Shrimp Stir-Fry

November 24, 2013 at 6:12 PM | Posted in shrimp, stir-fry, vegetables | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Shrimp Stir-Fry

Shrimp Stir Fry 004

 
Brrrr! Downright frigid out today! Around 9 degrees when I ventured out and got the paper tis morning and only in the low 20’s for a high. Hello Winter! Went to Kroger to pick up a few items for dinner tonight, doubled checked my receipt before I even left the store. I have learned my lesson about Kroger. I also stopped by Staples to pick up a few paper and ink supplies. For dinner tonight Shrimp Stir-Fry.

 

 

 

I had not prepared or had Stir-Fry in a long time. So I decided last night that was going to be dinner tonight! I went to local Walmart and Kroger to pick up some Mini Sweet Peppers, Medium Size Shrimp, Sliced water Chestnuts and a few other items for the Stir Fry. I had bought a Wok a while back and had never used it until today. For the Oil to fry everything I used a Toasted Sesame Oil. My ingredients were; Medium Shrimp (1 lb. Bag), Udon Stir-Fry Noodles, Mini Sweet Peppers, Sliced water Chestnuts, Baby Carrots, Sugar Snap Peas, Kikkoman Teriyaki Glaze, and Low Sodium Soy Sauce.

 

Shrimp Stir Fry 002

 

To prepare it, in a small skillet on med. high I added the 1 Tbsp Sesame Oil and then added 1 Tbsp Low Sodium Soy Sauce and 2 Tbs Teriyaki Glaze. Heated for one minute and set aside. I then boiled the Mini Carrots in a small sauce pan until they were almost done, fork tender, and set them aside. Then in the Wok, on high heat, I added 1 Tbsp of the Sesame Oil, the Mini Carrots, Sliced Water Chestnuts, sliced Sweet Peppers, and Sugar Snap Peas, cooked for 5 minutes. Then added the pouch of Udon Noodles, then another 1/2 Tbsp of Sesame Oil along with the Shrimp. Cooked another 2 minutes, until the Shrimp was cooked. Added the Glaze that I had set aside, stirred and cooked another minute and removed the Wok from the heat. It was ready to serve! The Stir-Fry came out delicious, makes me wonder why I waited so long to make Stir-Fry. Had dinner by myself tonight, parents went out to eat. Their not big fans of Stir-Fry. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Double Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 
UDON STIR-FRY NOODLESKame Uden Stir Fry Noodles

Other Noodles
Udon noodles are thick, white Japanese noodles. They can be eaten cold or hot. Udon noodles are often served in a mild fish broth, flavored with soy sauce and mirin (sweetened sake) and topped with thinly sliced scallions.
KA-ME Stir-Fry noodles are easy to prepare: Heat 1 tbsp KA-ME Sesame Oil in a wok; add thinly sliced vegetabled and stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add KA-ME Udon noodles, 1 tbsp KA-ME Soy Sauce, 1 tbp sugar and cook for 3 minutes, stirring constantly.
INGREDIENTS: WATER, WHEAT FLOUR, TAPIOCA STARCH, SALT ENZYME, ACIDITY REGULATORS (ACETIC AND LACTIC ACID, GLUCONO DELTA-LACTONE, SODIUM MALATE AND SOLIUM LACTATE).
http://www.kame.com/products/ingredients/noodles/udon-stir-fry-noodles

National Dish of the Week – Japan

July 8, 2011 at 4:43 PM | Posted in fish, Food, noodle, vegetables | 4 Comments
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Japanese cuisine has developed over the centuries as a result of many political and social changes throughout Japan. The cuisine eventually changed with the advent of the Medieval age which ushered in a shedding of elitism with the age of shogun rule. In the early modern era significant changes occurred resulting in the introduction of non-Japanese cultures, most notably Western culture, to Japan.

The modern term “Japanese cuisine” or washoku means traditional-style Japanese food, similar to that already existing before the end of national seclusion in 1868. In a broader sense of the word, it could also include foods whose ingredients or cooking methods were subsequently introduced from abroad, but which have been developed by Japanese people who have made these methods their own. Japanese cuisine is known for its emphasis on seasonality of food, quality of ingredients and presentation. The Michelin Guide has awarded Japanese cities by far the most Michelin stars of any country in the world (for example, Tokyo alone has more Michelin stars than Paris, Hong Kong, New York, LA and London combined).

Japanese cuisine is based on combining staple foods, typically rice or noodles, with a soup and okazu dishes made from fish, meat, vegetable, tofu and the like — to add flavor to the staple food. These are typically flavored with dashi, miso, and soy sauce and are usually low in fat and high in salt.

A standard Japanese meal generally consists of several different okazu accompanying a bowl of cooked white Japanese rice, a bowl of soup and some tsukemono (pickles).

The most standard meal comprises three okazu and is termed ichijū-sansai  “one soup, three sides”). Different cooking techniques are applied to each of the three okazu; they may be raw (sashimi), grilled, simmered (sometimes called boiled), steamed, deep-fried, vinegared, or dressed. This Japanese view of a meal is reflected in the organization of Japanese cookbooks: Chapters are devoted to cooking techniques as opposed to ingredients. There may also be chapters devoted to soups, sushi, rice, noodles, and sweets.

As Japan is an island nation its people eat much seafood. Meat-eating has been rare until fairly recently due to restrictions of Buddhism. However, strictly vegetarian food is rare since even vegetable dishes are flavored with the ubiquitous dashi stock, usually made with katsuobushi (dried skipjack tuna flakes). An exception is shōjin ryōri, vegetarian dishes developed by Buddhist monks. However, the advertised shōjin ryōri at public eating places includes some non-vegetarian elements.

Noodles are an essential part of Japanese cuisine usually as an alternative to a rice-based meal. Soba (thin, grayish-brown noodles containing buckwheat flour) and udon (thick wheat noodles) are the main traditional noodles and are served hot or cold with soy-dashi flavorings. Chinese-style wheat noodles served in a meat stock broth known as ramen have become extremely popular over the last century.

Vegetable consumption has dwindled while processed foods have become more prominent in Japanese households due to the rising costs of general foodstuffs.

Japanese cuisine offers a vast array of regional specialties known as kyōdo ryōri, many of them originating from dishes prepared using traditional recipes with local ingredients. Mainly, there are Kanto region food and Kansai region food. Kanto region foods taste very strong. For example the dashi-based broth for serving udon noodles is heavy on dark soy sauce, similar to soba broth. On the other hand Kansai region foods are lightly seasoned, with clear udon noodles made with light soy sauce.

While “local” ingredients are now available nationwide, and some originally regional dishes such as okonomiyaki and Edo-style sushi have spread throughout Japan and is no longer considered as such, many regional specialties survive to this day, with some new ones still being created.

The traditional Japanese table setting has varied considerably over the centuries, depending primarily on the type of table common during a given era. Before the 19th century, small individual box tables,hadoken,  or flat floor trays were set before each diner. Larger low tables, chabudai,that accommodated entire families were gaining popularity by the beginning of the 20th century, but these gave way to western style dining tables and chairs by the end of the 20th century.

Traditional Japanese table setting is to place a bowl of rice on your left and to place a bowl of miso soup on your right side at the table. Behind these, each okazu is served on its own individual plate. Based on the standard three okazu formula, behind the rice and soup are three flat plates to hold the three okazu; one to far back left, one at far back right, and one in the center. Pickled vegetables are often served on the side but are not counted as part of the three okazu. Chopsticks are generally placed at the very front of the tray near the diner with pointed ends facing left and supported by a chopstick rest, or hashioki.

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