has a high smoke point and is suitable for deep-frying, while dark sesame oil (from roasted sesame seeds) has a slightly lower smoke point and is unsuitable for deep-frying. Instead it can be used for the stir frying of meats or vegetables, sautéing, or for the making of an omelette.

Sesame oil is most popular in Asia, especially in Korea, China, and the South Indian states of Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, and Tamil Nadu, where its widespread use is similar to that of olive oil in the Mediterranean.

East Asian cuisines often use roasted sesame oil for seasoning.
The Chinese use sesame oil in the preparation of meals.
In Japan, rāyu, is a paste made of chili-sesame oil seasoning – and used as a spicy topping on various foods – or mixed with vinegar and soy sauce – and used as a dip.
In South India – before the advent of modern refined oils produced on a large scale, sesame oil was used traditionally for curries and gravies. It continues to be used, particularly in Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh, mixed with foods that are hot and spicy as it neutralizes the heat. It is often mixed in with a special spice powder that accompanies Idly, dosa as well as rice mixed with spice powders ([Paruppu Podi]). It is also used in pickles and condiments mainly in Andhra Pradesh.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 19, 2014 at 5:16 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Did you know that wrapping a potato in foil won’t actually make it bake faster? Rubbing it lightly with vegetable oil, however will.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 29, 2014 at 5:35 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Here’s a little handy tip I came across…

 

Before you chop chili peppers, rub a little vegetable oil into your hands and your skin won’t absorb the spicy chili oil.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 1, 2013 at 11:07 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Frustrated with syrup running down the sides of the bottle, making a disgusting mess? Try this trick: Rub the threads at the neck of the bottle with a small amount of vegetable oil. The oil will prevent the syrup from running and the cap from sticking next time you use it. This also works for molasses and honey containers.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 3, 2013 at 7:16 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Never pay for aerosol cooking sprays. Instead buy a giant jug of vegetable oil and add it to a spray bottle as needed. It’s the same thing and will cost you a fraction of the price.

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