Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 13, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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How to get into a quick-pickle……………..

Just whisk a little salt and sugar into some white vinegar. Pour over thinly sliced raw vegetables. Wait 20 minutes. Eat.

Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Coleslaw With Snow Peas and Corn

January 10, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is Coleslaw With Snow Peas and Corn. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Coleslaw Mix, Snow Peas, Whole Kernel Corn, Low Fat Mayonnaise, Fat Free Sour Cream, Nonfat Buttermilk, Cider Vinegar, Sugar, and Celery Seed. There’s 85 calories and 15 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Coleslaw With Snow Peas and Corn
Lighten up your meal with this refreshing recipe for coleslaw. The perfect addition to any outdoor get-together, this dish is as easy to make as it is delicious. Just mix up a few simple ingredients,

and you have the perfect side to accompany any barbecue feast!

Ingredients
4 cups (about 8 ounces) coleslaw mix
1/2 cup trimmed vertically sliced snow peas
1/2 cup whole kernel corn (frozen or fresh)
1/4 cup low-fat mayonnaise
1/4 cup fat-free sour cream
1/4 cup nonfat buttermilk
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
2 teaspoons sugar
1/4 teaspoon celery seed

Directions
Yield: 4 servings
Serving size: 3/4 cup

1 – Combine coleslaw, snow peas and corn in large bowl.

2 – Meanwhile, whisk mayonnaise, sour cream, buttermilk, vinegar, sugar, and celery seed in medium bowl. Add to coleslaw mixture and mix to combine.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 85 calories, Carbohydrates: 17 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 1 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 3 mg, Sodium: 175 mg, Fiber: 2 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/coleslaw-snow-peas-corn/

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One of America’s Favorites – Soufflé

December 28, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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A chocolate soufflé

A soufflé is a baked egg-based dish originating in France in the early eighteenth century. Combined with various other ingredients it can be served as a savory main dish or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé is the past participle of the French verb souffler which means “to blow”, “to breathe”, “to inflate” or “to puff”.

The earliest mention of the soufflé is attributed to French master cook Vincent La Chapelle, in the early eighteenth century. The development and popularization of the soufflé is usually traced to French chef Marie-Antoine Carême in the early nineteenth century.

 

Soufflés are typically prepared from two basic components:

1 – a flavored crème pâtissière, cream sauce or béchamel, or a purée as the base

Cheese soufflés

2 – egg whites beaten to a soft peak
The base provides the flavor and the egg whites provide the “lift”, or puffiness to the dish. Foods commonly used to flavor the base include herbs, cheese and vegetables for savory soufflés and jam, fruits, berries, chocolate, banana and lemon for dessert soufflés.

Soufflés are generally baked in individual ramekins of a few ounces or soufflé dishes of a few liters: these are typically glazed, flat-bottomed, round porcelain containers with unglazed bottoms, vertical or nearly vertical sides, and fluted exterior borders. The ramekin, or other baking vessel, may be coated with a thin film of butter to prevent the soufflé from sticking. Some preparations also include adding a coating of sugar, bread crumbs, or a grated hard cheese such as Parmesan inside the ramekin in addition to the butter; some cooks believe this allows the soufflé to rise more easily.

After being cooked, a soufflé is puffed up and fluffy, and it will generally fall after 5 or 10 minutes (as risen dough does). It may be served with a sauce atop the soufflé, such as a sweet dessert sauce, or with a sorbet or ice-cream on the side. When served, the top of a soufflé may be punctured with serving utensils to separate it into individual servings. This can also enable a sauce to integrate into the dish.

A chocolate soufflé with lava center served with ice cream

 

There are a number of both savory and sweet soufflé flavor variations. Savory soufflés often include cheese, and vegetables such as spinach, carrot and herbs, and may sometimes incorporate poultry, bacon, ham, or seafood for a more substantial dish. Sweet soufflés may be based on a chocolate or fruit sauce (lemon or raspberry, for example), and are often served with a dusting of powdered sugar. Frugal recipes sometimes emphasize the possibilities for making soufflés from leftovers.

A soufflé may be served alone or with ice cream, fruit, or a sauce.

Apple soufflé is made by lining a cake tin with pureed rice that has been boiled in sweetened milk and baking it in this until it sets. The rice “border” is filled with thickened apple marmalade and whipped egg whites and baked until it rises.

 

 

Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Brussels Sprouts With Lemon Crumbs

December 27, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | 1 Comment
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This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is Brussels Sprouts With Lemon Crumbs. To make this week’s Dish you’ll be needing Brussels Sprouts, Butter, Soft Whole Grain Bread Crumbs, Lemon Peel, Non Stick Cooking Spray, Sugar, Salt, and Pepper. The Dish is 89 calories and 10 net carbs per serving! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Brussels Sprouts With Lemon Crumbs
Featuring the time-tested combination of Brussels sprouts and lemon, this low-carb side dish is easy to throw together in a few minutes and is a great complement for chicken or pasta.

Brussels Sprouts With Lemon Crumbs

Ingredients
1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthwise
2 teaspoons butter
1/4 cup soft whole-grain bread crumbs, toasted
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
Nonstick cooking spray
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper

Directions
Yield:
4 servings

Serving size:
about 3/4 cup

1. Steam Brussels sprouts in steamer basket over boiling water 7 minutes, or until tender.

2. Meanwhile, melt butter in small skillet over medium heat. Add bread crumbs and lemon peel; mix to combine.

3. Heat large skillet coated with nonstick cooking spray over medium heat. Add Brussels sprouts; sprinkle with sugar, salt and pepper; cook, turning sprouts as they brown, 5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Transfer to serving plates; sprinkle with bread crumbs.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 86 calories, Carbohydrates: 14 g, Protein: 4 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 5 mg, Sodium: 234 mg, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/brussels-sprouts-with-lemon-crumbs/

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* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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Hot Cocoa

December 17, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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I have a recipe for Hot Cocoa to pass along. What better way to warm up a cold Winter’s Day or Night than Hot Cocoa! To make this Cocoa you’ll be needing Cocoa, Sugar, Salt, Hot Water, Skim Milk, and Vanilla. A Cup of Hot Cocoa sounds good about right now! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Hot Cocoa
Craving a cocoa fix but reluctant to use a prepackaged mix full of unpronounceable ingredients? This homemade version uses just six ingredients…

Ingredients
Preparation time: 5 minutes (includes heating time)

1/4 cup cocoa
5 tablespoons sugar
Dash salt
1/2 cup hot water
3 cups skim milk
1/4 teaspoon vanilla

Directions
Yield: about 3 3/4 cups
Serving size: 3/4 cup

1 – Combine cocoa, sugar, and salt in a medium saucepan. Gradually add hot water and boil over medium heat for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Add skim milk and heat thoroughly, stirring frequently. Do not allow the mixture to boil. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Serve hot.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 116 calories, Carbohydrates: 21 g, Protein: 6 g, Fat: <1 g, Saturated Fat: <1 g, Sodium: 136 mg, Fiber: <1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/beverages/hot-cocoa/

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* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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Diabetic Side Dish of the Week – Potato and Carrot Kugel

November 29, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Side Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Side Dish of the Week is a Potato and Carrot Kugel. The Dish is made using Carrots, White Potatoes, Granny Smith Apples, Onion, Pepper, Salt, Onion Powder, Sugar, Flour, Egg Substitute, and Reduced Fat Margarine. The Dish is 107 calories and 14 net carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Potato and Carrot Kugel
This hearty dish is light on calories and carbohydrate. Featuring carrots, white potatoes and Granny Smith apples, this casserole will put a good base in your stomach for your Passover celebrations.

Ingredients
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 40 minutes.

Nonstick cooking spray
2 large carrots (1/2 pound), peeled and grated
8 ounces white potato (2 small), peeled and grated
1 large Granny Smith apple (3–4 inches in diameter), peeled, cored, and grated
1/4 cup chopped onion
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 tablespoon sugar
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup liquid egg substitute
3 tablespoons reduced-calorie margarine, melted

Directions
Yield: 8 servings
Serving size: 1/2 cup

1 – nonstick skillet, spray nonstick cooking spray, then add carrots, potato, apple, and onion. (Spray with additional cooking spray or add 1–2 tablespoons water to prevent sticking if necessary.) Stir constantly, and cook only until vegetables have softened slightly. Spoon vegetable mixture into casserole dish. Combine black pepper, salt, onion powder, sugar, flour, egg substitute, and melted margarine in a small bowl and whisk together. Pour liquid over vegetables, and stir gently to make sure mixture is evenly distributed in dish. Bake for 35–40 minutes or until kugel is firm to the touch in center and lightly browned.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 107 calories, Carbohydrates: 15 g, Protein: 5 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 1 mg, Sodium: 262 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/main-dishes/potato-and-carrot-kugel/

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Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.

Inside every issue you’ll find…
* The latest medical and research news
* In-depth articles related to both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes
* Weight Self-Management: Everything to maintain a healthy diet
* Diabetic Cooking: Recipes and meals for every occasion
* Quizzes, Q&As, Resources, Products, and more! Your one-stop resource for advice, news and strategies for living with diabetes.
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Jill’s Pumpkin Pie

November 25, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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I also have a recipe for Jill’s Pumpkin Pie which also comes from the Wild Idea Buffalo website. To make this Pie you’ll be needing are Flour, Sugar, Salted Butter, Sugar, Eggs, Cider Vinegar, Lemon Juice, Cream, and Ice Cubes. Also included is a recipe for the Pie Filling. You can find this recipe at the Wild Idea Buffalo website where you can also purchase any of the Wild Idea Products. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

Jill’s Pumpkin Pie
Note: For custard style pies I have learned that pre-baking crust partially will give you a nice flaky crust on the bottom. You may also need to cover crust half way through baking pie, to keep from over browning. A little extra effort, but so worth it!
Pie Crust (Makes 2 – 10” deep-dish pie crusts)

Ingredients:

3 – cups flour, plus a bit more for rolling
½ – teaspoon salt
1 – tablespoon sugar
¾ – lb. salted butter, chilled and cut into pieces, plus a little more softened for buttering pan and foil
1 – egg, beaten
1 – teaspoon cider vinegar or lemon juice *I use half of each.
2 – tablespoons cream
1 – ice cube

Preparation:

1 – Pre-heat oven to 450°.
2 – In mixer using pastry blender, mix flour, salt & sugar.
3 – In small dish, beat eggs. Add vinegar and cream and mix well. Add ice cube to mixture to keep cold, and allow ice to melt almost all the way.
4 – Add chilled butter to flour mixture until incorporated.
5 – Slowly drizzle in egg mixture.
6 – Remove dough from mixer with floured hands, shape into ball and cut in half.
7 – Press dough into disk shape with your hands and place dough onto floured parchment. Top dough with additional floured parchment and roll out.
8 – Transfer dough to buttered pie pan carefully. Press lightly into pan, crimp edges and pierce the dough randomly with a fine pronged fork, about 8 times.
9 – Chill the piecrust for 30 minutes in the refrigerator.
10 – Lightly butter foil and place buttered side down on top of piecrust, shaping foil in piecrust shape without disturbing edges. Fill foiled crust at least half way up with dried beans, rice or pie weights.
11 – Place in 450° pre-heated oven and bake for 25 minutes.
Remove foiled piecrust from oven and remove foil gently. Return piecrust to oven to allow the bottom to brown, about another 10 minutes.
12 – Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly before filling.

Pumpkin Pie Filling
A few extra ingredients for a richer, creamer filling. Enjoy.

Ingredients:

3 – eggs
1¼ – cup dark, pure cane brown sugar, packed
½ – cup sour cream
½ – cup heavy cream
¼ – cup pure maple syrup
1 – teaspoon vanilla
1 – tablespoon cinnamon
1 – teaspoon ginger
1 – teaspoon allspice
4 – cups pureed pumpkin or canned pumpkin
*Yams or butternut squash can be used too.

Preparation:

1 – In mixer, beat eggs. Add remaining ingredients in order with mixer running, stopping to scrape the bottom occasionally. Mix until well incorporated.
2 – Pour pumpkin mixture into prepared piecrust.
3 – Bake at 350° for 75 minutes. Increase heat to 450° and bake for an additional 15 to 20 minutes.
4 – Remove pie from oven and allow to cool for 2 hours before serving.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/thanksgiving-recipes

One of America’s Favorites – Cranberry Sauce

November 23, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Cranberry sauce

Cranberry sauce or cranberry jam is a sauce or relish made out of cranberries, commonly served as a condiment or a side dish with Thanksgiving dinner in North America and Christmas dinner in the United Kingdom and Canada. There are differences in flavor depending on the geography of where the sauce is made: in Europe it is generally slightly sour-tasting, while in North America it is typically more heavily sweetened.

The recipe for cranberry sauce appears in the 1796 edition of The Art of Cookery by Amelia Simmons, the first known cookbook authored by an American.

Although the Pilgrims may have been aware of the wild cranberries growing in the Massachusetts Bay area, sugar was scarce, so it’s unlikely that cranberry sauce would have been among the dishes served at the First Thanksgiving meal. Cranberries aren’t mentioned by any primary sources for the First Thanksgiving meal. The only foods mentioned are “Indian corn”, wild turkey and waterfowl, and venison. The rest remains a matter of speculation among food historians. Although stuffings are not mentioned in primary sources, it was a common way to prepare birds for the table in the 17th century. According to a “Thanksgiving Primer” published by the Plimoth Plantation, cranberries may have been used in the stuffing recipes, but it’s unlikely they would have been made into a sauce because sugar was very scarce.

Cranberry sauce was first offered to consumers in North America in 1912 in Hanson, Massachusetts. Canned cranberry sauce appeared on the market in 1941, allowing the product to be sold year-round. Cranberry sauce can be used with a variety of meats, including turkey, pork, chicken, and ham.

Cranberry jelly from a can, sliced

The most basic cranberry sauce consists of cranberries boiled in sugar water until the berries pop and the mixture thickens. Some recipes include other ingredients such as slivered almonds, orange juice, zest, ginger, maple syrup, port, or cinnamon.

Commercial cranberry sauce may be loose and uncondensed, or condensed or jellied and sweetened with various ingredients. The jellied form may be slipped out of a can onto a dish, and served sliced or intact for slicing at the table.

Cranberry sauce is often eaten in conjunction with turkey for Christmas in the United Kingdom and Canada or Thanksgiving in the United States and Canada, and it is only rarely eaten or served in other contexts there.

 

 

One of America’s Favorites – Custard Pie

November 2, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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Custard pie – A coconut cream pie

A custard pie is any type of uncooked custard mixture added to an uncooked or partially cooked crust and baked together. In North America, custard pie commonly refers to a plain mixture of milk, eggs, sugar, salt, vanilla extract and sometimes nutmeg combined with a pie crust. It is distinctly different from a cream pie, which contains cooked custard poured into a cooled, precooked crust. In the United Kingdom, the comical or political act of pieing is conventionally done with a “custard pie”. Some common custard pies include pumpkin pie, lemon and buttermilk chess pie, coconut cream pie, and buko pie. True custard is defined as a liquid thickened with eggs. Due to the often large number of whole eggs in custard pie it is a very rich pie.

The Ancient Romans were the first to understand the binding properties of eggs. During the Middle Ages, the first custard pies, as we know them, began to appear. Initially, custards were used only as fillings for pies, pastries and tarts. Both Europe and Asia had recipes that contained custards. The word custard is derived from ‘crustade’ which is a tart with a crust. After the 16th century, custards began to be used in individual dishes rather than as a filling in crusts.

Today, custards are used as filling in pies and tarts, and as individual dishes. Ideally a custard pie should be light and delicate, but still have good body. Custards can be made in two ways: baked or stirred upon the stove, but most custard pie recipes call for baking. The eggs in custard mixtures, when cooked, turn from liquid to solid. If cooked over excessive heat, the eggs will curdle, which is extremely undesirable. Curdling can be prevented by using lower temperatures and stirring. As such, making true custard pie is a very delicate process.

A slice of pear custard pie

Savory pies with meat fillings were far more common than sweet pies in the Cuisine of the Thirteen Colonies. Sweet pies, when they were available, were made with a simple custard base of fresh milk, sugar and eggs. Some of these traditional pies like buttermilk pie, almond custard, Irish potato pie and bean pie (associated with the Nation of Islam) are uncommon in modern times.

 

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 1, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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How can I make my coleslaw better, kick it up a bit…………………

Simply whisk together the mayo, a little sugar, cider vinegar, salt and pepper, chopped onions, parsley, and some celery salt. Add part of the slaw dressing to the coleslaw mix and give it a good toss. Add more dressing as needed after tasting the creamy coleslaw.

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