One of America’s Favorites – Thanksgiving Dinner

November 25, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Thanksgiving Dinner

The centerpiece of contemporary Thanksgiving in the United States and in Canada is a large meal, generally centered on a large roasted turkey. It is served with a variety of side dishes which vary from traditional dishes such as mashed potatoes, stuffing, and cranberry sauce, to ones that reflect regional or cultural heritage. The majority of the dishes in the traditional American version of Thanksgiving dinner are made from foods native to the New World, as according to tradition the Pilgrims received these foods, or learned how to grow them, from the Native Americans. Thanksgiving dinner is the largest eating event in the United States; people eat more on Thanksgiving than on any other day of the year.

According to what traditionally is known as “The First Thanksgiving,” the 1621 feast between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag at Plymouth Colony contained waterfowl, venison, ham, lobster, clams, berries, fruit, pumpkin, and squash. William Bradford noted that, “besides waterfowl, there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many.” Many of the foods that were included in the first feast (except, notably, the seafood) have since gone on to become staples of the modern Thanksgiving dinner. Early feasts of the Order of Good Cheer, a French Canadian predecessor to the modern Thanksgiving, featured a potluck dinner with freshly-hunted fowl, game, and fish, hunted and shared by both French Canadians and local natives.

The use of the turkey in the US for Thanksgiving precedes Lincoln’s nationalization of the holiday in 1863. Alexander Hamilton proclaimed that no “Citizen of the United States should refrain from turkey on Thanksgiving Day,” and Benjamin Franklin had high regard for the wild turkey as an American icon, but turkey was uncommon as Thanksgiving fare until after 1800. By 1857, turkey had become part of the traditional dinner in New England.

The White House Cook Book, 1887, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette, et al., had the following menu: oysters on half shell, cream of chicken soup, fried smelts, sauce tartare, roast turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, baked squash, boiled onions, parsnip fritters, olives, chicken salad, venison pastry, pumpkin pie, mince pie, Charlotte russe, almond ice cream, lemon jelly, hickory nut cake, cheese, fruits and coffee.

A Thanksgiving Day dinner served to the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935 included: pickles, green olives, celery, roast turkey, oyster stew, cranberry sauce, giblet gravy, dressing, creamed asparagus tips, snowflake potatoes, baked carrots, hot rolls, fruit salad, mince meat pie, fruit cake, candies, grapes, apples, clams, fish, and many other food harvests. French drip coffee, cigars and cigarettes.

Sugar, among other food commodities, was rationed from 1942 to 1946. In 1947, as part of a voluntary rationing campaign, the Harry Truman Administration attempted to promote “Poultryless Thursdays,” discouraging Americans from eating poultry or egg products on Thursdays. Because Thanksgiving is always on a Thursday, this meant that turkey and pumpkin pie, two Thanksgiving staples, were discouraged, not only for that holiday, but for Christmas and New Year’s Day as well, since those holidays landed on Thursday in 1947. (Pumpkin pie was discouraged because it contained eggs.) The National Poultry and Egg Board furiously lobbied the President to cease promoting the plan; it culminated in a truce at the National Thanksgiving Turkey Presentation shortly before Thanksgiving. Turkey was no longer forbidden, but Eggless Thursdays remained for the rest of the year, meaning no pumpkin pie was served at the White House dinner that year.

Oven roasted turkey

Turkey is the most common main dish of a Thanksgiving dinner, to the point where Thanksgiving is sometimes colloquially called “Turkey Day.” In 2006, American turkey growers were expected to raise 270 million turkeys, to be processed into five billion pounds of turkey meat valued at almost $8 billion, with one third of all turkey consumption occurring in the Thanksgiving-Christmas season, and a per capita consumption of almost 18 pounds. The Broad Breasted White turkey is particularly bred for Thanksgiving dinner and similar large feasts; its large size (specimens can grow to over 40 pounds) and meat content make it ideal for such situations, although the breed must be artificially bred and suffers from health problems due to its size.

Most Thanksgiving turkeys are stuffed with a bread-based mixture and roasted. Sage is the traditional herb added to the stuffing, along with chopped celery, carrots, and onions. Other ingredients, such as chopped chestnuts or other tree nuts, crumbled sausage or bacon, cranberries, raisins, or apples, may be added to stuffing. If this mixture is prepared outside the bird, it may be known as dressing. Deep-fried turkey is rising in popularity due to its shorter preparation time, but carries safety risks.

The consumption of turkey on Thanksgiving is so ingrained in American culture that each year since 1947, the National Turkey Federation has presented a live turkey to the President of the United States prior to each Thanksgiving. These turkeys were initially slaughtered and eaten for the President’s Thanksgiving dinner; since 1989, the presented turkeys have typically been given a mock pardon to great fanfare and sent to a park to live out the rest of their usually short natural lives.

Non-traditional foods other than turkey are usually served as the main dish for a Thanksgiving dinner. Ham is often served alongside turkey in many non-traditional households. Goose and duck, foods which were traditional European centerpieces of Christmas dinners before being displaced, are now sometimes served in place of the Thanksgiving turkey. Sometimes, fowl native to the region where the meal is taking place is used; for example, an article in Texas Monthly magazine suggested quail as the main dish for a Texan Thanksgiving feast. John Madden, who appeared on television for the NFL Thanksgiving Day game from 1981 to 2001, frequently advocated his fondness for the turducken, deboned turkey, duck and chicken nested inside each other then cooked. In a few areas of the West Coast of the United States, Dungeness crab is common as an alternate main dish, as crab season starts in early November. Similarly, Thanksgiving falls within deer hunting season in the Northeastern United States, which encourages the use of venison as a centerpiece. Vegetarians or vegans may have a tofu, wheat gluten or lentil-based substitute; or stuffed squash. In Alaskan villages, whale meat is sometimes eaten. Irish immigrants have been known to have prime rib of beef as their centerpiece since beef in Ireland was once a rarity; families would save up money for this dish to signify newfound prosperity and hope. Many Italian-Americans will serve capon as the main course to the Thanksgiving meal.

In the United States, a globalist approach to Thanksgiving has become common with the impact of immigration. Basic “Thanksgiving” ingredients, or the intent of the holiday, can be transformed to a variety of dishes by using flavors, techniques, and traditions from their own cuisines. Others celebrate the holiday with a variety of dishes particularly when there is a crowd to be fed, guests’ tastes vary and considering the financial means available.

Many offerings are typically served alongside the main dish—so many that, because of the amount of food, the Thanksgiving meal is sometimes served midday or early afternoon to make time for all the eating, and preparation may begin at dawn or on days prior. Copious leftovers are also common following the meal proper.

Traditional Thanksgiving foods are sometimes specific to the day, such as riced potatoes, and although some of the foods might be seen at any semi-formal meal in the United States, the meal often has something of a ritual or traditional quality. Many Americans would say it is “incomplete” without cranberry sauce, stuffing or dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy, and brussels sprouts. Other commonly served dishes include winter squash and sweet potatoes, the latter often prepared with sweeteners such as brown sugar, molasses, or marshmallows. Fresh, canned, or frozen corn is popular and green beans are frequently served; in particular, green bean casserole, a product invented in 1955 by the Campbell Soup Company to promote use of its cream of mushroom soup, has become a Thanksgiving standard. Other roasted vegetables are often served, such as carrots or parsnips, celery stalks, beets, turnips, radishes, asparagus, Brussels sprouts or cauliflower. A fresh salad may be included, especially on the West Coast. A relish tray, with various pickles, olives, onions or peppers, is often included either with the meal itself or as a pre-meal appetizer. Bread rolls, biscuits, or cornbread, the latter particularly in the South and parts of New England, may also be served. For dessert, various pies are usually served, particularly pumpkin pie, though apple pie, mincemeat pie, sweet potato pie, cherry pie, chocolate pie, and pecan pie are often served as well.

There are also regional differences as to the stuffing or dressing traditionally served with the turkey. The traditional version has white bread cubes, sage, onion, celery and parsley. Southerners generally make their dressing from cornbread, while those in other parts of the country may opt for wheat or rye bread as the base. One or several of the following may be added to the dressing/stuffing: oysters, apples, chestnuts, raisins, and sausages or the turkey’s giblets.

Other dishes reflect the region or cultural background of those who have come together for the meal. For example, Sauerkraut (among those in the Mid-Atlantic; especially Baltimore) is

Green bean casserole

sometimes served. Many African Americans and Southerners serve baked macaroni and cheese and collard greens, along with chitterlings and sweet potato pie, while some Italian-Americans often have lasagne on the table and Ashkenazi Jews may serve noodle kugel, a sweet dessert pudding. Other Jewish families may consume foods commonly associated with Hanukkah, such as latkes or a sufganiyah; the two holidays are usually in close proximity and on extremely rare occasions overlap. It is not unheard of for Mexican Americans to serve their turkey with mole and roasted corn. In Puerto Rico, the Thanksgiving meal is completed with arroz con gandules (rice with pigeon peas) or arroz con maiz (rice with corn), pasteles (root tamales) stuffed with turkey, pumpkin-coconut crème caramel, corn bread with longaniza, potato salad, roasted white sweet potatoes and Spanish sparkling hard cider. Turkey in Puerto Rico is stuffed with mofongo. Cuban-Americans traditionally serve the turkey alongside a small roasted pork and include white rice and black beans or kidney beans. Vegetarians or vegans have been known to serve alternative entree centerpieces such as a large vegetable pie or a stuffed and baked pumpkin or tofu substitutes. Many Midwesterners (such as Minnesotans) of Norwegian or Scandinavian descent set the table with lefse.

The beverages at Thanksgiving can vary as much as the side dishes, often depending on who is present at the table and their tastes. Spirits or cocktails sometimes may be served before the main meal. On the dinner table, unfermented apple cider (still or sparkling) or wine are often served. Pitchers of sweet tea can often be found on Southern tables[citation needed]. Beaujolais nouveau is sometimes served; the beverage has been marketed as a Thanksgiving drink since the producers of the wine (which is made available only for a short window each year) set the annual release date to be one week before Thanksgiving beginning in 1985, and it is said to pair well with the wide variety of food served for Thanksgiving dinner. Thanksgiving marks the beginning of eggnog season.

 

Thanksgiving Dinner

November 27, 2014 at 5:31 PM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Thanksgiving Dinner

Thanksgiving Day Dinner 2014 007
Happy Thanksgiving Everyone! Hope you all had a wonderful day. Well I’ve been taking care of my parents the last few days, both have the flu that’s been going around. Now, I have it! It was bound to happen and I rarely get the flu, but I have it now. All you can do is work through it! For Dinner Tonight, Thanksgiving Dinner.

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving Day Dinner 2014 003
Last month I had posted that Jennie -O had sent me a free 12 – 13 lb. Jennie – O Oven Ready Whole Turkey, and today we put that Bird to use! It goes straight from your freezer to the oven, no thawing needed! How easy is this! It comes sealed in a Fool Proof Cooking Bag. Start by preheating your oven to 375 degrees. Just place it in a roasting pan, put 6 – 1/2″ slits in the top of the bag, and let that Bird Roast. Roast the turkey until a meat thermometer inserted into the center of the breast reaches 170°F, it also has a Pop -Up Thermometer inserted in it. When it was done I let the Turkey rest for 15 minutes. What a Turkey! Seasoned perfectly, moist, and just bursting with flavor! Thanks again to Jennie – O Turkey!

 

 

 

Thanksgiving Day Dinner 2014 005

For sides we used Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes, Deviled Eggs, Baked Sweet Potatoes, home canned Green Beans, and I heated up some rolls for Mom and Dad. For dessert later Mom had baked an Apple Pie and also a Chocolate Pie, using Splenda Sugar. Again hope all of you had a fantastic Thanksgiving, take care!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey
No time for thawing? Jennie-O® OVEN READY™ Turkey can go directly from your freezer to your oven, no thawing needed.
View this How-To Video to learn more about the ease of OVEN READY™ OVEN READY™ Whole TurkeyTurkey, and locate an OVEN READY™ Turkey in the freezer section of your grocery store.

 
Product Features:
* Gluten Free
* Preseasoned
* Comes sealed in our Fool-Proof® cooking bag
* With Gravy Packet

 

Cooking Instructions:
OVEN COOKING METHOD:
Preheat oven to 375 °F.
Remove frozen turkey from white outer package.
Do not remove turkey from FOOL PROOF. cooking bag.
Place in a roasting pan with at least 2″ high sides.
Note – Do not increase oven temperature, cooking bag may melt at higher temperatures.
Cut six 1/2 inch slits in top of FOOL PROOF. cooking bag.
Pull bag up and away from turkey, to release vacuum.
Place pan in oven, allowing room for bag to expand without touching the oven racks or walls.
Roast the turkey until a meat thermometer inserted into the center of the breast reaches 170°F.
Note – Meat temperature increases rapidly during last hour of cooking.Let turkey rest 15 minutes, cut open top of oven bag.

 

Watch out for hot steam and juices.
Heat gravy as directed on pouch.

APPROXIMATE OVEN ROASTING TIMES IN 375°F. OVEN TEMPERATURE:
11-12 lbs 4-1/4 to 4-1/2 hours.
12-13 lbs 4-1/2 to 5 hours.

 

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 112 g Total Carbohydrates 1 g
Calories 140 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 50 Sugars 0 g
Total Fat 6.0 g Protein 20 g
Saturated Fat 2.0 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 2%
Cholesterol 60 mg Iron 4%
Sodium 460 mg Calcium 2

 

 
http://www.jennieo.com/products/111-OVEN-READY%E2%84%A2-Whole-Turkey

Five Safety Tips for Deep Frying Turkey

November 25, 2013 at 9:50 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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A very good artlicle on Deep Frying Turkey, from the PBS web site. I left the link at the end of the post. While there check their Food Section out, full of good recipes and tips!

 

PBS

 

When it comes to deep frying turkey, you want to take every precaution to keep your family and your home safe. For the best suggestions, we went to an expert – a fire chief!

By Chief Fire Marshal Mike Julazadeh of the Charleston Fire Department of South Carolina

Fried turkeys are delicious, but they come with a slew of safety issues. Thousands of fires as well as many deaths and injuries happen each year due to turkey fryer fires. Before you set up your turkey fryer this Thanksgiving, remember these safety tips.

Get the Tips

Stay Away from The House – Set up the turkey fryer more than 10 feet away from your home and keep children and pets away. Never leave it unattended.

Find Flat Ground – The oil must be even and steady at all times to ensure safety. Place the fryer on a flat, level surface and carefully gauge the amount of oil needed.

Use a Thawed and Dry Turkey – Make sure your Thanksgiving turkey is completely thawed and dry. Extra water will cause the oil to bubble furiously and spill over. If oil spills from the fryer onto the burner, it can cause a fire.

Monitor the Temp – Use caution when touching the turkey fryer. The lid and handle can become very hot and could cause burns. Also be sure to keep track of the oil’s temperature as many fryers do not have their own thermostats.

Be Prepared – Have a fire extinguisher (multipurpose, dry-powder) ready at all times in the event that the oil ignites….

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/food/features/five-safety-tips-for-deep-frying-turkey/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=pbsofficial&utm_campaign=pbsfood_thanksgiving

Roasted Turkey Breast and Stuffing w/ Mashed Potatoes and Cut Green Beans

August 18, 2013 at 4:54 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Roasted Turkey Breast and Stuffing w/ Mashed Potatoes and Cut Green Beans

 

Roasted Turkey Breast Dressing 002

 

 

Not much going on today. A little hotter and a bit more humid but not real bad out. I did go to Meijer to see if I could find what to have for dinner, When in doubt, Turkey! I bought a Jennie-O Oven Ready Turkey Breast and dinner was set! I prepared a Roasted Turkey Breast and Stuffing w/ Mashed Potatoes and Cut Green Beans.

 

 

 

As I said I used a Jennie – O Oven Ready Skinless Boneless Turkey Breast. I love using the Jennie – O Oven Ready Boneless Skinless Turkey Breast. It’s an easy and delicious way to get your Turkey on! Comes in Jennie O turkey Breast Oven Ready Bag that you bake at 375 degrees for about 2 to 3 hour until it reads 170 degrees. It also now has a pop up inserted in the breast that pops up when done. The Turkey came out moist, juicy and delicious, excellent flavor!

 

 

For side dishes I prepared a box of Stove Top Stuffing, Bob Evans Mashed Potatoes, Del Monte Low Sodium Cut Green Beans, and Baked a Loaf of Pillsbury Rustic French Bread (the bread is for Mom and Dad). It was a very early Thanksgiving Dinner here today! For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Double Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

 

 

 

 

Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Boneless Skinless Turkey Breastjennie o oven ready turkey breast

 

Get all the great benefits of Oven Ready™ in a smaller-sized boneless and skinless turkey breast; this delicious home-cooked turkey breast is the perfect dinner to serve year-round.Goes directly from your freezer to your oven with no thawing.

 

Product Features:
Gluten Free
The Biggest Loser® product
Preseasoned
Comes sealed in our Fool-Proof® cooking bag
With Gravy Packet (contains gluten)

 

Cooking Instructions:

 

OVEN COOKING METHOD:
Preheat oven to 375 °F.
Remove frozen turkey from white outer package.
Do not remove turkey from FOOL PROOF. cooking bag.
Place in a roasting pan with at least 2″ high sides.
Note – Do not increase oven temperature, cooking bag may melt at higher temperatures.
Cut three 1/2 inch slits in top of FOOL PROOF. cooking bag.
Place pan in oven, allowing room for bag to expand without touching the oven racks or walls.
Roast the turkey until a meat thermometer reaches 170°F.
Note – Meat temperature increases rapidly during last hour of cooking.
Let turkey rest 10 minutes, cut open top of oven bag.
Watch out for hot steam and juices.
Heat gravy as directed on pouch.

 

APPROXIMATE OVEN ROASTING TIMES IN 375°F. OVEN TEMPERATURE:
2 – 3 lbs 2-1/2 to 3 hours.
Nutritional Information
Serving Size 112 g
Total Carbohydrates 1 g
Calories 100 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 10 Sugars 1 g
Total Fat 1.0 g Protein 23 g
Saturated Fat .0 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 0%
Cholesterol 40 mg Iron 2%
Sodium 460 mg Calcium 0%
Our products are labeled in compliance with government regulations. It is always necessary to read the labels on the products to determine if the food product meets your required needs regardless of how the product is represented on this site.

 
http://www.jennieo.com/products/113-OVEN-READY%E2%84%A2-Boneless-Skinless-Turkey-Breast

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 21, 2012 at 10:30 AM | Posted in baking, BEEF, cooking, pork chops | Leave a comment
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If your broiling steaks or chops, save a few slices of stale bread and set them in the bottom of the broiler pan to absorb fat drippings. This will eliminate smoking fat, it should also reduce any danger of a grease fire

Five fabulous new ways to cook your Thanksgiving turkey

November 19, 2012 at 12:39 PM | Posted in baking, cooking, turkey | Leave a comment
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This seemed like a good time to pass this along all about different Turkey cooking methods. I left the link at the bottom of the post so you can read the entire article, it’s a good one!

Five fabulous new ways to cook your Thanksgiving turkey
10:36 am November 19, 2012, by John Kessler

All those fancy cooks at the New York Times are proposing exciting ways to cook your Thanksgiving turkey. Why shove your bird into the oven on a roasting pan, they ask, when you know that’s just a one-way ticket to the ho hums?

According to the New York Times, you should STEAM your turkey.

But if that’s too much work, then you should BRAISE the bird or — better yet — SPATCHCOCK the sucker.

We will not be outdone by those commonplace techniques here at the AJC. If you really want to impress guests far beyond any way they might be momentarily wowed by a New York Times turkey, may we propose one of these five exciting new preparation methods:….

http://blogs.ajc.com/food-and-more/2012/11/19/five-fabulous-new-ways-to-cook-your-thanksgiving-turkey/?cxntfid=blogs_food_and_more

Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey

November 18, 2012 at 2:42 PM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products, turkey | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Well I got our Thanksgiving Turkey this morning at our local Walmart. For the second year in a row were going with the Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey. There’s just going to be 4 of us so the Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey will be plenty, with some great leftovers! It comes frozen and in its own cooking bag. You bake it according to its weight, usually anywhere from 4 1/2 to 5 hours. I’ve left the product description and web site link at the bottom of the post. Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

 

Jennie – O OVEN READY™ Whole Turkey
Oven Ready™ turkey from Jennie-O Turkey Store is the only whole turkey that goes directly from your freezer to your oven with no thawing, easy clean up, and no worries. View the easy step-by-step cooking instructions.

Product Features:
Gluten Free
Preseasoned
Comes sealed in our Fool-Proof® cooking bag
With Gravy Packet (contains gluten)

Nutritional Information
Serving Size 112 g Total Carbohydrates 1 g
Calories 140 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 50 Sugars 0 g
Total Fat 6.0 g Protein 20 g
Saturated Fat 2.0 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 2%
Cholesterol 60 mg Iron 4%
Sodium 460 mg Calcium 2%
Cooking Instructions:
OVEN COOKING METHOD:
Preheat oven to 375 °F.
Remove frozen turkey from white outer package.
Do not remove turkey from FOOL PROOF. cooking bag.
Place in a roasting pan with at least 2″ high sides.
Note – Do not increase oven temperature, cooking bag may melt at higher temperatures.
Cut six 1/2 inch slits in top of FOOL PROOF. cooking bag.
Pull bag up and away from turkey, to release vacuum.
Place pan in oven, allowing room for bag to expand without touching the oven racks or walls.
Roast the turkey until a meat thermometer inserted into the center of the breast reaches 170°F.
Note – Meat temperature increases rapidly during last hour of cooking.
Let turkey rest 15 minutes, cut open top of oven bag.
Watch out for hot steam and juices.
Heat gravy as directed on pouch.

APPROXIMATE OVEN ROASTING TIMES IN 375°F. OVEN TEMPERATURE:
11-12 lbs 4-1/4 to 4-1/2 hours.
12-13 lbs 4-1/2 to 5 hours.
Find this product in the freezer section of your grocery store.

http://www.jennieo.com/products/111-Oven-Ready%E2%84%A2-Whole-Turkey

What a Great Idea for a Restaurant! TGD

September 13, 2012 at 10:23 AM | Posted in BEEF, diabetes friendly, Food, turkey | Leave a comment
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Came across this story in Journal – News this morning and it really caught my eye. They opened a new restaurant, TGD, in neighboring town of Oxford, Ohio. (Home of Miami University). Finally a fast food restaurant that you can enjoy and healthy food at the same time! Turkey and all the Thanksgiving trimmings served year around. Check out their website, I hope they expand to West Chester real soon!

Thanksgiving Dinner 365

TGD’s mission is to serve real home cooked food in a fast casual setting while maintaining amazing taste and inexpensive prices so that everyone can enjoy our food. Of course TGD serves slow roasted turkey along with all of the fixings from mashed potatoes to green beans, and even homemade mac and cheese. But there is much more to TGD’s menu including a wide variety of other home cooked choices such as tender roast beef, baked chicken, honey glazed ham and our signature Turkey Nuggets™. In addition to hot options we also have made to order wraps and salads using only the freshest veggies, meats and sauces.

All of this is unlike most fast food chains because we actually prepare everything fresh right in our own kitchen each and every day. The other guys use poor quality frozen ingredients that are prepared days or even weeks in advance. Our high quality food is displayed fresh and hot in a steam table so it can be served to you immediately, allowing you to get your food with no wait.

Not only is our home cooked food served fast but it is of great value. Two adults can easily be filled up for around 14 bucks (including a drink fountain drink or iced tea).

The TGD concept originated at 4am after a long black jack session at the Rio in Las Vegas when co-founder Ryan Napier asked co-founder Nino Natale, “How good does a burger sound?” Nino looked back at him and replied “Not bad, but, how cool would it be if we could get Thanksgiving dinner right now in the same time it took to get a burger?”

Ryan’s eyes lit up and the two went on discussing how great each component of Thanksgiving dinner was. Ultimately the pair began wondering why a meal that so many people loved was only eaten once or twice a year. From that moment on it was their mission to deliver the beloved meal to the public at a great price, 365 days a year, in a fast food setting, while still maintaining highest quality of food possible.

The partners originally were running with the name “Thanksgiving Dinner.” While this describes the restaurant well it is a bit wordy and not as catchy as they wanted. For weeks while working on the concept they attempted to think of a better name but nothing seemed to be right. Finally one night while working Nino exclaimed “Ry I got it, let’s call it TGD!”

Ryan wasn’t sure exactly what he meant, so Nino explained that it simply stood for “Thanks Giving Dinner.” Ryan then replied “You know Thanksgiving is one word right?” Nino then said that he had always thought that it was two words. After laughing for a few minutes and thinking about it the partners agreed that they liked the name because the name was unique, simple, and had a great story behind it.

The first thing our founders agreed on when they decided to move forward with their idea was that every plate of food they served would be of the highest quality possible. They wanted the food in their restaurants to taste just like a home cooked Thanksgiving feast and they wanted to achieve this while still serving the food fast and at a great price.

They proceeded to go to several food distributors and each time the first thing that they said to them is exactly what they originally agreed on…that they needed the highest quality products that the distributor had to offer. Each time the food distributor took the partners list and pulled some samples of all of their highest quality products they could find.

After selecting the food company the partners and the food distributor’s executive chef painstakingly went over each recipe to make sure all of the highest quality ingredients were used and used correctly. All of this work and commitment to high quality has resulted in TGD having a real home cooked taste in each and every bite while still being served fast and at a great price so everyone can enjoy it.

http://tgd365.com/index.html

 

Jennie -O Roasted Turkey Breast Roast and Gravy w/ Mashed Potatoes and Glazed Carrots

October 23, 2011 at 6:29 PM | Posted in baking, diabetes, diabetes friendly, fruits, Jennie-O Turkey Products, low calorie, low carb, potatoes, turkey | 4 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Jennie -O  Turkey Breast Roast and Gravy w/ Mashed Potatoes and Glazed Carrots

Came across this yesterday at Meijer while grocery shopping and decided to give it a try, Jennie – O So Easy Turkey Breast Roast With Gravy. Esay to fix just bake at 350 degrees for 25 minutes and it’s done. You can also microwave it but I went with baking option. It really turned out great, very moist, tender and the gravy was very good. Plus it’s only 110 calories and 7 carbs per serving! The sodium (760 mg ) is higher than I normally like but it’s one of those that you can live with from time to time. I left the Nutrition of Turkey Breast at the end of the post. Anyway I served it with Idahoan Mashed Potatoes and Green Giant Glazed Carrots. It was more less a mini Thanksgiving Dinner and it was only 310 calories and 42 carbs! Not bad at all for all that. For a snack later a mini bag Of Jolly Time Pop Corn.

Jennie – O So Easy Turkey Breast Roast With Gravy

Nutritional Information
Serving Size     140 g     Total Carbohydrates     7 g
Calories     110     Dietary Fiber     0 g
Calories From Fat     15     Sugars     2 g
Total Fat     1.5 g     Protein     18 g
Saturated Fat     .5 g     Vitamin A     0%
Trans Fat     .0 g     Vitamin C     0%
Cholesterol     35 mg     Iron     6%
Sodium     760 mg     Calcium     2%

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