Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 18, 2018 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Put the toaster away……….

For a different type of toast, lightly butter a slice and cook it in a waffle iron.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 12, 2018 at 5:35 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Too much salt in the gravy……..

Thank you to Jenny for sharing this hint – When gravy is too salty, put in a few pieces of toasted bread for two or three minutes. The bread will absorb much of the salt.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 20, 2018 at 6:10 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Leftover Rice……..

Rice can be stored in the fridge for a longer amount of time if you store a slice of toast on top of it. The toast will absorb excess moisture and keep the rice fluffy and fresh.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 9, 2017 at 6:19 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Rice and Toast……..

Rice can be stored in the fridge for a longer amount of time if you store a slice of toast on top of it. The toast will absorb excess moisture and keep the rice fluffy and fresh.

Low-Carb Breakfast Recipes

May 25, 2017 at 4:52 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its Low-Carb Breakfast Recipes. Start your day off with these delicious and diabetic friendly recipes. Recipes including; The Quick and Easy Omelet, Sugar-and-Spice Biscuits, and Mushroom Scrambled Eggs. Find them all at one of my favorite recipe sites, Diabetic Living Online. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Low-Carb Breakfast Recipes

Whether you crave a homemade muffin, a brunch dish for company, or crisp hash browns, you’ll find it in this collection of diabetic breakfast favorites, most with carb counts of 20 grams or less per serving.

 

 

The Quick and Easy Omelet

Fresh herbs, spinach, and a simple red pepper relish elevate the look, taste, and nutrients of a plain omelet. Like most egg dishes, the protein level is high (16 grams per serving) and the carb count is low (7 grams)…….

 
Sugar-and-Spice Biscuits

When you want to impress your guests and stay on track with your diet, give these biscuits a try. There’s enough cinnamon-sugar to satisfy any sweet tooth, yet each serving has just 18 grams of carb……

 
Mushroom Scrambled Eggs

With 11 grams of protein, this easy-fix breakfast is a great way to start your day. The nonstarchy veggies — mushrooms, green onions, and tomatoes — add flavor and color without contributing a lot of carbs……..

 
* Click the link below to get all the Low-Carb Breakfast Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/breakfast/low-carb-breakfast-recipes

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 23, 2017 at 6:42 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Fry the Toast….

 
Warm some light butter or extra light olive oil over medium-high heat. Lay in the bread and fry until golden on both sides. Spice it up a bit with your favorite Spices.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 5, 2017 at 6:20 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Breakfast Toast…..

 
For a different type of toast, lightly butter a slice of bread on both sides and cook it in a waffle iron. You can also add Ground Cinnamon or Nutmeg to spice it up a bit more!

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 11, 2016 at 4:47 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Save that Rice…..

 
Rice can be stored in the fridge for a longer amount of time if you store a slice of toast on top of it. The toast will absorb excess moisture and keep the rice fluffy and fresh.

One of America’s Favorites – Fried Eggs

August 29, 2016 at 5:07 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Fried eggs

Fried eggs

A fried egg is a cooked dish commonly made using a fresh hen’s egg, fried whole with minimal accompaniment. Fried eggs are traditionally eaten for breakfast in English-speaking countries but may also be served at other times of the day.

 

 
Americans use many different terms to describe fried eggs, including:

Ham and eggs served with fried eggs prepared "sunny side up"

Ham and eggs served with fried eggs prepared “sunny side up”

* Over easy or over light
Cooked on both sides; the yolk is runny and the egg white is fully cooked. Eggs fried over easy are also commonly referred to as dippy eggs or dip eggs by Marylanders, by Pennsylvania Dutch people living in central Pennsylvania, by those living around them as well as in parts of Ohio, mainly due to the practice of dipping toast into the yolk while eating. This term is also occasionally used in Canada.
* Over medium
Cooked on both sides; the yolk is cooked through but soft and near liquid at the center. The egg white is thoroughly cooked.
* Over hard
Cooked on both sides with the yolk broken, until set or hard.
* Over well
Cooked on both sides with the yolk fully cooked through and hard. Similar to a hard-boiled egg.
* Sunny side up
Cooked on one side only, until the egg white is set, but the yolk remains liquid. This is often known simply as eggs up. Gently splashing the hot cooking oil or fat over the sunny side uncooked white (i.e., basting) may be done to thoroughly cook the white. Covering the frying pan with a lid during cooking (optionally adding a cover and half-teaspoon of water just before finishing) allows for a less “runny” egg, and is an alternative method to flipping for cooking an egg over easy (this is occasionally called sunny side down or basted).

 

 

Eggs in the basket

Eggs in the basket

Egg in the basket
This American dish is usually made by cutting a circle or other shape out of a slice of bread, often using a drinking glass or biscuit cutter. The bread is fried until brown on one side and then flipped, and an egg is broken into the center and seasoned, usually with salt and pepper, and sometimes herbs. The pan is then covered, and the egg is cooked until the white is just set. The cutout center of the bread is often fried as well, and served alongside or on top of the finished egg.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Scrambled Eggs

August 1, 2016 at 4:49 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Scrambled eggs with grated cheese.

Scrambled eggs with grated cheese.

Scrambled eggs is a dish made from whites and yolks of eggs (usually chicken eggs) stirred or beaten together, typically with salt and butter and variable other ingredients, and then gently heated in a pan while being stirred.

 
Only eggs are necessary to make scrambled eggs, but nearly always salt is used, and very often other ingredients such as water, milk, butter, cream or in some cases creme fraiche or grated cheese may be added. The eggs are cracked into a bowl; with some salt, and the mixture is stirred or whisked. More consistent and far quicker results are obtained if a small amount of thickener such as cornstarch, potato starch or flour is added; this enables much quicker cooking with reduced risk of overcooking, even when less butter is used.

The mixture can be poured into a hot pan containing melted butter or oil, where it starts coagulating. The heat is turned down and the eggs are stirred as they cook. This creates small, soft curds of egg. Unlike pancake or omelette scrambled egg is virtually never browned.

Once the liquid has mostly set, additional ingredients such as ham, herbs, cheese or cream may be folded in over low heat, just until incorporated. The eggs are usually slightly undercooked when removed from heat, since the eggs will continue to set. If any liquid is seeping from the eggs (syneresis), this is a sign of undercooking, overcooking or adding undercooked high-moisture vegetables.

 

 

Preparation in pans

Preparation in pans

Variations
* English style. In English style the scrambled eggs are stirred very thoroughly during cooking to give a soft, fine texture
* American style – In American style the eggs are scooped in towards the middle of the pan as they set, giving larger curds.
* Scrambled eggs can be made easily sous-vide, which gives the traditional smooth creamy texture and requires only occasionally mixing during cooking.
* Another technique for cooking creamy scrambled eggs is to pipe steam into eggs with butter via a steam wand (as found on an espresso machine).
* Scrambled eggs can also be cooked in a Microwave oven.

 

 

Scrambled eggs with bacon and pancakes

Scrambled eggs with bacon and pancakes

Classical haute cuisine preparation calls for serving scrambled eggs in a deep silver dish. They can also be presented in small croustades made from hollowed-out brioche or tartlets. When eaten for breakfast, scrambled eggs often accompany toast, bacon, smoked salmon, hash browns, cob, pancakes, ham or sausages. Popular condiments served with scrambled eggs include ketchup, hot sauce, and Worcestershire sauce.

 

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