It’s Nuts I tell you….TRUFFLES

December 27, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in nuts, NUTS COM | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

This week from the nuts.com website (https://nuts.com/) its all about Truffles. A box of 8 giant Gourmet Truffles with flavors of; Dark Chocolate Raspberry, White Chocolate, Dark Chocolate Grand Marnier, Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate Champagne, Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate Hazelnut and Tiramisu. Oh the Chocolate! This is just one of many Chocolates and Sweets that you can find at the Nus site (https://nuts.com/). Along with Chocolate Treats you can also find items like; GIFTS, NUTS, DRIED FRUIT, SNACKS, COFFEE and TEA, and COOKING and BAKING. Plus Get 1-2 day FREE shipping on orders over $59, see for details! Gifts for all occasions or just to treat yourself, check it out today. Enjoy and make 2019 a Healthy One!

 

 

 

 

TRUFFLES
We’re in awe of these giant gourmet truffles. This box of eight assorted dessert truffles features decadent flavors to appeal to any chocolate lover’s palate. There is a reason our customers rave about these. Giant gourmet truffles are not only beautiful to behold, they’re also extraordinarily delicious.

This box includes eight unique and mouthwatering flavors: Dark Chocolate Raspberry, White Chocolate, Dark Chocolate Grand Marnier, Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate Champagne, Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate Hazelnut and Tiramisu.

Ingredients
Packaged in the same facility as peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, and milk products.

More Info
Store at room temperature for up to 1 year.
https://nuts.com/chocolatessweets/premium-chocolates/truffles.html

 

Order securely online or call us:
800-558-6887 or 908-523-0333
Operating Hours (ET):
M-TH 8AM-8PM
F-S 8AM-6:30PM

https://nuts.com/

Low-Added-Sugars Dessert Recipes

April 21, 2016 at 4:49 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell website – Low-Added-Sugars Dessert Recipes. Enjoy a delicious Low-Added-Sugars Dessert with these recipes. Recipes that include; Peanut Butter & Pretzel Truffles, Tropical Fruit Ice, and Watermelon-Blueberry Ice Pops. Find them all at the EatingWell website, enjoy! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 

Low-Added-Sugars Dessert Recipes

Sweet Treats with Surprisingly Low Added SugarsEatingWell2
Eating too many added sugars may be taking a toll on our heart health—and recent research shows that it’s associated with lower levels of “good” HDL cholesterol and higher levels of triglycerides (“bad” fats in the blood). Added sugars are those added to food by consumers or during manufacturing by food producers and include sweeteners like honey, molasses and agave nectar as well as table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup. Keep your added sugars intake low with these sweet treats that have 4 grams or less of added sugars per serving.

 

 

Peanut Butter & Pretzel Truffles
These peanut butter-pretzel truffles satisfy your craving for something sweet and salty….

 
Tropical Fruit Ice
This super-simple recipe makes an exotic ice with intense flavor. To turn it into a showstopper dessert, garnish with sliced fresh tropical fruit and toasted coconut….

 
Watermelon-Blueberry Ice Pops
These were a staff favorite during the development process. The whole blueberries in these pops have the look of watermelon seeds……

 

 

* Click thelink below to get all the Low-Added-Sugars Dessert Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/low_added_sugars_recipes

Sweet & Savory Nut Recipes

October 14, 2015 at 5:29 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Off the Diabetic Living Online website it’s Sweet & Savory Nut Recipes. Whether it’s Pistachios, Peanuts, or Cashews, you’ll find them all on Diabetic Living. If you’re looking for a Diabetic Friendly Recipe or just looking for ideas or tips you can find it all on Diabetic Living Online website! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 
Sweet & Savory Nut RecipesDiabetic living logo
Nuts are packed with protein and contain plenty of healthy fats. Get your fill with these delicious varieties of sweet and savory nut recipes that are diabetes-friendly.

 
Chocolate-Orange Pistachio Bars

You get a serving of two bars topped with rich chocolate and chopped pistachios for just 21 grams of carb. Have just one bar to cut the carb and calorie count even more……

 
Cilantro Chicken with Peanuts

Forget takeout! Whip up this fast Asian-style chicken dish for a healthy meal at home with only 6 grams of carb when served over shredded cabbage……

 
Cashew Truffles

Only five ingredients go into this fun, low-carb dessert. Not only is the creamy chocolate in this recipe covered in chopped cashews, you also get a surprise cashew in the middle of the truffle…….

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Sweet & Savory Nut Recipes

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/popular/sweet-savory-nut-recipes

One of America’s Favorites – Truffles

January 20, 2014 at 10:56 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , ,
Crispy veal sweetbreads filled with truffle

Crispy veal sweetbreads filled with truffle

 

A truffle is the fruiting body of a subterranean Ascomycete fungus, predominantly one of the many species of the genus Tuber. Some of the truffle species are highly prized as a food. French gourmand Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin called truffles “the diamonds of the kitchen”. Edible truffles are held in high esteem in Middle Eastern, French, Spanish, Italian, Greek and Georgian cooking, as well as in international haute cuisine. Truffles are ectomycorrhizal fungi and are therefore usually found in close association with the roots of trees. Spore dispersal is accomplished through fungivores, animals that eat fungi.

 

 

 

The origin of the word truffle appears to be the Latin term tuber, meaning “swelling” or “lump”, which became tufer- and gave rise to the various European terms: French truffe, Spanish trufa, Danish trøffel, German Trüffel, Swedish tryffel, Dutch truffel, Polish trufel, Serbian тартуф / tartuf and Croatian tartuf. In Portuguese, the words trufa and túbera are synonyms, the latter closer to the Latin term. The German word Kartoffel (“potato”) is derived from the Italian tartufo (truffle) because of superficial similarities.

 

 

 
The mycelia of truffles form symbiotic, mycorrhizal relationships with the roots of several tree species including beech, poplar, oak, birch, hornbeam, hazel, and pine. They prefer argillaceous or calcareous soils which are well drained and neutral or alkaline. Truffles fruit throughout the year, depending on the species and can be found buried between the leaf litter and the soil.

 

 

White truffle washed and cut

White truffle washed and cut

 

The “white truffle” or “trifola d’Alba” (Tuber magnatum) comes from the Langhe and Montferrat areas of the Piedmont region in northern Italy and, most famously, in the countryside around the cities of Alba and Asti; in Italy it can also be found in Molise, Abruzzo, and in the hills around San Miniato, in Tuscany. It is also found on the Istria peninsula, in Croatia in the Motovun forest along the Mirna river, and in Slovenia along the Dragonja and Rizana river, as well as in the Drome area in France. Growing symbiotically with oak, hazel, poplar and beech and fruiting in autumn, they can reach 12 cm (5 in) diameter and 500 g, though are usually much smaller. The flesh is pale cream or brown with white marbling. Italian white truffles are very highly esteemed (illustration, left) and are the most valuable on the market: The white truffle market in Alba is busiest in the months of October and November when the Fiera del Tartufo (truffle fair) takes place. In 2001, the Tuber magnatum truffles sold for between 1000–2200 USD per pound (2000–4500 USD per kg); as of December 2009 they were being sold at 14,203.50 USD per kilogram.
Giancarlo Zigante and his dog Diana found one of the largest truffles in the world near Buje, Croatia. The truffle weighed 1.31 kilograms (2 lb 14 oz) and has entered the Guinness Book of Records.
The record price paid for a single white truffle was set in December 2007, when Macau casino owner Stanley Ho paid 330,000 USD (£165,000) for a specimen weighing 1.5 kilograms (3.3 lb), discovered by Luciano Savini and his dog Rocco. One of the largest truffles found in decades, it was unearthed near Pisa, Italy and sold at an auction held simultaneously in Macau, Hong Kong and Florence. This record was then matched on November 27, 2010 when Ho again paid 330,000 USD for a pair of white truffles, including one weighing nearly a kilogram.
The Tuber magnatum pico white truffle is found mostly in northern and central Italy, while the Tuber borchii, or whitish truffle, is found in Tuscany, Abruzzo, Romagna, Umbria, the Marche and Molise. Neither of these is as aromatic as those from Piedmont, although those from Città di Castello come quite close.

 

 

Black Périgord Truffle, cut

Black Périgord Truffle, cut

 

The black truffle or black Périgord truffle (Tuber melanosporum), the second-most commercially valuable species, is named after the Périgord region in France and grows with oak and hazelnut trees. Black truffles are harvested in late autumn and winter. The genome sequence of the black truffle was published in March 2010.

 

 

 

The black summer truffle (Tuber aestivum) is found across Europe and is prized for its culinary value. Burgundy truffles (Tuber uncinatum) are harvested in autumn until December and have aromatic flesh of a darker color.

 

 

 

A less common truffle is “garlic truffle” (Tuber macrosporum). In the U.S. Pacific Northwest, several species of truffle are harvested both recreationally and commercially, most notably, the “Oregon white truffles”, Tuber oregonense and Tuber gibbosum.
The “pecan truffle” (Tuber lyonii) syn. texense is found in the Southern United States, usually associated with pecan trees. Chefs who have experimented with them agree “they are very good and have potential as a food commodity”. Although pecan farmers used to find them along with pecans and discard them, considering them a nuisance, they sell for about $100 a pound and have been used in some gourmet restaurants.

 

 

 
Truffles long eluded techniques of domestication, however, truffles can be cultivated. As early as 1808, there were successful attempts to cultivate truffles, known in French as trufficulture. People had long observed that truffles were growing among the roots of certain trees, and in 1808, Joseph Talon, from Apt (département of Vaucluse) in southern France, had the idea to sow some acorns collected at the foot of oak trees known to host truffles in their root system.
The experiment was successful: Years later, truffles were found in the soil around the newly grown oak trees. In 1847, Auguste Rousseau of Carpentras (in Vaucluse) planted 7 hectares (17 acres) of oak trees (again from acorns found on the soil around truffle-producing oak trees), and he subsequently obtained large harvests of truffles. He received a prize at the 1855 World’s Fair in Paris.
These successful attempts were met with enthusiasm in southern France, which possessed the sweet limestone soils and dry, hot weather that truffles need to grow. In the late 19th century, an epidemic of phylloxera destroyed many of the vineyards in southern France. Another epidemic destroyed most of the silkworms there, too, making the fields of mulberry trees useless. Thus, large tracts of land were set free for the cultivation of truffles. Thousands of truffle-producing trees were planted, and production reached peaks of hundreds of tonnes at the end of the 19th century. In 1890, there were 75,000 hectares (190,000 acres) of truffle-producing trees.

In the 20th century, however, with the growing industrialization of France and the subsequent rural exodus, many of these truffle fields (champs truffiers or truffières) returned to wilderness. The First World War also dealt a serious blow to the French countryside, killing 20% or more of the male working force. As a consequence, newly acquired techniques of trufficulture were lost. Also, between the two world wars, the truffle groves planted in the 19th century stopped being productive. (The average life cycle of a truffle-producing tree is 30 years.) Consequently, after 1945, the production of truffles plummeted, and the prices have risen dramatically. In 1900, truffles were used by most people, and on many occasions. Today, they are a rare delicacy reserved for the rich, or used on very special occasions.
In the last 30 years, new attempts for mass production of truffles have been started. Eighty percent of the truffles now produced in France come from specially planted truffle groves. Nonetheless, production has yet to recover its 1900s peaks. Local farmers are opposed to a return of mass production, which would decrease the price of truffles. There are now truffle-growing areas in the United Kingdom, United States, Spain, Sweden, New Zealand, Australia and Chile.

 

 

 

Trained truffle pig

Trained truffle pig

Looking for truffles in open ground is almost always carried out with specially trained pigs (truffle hogs) or, more recently, dogs. The Lagotto Romagnolo is currently the only dog breed recognized for sniffing out truffles (although virtually any breed could be trained for this purpose). The female pig’s natural truffle-seeking, as well as her usual intent to eat the truffle, is due to a compound within the truffle similar to androstenol, the sex pheromone of boar saliva, to which the sow is keenly attracted.
In Italy, the use of the pig to hunt truffles is prohibited since 1985 due to damage caused by animals to truffle’s mycelia during the digging that dropped the production rate of the area for some years.

 

 

 
Because of their high price and their pungent taste, truffles are used sparingly. Supplies can be found commercially as unadulterated fresh produce or preserved, typically in a light brine.
White truffles are generally served raw, and shaved over steaming buttered pasta or salads or fried eggs. White or black paper-thin truffle slices may be inserted into meats, under the skins of roasted fowl, in foie gras preparations, in pâtés, or in stuffings. Some speciality cheeses contain truffles, as well.
The flavor of black truffles is far less pungent and more refined than that of white truffles. Its strong flavor is often described as syrupy sweet. Black truffles also are used for producing truffle salt and truffle honey.
While in the past chefs used to peel truffles, in modern times, most restaurants brush the truffle carefully and shave it or dice it with the skin on so as to make the most of this valuable ingredient. A few restaurants, such as Philippe Rochat in Switzerland, still stamp out circular discs of truffle flesh and use the skins for sauces.

 

 

 
Truffle oil is often used as a lower-cost and convenient substitute for truffles, to provide flavoring, or to enhance the flavor and aroma of truffles in cooking. Most “truffle oil”, however, does not contain any truffles. The vast majority is olive oil which has been artificially flavoured using a synthetic agent such as 2,4-dithiapentane. Daniel Patterson reported in the New York Times that “even now, you will find chefs who are surprised to hear that truffle oil does not actually come from real truffles.”

 

 

 

Truffle oil

Truffle oil

The bulk of truffle oil on the market is made with a synthetic ingredient, as are many other truffle products. However, alcohol is now being used to carry the truffle flavor without the need for synthetic flavourings. The first truffle vodka, Black Moth Vodka, is a natural vodka infused with black Périgord truffles (Tuber melanosporum). Although primarily used as a spirit in its own right and mixed in a range of cocktails, truffle vodka is also used by various chefs to flavour dishes by evaporating the alcohol through cooking whilst retaining the truffle aroma.

 

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Grow Your Health Gardening

Tips for Hydroponic, Aeroponic, Aquaponic, and Soil-based Gardening Methods

Don't hold your breath

Tripping the world, slowly

Healthaware

Health is Wealth

Hapanese Cuisine

Eats and Treats from Your Favorite Half-Asian

Food For Thought

Changing your life, one recipe at a time.

asliceofkatecom.wordpress.com/

Where you can never have too many slices

A Series by Liz & Angie

Cards (and more) made from the heart.

fivethumbsupblog

Making awesome food.

Best of Vegan

Your #1 Resource for Vegan Cooking

The Simple Seagan

Simple recipes for the vegan, who sometimes eats seafood.

Life on Lavender

Building a Beautiful Life as a Single Mama

Today's Furry Moments

Life with 5 chickens, a food-obsessed dog, a cranky beardie and a crazy cat. Oh, and some fish.

Front Porch Bakery

Made-From-Scratch Made Simple

pyritewealth

Just another WordPress site.

R & L Foods

Enjoy Our Foods

Tip to Tail Gourmet

Start to finish, Tip to Tail!