Smoked Cajun Turkey, Rosemary Ham, and Swiss Grilled Sandwich w/ ….

December 30, 2013 at 6:12 PM | Posted in Ham, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Ore - Ida, Sargento's Cheese | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Smoked Cajun Turkey, Rosemary Ham, and Swiss Grilled Sandwich w/ Baked Fries

 

Cajun Turkey Ham Swiss Fries 001

 

Our nice weather left real quickly, snow flurries and a wind chill in the 20’s. Went to the grocery early and then spent most of the afternoon cleaning my Hoveround Chair and then catching up on laundry. For dinner tonight, Smoked Cajun Turkey, Rosemary Ham, and Swiss Grilled Sandwich w/ Baked Fries.

 

 

 

I picked up a Jennie – O Premium Portions Hickory Smoked Cajun Style Turkey Breast, try saying that five times real fast! I love these, great sliced, for sandwiches, and just the right size for 1 or 2 people (1.39 lbs). Plus it’s only it’s only 50 calories and 1 carb per serving! It comes already seasoned and precooked. Just serve cold or heated up. I heated up a few slices in the oven for the sandwich. So I had the Turkey and I also had a couple of slices of Kroger Private Selection Oven Roasted Rosemary Ham. Topped it with Sargento Ultra Thin Swiss Cheese and Hidden Valley Spicy Chipotle Spread. Served it on a couple of slices of Klosterman Wheat Bread and then grilled in a medium size skillet with a 1/2 Tbs of Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter.

 

 

 

Then for a side I baked some Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries, served with a side of Hunt’s Ketchup. For dessert later a Del Monte No Sugar Added Pech Chunk Cup.

 

 

Jennie o sun dried tomato turkey breast

Jennie – O Premium Portions Hickory Smoked Cajun Style Turkey Breast

Ready to cut and serve, hot or cold.
Find this product in the refrigerated section of your grocery store.
Product Features:
* 99% fat free
* Gluten Free
* Great for salads, sandwiches and more
* Fully Cooked
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 2 oz (56 g)
Servings Per Container: varies

Calories 50
Calories from Fat 5
Amount Per Serving and/or % Daily Value*
Total Fat .5 g (1%)
Saturated Fat 0 g (0%)
Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 25 mg (8%)
Sodium 610 mg (25%)
Total Carbohydrate 1 g (0%)
Dietary Fiber 0 g (0%)
Sugars 1 g
Protein 12 g

 

 
http://www.jennieo.com/products/95-Oven-Roasted-Premium-Portion-Turkey-Breast

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 12, 2013 at 8:02 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Before you store semi-hard cheeses like Cheddar, Swiss, or Gruyere, rub the cut edges with a little bit of butter. You’ll never notice the taste difference, and the cheese will be less likely to dry out or become moldy.

Dinner by Subway!

July 6, 2013 at 5:16 PM | Posted in Ball Park Smoked Turkey Franks, Subway | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Subway 6″ Sub on 9 Grain Bun w/ Turkey and Black Forest Hamsubway-turkey-ham-003

 

 

Heavy rains all day and more to come, a lot of flooding and roads closed. Just seems like it’s been a long week and really had no desire to cook tonight. So it was Subway tonight! I got myself and my parents 6″ Subs for dinner.

 

 

For my parents I got 2 6″ Subway Clubs. Comes on a 6″ 9 Grain Wheat Hoagie Bun with Turkey, Roast Beef, and Black Forest Ham and topped with Cucumbers, Black Olives, Tomato, Red Onion, and Green Peppers. For myself I had 6″ 9 Grain Wheat Hoagie Bun with Turkey and Black Forest Ham with toppings of Black Olives, Lettuce, and Jalapenos. I added a slice of Sargento Ultra Thin Swiss Cheese, 40 calories. My Sub had 310 calories (With the Cheese) and 44 carbs. We also had Ruffle’s Light potato Chips, 80 calories and 17 carbs per serving (About 18 Chips). For dessert later a Healthy Choice Vanilla Bean Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

Subway Club®Subway3
Tender sliced turkey, lean roast beef and tasty Black Forest ham come together with your choice of fresh veggies for a low-fat flavor fiesta. Try it today on freshly baked bread and experience all the deliciousity for 6 grams of fat.
Turkey Breast & Black Forest Ham
A sandwich so deliciously hearty, you won’t know you’re eating low fat. Enjoy the flavor of tender sliced turkey breast and Black Forest ham with your favorite veggies from juicy tomatoes to sweet red onions served on your favorite freshly baked bread.

 

http://www.subway.com/menu/MenuCategoryItems.aspx?CC=USA&LC=ENG&MenuTypeId=1&MenuId=54

Smoked Turkey and Roasted Pastrami on Whole Grain Bun w/ Ruffle’s Light Chips

July 3, 2013 at 5:14 PM | Posted in Boar's Head, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Sargento's Cheese | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Smoked Turkey and Roasted Pastrami on Whole Grain Bun w/ Ruffle’s Light Potato ChipsTurkey and Pastrami on Whole Wheat 001

 

 
Ahhh, another one of those days! Finally got my Hoveround Chair repaired and back running at 100%. Them digital camera went whacko and had to figure out how to reprogram that. Then a Java Update for my computer went awry and took me most of the afternoon to get my computer back up to 100%. Managed to slide out to pick up a few groceries in there too, busy day! For dinner a Smoked Turkey and Roasted Pastrami on Whole Grain Bun w/ Ruffle’s Light Chips.

 
I used Boar’s Head Pastrami and Boar’s Head Smoked Turkey for my sandwich along with a slice of Sargento Swiss Cheese. First time I tried the Boar’s Head Pastrami or Smoked Turkey, very good as all Boar’s Head Meat. I served it all on a Healthy Life Whole Grain Bun. I had a side of Ruffle’s Light Potato Chips. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

 

 

 

 
Boar’s Head ALL NATURAL* SMOKED TURKEY BREASTBoar's Head Smoked Turkey
*No artificial ingredients, minimally processed
• Humanely Raised†
• No MSG Added
• No Nitrate or Nitrite Added††
• No Preservatives
• Raised Without the Use of Antibiotics or Hormones†††
• Vegetarian Grain Fed

Skinless turkey breast that is slow roasted and then lightly smoked in a smoke house. Certified heart-healthy, extra lean, high in protein and preservative free. Try using it for a chopped salad with romaine lettuce, corn, black beans, avocado, dates, green onions and corn bread croutons tossed in a vinaigrette dressing.

 
http://boarshead.com/products/turkey/338-all-natural-smoked-turkey

 

 

CAP-OFF TOP ROUND PASTRAMI
USDA Choice pastrami made in the Traditional New York Style. Coated with black pepper and spices, then slowly smoked for a unique, full flavor. Our Top Round Pastrami is lean, rich in protein, tender and can be served hot or cold.

 

 

http://boarshead.com/products/beef/205-cap-off-choice-top-round-pastrami

 

Baked Ham & Swiss Potato Rolls w/ Baked Crinkle Fries

February 21, 2013 at 6:23 PM | Posted in Aunt Millie's, baking | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Baked Ham & Swiss Potato Rolls w/ Baked Crinkle Fries

 
A while back I made some Aunt Millie’s Baked Ham & Swiss Rolls, using Aunt Millie’s Hawaiian Rolls. This time I made them using Walmart Bakery Split Top Potato Rolls. These are only 90 calories and 16 carbs. I also used Kroger Hickory Smoker Ham and it’s 70 calories and 1 carb per serving.
This is makes one tasty sandwich! As I said the first time I made these,This is another one of those keeper recipes T o prepare it preheatBaked ham and swiss on potato roll 006 your oven to 350 degrees. Then I used a package of Potato Split Top Rolls, that I had cut in half., 1 – 12 oz. Package of Kroger Private Selection Hickory Smokehouse Ham, and 1 package of Sargento Ultra Thin Swiss Cheese. I Cut the rolls in half and Place the bottom in a deep baking pan large enough to hold 6 sandwiches, about 11″ x 14″ pan. Then I topped the rolls in the pan with Ham slices, and top with the Swiss Cheese slices. and placed the top of the rolls on the sandwiches.
I then poured a topping mixture evenly over the sandwiches. To make the mixture I combined the following ingredients: 4 Tbsp. butter (1/2 stick) melted, 2 tsp. dried onion, 1 1/2 tsp. Worchestershire sauce, 1 1/2 tsp. Poppyseed dressing, and 1/2 tsp. yellow mustard. Mix well with a whisk or fork till its well combined. Pour mixture evenly over the sandwiches. Cover with foil and bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes then remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes to allow the rolls to crisp. Remove from oven to cool and serve. And as I said earlier they are delicious. The topping mixture is what gives it it’s fantastic flavor. I can’t wait to try this on some Grilled Cheese or Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches! The recipe is for 12 sandwiches, I only made 6 Sandwiches so I cut back on the amount of Butter I used. I used Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter, another calorie and carb saver! Just by doing the little things like going to an Ultra Thin cut of Meat or Cheese or by going with low fat, reduced fat, low carb you can end up reducing the fat, calorie and carb count on any recipe. It all adds up. Once again the Sandwiches came out absolutely delicious! It’s just the whole combination of everything that just bursts these Sandwiches with flavor. I love these sandwiches!! I’ve left the original recipe and web site link to Aunt Millie’s below.

 
To accompany my Baked Ham and Swiss Sandwiches I prepared some Baked Ore Ida Crinkle Fries. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

 
Aunt Millie’s Baked Ham & Swiss RollsBaked Ham and Swiss 003
Fresh from the oven!

Ingredients:
1 package Aunt Millie’s Hawaiian dinner rolls. 12 ct.
1 – 12 oz. Package of ham slices
1 – 8 oz. package of swiss cheese, slices
8 Tbsp. butter (one stick) melted
2 tsp. dried onion
1 1/2 tsp. Worchestershire sauce
1 1/2 tsp. Poppyseed dressing
1/2 tsp. yellow mustard
Yield: 12 servings

 

Directions:
Cut rolls in half.
Place the bottom in a deep baking pan large enough to hold 12 sandwiches, about 11″ x 14″ pan.
Top the rolls in the pan with ham slices, and top with the swiss cheese slices.
Place the top of the rolls on the sandwiches.
Mix together butter, onion, Worchestershire, dressing, and mustard.
Pour mixture evenly over the sandwiches.
Cover with foil and bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes.
Remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes to allow the rolls to crisp.
Remove from oven to cool and serve.
Nutrition Information:

Serving Size 1 Roll (112g)
Number of Servings 12
Calories 15
Calories from Fat 130
Total Fat 15g 23% DV
Saturated Fat 8g 41% DV
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 4.5g
Cholesterol 50mg 17% DV
Sodium 750mg 31% DV
Potassium 160mg 4% DV
Total Carbohydrate 29g 10% DV
Dietary Fiber 1g 5% DV
Sugar 7g
Protein 16g
*Percent Daily Values (%DV) are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 
http://www.auntmillies.com/Recipes/Sandwiches-Hot/Baked-Ham-and-Cheese-Rolls.asp

Baked Ham & Swiss Rolls w/ Baked Fingerling Parm Wedges and Aspragus

January 24, 2013 at 6:59 PM | Posted in baking, Sargento's Cheese, vegetables | 7 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Baked Ham & Swiss Rolls w/ Baked Fingerling Parm Wedges and AsparagusBaked Ham and Swiss 009

 

Went to the store early to pick up some items for tonight’s dinner. It’s still frigid out but a beautiful sunny day, but snow on the way Friday! Prepared a new recipe for dinner tonight that I came across on Facebook, on the Aunt Millie’s Facebook page, Baked Ham & Swiss Rolls . It looked and sounded too good not to try, and it was delicious! So for dinner tonight I prepared Baked Ham & Swiss Rolls w/ Baked Fingerling Parm Wedges and Asparagus.

 
This is one tasty sandwich! This is another one of those keeper recipes, but I’ll have to put a star next to it because it’s so delicious. T o prepare it preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Then I used A package of package of Aunt Millie’s Hawaiian dinner rolls. (12 ct), 1 – 12 oz. Package of Hillshire Farm Smoked Ham/Ultra Thin, and 1 package of Sargento Ultra Thin Swiss Cheese. I lightened the calorie and carb count by using the thin cuts of Ham and Cheese.Cut the rolls in half and Place the bottom in a deep baking pan large enough to hold 12 sandwiches, about 11″ x 14″ pan. Then I topped the rolls in the pan with Ham slices, and top with the Swiss Cheese slices. and placed the top of the rolls on the sandwiches.

 
I then poured a topping mixture evenly over the sandwiches. To make the mixture I combined the following ingredients: 8 Tbsp. butter (one stick) melted, 2 tsp. dried onion, 1 1/2 tsp. Worchestershire sauce, 1 1/2 tsp. Poppyseed dressing, and 1/2 tsp. yellow mustard. Mix well with a whisk or fork till its well combined. Pour mixture evenly over the sandwiches. Cover with foil and bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes then remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes to allow the rolls to crisp. Remove from oven to cool and serve. And as I said earlier they are delicious. The topping mixture is what gives it it’s fantastic flavor. I can’t wait to try this on some Grilled Cheese or Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwiches! The recipe is for 12 sandwiches, I only made 8 sandwiches so I cut back on the amount of Butter I used. I used Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter, another calorie and carb saver! Just by doing the little things like going to an Ultra Thin cut of Meat or Cheese or by going with low fat, reduced fat, low carb you can end up reducing the fat, calorie and carb count on any recipe. It all adds up.

 
Tp accompany my Baked Ham and Swiss Sandwiches I prepared some Baked Fingerling Potato Wedges. I just quartered the Potatoes and then mixed them with Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Sea Salt, Black Peppercorn, and Parsley. Put them on a cookie sheet pan and baked them at 400 degrees for 30 minutes. I also prepared a bag of Pict Sweet Asparagus Spears. It comes in a Steam Microwavable Bag, just heat for 5 minutes and it’s ready! For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 
Aunt Millie’s Baked Ham & Swiss Rolls

Fresh from the oven!

Fresh from the oven!

 
Ingredients:
1 package Aunt Millie’s Hawaiian dinner rolls. 12 ct.
1 – 12 oz. Package of ham slices
1 – 8 oz. package of swiss cheese, slices
8 Tbsp. butter (one stick) melted
2 tsp. dried onion
1 1/2 tsp. Worchestershire sauce
1 1/2 tsp. Poppyseed dressing
1/2 tsp. yellow mustard
Yield: 12 servings

 

Directions:
Cut rolls in half.
Place the bottom in a deep baking pan large enough to hold 12 sandwiches, about 11″ x 14″ pan.
Top the rolls in the pan with ham slices, and top with the swiss cheese slices.
Place the top of the rolls on the sandwiches.
Mix together butter, onion, Worchestershire, dressing, and mustard.
Pour mixture evenly over the sandwiches.
Cover with foil and bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes.
Remove foil and bake an additional 15 minutes to allow the rolls to crisp.
Remove from oven to cool and serve.

 
Nutrition Information:

Serving Size 1 Roll (112g)
Number of Servings 12
Calories 15
Calories from Fat 130
Total Fat 15g 23% DV
Saturated Fat 8g 41% DV
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 4.5g
Cholesterol 50mg 17% DV
Sodium 750mg 31% DV
Potassium 160mg 4% DV
Total Carbohydrate 29g 10% DV
Dietary Fiber 1g 5% DV
Sugar 7g
Protein 16g
*Percent Daily Values (%DV) are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
http://www.auntmillies.com/Recipes/Sandwiches-Hot/Baked-Ham-and-Cheese-Rolls.aspx

Lunch Time with a Panini Sandwich!

August 22, 2012 at 12:29 PM | Posted in cheese, diabetes, diabetes friendly, low calorie, low carb, Oscar Mayer, Panini Grill, Sargento's Cheese | 1 Comment
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An easy made and healthy lunch. Heated up my Panini Grill and made a Ham & Turkey and Swiss Panini. I used a half serving Oscar Mayer Carver Board Sliced Turkey Breast, a full serving of thin sliced Ham, a slice of Sargento Ultra Thin Swiss Cheese, and a Flatout Whole Wheat Flatbread. I also added French’s Mustard to top it. All for under 250 calories and made in about 15 minutes!

Cheese of the Week – Baby Swiss

March 26, 2012 at 8:52 AM | Posted in cheese, Food | 1 Comment
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Baby Swiss

Its appearance and texture is ivory to pale yellow. It is a creamy cheese with small holes and it melts well when shredded. Baby Swiss has a buttery, slightly nutty and sweet flavor. It goes well with sweet fruits and berries croissants and muffins, white and red wine, juices and even ice-cold milk.

Country: American cheese

Milk: cow milk

Texture: semi-soft

Baby Swiss is an American cheese closely related to traditional Swiss cheese, the generic name for the family of holey cheeses popular all around the world. What sets Baby Swiss apart from its close relative is its mild taste and smooth, creamy texture. It has smaller “eyes” (the holes in Swiss cheese).

Baby Swiss cheese originated in the mid 1960s outside of Charm, Ohio, and was invented by cheese connoisseur Alfred Guggisberg, an alumnus of the Swiss Federal “Molkereishulle” (cheese maker’s institute). The name Baby Swiss was coined by Alfred’s wife, Margaret Guggisberg, who thought that in comparison to the larger wheels of traditional Swiss cheese, when placed side by side, the new cheese looked like a baby.

Swiss cheeses are formed and flavored through the breaking down of lactic acid by bacteria, which generate carbon dioxide bubbles in the cheese as it ages. One of the key differences when it comes to making Baby Swiss, as opposed to traditional Swiss, is that it is aged only for a matter of weeks, whereas old-fashioned Swiss is typically aged for months, time varying depending on the desired sharpness of the cheese.

Baby Swiss is most commonly enjoyed in the United States, but can also be found in Europe and Australia. Most common uses include snacking, slicing for sandwiches, and melting for fondue. Locals of the area where Baby Swiss originated also commonly pair it with Trail Bologna, another local staple.

Grilled Mushroom and Baby Swiss

Ingredients:

1 tbsp Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
14 cup     Baby Spinach (optional)
14 cup fresh Mushrooms (sliced)
Sea Salt
Black Pepper
2 slices Bread, Whole Grain
1 tbsp softened Butter, i Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter
2 slices Baby Swiss Cheese

1 Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat, and cook and stir mushrooms and spinach until mushrooms are tender and spinach is wilted, about 3 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper; set aside.
2 Spread one side of each bread slice with butter. Place one bread slice, buttered side down, into the skillet. Top with the Swiss cheese, then spread the mushroom mixture on top of the cheese. Cover with the second slice of bread, buttered side up. Cook until the sandwich is golden brown on both sides, turning once. Cut in half and serve hot.

Cheese

February 16, 2012 at 10:21 AM | Posted in cheese, diabetes, Food | 3 Comments
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Cheese is a generic term for a diverse group of milk-based food products. Cheese is produced throughout the world in wide-ranging

Swiss Cheese

flavors, textures, and forms.

Cheese consists of proteins and fat from milk, usually the milk of cows, buffalo, goats, or sheep. It is produced by coagulation of the milk protein casein. Typically, the milk is acidified and addition of the enzyme rennet causes coagulation. The solids are separated and pressed into final form. Some cheeses have molds on the rind or throughout. Most cheeses melt at cooking temperature.

Hundreds of types of cheese are produced. Their styles, textures and flavors depend on the origin of the milk (including the animal’s diet), whether they have been pasteurized, the butterfat content, the bacteria and mold, the processing, and aging. Herbs, spices, or wood smoke may be used as flavoring agents. The yellow to red color of many cheeses is from adding annatto.

For a few cheeses, the milk is curdled by adding acids such as vinegar or lemon juice. Most cheeses are acidified to a lesser degree by bacteria, which turn milk sugars into lactic acid, then the addition of rennet completes the curdling. Vegetarian alternatives to rennet are available; most are produced by fermentation of the fungus Mucor miehei, but others have been extracted from various species of the Cynara thistle family.

Cheese is valued for its portability, long life, and high content of fat, protein, calcium, and phosphorus. Cheese is more compact and

Cheese on market stand in Basel, Switzerland

has a longer shelf life than milk. Cheesemakers near a dairy region may benefit from fresher, lower-priced milk, and lower shipping costs. The long storage life of some cheese, especially if it is encased in a protective rind, allows selling when markets are favorable.

Cheese is an ancient food whose origins predate recorded history. There is no conclusive evidence indicating where cheesemaking originated, either in Europe, Central Asia or the Middle East, but the practice had spread within Europe prior to Roman times and, according to Pliny the Elder, had become a sophisticated enterprise by the time the Roman Empire came into being.

Proposed dates for the origin of cheesemaking range from around 8000 BCE (when sheep were first domesticated) to around 3000 BCE. The first cheese may have been made by people in the Middle East or by nomadic Turkic tribes in Central Asia. Since animal skins and inflated internal organs have, since ancient times, provided storage vessels for a range of foodstuffs, it is probable that the process of cheese making was discovered accidentally by storing milk in a container made from the stomach of an animal, resulting in the milk being turned to curd and whey by the rennet from the stomach. There is a legend with variations about the discovery of cheese by an Arab trader who used this method of storing milk.

Cheesemaking may have begun independently of this by the pressing and salting of curdled milk to preserve it. Observation that the effect of making milk in an animal stomach gave more solid and better-textured curds, may have led to the deliberate addition of rennet.

The earliest archeological evidence of cheesemaking has been found in Egyptian tomb murals, dating to about 2000 BCE. The earliest cheeses were likely to have been quite sour and salty, similar in texture to rustic cottage cheese or feta, a crumbly, flavorful Greek cheese.

Cheese produced in Europe, where climates are cooler than the Middle East, required less salt for preservation. With less salt and acidity, the cheese became a suitable environment for useful microbes and molds, giving aged cheeses their respective flavors.

Cheese factory in Holland

Until its modern spread along with European culture, cheese was nearly unheard of in oriental cultures, in the pre-Columbian Americas, and only had limited use in sub-Mediterranean Africa, mainly being widespread and popular only in Europe and areas influenced strongly by its cultures. But with the spread, first of European imperialism, and later of Euro-American culture and food, cheese has gradually become known and increasingly popular worldwide, though still rarely considered a part of local ethnic cuisines outside Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas.

The first factory for the industrial production of cheese opened in Switzerland in 1815, but it was in the United States where large-scale production first found real success. Credit usually goes to Jesse Williams, a dairy farmer from Rome, New York, who in 1851 started making cheese in an assembly-line fashion using the milk from neighboring farms. Within decades hundreds of such dairy associations existed.

The 1860s saw the beginnings of mass-produced rennet, and by the turn of the century scientists were producing pure microbial cultures. Before then, bacteria in cheesemaking had come from the environment or from recycling an earlier batch’s whey; the pure cultures meant a more standardized cheese could be produced.

Factory-made cheese overtook traditional cheesemaking in the World War II era, and factories have been the source of most cheese in America and Europe ever since. Today, Americans buy more processed cheese than “real”, factory-made or not.

A required step in cheesemaking is separating the milk into solid curds and liquid whey. Usually this is done by acidifying (souring) the milk and adding rennet. The acidification can be accomplished directly by the addition of an acid like vinegar in a few cases (paneer, queso fresco), but usually starter bacteria are employed instead. These starter bacteria convert milk sugars into lactic acid. The same bacteria (and the enzymes they produce) also play a large role in the eventual flavor of aged cheeses. Most cheeses are made with starter bacteria from the Lactococci, Lactobacilli, or Streptococci families. Swiss starter cultures also include Propionibacter shermani, which produces carbon dioxide gas bubbles during aging, giving Swiss cheese or Emmental its holes (called eyes”).

Some fresh cheeses are curdled only by acidity, but most cheeses also use rennet. Rennet sets the cheese into a strong and rubbery gel compared to the fragile curds produced by acidic coagulation alone. It also allows curdling at a lower acidity—important because flavor-making bacteria are inhibited in high-acidity environments. In general, softer, smaller, fresher cheeses are curdled with a greater proportion of acid to rennet than harder, larger, longer-aged varieties.

At this point, the cheese has set into a very moist gel. Some soft cheeses are now essentially complete: they are drained, salted, and packaged. For most of the rest, the curd is cut into small cubes. This allows water to drain from the individual pieces of curd.

Some hard cheeses are then heated to temperatures in the range of 35–55 °C (95–131 °F). This forces more whey from the cut curd. It also changes the taste of the finished cheese, affecting both the bacterial culture and the milk chemistry. Cheeses that are heated to the higher temperatures are usually made with thermophilic starter bacteria that survive this step—either Lactobacilli or Streptococci.

Salt has roles in cheese besides adding a salty flavor. It preserves cheese from spoiling, draws moisture from the curd, and firms cheese’s texture in an interaction with its proteins. Some cheeses are salted from the outside with dry salt or brine washes. Most cheeses have the salt mixed directly into the curds.
Cheese factory in Holland

Other techniques influence a cheese’s texture and flavor. Some examples:

Stretching: (Mozzarella, Provolone) The curd is stretched and kneaded in hot water, developing a stringy, fibrous body.
Cheddaring: (Cheddar, other English cheeses) The cut curd is repeatedly piled up, pushing more moisture away. The curd is also mixed (or milled) for a long time, taking the sharp edges off the cut curd pieces and influencing the final product’s texture.
Washing: (Edam, Gouda, Colby) The curd is washed in warm water, lowering its acidity and making for a milder-tasting cheese.

Most cheeses achieve their final shape when the curds are pressed into a mold or form. The harder the cheese, the more pressure is applied. The pressure drives out moisture—the molds are designed to allow water to escape—and unifies the curds into a single solid body.

A newborn cheese is usually salty yet bland in flavor and, for harder varieties, rubbery in texture. These qualities are sometimes enjoyed—cheese curds are eaten on their own—but normally cheeses are left to rest under controlled conditions. This aging period (also called ripening, or, from the French, affinage) lasts from a few days to several years. As a cheese ages, microbes and enzymes transform texture and intensify flavor. This transformation is largely a result of the breakdown of casein proteins and milkfat into a complex mix of amino acids, amines, and fatty acids.

Some cheeses have additional bacteria or molds intentionally introduced before or during aging. In traditional cheesemaking, these microbes might be already present in the aging room; they are simply allowed to settle and grow on the stored cheeses. More often today, prepared cultures are used, giving more consistent results and putting fewer constraints on the environment where the cheese ages. These cheeses include soft ripened cheeses such as Brie and Camembert, blue cheeses such as Roquefort, Stilton, Gorgonzola, and rind-washed cheeses such as Limburger.

There are several types of cheese, with around 500 different varieties recognised by the International Dairy Federation, over 400

Colby Cheese

identified by Walter and Hargrove, over 500 by Burkhalter, and over 1,000 by Sandine and Elliker. The varieties may be grouped or classified into types according to criteria such as length of ageing, texture, methods of making, fat content, animal milk, country or region of origin, etc. – with these criteria either being used singly or in combination, but with no single method being universally used. The method most commonly and traditionally used is based on moisture content, which is then further discriminated by fat content and curing or ripening methods. Some attempts have been made to rationalise the classification of cheese – a scheme was proposed by Pieter Walstra which uses the primary and secondary starter combined with moisture content, and Walter and Hargrove suggested classifying by production methods which produces 18 types, which are then further grouped by moisture content.

At refrigerator temperatures, the fat in a piece of cheese is as hard as unsoftened butter, and its protein structure is stiff as well. Flavor and odor compounds are less easily liberated when cold. For improvements in flavor and texture, it is widely advised that cheeses be allowed to warm up to room temperature before eating. If the cheese is further warmed, to 26–32 °C (79–90 °F), the fats will begin to “sweat out” as they go beyond soft to fully liquid.

Above room temperatures, most hard cheeses melt. Rennet-curdled cheeses have a gel-like protein matrix that is broken down by heat. When enough protein bonds are broken, the cheese itself turns from a solid to a viscous liquid. Soft, high-moisture cheeses will melt at around 55 °C (131 °F), while hard, low-moisture cheeses such as Parmesan remain solid until they reach about 82 °C (180 °F). Acid-set cheeses, including halloumi, paneer, some whey cheeses and many varieties of fresh goat cheese, have a protein structure that remains intact at high temperatures. When cooked, these cheeses just get firmer as water evaporates.

Some cheeses, like raclette, melt smoothly; many tend to become stringy or suffer from a separation of their fats. Many of these can be coaxed into melting smoothly in the presence of acids or starch. Fondue, with wine providing the acidity, is a good example of a smoothly melted cheese dish. Elastic stringiness is a quality that is sometimes enjoyed, in dishes including pizza and Welsh rarebit.

Feta from Greece

Even a melted cheese eventually turns solid again, after enough moisture is cooked off. The saying “you can’t melt cheese twice” (meaning “some things can only be done once”) refers to the fact that oils leach out during the first melting and are gone, leaving the non-meltable solids behind.

As its temperature continues to rise, cheese will brown and eventually burn. Browned, partially burned cheese has a particular distinct flavor of its own and is frequently used in cooking (e.g., sprinkling atop items before baking them).

In general, cheese supplies a great deal of calcium, protein, phosphorus and fat. A 30-gram (1.1 oz) serving of Cheddar cheese contains about 7 grams (0.25 oz) of protein and 200 milligrams of calcium. Nutritionally, cheese is essentially concentrated milk: it takes about 200 grams (7.1 oz) of milk to provide that much protein, and 150 grams (5.3 oz) to equal the calcium.

Cheese is often avoided by those who are lactose intolerant, but ripened cheeses like Cheddar contain only about 5% of the lactose found in whole milk, and aged cheeses contain almost none. Nevertheless, people with severe lactose intolerance should avoid eating dairy cheese. As a natural product, the same kind of cheese may contain different amounts of lactose on different occasions, causing unexpected painful reactions.

A 2009 study at the Curtin University of Technology compared individuals who consumed three servings per day to those who consumed five per day. The researchers concluded that increased consumption resulted in a reduction of abdominal fat, blood pressure and blood sugar.

58th Annual Ohio Swiss Festival – Sugarcreek, Ohio

September 28, 2011 at 12:20 PM | Posted in cheese, Festivals, Food, fruits | 1 Comment
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September 30-Oct 1, 2011  58th Annual Ohio Swiss Festival
Sugarcreek, Ohio
Held in Sugarcreek, the Little Switzerland of Ohio, with parades, queen pageant, musical entertainment, rides, 5K Swiss Cheese Chase, cheese auction, cheesemaking contest, Steintossen stone throwing, yodeling Swiss cheese eating and Swiss costume contests. Sample award-winning wine and cheese from our local artisans throughout the festival.

The Ohio Swiss Festival was originally organized to celebrate the Sugarcreek area’s Swiss heritage and to help numerous local artisan cheese makers selloff any excess Swiss cheese they may have produced.  That said, after nearly 60 years, it continues to be a success.

Sugarcreek and its surrounding area were heavily populated by German and Swiss settlers.  At one time the art of cheese making was practiced much like it was in the old country – starting with little more than a copper kettle, milk and small fire. While time and Environmental Protection Agency standards have changed, the quality of cheese in this area of Ohio continues to be world class.

Many of the families that started making cheese all those years ago continue to pass on the tradition from generation to generation.  While you can find big-box cheese at your local super market, you won’t find the quality, craftsmanship or family touch that you will at the cheese houses in the Sugarcreek Area.

Nor will you find the selection of quality all in one place, like you can at the Ohio Swiss Festival.

http://www.villageofsugarcreek.com/ohioswissfest/

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