Thanksgiving Dinner!

November 26, 2015 at 6:07 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, Jennie-O Turkey Products | 8 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Thanksgiving Day Dinner!

 

Thanksgiving Day Dinner 008
First a Happy Thanksgiving to everyone! It’s been a mostly cloudy day around here, high in the 50’s. The finger I had surgery on is looking good, go next week to have the stitches removed. Not a lot going on today. It was just me, Mom, and Dad for Thanksgiving Dinner with others stopping by later in the day and evening. Spent the day as Mom’s sous chef, she wanted to make dinner. For dinner tonight it’s Thanksgiving Dinner!

 

 

Thanksgiving Day Dinner 003
We got the Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey out of the freezer and into the oven today! Jennie – O sent me this 13 lb. Bird about a month ago and we’ve been waiting to break it out! Jennie sends me one every year for being a member of their Switch Club, so a big thank you again to Jennie – O Turkey!

 

 
It couldn’t be any easier to prepare the Turkey. It goes straight from the freezer into the oven. It comes in a Oven Ready Bag. Preheat the oven on 375°F. Just remove it from the outer package, but leaving it in the cooking bag. Make a few of slits in the bag, place in the roasting pan, and your set. Then roast the Turkey until a meat thermometer reaches 165°F. in the breast and 180°F. in the thigh, about 4 hours. Let it rest out of the oven for 15 minutes and then let the feast begin! The Turkey, as always, came out mouth-watering delicious! Fantastic flavor, moist, juicy, and it browns up perfectly in the heating bag. So thank you agin to Jennie – O for our free Turkey! Below is the rest of our Thanksgiving Menu, my Mom went over board again but she loves making Thanksgiving dinner. I kept an eye on the Bird and helped and Mom out. Enjoy everyone!

 

 

Thanksgiving Day Dinner 005
Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey, canned Green Beans, Baked Beans, Sweet Potato Casserole, Cream Style Corn, Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes, Pickled Beets, Deviled Eggs, Baked Rolls, Chocolate Pie, Pumpkin Pie, and Pecan Pie. All the pies were made with Splenda. Happy Thanksgiving All!

 

 

 

 

Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey
Whether it’s a holiday or everyday meal, JENNIE-O® OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey is the perfect solution for you. OVEN READY™ goes straight from your freezer to your oven, no thawing needed.
To learn more on cooking an OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey, make sure to watch our simple How-To Video and locate an OVEN READY™ Turkey in the freezer section of your grocery store.

Cooking Instructions:ennie - O OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey 002
OVEN ROASTING:
* Preheat oven to 375°F.
* Remove frozen turkey from outer package.
* Do not remove turkey from cooking bag.
* Place in a roasting pan with at least 2-inch high sides.
* Note – Do not increase oven temperature, cooking bag may melt at higher temperatures.

* Cut six 1/2-inch slits in top of cooking bag.
* Pull bag up and away from turkey.
* Place pan in oven, allowing room for bag to expand without touching the oven racks or walls.
* Roast turkey until a meat thermometer reaches 165°F. in the breast and 180°F. in the thigh.
Note – Meat temperature increases rapidly during last hour of cooking.
* Let turkey rest 15 minutes, cut open top of oven bag.
* Be cautious of hot steam and juices.
* Prepare gravy as directed on pouch.

APPROXIMATE ROASTING TIMES IN 375°F. OVEN:
11-13 lbs 4 hours.

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 112 g Total Carbohydrates 1 g
Calories 140 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 50 Sugars 0 g
Total Fat 6.0 g Protein 20 g
Saturated Fat 2.0 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 2%
Cholesterol 60 mg Iron 4%
Sodium 460 mg Calcium 2%
Ingredients
Solution Ingredients: Water, Seasoning (Maltodextrin, Dehydrated Turkey Broth, Onion Powder, Salt, Yeast Extract, Carrot Powder, Dextrose, Natural Flavors, Garic Powder, Annatto (color)), Sodium Phosphate, Salt, Sugar. Rubbed with: Salt, Maltodextrin, Sugar, Dextrose, Onion Powder, Spices, Carrot Powder, Garlic Powder, Paprika (Color), Extractive of Turmeric (Color). Gravy Ingredients: Water, Gravy Seasoning (Detrose, Modified Food Starch, Rice Flour, Maltodextrin, Hydrolyzed Corn Protein, Rendered Chicken Fat, Salt, Onion Powder, Yeast Extract, Dehydrated Turkey Broth, Dehydrated Cooked Turkey, Xanthan Gum, Natural Flavors (Contains Torula Yeast), Spice, Disodium Inosinate, Disodium Guanylate).

http://www.jennieo.com/products/111-OVEN-READYTM-Whole-Turkey

Happy Thanksgiving!

November 26, 2015 at 6:52 AM | Posted in turkey | Leave a comment
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Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving!

November 27, 2014 at 6:25 AM | Posted in cooking | Leave a comment
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Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!Thanksgiving 14

One of America’s Favorites – Thanksgiving Dinner

November 26, 2014 at 6:28 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A traditional Thanksgiving dinner

A traditional Thanksgiving dinner

The centerpiece of contemporary Thanksgiving in the United States and Canada is a large meal, generally centered on a large roasted turkey. The majority of the dishes in the traditional American version of Thanksgiving dinner are made from foods native to the New World, as according to tradition the Pilgrims received these foods from the Native Americans. However, many of the classic traditions attributed to the first Thanksgiving are actually myths later introduced.

 

 

 

According to what traditionally is known as “The First Thanksgiving,” the 1621 feast between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag at Plymouth Colony contained turkey, waterfowl, venison, fish, lobster, clams, berries, fruit, pumpkin, and squash. William Bradford noted that, “besides waterfowl, there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many.” Many of the foods that were included in the first feast (except, notably, the seafood) have since gone on to become staples of the modern Thanksgiving dinner.

The use of the turkey in the USA for Thanksgiving precedes Lincoln’s nationalization of the holiday in 1863. Alexander Hamilton proclaimed that no “Citizen of the United States should refrain from turkey on Thanksgiving Day,” and many of the Founding Fathers (particularly Benjamin Franklin) had high regard for the wild turkey as an American icon, but turkey was uncommon as Thanksgiving fare until after 1800. By 1857, turkey had become part of the traditional dinner in New England.

 

 

 

A Thanksgiving Day dinner served to the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935 included: pickles, green olives, celery, roast turkey, oyster stew, cranberry sauce, giblet gravy, dressing, creamed asparagus tips, snowflake potatoes, baked carrots, hot rolls, fruit salad, mince meat pie, fruit cake, candies, grapes, apples, clams, fish, and many other food harvests. French drip coffee, cigars and cigarettes.

The White House Cook Book, 1887, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette, et al., had the following menu: oysters on half shell, cream of chicken soup, fried smelts, sauce tartare, roast turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, baked squash, boiled onions, parsnip fritters, olives, chicken salad, venison pastry, pumpkin pie, mince-pie, Charlotte russe, almond ice cream, lemon jelly, hickory nut cake, cheese, fruits and coffee.

 

 

 

Turkey being the most common main dish of a Thanksgiving dinner, Thanksgiving is sometimes colloquially called “Turkey Day.” In 2006, American turkey growers were expected to raise 270 million turkeys, to be processed into five billion pounds of turkey meat valued at almost $8 billion, with one-third of all turkey consumption occurring in the Thanksgiving-Christmas season, and a per capita consumption of almost 18 pounds (8.2 kg). The Broad Breasted White turkey is particularly bred for Thanksgiving dinner and similar large feasts; its large size (specimens can grow to over 40 pounds) and meat content make it ideal for such situations, although the breed must be artificially bred and suffers from health problems due to its size.

Most Thanksgiving turkeys are stuffed with a bread-based mixture and roasted. Sage is the traditional herb added to the stuffing (also called dressing), along with chopped celery, carrots, and onions. Deep-fried turkey is rising in popularity, a deep-fried Thanksgiving turkey can be prepared using a propane deep fryer outdoors. When deep-frying a turkey it must be completely thawed and patted dry for safety. Attempting to fry frozen or partially frozen turkeys can result in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion due to the high water content of the turkey. When frying a turkey outdoors using a propane turkey fryer the following safety measures should be followed including avoiding oil spillover by not overfilling the pot, turning off the flame when lowering the turkey into oil, frying outside away from the home, garage, and other structures including wooden decks. A grease fire approved fire extinguisher should also be nearby in case of accidental fire. A Thanksgiving turkey can also be fried in an alternative infrared turkey fryer which uses no oil. Infrared turkey fryers can be purchased from many retailers including many big box stores, home improvement warehouse stores, and directly from the manufacturer online. In more recent years it is also true that as the wild population of turkeys has rebounded in most of the US, some will hunt and dress their turkey in the woods and then freeze it until meal preparation.

 

 

 

Oven roasted turkey

Oven roasted turkey

Butterball, a national turkey producer, runs a well-known hotline (the “Turkey Talk Line”) for those who need assistance cooking a turkey.

Non-traditional foods other than turkey are sometimes served as the main dish for a Thanksgiving dinner. Ham is often served alongside turkey in many households. Goose and duck, foods which were traditional European centerpieces of Christmas dinners before being displaced, are now sometimes served in place of the Thanksgiving turkey. Sometimes, fowl native to the region where the meal is taking place is used; for example, an article in Texas Monthly magazine suggested quail as the main dish for a Texan Thanksgiving feast. John Madden, who appeared on television for the NFL Thanksgiving Day game from 1981 to 2001, frequently advocated his fondness for the turducken, deboned turkey, duck and chicken nested inside each other than cooked. In a few areas of the West Coast of the United States, Dungeness crab is common as an alternate main dish, as crab season starts in early November.”Similarly, Thanksgiving falls within deer hunting season in the Northeastern United States, which encourages the use of venison as a centerpiece. Sometimes a variant recipe for cooking turkey is used; for example, a Chinese recipe for goose could be used on the similarly sized American bird. Vegetarians or vegans may have a tofu-based substitute; a Field Roast, which is a wheat-based product; or a special seasonal dish, such as stuffed squash. In Alaskan villages, whale meat is sometimes eaten. Irish immigrants have been known to have prime rib of beef as their centerpiece since beef in Ireland was once a rarity; families would save up money for this dish to signify newfound prosperity and hope.

 

 

 

In the United States, a globalist approach to Thanksgiving has become common with the impact of immigration. Basic “Thanksgiving” ingredients, or the intent of the holiday, can be transformed to a variety of dishes by using flavors, techniques, and traditions from their own cuisines. Others celebrate the holiday with a variety of dishes particularly when there is a crowd to be fed, guest’s tastes vary and considering the financial means available.

Many other foods are typically served alongside the main dish—so many that, because of the amount of food, the Thanksgiving meal is sometimes served midday or early afternoon to make time for all the eating, and preparation may begin at dawn or on days prior. Copious leftovers are also common following the meal proper.

Traditional Thanksgiving foods are sometimes specific to the day, and although some of the foods might be seen at any semi-formal meal in the United States, the meal often has something of a ritual or traditional quality. Many Americans would say it is “incomplete” without cranberry sauce; stuffing or dressing; and gravy. Other commonly served dishes include winter squash; sweet potatoes; mashed potatoes; dumplings; noodles; corn on the cob or hominy; deviled eggs; green beans or green bean casserole; sauerkraut (among those in the Mid-Atlantic; especially Baltimore); peas and carrots; bread rolls; cornbread (in the south and parts of New England); or biscuits, rutabagas or turnips; and a salad. For dessert, various pies are often served, particularly apple pie, mincemeat pie, sweet potato pie, pumpkin pie, chocolate cream pie and pecan pie.

 

 

A Thanksgiving meal in New England

A Thanksgiving meal in New England

There are also regional differences as to the stuffing or dressing traditionally served with the turkey. Southerners generally make their dressing from cornbread, while those in other parts of the country make stuffing from white, wheat or rye bread as the base. One or several of the following may be added to the dressing/stuffing: oysters, apples, chestnuts, raisins, celery and/or other vegetables, sausages or the turkey’s giblets. The traditional Canadian version has bread cubes, sage, onion and celery. Rice is also sometimes used instead of bread in some parts of Canada.

Other dishes reflect the region or cultural background of those who have come together for the meal. For example, many African-Americans and Southerners serve baked macaroni and cheese and collard greens, along with chitterlings and sweet potato pie, while some Italian-Americans often have lasagne on the table and Ashkenazi Jews may serve noodle kugel, a sweet dessert pudding. Other Jewish families may consume foods commonly associated with Hanukkah, such as latkes or a sufganiyah; the two holidays are usually in close proximity and on extremely rare occasions overlap. It is not unheard of for Mexican Americans to serve their turkey with mole and roasted corn. In Puerto Rico, the Thanksgiving meal is completed with arroz con gandules (rice with pigeon peas) or arroz con maiz (rice with corn), pasteles (root tamales) stuffed with turkey, pumpkin-coconut crème caramel, corn bread with longaniza, potato salad, roasted white sweet potatoes and Spanish sparkling hard cider. Turkey in Puerto Rico is stuffed with mofongo. Cuban-Americans traditionally serve the turkey alongside a small roasted pork and include white rice and black beans or kidney beans. Vegetarians or vegans have been known to serve alternative entree centerpieces such as a large vegetable pie or a stuffed and baked pumpkin or tofu substitutes. Many Midwesterners (such as Minnesotans) of Norwegian or Scandinavian descent set the table with lefse, (Lefse is a traditional soft, Norwegian flatbread.)

 

 

 

The beverages at Thanksgiving can vary as much as the side dishes, often depending on who is present at the table and their tastes. Spirits or cocktails sometimes may be served before the main meal. On the dinner table, unfermented apple cider (still or sparkling) and/or wine are often served. Pitchers of sweet tea can often be found on Southern tables. Beaujolais nouveau is sometimes served, as “Beaujolais day” falls before American Thanksgiving.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 
Have a Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!

 

One of America’s Favorites – Turkey Meat

November 24, 2014 at 6:28 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A roast turkey prepared for a traditional U.S. Thanksgiving meal.

A roast turkey prepared for a traditional U.S. Thanksgiving meal.

Turkey meat is the meat from turkeys, typically domesticated turkeys. It is a popular poultry product used in a number of culturally significant events as well as for everyday nourishment.

 

 
Turkeys are sold sliced and ground, as well as “whole” in a manner similar to chicken with the head, feet, and feathers removed. Frozen whole turkeys remain popular. Sliced turkey is frequently used as a sandwich meat or served as cold cuts; in some cases where recipes call for chicken it can be used as a substitute. Ground turkey is sold just as ground beef, and is frequently marketed as a healthy alternative to beef. Without careful preparation, cooked turkey is usually considered to end up less moist than other poultry meats such as chicken or duck.

Wild turkeys, while technically the same species as domesticated turkeys, have a very different taste from farm-raised turkeys. Almost all of the meat is “dark” (even the breast) with a more intense flavor. The flavor can also vary seasonally with changes in available forage, often leaving wild turkey meat with a gamier flavor in late summer due to the greater number of insects in its diet over the preceding months. Wild turkey that has fed predominantly on grass and grain has a milder flavor. Older heritage breeds also differ in flavor.

 

 

 

A large amount of turkey meat is processed. It can be smoked and as such is sometimes sold as turkey ham or turkey bacon, which is widely considered to be far healthier than pork-based bacon. Twisted helices of deep fried turkey meat, sold as “turkey twizzlers,” came to prominence in the UK in 2004 when chef Jamie Oliver campaigned to have them and similar foods removed from school dinners.

Unlike chicken eggs, turkey eggs are not commonly sold as food due to the high demand for whole turkeys and lower output of eggs as compared with other fowl (not only chickens, but even ducks or quail). The value of a single turkey egg is estimated to be about $3.50 on the open market, substantially more than an entire carton of one dozen chicken eggs.

Turkeys are traditionally eaten as the main course of Thanksgiving in the United States and Canada, and at Christmas feasts in much of the rest of the world (often as stuffed turkey). It was eaten as such as early as the 16th century in England. Before the 20th century, pork ribs were the most common food for the North American holidays, as the animals were usually slaughtered in November. Turkeys were once so abundant in the wild that they were eaten throughout the year, the food considered commonplace, whereas pork ribs were rarely available outside of the Thanksgiving-New Year season. While the tradition of turkey at Christmas spread throughout England in the 17th century, among the working classes it became common to serve goose, which remained the predominant roast until the Victorian era.

In the UK in 2009, 7,734,000 turkeys were consumed on Christmas Day.

 

 

 

 

After World War II, cheap imported turkey tail became popular in Samoa. Because the cut is so fatty, to combat obesity it was banned from 2007 to 2013, only allowed back when Samoa joined the World Trade Organization.

Turkey with mole sauce is regarded as Mexico’s “national dish”.

 

 

 

Roast turkey

Roast turkey

Both fresh and frozen turkeys are used for cooking; as with most foods, fresh turkeys are generally preferred, although they cost more. Around holiday seasons, high demand for fresh turkeys often makes them difficult to purchase without ordering in advance. For the frozen variety, the large size of the turkeys typically used for consumption makes defrosting them a major endeavor: a typically sized turkey will take several days to properly defrost.

Turkeys are usually baked or roasted in an oven for several hours, often while the cook prepares the remainder of the meal. Sometimes, a turkey is brined before roasting to enhance flavor and moisture content. This is necessary because the dark meat requires a higher temperature to denature all of the myoglobin pigment than the white meat (very low in myoglobin), so that fully cooking the dark meat tends to dry out the breast. Brining makes it possible to fully cook the dark meat without drying the breast meat. Turkeys are sometimes decorated with turkey frills prior to serving.

In some areas, particularly the American South, they may also be deep fried in hot oil (often peanut oil) for 30 to 45 minutes by using a turkey fryer. Deep frying turkey has become something of a fad, with hazardous consequences for those unprepared to safely handle the large quantities of hot oil required.

 

 

 

 

Turkey contains more protein per ounce than other meats. The white meat of turkey is generally considered healthier than dark meat because of its lower saturated fat content, but the nutritional differences are small. Turkey is reputed to cause sleepiness, but holiday dinners are commonly large meals served with carbohydrates, fats, and alcohol in a relaxed atmosphere, all of which are bigger contributors to post-meal sleepiness than the tryptophan in turkey.

 

 

 

Roast turkey served with salad, sauces and sparkling juice. On the left is a log cake.

Roast turkey served with salad, sauces and sparkling juice. On the left is a log cake.

For Thanksgiving in the United States and Canada, turkey is typically served stuffed or with dressing (on the side), with cranberry sauce and gravy. Common complementary dishes include mashed potatoes, corn on the cob, green beans, squash, and sweet potatoes. Pie is the usual dessert, especially those made from pumpkins, apples, or pecans.

When eaten at Christmas in the United Kingdom, turkey is traditionally served with winter vegetables including roast potatoes, Brussels sprouts and parsnips. Cranberry sauce is the traditional condiment in the northern rural areas of the United Kingdom where wild cranberries grow. In the south and in urban areas, where cranberries until recently were difficult to obtain, bread sauce was used in its place, but the availability of commercial cranberry sauce has seen a rise in its popularity in these areas too. Sometimes sausage meat, cocktail sausages or liver wrapped in bacon is also served (known as bacon rolls or “pigs in blankets”).

Especially during holiday seasons, stuffing, also known as dressing, is traditionally served with turkey. There are many varieties: oatmeal, chestnut, sage and onion (flavored bread), cornbread, and sausage are the most traditional. Stuffing may either be used to stuff the turkey (as the name implies), or may be cooked separately and served as a side dish.

 

 

 

 

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Rosemary Citrus Herb Turkey and Cranberry Sparkler

November 21, 2014 at 6:30 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | 2 Comments
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is a Rosemary Citrus Herb Turkey and for a Holiday Drink a Cranberry Sparkler. It’s made with the Jennie – O Premium Basted Young Turkey-Frozen. Both the Rosemary Citrus Herb Turkey and Cranberry Sparkler can be found on the Jennie – O Turkey website. http://www.jennieo.com/

 

 

Rosemary Citrus Herb Turkey

Rosemary Citrus Herb Turkey
Fresh herbs and citrus zest flavor this moist and tender roasted turkey.
Ingredients
⅓ cup thinly sliced garlic cloves
⅓ cup fresh rosemary
2 tablespoons fresh thyme
1 tablespoon mild olive oil
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cracked pepper
grated peel of 1 lemon
grated peel of 1 orange
1 (10 to 12-pound) JENNIE-O® Premium Basted Young Turkey, thawed, giblets and neck removed

 
Directions
In food processor bowl, combine all ingredients except turkey; process until citrus peel and garlic are finely chopped and ingredients are blended well.

Refrigerate until ready to use. Rub herb mixture over surface of turkey.

Cook turkey as specified on the package. Roast until timer pops up and turkey is fully cooked, 180°F as measured by a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh. ALWAYS confirm doneness with a meat thermometer. Juices should run clear. Let turkey stand 20 minutes before carving.
Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

 

 

http://www.jennieo.com/recipes/883-Rosemary-Citrus-Herb-Turkey

 

 

 

Cranberry Sparkler
Cranberry Sparkler

Toast to fall with this fresh, bubbly cocktail.
Ingredients
2 cups cranberry juice cocktail, chilled
2 cups orange juice
1 (750ml) bottle champagne or sparkling wine
Directions
In large pitcher, combine cranberry juice cocktail, orange juice and champagne.
Nutritional Information
Calories 70 Fat 0g
Protein 1g Cholesterol 0mg
Carbohydrates 18g Sodium 0mg
Fiber 1g Saturated Fat 0g
Sugars 16g

 

 

http://www.jennieo.com/recipes/887-Cranberry-Sparkler

A Huge Thank You to Jennie – O Turkey!

October 21, 2014 at 12:25 PM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Jennie - O Whole Turkey 002

Last night I was just talking to my Mom about getting a Turkey for the upcoming Thanksgiving. Then about 9:30 this morning a delivery driver pulled up, as he walked by the dining room window I could tell he was carrying a heavy box. I answered the knock and he said I better bring this in for you it’s a heavy one. I thanked him and I seen on the label on the familiar white delivery box it was from Jennie – O Turkey. Opened it up and Bam our Thanksgiving Turkey was here!

 

 

I receive Jennie – O Products, Gifts, and coupons from time to time. I was invited by Jennie – O to join their Switch Club to test and blog about their products that I try. I had already received many products already but this was an incredible product to receive! It’s the Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey. It feels about like a 10-12 lb. Turkey, maybe even more. It comes sealed in our Fool-Proof® cooking bag, with Gravy Packet, and Preseasoned. Just pop this Bird, while frozen, in the oven and you got your Turkey for the Thanksgiving Feast! I’ll update this after we have the Turkey for Thanksgiving. Again many thanks to Jennie – O Turkey for sending me this and thank you to all the subscribers and readers that keep me going!

 

 

JO Whole Turkey

Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey
No time for thawing? Jennie-O® OVEN READY™ Turkey can go directly from your freezer to your oven, no thawing needed.

Product Features:
* Gluten Free
* Preseasoned
* Comes sealed in our Fool-Proof® cooking bag
With Gravy Packet

 

 

Cooking Instructions:
OVEN COOKING METHOD:
* Preheat oven to 375 °F.
* Remove frozen turkey from white outer package.
* Do not remove turkey from FOOL PROOF. cooking bag.
* Place in a roasting pan with at least 2″ high sides.
* Note – Do not increase oven temperature, cooking bag may melt at higher temperatures.
* Cut six 1/2 inch slits in top of FOOL PROOF. cooking bag.
* Pull bag up and away from turkey, to release vacuum.
* Place pan in oven, allowing room for bag to expand without touching the oven racks or walls.
* Roast the turkey until a meat thermometer inserted into the center of the breast reaches 170°F.
* Note – Meat temperature increases rapidly during last hour of cooking.
* Let turkey rest 15 minutes, cut open top of oven bag.
* Watch out for hot steam and juices.
* Heat gravy as directed on pouch.

 

APPROXIMATE OVEN ROASTING TIMES IN 375°F. OVEN TEMPERATURE:
8 11-12 lbs 4-1/4 to 4-1/2 hours.
* 12-13 lbs 4-1/2 to 5 hours

 

Jennie O Make the Switch
Nutritional Information
Serving Size 112 g Total Carbohydrates 1 g
Calories 140 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 50 Sugars 0 g
Total Fat 6.0 g Protein 20 g
Saturated Fat 2.0 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 2%
Cholesterol 60 mg Iron 4%
Sodium 460 mg Calcium 2%

 
Ingredients
SOLUTION INGREDIENTS: WATER, SODIUM PHOSPHATE, SALT, SUGAR. RUBBED WITH: SALT, MALTODEXTRIN, SUGAR, DEXTROSE, ONION POWDER, SPICES, CARROT POWDER, GARLIC POWDER, PAPRIKA (COLOR), EXTRACTIVE OF. TURMERIC (COLOR). GRAVY INGREDIENTS: WATER, SEASONING (MODIFIED FOOD STARCH, SWEET WHEY SOLIDS (MILK), CORN STARCH, AUTOLYZED YEAST EXTRACT, SALT, CARAMEL COLOR, CALCIUM CASEINATE (MILK), ONION POWDER, PAPRIKA, XANTHAN GUM, DICALCIUM PHOSPHATE, FLAVORING), CONTAINS MILK. NO GLUTEN.

 

 

http://www.jennieo.com/products/111-OVEN-READY%E2%84%A2-Whole-Turkey

Cooking Light With Seafood

December 7, 2013 at 10:36 AM | Posted in seafood | 2 Comments
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Excellent article and some delicious sounding recipes from the NY Times web site. The link is at the end of the post.

 
Cooking Light With Seafood
By MARTHA ROSE SHULMAN

 

 

Many of you, still full from Thanksgiving, may be anticipating holiday parties to come and wondering how to balance things out with some of the meals in between. With this in mind, I decided to work on light fish and seafood dinners for this week’s Recipes for Health. They should provide you with a respite from rich food during this shortened window between Thanksgiving and Christmas.

I bought several fillets of Alaskan cod knowing that the Alaskan state fisheries use sustainable practices. Cod is a very mild tasting fish that has a fairly firm texture. I oven steamed the fillets using the same technique I use for salmon and made three different sauces to serve with the fish. Oven steaming worked beautifully. I love using this cooking method because you don’t need any extra oil, except to oil the foil on your baking sheet, and you won’t be left with lingering odors of fried fish in your kitchen. It is a very forgiving method for preparing fish and lends itself to do-ahead cooking.

In addition to the cod with sauces, I made a refreshing and satisfying ceviche and I also bought some clams, which I steamed and served with a spicy tomato sauce. …..

 

 

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/06/cooking-light-with-seafood/?_r=0

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 2, 2013 at 7:30 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 1 Comment
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Did you know potatoes can remove some stains from your hands? Just rub raw potatoes slices against the stain under water.

What To Do With Thanksgiving Leftovers

November 29, 2013 at 10:57 AM | Posted in leftovers | Leave a comment
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Thanksgiving Leftover Ideas from the PBS web site, the link is at the bottom of the page.

 

 

PBS

 

What To Do With Thanksgiving Leftovers
November 20, 2012

After all the cooking and cleaning of Thanksgiving is over, you likely will not want to cook anymore. Thanksgiving leftovers do not have to be complicated recipes. You just have to get creative! We have a few suggestions to get your Thanksgiving leftovers out of the fridge and recreated into new dishes…..
Kabocha Turkey Pasta

Mix turkey and pumpkin into this Autumn-colored pasta dish that is rich in protein and flavor. It’s a quick weeknight meal, but it also makes for a great appetizer course at a fall dinner party….

 
Turkey Salad Roll-Ups

Make some healthy turkey salad roll-ups with this delicious lunch recipe. Leftover roasted turkey is mixed with creamy mayonnaise and Dijon mustard then wrapped up in a whole-wheat wrap with a healthy smear of cranberry sauce….

 
* Click the link to get all these great leftover recipes! *

 

http://www.pbs.org/food/features/thanksgiving-leftovers-recipes/?utm_source=foodnewsletter&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_term=main2&utm_content=pbsfood_thanksgiving&utm_campaign=pbsfood_thanksgiving

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