One of America’s Favorites – Tamale Pie

May 25, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A tamale pie

Tamale pie is a pie and casserole dish in the cuisine of the Southwestern United States. It is prepared with a cornmeal crust and ingredients typically used in tamales. It has been described as a comfort food. The dish, invented sometime in the early 1900s in the United States, may have originated in Texas, and its first known published recipe dates to 1911.

Tamale pie is prepared with a cornmeal crust and typical tamale fillings arranged in several layers. Beef is traditionally used, but it can also be prepared using other meats such as chicken and turkey meat, and can also be prepared as a meatless dish. Although sometimes characterized as Mexican food, these forms are not popular in Mexican-American culture, in which the individually wrapped style is preferred. Tamale pie has been described as a “comfort-food classic” in the book The Ultimate Casseroles Book, published by Better Homes and Gardens.

Ingredients that are used include beef and ground beef, pork, chorizo, chicken, beans, cheese, cornmeal, corn, creamed corn, beans, black olives, onion, garlic, tomato, bell peppers, chili peppers, salsa, butter, seasonings such as chili powder, salt and pepper. Standard fine cornmeal can be used, as can masa harina, a corn-based tortilla flour. Cheese used may be used to top the dish, and can also be inside of the pie. The dish is typically baked in an oven. Garnishes used include cheese, sliced tomatoes, avocado slices, cilantro and olive oil.

A portion of a tamale pie

Tamale pie was invented sometime in the early 1900s in the United States, and circa the mid 1910s the dish was included in the curriculums of some home economics classes in U.S. high schools. The dish may have originated in the U.S. state of Texas. John F. Mariani’s 1983 title The Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink claims the first published recipe for tamale pie dates to 1911. Recipes for this style of dish were also published prior to this time. The 1899 book The Capitol Cook Book, published in Austin, Texas included a recipe for a similar pot pie prepared with a wheat flour crust on the top of the dish, and the 1905 book The Times Cook Book #2, published by the Los Angeles Times, included a recipe for a casserole with “cornmeal crusts above and below.” Another cookbook published circa the time of World War I has a tamale pie recipe, stating that the dish can be utilized to save wheat.

 

Jennie – O Turkey Product – Chipotle BBQ Turkey Breast Tenderloin

December 4, 2014 at 7:09 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This product along with all the others can be found at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Also while your checking out the Chipotle BBQ Turkey Breast Tenderloin click on over the Recipe Section, which is full of delicious and healthy recipes, ideas, and tips! http://www.jennieo.com/

 

 

Chipotle BBQ Turkey Breast Tenderloin
Pair this all natural smokey flavor with your choice of complimentary sides.Chipotle BBQ Turkey Breast Tenderloin
Product Features:
* 99% Fat Free
* Preseasoned
* Gluten Free
* 24-oz package

Cooking Instructions:
GRILL METHOD:
* Preheat grill over medium heat, place tenderloins directly on grate.
* Grill, turning occasionally, until meat thermometer inserted into thickest portion of meat reaches 165º F, approximately 45-50 minutes.
* Remove from heat, cover and let rest 5-10 minutes before slicing.

BAKE METHOD:
* Preheat oven to 350º F.
* Place tenderloins in a shallow baking pan.
* Bake until meat thermometer inserted into thickest portion of meat reaches 165º F, approximately 60-70 minutes.
* Remove from oven, cover and let rest 5-10 minutes before slicing.

SLOW COOKER METHOD:
* Peel back and remove packaging .
* Place tenderloins (two in each packet) in slow cooker, add 1/2 cup water, and cover with lid.
* Cook according to instructions below AND until internal temperature reaches 165° F. as measured by a meat thermometer.
* Remove and serve.
* Slow cookers may vary in cooking performance.
* Cook Time on HIGH Setting – Fresh 1 hr 45 min or Frozen 3 hrs.
* Cook Time on LOW Setting – Fresh 2 hrs 25 min or Frozen 3 hrs 35 min.

Jennie O Make the Switch

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 112 g Total Carbohydrates 4 g
Calories 110 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 10 Sugars 3 g
Total Fat 1.0 g Protein 20 g
Saturated Fat .5 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 2%
Cholesterol 50 mg Iron 4%
Sodium 650 mg Calcium 0%
http://www.jennieo.com/products/174-Chipotle-BBQ-Turkey-Breast-Tenderloin

One of America’s Favorites – Thanksgiving Dinner

November 26, 2014 at 6:28 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A traditional Thanksgiving dinner

A traditional Thanksgiving dinner

The centerpiece of contemporary Thanksgiving in the United States and Canada is a large meal, generally centered on a large roasted turkey. The majority of the dishes in the traditional American version of Thanksgiving dinner are made from foods native to the New World, as according to tradition the Pilgrims received these foods from the Native Americans. However, many of the classic traditions attributed to the first Thanksgiving are actually myths later introduced.

 

 

 

According to what traditionally is known as “The First Thanksgiving,” the 1621 feast between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag at Plymouth Colony contained turkey, waterfowl, venison, fish, lobster, clams, berries, fruit, pumpkin, and squash. William Bradford noted that, “besides waterfowl, there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many.” Many of the foods that were included in the first feast (except, notably, the seafood) have since gone on to become staples of the modern Thanksgiving dinner.

The use of the turkey in the USA for Thanksgiving precedes Lincoln’s nationalization of the holiday in 1863. Alexander Hamilton proclaimed that no “Citizen of the United States should refrain from turkey on Thanksgiving Day,” and many of the Founding Fathers (particularly Benjamin Franklin) had high regard for the wild turkey as an American icon, but turkey was uncommon as Thanksgiving fare until after 1800. By 1857, turkey had become part of the traditional dinner in New England.

 

 

 

A Thanksgiving Day dinner served to the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935 included: pickles, green olives, celery, roast turkey, oyster stew, cranberry sauce, giblet gravy, dressing, creamed asparagus tips, snowflake potatoes, baked carrots, hot rolls, fruit salad, mince meat pie, fruit cake, candies, grapes, apples, clams, fish, and many other food harvests. French drip coffee, cigars and cigarettes.

The White House Cook Book, 1887, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette, et al., had the following menu: oysters on half shell, cream of chicken soup, fried smelts, sauce tartare, roast turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, baked squash, boiled onions, parsnip fritters, olives, chicken salad, venison pastry, pumpkin pie, mince-pie, Charlotte russe, almond ice cream, lemon jelly, hickory nut cake, cheese, fruits and coffee.

 

 

 

Turkey being the most common main dish of a Thanksgiving dinner, Thanksgiving is sometimes colloquially called “Turkey Day.” In 2006, American turkey growers were expected to raise 270 million turkeys, to be processed into five billion pounds of turkey meat valued at almost $8 billion, with one-third of all turkey consumption occurring in the Thanksgiving-Christmas season, and a per capita consumption of almost 18 pounds (8.2 kg). The Broad Breasted White turkey is particularly bred for Thanksgiving dinner and similar large feasts; its large size (specimens can grow to over 40 pounds) and meat content make it ideal for such situations, although the breed must be artificially bred and suffers from health problems due to its size.

Most Thanksgiving turkeys are stuffed with a bread-based mixture and roasted. Sage is the traditional herb added to the stuffing (also called dressing), along with chopped celery, carrots, and onions. Deep-fried turkey is rising in popularity, a deep-fried Thanksgiving turkey can be prepared using a propane deep fryer outdoors. When deep-frying a turkey it must be completely thawed and patted dry for safety. Attempting to fry frozen or partially frozen turkeys can result in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion due to the high water content of the turkey. When frying a turkey outdoors using a propane turkey fryer the following safety measures should be followed including avoiding oil spillover by not overfilling the pot, turning off the flame when lowering the turkey into oil, frying outside away from the home, garage, and other structures including wooden decks. A grease fire approved fire extinguisher should also be nearby in case of accidental fire. A Thanksgiving turkey can also be fried in an alternative infrared turkey fryer which uses no oil. Infrared turkey fryers can be purchased from many retailers including many big box stores, home improvement warehouse stores, and directly from the manufacturer online. In more recent years it is also true that as the wild population of turkeys has rebounded in most of the US, some will hunt and dress their turkey in the woods and then freeze it until meal preparation.

 

 

 

Oven roasted turkey

Oven roasted turkey

Butterball, a national turkey producer, runs a well-known hotline (the “Turkey Talk Line”) for those who need assistance cooking a turkey.

Non-traditional foods other than turkey are sometimes served as the main dish for a Thanksgiving dinner. Ham is often served alongside turkey in many households. Goose and duck, foods which were traditional European centerpieces of Christmas dinners before being displaced, are now sometimes served in place of the Thanksgiving turkey. Sometimes, fowl native to the region where the meal is taking place is used; for example, an article in Texas Monthly magazine suggested quail as the main dish for a Texan Thanksgiving feast. John Madden, who appeared on television for the NFL Thanksgiving Day game from 1981 to 2001, frequently advocated his fondness for the turducken, deboned turkey, duck and chicken nested inside each other than cooked. In a few areas of the West Coast of the United States, Dungeness crab is common as an alternate main dish, as crab season starts in early November.”Similarly, Thanksgiving falls within deer hunting season in the Northeastern United States, which encourages the use of venison as a centerpiece. Sometimes a variant recipe for cooking turkey is used; for example, a Chinese recipe for goose could be used on the similarly sized American bird. Vegetarians or vegans may have a tofu-based substitute; a Field Roast, which is a wheat-based product; or a special seasonal dish, such as stuffed squash. In Alaskan villages, whale meat is sometimes eaten. Irish immigrants have been known to have prime rib of beef as their centerpiece since beef in Ireland was once a rarity; families would save up money for this dish to signify newfound prosperity and hope.

 

 

 

In the United States, a globalist approach to Thanksgiving has become common with the impact of immigration. Basic “Thanksgiving” ingredients, or the intent of the holiday, can be transformed to a variety of dishes by using flavors, techniques, and traditions from their own cuisines. Others celebrate the holiday with a variety of dishes particularly when there is a crowd to be fed, guest’s tastes vary and considering the financial means available.

Many other foods are typically served alongside the main dish—so many that, because of the amount of food, the Thanksgiving meal is sometimes served midday or early afternoon to make time for all the eating, and preparation may begin at dawn or on days prior. Copious leftovers are also common following the meal proper.

Traditional Thanksgiving foods are sometimes specific to the day, and although some of the foods might be seen at any semi-formal meal in the United States, the meal often has something of a ritual or traditional quality. Many Americans would say it is “incomplete” without cranberry sauce; stuffing or dressing; and gravy. Other commonly served dishes include winter squash; sweet potatoes; mashed potatoes; dumplings; noodles; corn on the cob or hominy; deviled eggs; green beans or green bean casserole; sauerkraut (among those in the Mid-Atlantic; especially Baltimore); peas and carrots; bread rolls; cornbread (in the south and parts of New England); or biscuits, rutabagas or turnips; and a salad. For dessert, various pies are often served, particularly apple pie, mincemeat pie, sweet potato pie, pumpkin pie, chocolate cream pie and pecan pie.

 

 

A Thanksgiving meal in New England

A Thanksgiving meal in New England

There are also regional differences as to the stuffing or dressing traditionally served with the turkey. Southerners generally make their dressing from cornbread, while those in other parts of the country make stuffing from white, wheat or rye bread as the base. One or several of the following may be added to the dressing/stuffing: oysters, apples, chestnuts, raisins, celery and/or other vegetables, sausages or the turkey’s giblets. The traditional Canadian version has bread cubes, sage, onion and celery. Rice is also sometimes used instead of bread in some parts of Canada.

Other dishes reflect the region or cultural background of those who have come together for the meal. For example, many African-Americans and Southerners serve baked macaroni and cheese and collard greens, along with chitterlings and sweet potato pie, while some Italian-Americans often have lasagne on the table and Ashkenazi Jews may serve noodle kugel, a sweet dessert pudding. Other Jewish families may consume foods commonly associated with Hanukkah, such as latkes or a sufganiyah; the two holidays are usually in close proximity and on extremely rare occasions overlap. It is not unheard of for Mexican Americans to serve their turkey with mole and roasted corn. In Puerto Rico, the Thanksgiving meal is completed with arroz con gandules (rice with pigeon peas) or arroz con maiz (rice with corn), pasteles (root tamales) stuffed with turkey, pumpkin-coconut crème caramel, corn bread with longaniza, potato salad, roasted white sweet potatoes and Spanish sparkling hard cider. Turkey in Puerto Rico is stuffed with mofongo. Cuban-Americans traditionally serve the turkey alongside a small roasted pork and include white rice and black beans or kidney beans. Vegetarians or vegans have been known to serve alternative entree centerpieces such as a large vegetable pie or a stuffed and baked pumpkin or tofu substitutes. Many Midwesterners (such as Minnesotans) of Norwegian or Scandinavian descent set the table with lefse, (Lefse is a traditional soft, Norwegian flatbread.)

 

 

 

The beverages at Thanksgiving can vary as much as the side dishes, often depending on who is present at the table and their tastes. Spirits or cocktails sometimes may be served before the main meal. On the dinner table, unfermented apple cider (still or sparkling) and/or wine are often served. Pitchers of sweet tea can often be found on Southern tables. Beaujolais nouveau is sometimes served, as “Beaujolais day” falls before American Thanksgiving.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 
Have a Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!

 

One of America’s Favorites – Turkey Meat

November 24, 2014 at 6:28 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A roast turkey prepared for a traditional U.S. Thanksgiving meal.

A roast turkey prepared for a traditional U.S. Thanksgiving meal.

Turkey meat is the meat from turkeys, typically domesticated turkeys. It is a popular poultry product used in a number of culturally significant events as well as for everyday nourishment.

 

 
Turkeys are sold sliced and ground, as well as “whole” in a manner similar to chicken with the head, feet, and feathers removed. Frozen whole turkeys remain popular. Sliced turkey is frequently used as a sandwich meat or served as cold cuts; in some cases where recipes call for chicken it can be used as a substitute. Ground turkey is sold just as ground beef, and is frequently marketed as a healthy alternative to beef. Without careful preparation, cooked turkey is usually considered to end up less moist than other poultry meats such as chicken or duck.

Wild turkeys, while technically the same species as domesticated turkeys, have a very different taste from farm-raised turkeys. Almost all of the meat is “dark” (even the breast) with a more intense flavor. The flavor can also vary seasonally with changes in available forage, often leaving wild turkey meat with a gamier flavor in late summer due to the greater number of insects in its diet over the preceding months. Wild turkey that has fed predominantly on grass and grain has a milder flavor. Older heritage breeds also differ in flavor.

 

 

 

A large amount of turkey meat is processed. It can be smoked and as such is sometimes sold as turkey ham or turkey bacon, which is widely considered to be far healthier than pork-based bacon. Twisted helices of deep fried turkey meat, sold as “turkey twizzlers,” came to prominence in the UK in 2004 when chef Jamie Oliver campaigned to have them and similar foods removed from school dinners.

Unlike chicken eggs, turkey eggs are not commonly sold as food due to the high demand for whole turkeys and lower output of eggs as compared with other fowl (not only chickens, but even ducks or quail). The value of a single turkey egg is estimated to be about $3.50 on the open market, substantially more than an entire carton of one dozen chicken eggs.

Turkeys are traditionally eaten as the main course of Thanksgiving in the United States and Canada, and at Christmas feasts in much of the rest of the world (often as stuffed turkey). It was eaten as such as early as the 16th century in England. Before the 20th century, pork ribs were the most common food for the North American holidays, as the animals were usually slaughtered in November. Turkeys were once so abundant in the wild that they were eaten throughout the year, the food considered commonplace, whereas pork ribs were rarely available outside of the Thanksgiving-New Year season. While the tradition of turkey at Christmas spread throughout England in the 17th century, among the working classes it became common to serve goose, which remained the predominant roast until the Victorian era.

In the UK in 2009, 7,734,000 turkeys were consumed on Christmas Day.

 

 

 

 

After World War II, cheap imported turkey tail became popular in Samoa. Because the cut is so fatty, to combat obesity it was banned from 2007 to 2013, only allowed back when Samoa joined the World Trade Organization.

Turkey with mole sauce is regarded as Mexico’s “national dish”.

 

 

 

Roast turkey

Roast turkey

Both fresh and frozen turkeys are used for cooking; as with most foods, fresh turkeys are generally preferred, although they cost more. Around holiday seasons, high demand for fresh turkeys often makes them difficult to purchase without ordering in advance. For the frozen variety, the large size of the turkeys typically used for consumption makes defrosting them a major endeavor: a typically sized turkey will take several days to properly defrost.

Turkeys are usually baked or roasted in an oven for several hours, often while the cook prepares the remainder of the meal. Sometimes, a turkey is brined before roasting to enhance flavor and moisture content. This is necessary because the dark meat requires a higher temperature to denature all of the myoglobin pigment than the white meat (very low in myoglobin), so that fully cooking the dark meat tends to dry out the breast. Brining makes it possible to fully cook the dark meat without drying the breast meat. Turkeys are sometimes decorated with turkey frills prior to serving.

In some areas, particularly the American South, they may also be deep fried in hot oil (often peanut oil) for 30 to 45 minutes by using a turkey fryer. Deep frying turkey has become something of a fad, with hazardous consequences for those unprepared to safely handle the large quantities of hot oil required.

 

 

 

 

Turkey contains more protein per ounce than other meats. The white meat of turkey is generally considered healthier than dark meat because of its lower saturated fat content, but the nutritional differences are small. Turkey is reputed to cause sleepiness, but holiday dinners are commonly large meals served with carbohydrates, fats, and alcohol in a relaxed atmosphere, all of which are bigger contributors to post-meal sleepiness than the tryptophan in turkey.

 

 

 

Roast turkey served with salad, sauces and sparkling juice. On the left is a log cake.

Roast turkey served with salad, sauces and sparkling juice. On the left is a log cake.

For Thanksgiving in the United States and Canada, turkey is typically served stuffed or with dressing (on the side), with cranberry sauce and gravy. Common complementary dishes include mashed potatoes, corn on the cob, green beans, squash, and sweet potatoes. Pie is the usual dessert, especially those made from pumpkins, apples, or pecans.

When eaten at Christmas in the United Kingdom, turkey is traditionally served with winter vegetables including roast potatoes, Brussels sprouts and parsnips. Cranberry sauce is the traditional condiment in the northern rural areas of the United Kingdom where wild cranberries grow. In the south and in urban areas, where cranberries until recently were difficult to obtain, bread sauce was used in its place, but the availability of commercial cranberry sauce has seen a rise in its popularity in these areas too. Sometimes sausage meat, cocktail sausages or liver wrapped in bacon is also served (known as bacon rolls or “pigs in blankets”).

Especially during holiday seasons, stuffing, also known as dressing, is traditionally served with turkey. There are many varieties: oatmeal, chestnut, sage and onion (flavored bread), cornbread, and sausage are the most traditional. Stuffing may either be used to stuff the turkey (as the name implies), or may be cooked separately and served as a side dish.

 

 

 

 

Tips for Food Safety – From Jennie – O Turkey

September 27, 2014 at 5:22 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Some great Food Safety Tips from Jennie – O Turkey to pass along today. These tips are on the Jennie -O website along with all kinds of healthy recipes, products, and tips. http://www.jennieo.com/

 
Tips for Food Safety
Ensure food safety by following these guidelines
We take food safety as seriously as we take great taste. That’s why we’re arming you with the knowledge to properly prepare and cook raw meat to ensure food safety and a delicious meal for your family.

 

 

Jennie O Make the Switch
Follow just 4 rules to ensure food safety.

 
1. Clean.
* Remember to use warm, soapy water to wash anything the raw meat touches:
* Remember to use warm, soapy water to wash anything the raw meat touches
* Your hands
* Countertops and other surfaces
* Cutting boards
* Plates or serving platters
* Meat thermometer
* Grill utensils

 
2. Separate.
* Avoid cross-contamination by separating raw meat from other foods.
* Avoid cross-contamination by separating raw meat from other foods
* Use separate cutting boards
* Use separate knives and utensils
* Separate it in your shopping bags and refrigerator
* Store in sealed containers to keep juices from dripping onto other foods
* Never reuse a raw turkey marinade on cooked turkey

 
3. Cook.
* Fully cook meat to destroy bacteria that could cause food-borne illness.
*Fully cook meat to destroy bacteria that could cause food-borne illness
* Cook the product as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer
* Roast until timer pops up and turkey is fully cooked, 180°F as measured by a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh. ALWAYS confirm doneness with a meat thermometer. Juices should run clear. Let turkey stand 20 minutes before carving.
* Never eat under-cooked poultry
*Never reuse a raw knife or cutting board for cooked food

 
4. Chill.
* Storing raw meat at the right temperature helps keep food safe.
* Storing raw meat at the right temperature helps keep food safe
* Set your refrigerator to 40 degrees or lower
* Thaw raw meats in the refrigerator in fully sealed containers
* Keep thawed or fresh meat in the refrigerator for no more than 3 days before cooking
* Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours of cooking
* Eat leftovers within 3-4 days

 

http://www.jennieo.com/cooking-with-turkey/2-Tips-for-Food-Safety

Jennie – O Turkey Product – Smoked Whole Turkey

September 6, 2014 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Keep this one in mind for the upcoming Holiday Season, Smoked Whole Turkey.

Jennie - O Smoked Whole Turkey

 

Smoked Whole Turkey
A moist and delicious whole turkey with smoked flavor for the perfect meal.
Product Features:
* Fully Cooked
* Simply Heat & Serve
* Gravy Recipe
* Product may appear pink due to the smoking process, but product is fully cooked and safe to eat. Enjoy!

 

 

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 112 g Total Carbohydrates 0 gJennie O Make the Switch
Calories 160 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 50 Sugars 1 g
Total Fat 6.0 g Protein 27 g
Saturated Fat 2.0 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 2%
Cholesterol 100 mg Iron 4%
Sodium 550 mg Calcium 0%

 
Ingredients
TURKEY, WATER, SALT, DEXTROSE, SODIUM PHOSPHATE, CARRAGEENAN, SODIUM NITRITE.
http://www.jennieo.com/products/177-Smoked-Whole-Turkey

Jennie – O Turkey Product – Fully Cooked Italian Style Turkey Meatballs

August 31, 2014 at 6:11 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie O Turkey Product highlight is the Fully Cooked Italian Style Turkey Meatballs.

 
Fully Cooked Italian Style Turkey Meatballs
No thawing necessary. Ready in 2-3 minutes, they come fully cooked and go right from the freezer to the microwave.

 

 

Jennie - O Fully Cooked Italian Style Turkey Meatballs
Product Features:
* Approximately 24 Meatballs
* 24-oz package
* Gluten Free

 

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 84 g Total Carbohydrates 2 g
Calories 180 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 110 Sugars 0 g
Total Fat 13.0 g Protein 16 g
Saturated Fat 4.0 g Vitamin A 2%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 2%
Cholesterol 80 mg Iron 10%
Sodium 440 mg Calcium 6%
Ingredients
TURKEY, WATER, SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE (WITH CARAMEL COLOR), CONTAINS 2% OR LESS SALT, NATURAL FLAVORING, SEASONING (SPICES, YEAST EXTRACT, DEHYDRATED ONION, GRANULATED GARLIC, DEHYDRATED BELL PEPPERS, DEHYDRATED PARSLEY, NATURAL FLAVORS INCLUDING EXTRACTIVE OF. PAPRIKA SALT). CONTAINS SOY. NO GLUTEN.

 
http://www.jennieo.com/products/85-Fully-Cooked-Italian-Style-Turkey-Meatballs

Jennie – O turkey Product Pass Along – Maple Turkey Bacon

August 9, 2014 at 5:54 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Well unfortunately I haven’t seen this product in our stores here locally, but I look forward to trying it if I come across some. If you see some give it a try and let me know what you think! You can check out this product out along with all the others and al the recipes by going to the Jennie – O Turkey website. http://www.jennieo.com/

 

 

Maple Turkey Bacon
Our Turkey Bacon is a delicious alternative to pork bacon.
This unbeatable combination of the sweet taste of maple added to our already delicious bacon creates a new way to enjoy turkey bacon every day!

Jennie O Maple Turkey Bacon

Product Features:
* 60% Less Fat & Sodium Than USDA Data For Pork Bacon
* Resealable Package
*12-oz package
* Gluten Free

 

 

Cooking Instructions:
COOKING INSTRUCTIONS FOR CRISPY BACON:

 

BAKE:
Preheat oven to 375°F.
Place desired number of slices on pan.
Bake 8-12 minutes or to desired crispness, no turning is necessary.

 

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 15 g Total Carbohydrates 0 g
Calories 30 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 20 Sugars 0 g
Total Fat 2.5 g Protein 2 g
Saturated Fat .5 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 0%
Cholesterol 10 mg Iron 0%
Sodium 130 mg Calcium 2%

 

http://www.jennieo.com/products/166-Maple-Turkey-Bacon

Muenster Turkey Franks w/ Baked Fries

July 28, 2014 at 5:21 PM | Posted in Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Ore - Ida | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Muenster Turkey Franks w/ Baked Fries

 

 

Muenster Turkey Frank Fries 005
We avoided the heavy storms that hit in some areas around here last night, just a shower or two. One good thing is the storm moved out the heat and humidity. It was about 59 degrees this morning, with no HUmidity! Ran a few errands for myself and Mom and that was about it for the day. Did repair another down spout on the car port that had blown off from the storm Saturday Night. For dinner tonight I prepared a Muenster Turkey Frank w/ Baked Fries.

 

 
I used Jennie – O Bun Length Uncured Turkey Franks. My last package of my free samples of Jennie – O Turkey Franks. I love grilling but I’m a huge fan of boiling Franks and Dogs also. So I boiled these for dinner. These are some nice looking plump Turkey Franks, when boiled. Fantastic taste and as they say, they’re Bun Length. I served it on a Healthy Life Whole Grain Hot Dog Bun. I had been using Aunt Millie’s Reduced Calories Buns but they are getting tough to find in local stores, not sure why but Kroger no longer carries them. Anyway served it on the Healthy Life Whole Grain Bun and topped with a slice of Boar’s Head Muenster Cheese and French’s Yellow Mustard. One fine Frank, Thank you Jennie – O! For a side dish I baked up some Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries, served these with a side of Hunt’s Ketchup for dipping. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Greek Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

Jennie – O Bun Length Uncured Turkey FranksJennie - O Bun Length Uncured Turkey Franks
Product Features:
* No Gluten
* 8 oz. Package
* All Natural
* No Preservative
* No Nitrate or Nitrites
* Lean

 

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 56 g Total Carbohydrates 2 g
Calories 80 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 40 Sugars 1 g
Total Fat 4.0 g Protein 8 g
Saturated Fat 1.5 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 0%
Cholesterol 45 mg Iron 4%
Sodium 410 mg Calcium 2%

 

Ingredients
DARK TURKEY, WATER, CONTAINS 2% OR LESS FRANK SEASONING (SUGAR, YEAST EXTRACT, PAPRIKA, SALT, DRIED GARLIC, NATURAL FLAVOR, PAPRIKA EXTRACT (COLOR)), RICE STARCH, SALT, NATURAL FLAVOR (CELERY JUICE POWDER), POTASSIUM CHLORIDE, NATURAL FLAVORING. MADE WITH COLLAGEN CASING. NO GLUTEN.

 

 

– See more at: http://www.jennieo.com/products/196-Bun-Length-Uncured-Turkey-Franks#sthash.OsuHWgcq.dpuf

Seasoned Turkey Breast Steak w/ Steam Crisp Sweet Corn Kernels, Mashed Potatoes,…

February 7, 2014 at 6:21 PM | Posted in Green Giant, Jennie-O Turkey Products | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Seasoned Turkey Breast Steak w/ Steam Crisp Sweet Corn Kernels, Mashed Potatoes, and Baked French Bread

 

 

 
Another sunny but frigid day out again, minus 3 with the wind chill. Got out this afternoon and finished clearing the driveway again. From that to, I went to the bank, post office, and stopped by Walmart to pick up a few items and a prescription. For dinner prepared the Jennie – O Seasoned Turkey Breast Steak. Tonight I prepared a Seasoned Turkey Breast Steak w/ Steam Crisp Sweet Corn Kernels, Mashed Potatoes, and Baked French Bread.

 

 

Jenn O Turkey Breast Steak 004

I came across the Jennie – O Turkey Breast Steak at Walmart a while back, and been using regular ever since! It comes Seasoned and it’s only 130 calories and 3 carbs per serving. You can prepare it several ways, I pan fried mine. To prepare it just preheat a large skillet over medium heat, spray it with nonstick spray. Cook the steaks, turning 2-3 times until meat thermometer inserted into thickest portion of meat reached 165°F, approximately 19-21 minutes. Covered with lid for the last 5 minutes of cooking. Remove from stove top, cover, and let rest for 5-10 minutes before slicing. Then you have a fine and tasty Turkey Breast Steak! As usual it’s another winner from Jennie – O! It was well seasoned, I did add a couple of shakes of Sea Salt while it was cooking.

 

 

 
For one side dish I heated up a can of Green Giant Steam Crisp Super Sweet Yellow and White Kernel Corn, my favorite canned Corn. Then I tried a new Mashed Potato, Betty Crocker Creamy Buttery Mashed Potatoes. Comes in a microwavable container, just add water and heat. It came out very good. I normally buy the Idahoan Mashed Potatoes but Walmart had the Betty Crocker ones on sale so I went with that. Then I baked a loaf of Pillsbury Rustic French Bread. Lightly brushed the top of the loaf with Extra Virgin Olive Oil and sprinkled Sesame Seeds on top before baking. For dessert tonight a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 
Jennie – O Turkey Breast SteakJennie O Turkey Steak
A leaner, great tasting grilling option with only 130 calories and 23 g of protein per serving.
* 97% Fat Free
* Gluten Free
* Great on the Grill
* 16 – 24 oz package

 

Cooking Instructions:
SKILLET METHOD:
Preheat a large skillet over Medium heat.
Spray with nonstick spray.
Cook steaks, turning 2-3 times UNTIL meat thermometer inserted into thickest portion of meat reaches 165°F, approximately 19-21 minutes.
Cover with lid for the last 5 minues of cooking.
Remove from stovetop, cover, and let rest for 5-10 minutes before slicing.

 

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 112 g Total Carbohydrates 3 g
Calories 130 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 30 Sugars 1 g
Total Fat 3.0 g Protein 23 g
Saturated Fat 1.0 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 2%
Cholesterol 60 mg Iron 4%
Sodium 510 mg Calcium 0%
– See more at: http://www.jennieo.com/products/160-Turkey-Breast-Steak#sthash.19f6j809.dpuf

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