Smoky Mushroom Bread Pudding with Three Cheeses

July 25, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, diabetes, diabetes friendly | Leave a comment
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Here’s a recipe for a Smoky Mushroom Bread Pudding. Some of the Ingredients you’ll be needing are Bread, Butter, Onion, Spices, Mushrooms, Tabasco, Eggs, Green Onions, Wisconsin Smoked Cheddar Cheese, Wisconsin American Processed Cheese, Wisconsin Parmesan Cheese, and more! The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of your recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Smoky Mushroom Bread Pudding with Three Cheeses
Bread pudding is one of the comfort foods. This savory version features smoked cheddar, processed cheddar and Parmesan cheeses, and can be served as a satisfying meatless entrée or hearty side dish.

Recipe Ingredients:
8 slices firm textured bread, not sourdough
2 tablespoons butter – divided use
1 medium onion, diced
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
8 ounces fresh mushrooms, chopped unevenly
Salt and pepper
2 cups milk
1 teaspoon dried (powdered) mustard
Dash hot pepper sauce, such as Tabasco™
3 large eggs, beaten
2 tablespoons chopped green onions
1/2 cup shredded Wisconsin Smoked Cheddar cheese
4 slices (3 ounces) diced Wisconsin American processed cheese
1/2 cup Wisconsin Parmesan cheese, shredded or grated

Cooking Directions:
1 – Trim the crusts from the bread and place half the slices in an oblong baking dish, about 10 inches in length. Cut the bread to cover the bottom of the casserole. Reserve remaining slices.
2 – Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C).
3 – Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter in a deep, large skillet and add the onion. Crumble the oregano and thyme over the onion and mix. Cook the onion over low/medium heat until it is soft, about 12 minutes. Add the remaining butter and mushrooms. Stir so the mushrooms are coated. Cook the mushrooms for about 5 minutes, until tender. Season with salt and pepper.
4 – In a large bowl, whisk the milk, dried mustard, hot pepper sauce and eggs. Stir in green onions. In another bowl, mix the cheeses.
5 – Spoon the mushroom mixture over the bread in the casserole. Layer with half the cheese. Place remaining bread slices over and top with remaining cheese. Pour milk mixture over all. Cover with foil. Bake 20 minutes. Remove foil and bake 15 minutes longer.
6 – Serve hot.
Makes 6 to 8 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/sidedish/smoky_bread_pudding_with_wisconsin_cheeses_recipe.html

Seafood of the Week – Prawn Cocktail

July 29, 2014 at 5:41 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week, shrimp | Leave a comment
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Prawn cocktail

Prawn cocktail

Prawn cocktail, also known as shrimp cocktail, is a seafood dish consisting of shelled, cooked, prawns in a Marie Rose sauce, served in a glass. It was the most popular hors d’œuvre in Great Britain from the 1960s to the late 1980s, after which it became unfashionable before making a comeback in recent years. According to the English food writer Nigel Slater, the prawn cocktail “has spent most of [its life] see-sawing from the height of fashion to the laughably passé” and is now often served with a degree of irony.

 
A dish of cooked seafood with a piquant sauce of some kind is of ancient origin and many varieties exist. Oyster or shrimp dishes of this kind were popular in the United States in the late nineteenth century and some sources link the serving of the dish in cocktail glasses to the ban on alcoholic drinks during the 1920s prohibition era in the United States.

In the United Kingdom, the invention of the Prawn Cocktail is often credited to British television chef Fanny Cradock in the 1960s, however, it is more likely that Craddock merely popularised her version of an established dish that was not well known until then in Britain. In their 1997 book The Prawn Cocktail Years, Simon Hopkinson and Lindsey Bareham note that the prawn cocktail has a “direct lineage to Escoffier”.

In North America, the sauce is red, essentially ketchup plus horseradish. In other areas, the sauce is pink, based on a mixture of ketchup (tomato sauce) and mayonnaise, which is known as Marie Rose sauce.

 
Nigel Slater says “It is all in the sauce” and that “The true sauce is principally mayonnaise, tomato ketchup and a couple of shakes of Tabasco.”

The chef Heston Blumenthal states that prawn cocktail is his “secret vice”, “When I get home late after working in the Fat Duck there’s nothing I like better than to raid the fridge for prawn cocktail”. Blumenthal notes that it is best to use homemade mayonnaise, and recommends adding chopped basil and tarragon.

The television chef and writer Delia Smith states that the best version is with prawns that you have cooked yourself, and that in the 1960s it was “something simple but really luscious, yet over the years it has suffered from some very poor adaptations, not least watery prawns and inferior sauces”.

According to the chef Jamie Oliver, the prawn cocktail is a “wicked little starter … guaranteed to please your guests”. His recipe includes garlic, cucumber, mint, salad cress and crabmeat, which demonstrates the versatility and adaptability of the basic concept.

As Hopkinson and Bareham note in The Prawn Cocktail Years, what was once considered to be the “Great British Meal” consisted of Prawn Cocktail, followed by Steak Garni with Chips and Black Forest Gateau for desert, commenting that “cooked as it should be, this much derided and often ridiculed dinner is still something very special indeed”.

 
The ubiquity of the prawn cocktail has led to such products as prawn cocktail flavor crisps, which are still one of the most popular varieties of this snack food. Wotsits and Quavers are also available in prawn cocktail flavor. Prawn cocktail flavor crisps were the second most popular in the UK in 2004, with a 16% market share.

Seafood of the Week – Clams Casino

May 27, 2014 at 5:38 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | Leave a comment
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Clams casino over rock salt with lemon and parsley garnish

Clams casino over rock salt with lemon and parsley garnish

Clams casino is a clam “on the halfshell” dish with breadcrumbs and bacon. It originated in Rhode Island in the United States. It is often served as an appetizer in New England and is served in variations nationally.

 

 

 
The dish uses littlenecks or cherrystone clams. Other basic ingredients include butter, peppers, bacon and garlic. Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper, white wine, lemon juice, and shallots or onion are also used. Tabasco sauce is sometimes added, and parsley is sometimes used as a garnish.

 

 

 
The clams, bacon, and other ingredients are cooked in various ways depending on the recipe, and then added with breading to half the clam shell and baked or broiled (grilled from above) to a golden brown.

The dish is popular with Italian-Americans, having “a permanent spot on just about every trattoria menu” in Little Italy, Manhattan, and is considered an American classic. Clams casino is often served at Italian festivals and during the holidays[6] in the United States.

There are many variations on the dish, but the constant factor is the bacon: “Bacon remains the major key to its success”, with some chefs recommending smoked bacon for its salty flavor and others advocating an unsmoked variety.

 

 

 
According to legend, the recipe for clams casino was originally developed in 1917 in the Little Casino in Narragansett, Rhode Island, by a maître d’hôtel for a woman of means wanting something special for her guests. Good Housekeeping Great American Classics attributes the dish to Mrs. Paran Stevens and maître d’hôtel Julius Keller. She named the dish after the hotel, and word and popularity of the dish has since spread across the United States, including New Orleans, where oysters are substituted for clams. Clams casino remains a very popular dish in Rhode Island, “appearing on almost every menu”.

“In the first decades of this century (20th), if a restaurant wanted to be noted, it came up with a dish that involved the baking of shellfish”. While there was a profusion of this type of menu offering (often with the meat taken out of the shell prepared with sauce and returned to the shell), clams casino and oysters Rockefeller “are among the few surviving dishes from the shellfish fad”.

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