Montgomery Inn Pulled Pork BBQ Sandwich w/ Baked Fries

June 15, 2014 at 5:27 PM | Posted in Aunt Millie's, BBQ, grilling, Ore - Ida | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Montgomery Inn Pulled Pork BBQ Sandwich w/ Baked Fries

 

 

Mom and Dads T-Bone

Mom and Dads T-Bone

A Happy Father’s Day to my Dad and all the other Fathers out there! Another sunny day out again, bit warmer and more humid though. Went to Jungle Jim’s International Market this morning, they had T-Bones on sale and I wanted to prepare them for Mom and Dad for dinner. I’ve been wanting some BBQ so for my dinner I prepared Montgomery Inn Pulled Pork BBQ Sandwich w/ Baked Fries.

 

 

 

 

 

Montgomery Inn Pulled Pork BBQ 001

For Mom and Dad I prepared grilled the T-Bone Steaks, Baked Potato, Three Bean Salad, and Baked up some Texas Toast. For my BBQ I used the Montgomery Inn Hardwood Smoked Pulled Pork w/ Barbecue Sauce. Montgomery Inn is one of the original Barbecue and Ribs Restaurant in the Cincinnati area. It has some of the finest food, love them Ribs, anywhere! They also sell their Ribs and Pulled Pork and Chicken at all Kroger. So when it’s Pulled Pork I almost always use the Montgomery Inn brand. Anyway you just heat it in a medium sauce pan until it’s warmed and you have BBQ. It’s the perfect combination of the Pork and the mouth watering Montgomery Inn Sauce that makes this so delicious! Plus it’s only 110 calories and 8 carbs per serving. I served it on an Aunt Millie’s Reduced Calorie Whole Grain Bun. I also baked up some Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries. Served these with a side of Hunt’s Ketchup and also had an Ice-Cold Diet Dr. Pepper. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

Montgomery Inn Pulled Pork with Barbecue SauceMontgomery inn BBQ2

 

Product Details
* World famous.
* The ribs king.
* Hardwood smoked.
* Fully cooked.
* Genuine barbecue.

Just heat & eat! US inspected and passed by Department of Agriculture. Previously frozen for your protection. The world’s greatest pulled pork barbecue is now all yours! We slow-smoke our choice cuts of pork for hours over hardwood coals; blend the lean, juicy meat with our secret spices; and then add our world-famous Montgomery Inn Barbecue Sauce to give it that special flavor. Enjoy!

 

Directions
Refreeze or keep refrigerated. Microwave Oven: 1. Remove desired amount of barbecue from tray and place in microwave safe bowl. 2. Cover with plastic wrap and heat on High power (100%) for two (2) minutes. 3. Pull film back from edge of container and stir product thoroughly. 4. Replace film and heat for an additional 1-2 minutes or until hot! 5. Remove from oven and stir well before serving. Stove Top: 1. Place desired amount of barbecue in a medium size sauce pan. 2. Heat over medium low heat 6-12 minutes (covered) and occasionally stir so as not to burn. 3. Remove product from stove and serve. We highly recommend cooking our barbecue from a thawed state. Remove any uncooked barbecue from original packaging and place in a sealable container and refrigerate.

 

Ingredients
Pork, Tomatoes, Distilled Vinegar, Corn Syrup, Sugar, Water, Salt, Spices, Dehydrated Onions, Dehydrated Garlic, Molasses, Natural Flavors, Caramel Color, and Tamarinds.

 

Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 2 oz
Servings per container: 16
Nutrient Qty %DV
Calories 110
Calories from Fat 35
Total Fat 4 g 6%
Saturated Fat 1 g 5%
Cholesterol 35 mg 12%
Sodium 250 mg 10%
Total Carbohydrate 8 g 3%
Sugars 8 g
Protein 8 g
Iron 6%

Advertisements

Buffalo T-Bone Steak w/ Baked Potato and Roasted Asparagus

December 29, 2013 at 6:32 PM | Posted in bison, Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Today’s Menu: Buffalo T-Bone Steak w/ Baked Potato and Roasted Asparagus

 

Buffalo T Bone 005

 

Lot of rain today and only a high in the mid 3o’s. Had some Turkey Goetta for breakfast this morning. First time I’ve had it in a while, I really like Goetta! Fries up to nice golden brown with good crunch to it. Had Goetta, one Egg, and Toast. Doctor’s appointment tomorrow afternoon, my 6 month check-up at my Oncologist. For dinner tonight a Buffalo T-Bone Steak w/ Baked Potato and Roasted Asparagus.

 

 

 

It was the first time I’ve had a Buffalo T-Bone Steak. I have 2 of them, 1 left in the freezer, they came in the Wild Idea Buffalo Holiday Package I had purchased. The Buffalo Ribeye was incredible and I think the T-Bone was even better! I seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. I then pan fried it Canola Oil about 9 minutes, 5 minutes on one side and 4 1/2 on the other. Had to cook it a bit longer than normal, a thick Steak. It came a perfect medium rare and just bursting with incredible flavor! As any Wild Idea Buffalo cut, just a perfect piece of meat!

 

 

 

For one side I had a Baked Potato that I topped with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn, a dab of Daisy Reduced Fat Sour Cream, and I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter. Then I had some fresh Roasted Asparagus. To prepare the Asparagus I just needed Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Cloves Garlic, minced, Sea Salt, Freshly grated Black Pepper, Lemon Juice, and Shredded Parmesan Cheese. The complete recipe and instructions are at the end of the post. Another fine dinner tonight. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo T Bone Steak

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo 16 oz. T-Bone Steak
Can’t make up your mind? Try the best of both: cut from the mid section of the New York and Tenderloin, conveniently cut into one juicy steak. Cut to 16 oz.

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

 

 

 

 

Roasted Asparagus

INGREDIENTS
1 lb asparagus spears (thick spears are best for roasting)
1-2 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 Cloves Garlic, minced
Sea Salt
Freshly grated Black Pepper
Lemon Juice
Shredded Parmesan Cheese

 

 

METHOD
1 Preheat oven to 400°F. Rinse clean the asparagus. Break the tough ends off of the asparagus and discard.
2 Lay the asparagus spears out in a single layer in a baking dish or a foil-covered roasting pan. Drizzle olive oil over the spears, roll the asparagus back and forth until they are all covered with a thin layer of olive oil. (Alternatively you can put the asparagus and oil in a plastic bag, and rub the bag so that the oil gets evenly distributed.) Sprinkle with minced garlic, salt, and pepper. Rub over the asparagus so that they are evenly distributed.
3 Place pan in oven and cook for approximately 8-10 minutes, depending on how thick your asparagus spears are, until lightly browned and tender when pierced with a fork. Drizzle with a little fresh lemon juice and shredded Parm Cheese before serving.
Yield: Serves 4.

 

One of America’s Favorites – T-Bone Steak

May 27, 2013 at 9:21 AM | Posted in BEEF, One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,

The T-bone and porterhouse are steaks of beef cut from the short loin. Both steaks include a “T-shaped” bone with meat on each side.

A T-bone steak being cooked on a grill

A T-bone steak being cooked on a grill

Porterhouse steaks are cut from the rear end of the short loin and thus include more tenderloin steak, along with (on the other side of the bone) a large strip steak. T-bone steaks are cut closer to the front, and contain a smaller section of tenderloin.
There is little agreement among experts on how large the tenderloin must be to differentiate a T-bone steak from porterhouse. The U.S. Department of Agriculture‘s Institutional Meat Purchase Specifications state that the tenderloin of a porterhouse must be at least 1.25 inches (32 mm) thick at its widest, while that of a T-bone must be at least 0.5 inches (13 mm). However steaks with a large tenderloin are often called a “T-bone” in restaurants and steakhouses despite technically being porterhouse.
Due to their large size and the fact that they contain meat from two of the most prized cuts of beef (the short loin and the tenderloin), T-bone steaks are generally considered one of the highest quality steaks, and prices at steakhouses are accordingly high. Porterhouse steaks are even more highly valued due to their larger tenderloin.
In the United States, the T-bone has the meat-cutting classification IMPS 1174; the porterhouse is IMPS 1173.
In British usage, followed in Commonwealth countries, porterhouse refers to the strip steak side of a T-bone steak, while the tenderloin side is called the fillet.

 
The origin of the term “porterhouse” is surprisingly contentious, with several cities and establishments claiming to have coined it. The Oxford English Dictionary traces the etymology from proprietor Martin Morrison serving large T-bones in his Pearl Street, Manhattan “Porter House” around 1914, while noting the lack of contemporary evidence to support the tale. This origin story gained traction in the late 19th century, but others contend a Cambridge, Massachusetts, hotel and restaurant proprietor named Zachariah B. Porter lent his name to the cut of beef, and others claim the steak takes its name from various 19th Century U.S. hotels or restaurants called Porter House, such as the popular Porter House Hotel in Flowery Branch, Georgia. There is no known contemporary evidence that any particular establishment is related to the steak.

 
To cut a T-bone from butchered cattle, a lumbar vertebra is sawn in half through the vertebral column. The downward prong of the ‘T’

Beef cut:Short Loin + Tenderloin Steak type:	T-bone steak

Beef cut: Short Loin + Tenderloin
Steak type: T-bone steak

is a transverse process of the vertebra, and the flesh surrounding it is the spinal muscles. The small semicircle at the top of the ‘T’ is half of the vertebral foramen.

 
T-bone and porterhouse steaks are suited to fast, dry heat cooking methods, such as grilling or broiling. Due to their relative lack of collagen, longer cooking times are not necessary to tenderize the meat.
The bone also conducts heat within the meat so that it cooks more evenly and prevents meat drying out and shrinking during cooking. The meat near the bone will cook more slowly than the rest of the steak, and the tenderloin will tend to reach the desired level of doneness before the strip.

 
Bistecca alla fiorentina, or ‘beefsteak Florentine style’, consists of a T-bone traditionally sourced from either the Chianina or Maremmana breeds of cattle. A favorite of Tuscan cuisine, the steak is grilled over a wood or charcoal fire, seasoned with salt, (sometimes with black pepper), and olive oil, applied immediately after the meat is retired from the heat. Thickly cut and very large, “Bisteca” are often shared between two or more persons, and traditionally served very rare, sometimes garnished with lemon wedges, (if not accompanied by red wine), and accompanied by Tuscan beans as a side dish. An early recipe dictates: 1/1,5 kg, 3 fingers thick, 3-5 minutes grilling per side (flipping it only once) and 5-7 minutes vertically standing on its bone so as to make the blood drain out. The same cut of meat, but from the calf, is used in the famous dish Cutlet of Veal in the Milan Style, for which carefully chosen 1.5 cm-thick cuts are battered in fresh breadcrumbs and gently fried (sautéed) in abundant clarified butter with salt. This is a favored dish in Italy.

Buffalo Steaks on a Charcoal Grill

March 26, 2013 at 8:41 AM | Posted in bison, grilling | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

With the Spring here it’s time to tune those grills up! When their ready and fired up what better than a Top Sirloin or any of the other cuts of Buffalo from Wild Idea Buffalo. Below are some basic hints for grilling Buffalo with charcoal. I left the Wild Idea Buffalo web site link at the bottom of the post. Now get ready, Get set, GRILL!
Buffalo Steaks on a Charcoal GrillWild Idea Top Sirloin

Basic how-to instructions for cooking steaks on a charcoal grill.

Ideal for: Tenderloin Filets, Ribeyes, New Yorks, Top Sirloin, Sirloin, Bone-in Ribeye, Porter House, T-Bones and Terres Major Filet

Some swear there’s nothing like a charcoal grill. We say it’s even better with bison. Rub steaks with olive oil, salt, and pepper or the rub you love. Let them rest at room temperature for 2 hours before cooking.

*Use a clean grill.
*Pile coals high in center and allow them to get white-hot.
*Spread coals evenly with tongs, then place oiled grill grate low and close to coals.
*Apply prepared steaks and cover with lid, following cooking times below.

Steak Cooking Times

These guidelines are to medium rare.
Adjust time according to steak’s thickness and personal preference.
We recommend cooking steaks no more than medium.

Thickness First side Second side
1 inch 3 minutes 2 minutes
1½ inch 4 minutes 4 minutes

 
http://wildideabuffalo.com/

One of America’s Favorites – Beefsteak

March 4, 2013 at 10:54 AM | Posted in BEEF, bison | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A beefsteak is a flat cut of beef, usually cut perpendicular to the muscle fibers. Beefsteaks are usually grilled, pan-fried, or broiled.

Rump steak cooked to medium rare

Rump steak cooked to medium rare

The more tender cuts from the loin and rib are cooked quickly, using dry heat, and served whole. Less tender cuts from the chuck or round are cooked with moist heat or are mechanically tenderized (cf. cube steak).

 

 

In the United Kingdom, steak is typically served with chips (french fries), fried mushrooms and a fried tomato. Other vegetables such as peas, carrots or a green salad can also be served. English mustard and ketchup are condiments sometimes used. The country has a long history of beef eating and was once known for its beef and beef cooking methods, earning the English the mildly offensive nickname, “Les Rosbif” from the French.

 
In the United States, a restaurant that specializes in beefsteaks is known as a steakhouse, and typical steak dinner consists of a steak, with a starchy side dish, usually baked or mashed potatoes, but occasionally another potato dish, rice, pasta, or beans. A side salad or a small serving of cooked vegetables often accompanies the meat and side, with corn on the cob, green beans, creamed spinach, asparagus, tomatoes, mushrooms, peas, and onion rings being popular. A well-known accompaniment to steak is shrimp or a cooked lobster tail, a combination often called “surf and turf” or “reef and beef” and “pier and steer”. Rounding out an American steak dinner is some sort of bread, usually a dinner roll.

 
In Australia, beefsteak is available in almost every pub, bistro or restaurant specialising in modern Australian food, and is ranked based on the quality and the cut. Most venues will usually have between 5 and 7 different cuts of steak, on their own menu, and is served medium rare by default. A steak is normally accompanied by a choice of thick sauce, such as mushroom or pepper, and a choice of either fries or Jacket Potato. A complementary choice of side salad or steamed vegetables is also commonly offered.
Special steak knives are provided, which are usually serrated, though straight blades also work; they also often have wooden handles. Prepared condiments known as steak sauces are generally on the table in steakhouses. Tenderized round or sirloin steaks, breaded, and pan-fried or deep-fried, are called chicken fried or country fried steaks, respectively. Thinly sliced ribeye or other tender cuts, cooked on a hot griddle and shredded slightly, and served on Italian style rolls are called Philly steaks, named after Philadelphia, the city in which they became famous.

 
In France, steak is usually served with French fries or ‘pommes frites’ as they are referred to in French. The combination is known as ‘steak-frites.’ Vegetables are not normally served with steak in this manner, but a green salad may follow or (more commonly) be served at the same time. This is also the case in Argentina.

 
In Italy, steak was not widely eaten until after World War II because the relatively rugged countryside does not readily accommodate the space and resource demands of large herds of cattle. Some areas of Piedmont and Tuscany, however, were renowned for the quaility of their beef. Bistecca alla Fiorentina is a well-known specialty of Florence; it is typically served with just a salad. From the 1960s onward, economic gains allowed more Italians to afford a red meat diet.

 
In the Balkan region, steak is often rubbed with mustard and pepper, and marinated in vinegar and vegetable oil for up to a week. It is then fried in butter, and a slice of toast is then used to soak up the pan drippings. The steak is served on the toast and topped with optional fried egg and a sprig of parsley.

 

 

The amount of time a steak is cooked is based upon personal preference; shorter cooking times retain more juice, whereas longer steak cooking times result in drier, tougher meat but reduce concerns about disease. A vocabulary has evolved to describe the degree to which a steak is cooked.[citation needed] The following terms are in order from least cooked to most cooked:

 
*Raw (French: cru)— Uncooked. Used in dishes like steak tartare, carpaccio, gored gored, tiger meat and kitfo.

*Seared, Blue rare or very rare (French: bleu)— Cooked very quickly; the outside is seared, but the inside is usually cool and barely

Steaks on a grill

Steaks on a grill

cooked.[citation needed] The steak will be red on the inside and barely warmed. Sometimes asked for as “blood rare” or “bloody as hell”. In the United Kingdom sometimes asked for “still mooing”, meaning so rare that the animal is alive. In the United States, this is also sometimes referred to as ‘Black and Blue’ or ‘Pittsburgh Rare’. In Germany this is also known as “English Style or bloody”. It is common for chefs to place the steak in an oven to warm the inside of the steak. This method generally means ‘blue’ steaks take longer to prepare than any other steak degree, as these require additional warming time prior to cooking.

8Rare (French: saignant)— (52 °C (126 °F) core temperature) The outside is grey-brown, and the middle of the steak is fully red and slightly warm.


*Medium rare (French: entre saignant et à point)— (55 °C (131 °F) core temperature) The steak will have a reddish-pink center. This is the standard degree of cooking at most steakhouses, unless specified otherwise.


*Medium (French: à point, anglais) — (63 °C (145 °F) core temperature) The middle of the steak is hot and fully pink surrounding the center. The outside is grey-brown.


*Medium well done (French: demi-anglais, entre à point et bien cuit)— (68 °C (154 °F) core temperature) The meat is lightly pink surrounding the center.


*Well done (French: bien cuit) — (73 °C (163 °F) and above core temperature) The meat is grey-brown in the center and slightly charred. In parts of England this is known as “German style”.


*Overcook (French: trop cuit) — (much more than 90 °C (194 °F) core temperature) The meat is blackened throughout and slightly crispy.

 
A style exists in some parts of North America called “Chicago”. A Chicago-style steak is cooked to the desired level and then quickly

American cuts of beef.

American cuts of beef.

charred. The diner orders it by asking for the style followed by the doneness (e.g. “Chicago-style rare”). A steak ordered “Pittsburgh rare” is rare or very rare on the inside and charred on the outside. In Pittsburgh, this style is referred to as “black and blue” (black or “sooty” on the outside, and blue rare on the inside).

 

 
Types of beefsteaks

*Chateaubriand steak
Usually served for two, center cut from the large end of the tenderloin. Sometimes it’s extra thick top sirloin.
*Chuck steak
A cut from neck to the ribs.
*Cube steak
A cut of meat, usually top round, tenderized by fierce pounding with a mallet or mechanical blades.
*Filet Mignon
A cut from the small end of the tenderloin; the most tender and usually the most expensive cut by weight.
*Flap steak
A cut from the bottom sirloin.
*Flank steak
From the underside. Not as tender as steaks cut from the rib or loin.
*Flat iron steak
A cut from under the shoulder blade.
*Hanger steak or (French) onglet
A steak from near the center of the diaphragm. Flavorful, and very tender towards the edges, but sinewy in the middle. Often called the butcher’s tenderloin or hanging tender.
*Popeseye steak
Thinly sliced rump steak, originating in Scotland and available in the UK.
*Ranch steak
A chuck steak usually cut no thicker than one inch, 10 ounces or less, and trimmed of all excess fat
*Rib eye steak, also known as Scotch fillet, and Entrecôte
A rib steak consisting of the longissimus muscle and the spinalis or cap. This comes from the primal rib used to make prime rib which is typically oven roasted as opposed to grilled as is typical with rib eye. Also known as a Spencer Steak.
*Round steak, rump steak, or (French) rumsteak
A cut from the rump of the animal. A true grilling steak with good flavor though it can be tough if not cooked properly.
*Sirloin steak
A steak cut from the hip. Also tends to be less tough, resulting in a higher price.
*Outside Skirt steak
A steak made from the diaphragm. Very flavorful, but also rather tough.
*Inside skirt steak
A steak from the flank or bottom sirloin similar in appearance but more tender than the outside.
*Strip steak, also known as New York strip
A high-quality steak cut from the strip loin, a muscle that is relatively low in connective tissue, so it is particularly tender.
*T-bone steak and Porterhouse
A cut from the tenderloin and strip loin, connected with a T-shaped bone (lumbar vertebra). The two are distinguished by the size of the tenderloin in the cut. T-bones have smaller tenderloin sections, while the *Porterhouse – though generally smaller in the strip – will have more tenderloin. T-bone and Porterhouse steaks are among the most expensive steaks on a menu because of the large individual portion size.
*Tri-tip steak/roast
Also known as a Triangle Steak, due to its shape, it’s a boneless cut from the bottom sirloin butt.
Several other foods are called “steak” without actually being steaks:
*Beef tips
Small cuts of high or medium quality beef left over from preparing or trimming steaks, grilled and served in a manner similar to the cuts they were taken from. Common as a “budget conscious” option for those who want to eat steak but cannot afford (or cannot consume) a whole steak.
*Salisbury steak
Not a steak, but rather a burger from ground beef made with onions, usually bread crumbs, and occasionally mushrooms. Also known as “Hamburger Steak” or “Minute Steak” (due to its shorter cooking time). It is the least expensive “cut” of steak, usually because it is made of lower grade meat.
*Steak tartare or tartar steak
Finely chopped raw fillet of beef, onion, parsley, capers, a hot sauce (usually Worcestershire) and raw egg.

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

The Fresh Princess

From Beachwood Ohio born and raised in the kitchen is where I spend most of my days

Nicole's Kitchen Bites

A Place Where Variety Meets The Kitchen

On the Menu @ Tangie's Kitchen

Healthy, wholesome and affordable cooking for the heart and soul.

A Note From Abroad

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sailaway from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” ~ Mark Twain

Shari's Low Carb Kitchen

Low carb cooking from our kitchen to yours

Jennifer DiGregorio

health coaching for IBS, weight loss + anti-aging

Tasteful Tavern

Live Tastefully.

Ragnar's Hot Peppers

My review of hot sauces, my favorite hot peppers, and other hot stuff...

Bits and Bobs

Making a life from all the little bits around us

Lisa's " I have too much time on my hands" Site

Recipes, Weekly Flyer Report, Small Talk and All Around Craziness

peckish

on a quest to find tasty snacks and comfort food

dixiechileranch

Dixie Chile Ranch Updates

cartographysis

when literature and travel meet at the cul-de-sac

Design Dazzle

Inspiration for kids rooms, baby nurseries, and kids parties

Loaves and Dishes

The Unapologetic Comfort Food Site

Mums!

A food blog where traditional cooking meets culinary curiosity

Roots and Rosemary

Clean, healthy recipes with nutrition at the roots of each one