Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 1, 2017 at 6:15 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Stuff it…………

* Bread end pieces are great to save for making stuffing, and don’t limit yourself to plain white bread. All types of bread are suitable.
* Any variety of rice also makes an excellent stuffing, but the rice needs to be cooked first. Vegetables such as onion, garlic, celery, and mushrooms can be lightly sauteed before adding to the mixture.
* Space. Pack the stuffing loosely inside the turkey, because it will expand during cooking. Bake any stuffing that won’t fit in a covered casserole alongside the turkey.

Savory Buffalo Sausage Stuffing

November 22, 2017 at 6:31 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Here’s another Wild Idea Buffalo recipe – Savory Buffalo Sausage Stuffing. Made with Wild Idea Buffalo Chorizo, Italian or Breakfast Sausage. It’s a perfect Stuffing for the Holidays! You can find this recipe or purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Chorizo, Italian or Breakfast Sausage all at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

Savory Buffalo Sausage Stuffing:

Ingredients:
2 – tablespoons butter
2 – tablespoons olive oil
1 – 1 lb. Wild Idea Buffalo Chorizo, Italian or Breakfast Sausage
1 – onion, diced
3 – stalks celery, sliced
2 – teaspoons dried sage
2 – teaspoons dried thyme
1 – teaspoon ground fennel
1 – teaspoon salt
1 – tablespoon pepper
1 – 16 oz. bag herb seasoned stuffing
2 – cups organic chicken stock

Preparation:

1 – In heavy skillet over medium high heat, heat butter and olive oil.
2 – Crumble in sausage and add onion, celery and all of the dried seasonings. Sauté for 8 minutes.
3 – Add herbed stuffing and stir to incorporate.
4 – Slowly add you stock. Mixture should be moist and hold together.
5 – Transfer stuffing to a buttered casserole dish and bake in pre-heated oven for 45 minutes.
6 – Delicious with turkey, buffalo or by itself.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/thanksgiving-recipes

Healthy Acorn Squash Recipes

October 25, 2017 at 5:30 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Acorn Squash Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Acorn Squash Recipes like; Mexican Stuffed Acorn Squash, Southwestern Stuffed Acorn Squash, and Moroccan Chickpea-Stuffed Acorn Squash. Find these and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

Healthy Acorn Squash Recipes
Find healthy, delicious acorn squash recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Mexican Stuffed Acorn Squash
Fall favorite acorn squash gets a Mexican twist with a spicy-as-you-like-it turkey and veggie stuffing…..

Southwestern Stuffed Acorn Squash
Cumin and chili powder season a filling of turkey sausage, tomatoes, black beans and Swiss cheese for creamy acorn squash. Serve this stuffed squash with warmed corn tortillas for wrapping up bites of all the tasty ingredients……

Moroccan Chickpea-Stuffed Acorn Squash
Think of this healthy vegetarian side dish recipe as a meatless tagine served in a squash bowl. Kabocha, sweet dumpling or carnival squash make good alternatives to acorn squash. To make this side a hearty vegetarian meal, serve 2 halves each……

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Acorn Squash Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/21946/ingredients/vegetables/squash/winter/acorn/

Our Best Pork and Ham Recipes

December 18, 2016 at 6:17 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its Our Best Pork and Ham Recipes. Diabetic Friendly Pork and Ham recipes. Recipes that include; Italian Pork Chops, Lemon-Sage Pork Salad, and Pork with Pear Stuffing. Find them all at one of my favorite recipe sites, Diabetic Living Online. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Our Best Pork and Ham RecipesDiabetic living logo

These filling pork and ham recipes are high in protein and low in carbs, making them great additions to your diabetic diet.

 

 

Italian Pork Chops

Italian seasoning and balsamic vinegar lend authentic Italian flavor to these meaty chops…..

 
Lemon-Sage Pork Salad

If you don’t have time for the homemade vinaigrette in this recipe, use a purchased version — but make sure to look at the carbohydrate content to ensure that it fits into your diabetic meal plan…..

 
Pork with Pear Stuffing

This dish is both elegant and easy to prepare. Let the roast stand for a couple of minutes before slicing it across the grain on a slight diagonal. The stuffing adds a swirl of color to each slice and provides a sweet, nutty counterpoint to the tender pork……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the – Our Best Pork and Ham Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/pork/our-best-pork-ham-recipes

Thanksgiving Turkey Pie

November 26, 2016 at 6:18 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Still have leftover Turkey and dressing in the fridge? Put them to use with this recipe off the Jennie – O website, Thanksgiving Turkey Pie. you can find this recipe along with all the other delicious recipes at the Jennie – O website. Enjoy and Make the Switch! https://www.jennieo.com/

 

 

Thanksgiving Turkey Pie

Take Thanksgiving leftovers from blah to brilliant in less than 15 minutes of prep. Using your leftover stuffing, this fun, kid-friendly savory pie recipe will have the whole family gobble-gobbling all over again.

INGREDIENTSthanksgiving-turkey-pie

2½ cups prepared stuffing
1½ cups cubed JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Oven Roasted Turkey Breast
¼ cup chopped onion
1 cup shredded low-fat Swiss cheese
¾ cup milk
1 cup egg substitute or 4 eggs
2 teaspoons mustard
¼ teaspoon pepper
garnish with chopped parsley, if desired
DIRECTIONS

1) Heat oven to 350°F. Spray 9-inch pie plate with cooking spray. Press stuffing in pie plate to form pie crust. Add turkey to crust. Sprinkle with onion and cheese.
2) In small bowl, whisk milk, eggs, mustard and pepper. Pour into pie crust. Bake 35 to 40 minutes or until set. Garnish with chopped parsley, if desired.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATIONJennie O Make the Switch
PER SERVING
Calories180
Protein21g
Carbohydrates18g
Fiber1g
Sugars3g
Fat2.5g
Cholesterol35mg
Sodium800mg
Saturated Fat1g

https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/17-thanksgiving-turkey-pie

One of America’s Favorites – Stuffing

February 1, 2016 at 5:55 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Stuffed turkey

Stuffed turkey

Stuffing, filling or dressing is an edible substance or mixture, often a starch, used to fill a cavity in another food item while cooking. Many foods may be stuffed, including eggs, poultry, seafood, mammals, and vegetables.

Turkey stuffing often consists of dried bread, in the form of croutons, cubes or breadcrumbs, pork sausage meat, onion, celery, salt, pepper, and other spices and herbs such as summer savoury, sage, or a mixture like poultry seasoning. Giblets are often used. Popular additions in the United Kingdom include dried fruits and nuts (notably apricots and flaked almonds), and chestnuts.

 
It is not known when stuffings were first used. The earliest documentary evidence is the Roman cookbook, Apicius De Re Coquinaria, which contains recipes for stuffed chicken, dormouse, hare, and pig. Most of the stuffings described consist of vegetables, herbs and spices, nuts, and spelt (an old cereal), and frequently contain chopped liver, brains, and other organ meat.

Names for stuffing include “farce” (~1390), “stuffing” (1538), “forcemeat” (1688), and relatively more recently in the United States; “dressing” (1850).

 

 

Stuffed Parasol mushroom

Stuffed Parasol mushroom

In addition to stuffing the body cavity of animals, including birds, fish, and mammals, various cuts of meat may be stuffed after they have been deboned or a pouch has been cut into them. Popular recipes include stuffed chicken legs, stuffed pork chops, stuffed breast of veal, as well as the traditional holiday stuffed turkey or goose.

Many types of vegetables are also suitable for stuffing, after their seeds or flesh has been removed. Tomatoes, capsicums (sweet or hot peppers), vegetable marrows (e.g., zucchini) may be prepared in this way. Cabbages and similar vegetables can also be stuffed or wrapped around a filling. They are usually blanched first, in order to make their leaves more pliable. Then, the interior may be replaced by stuffing, or small amounts of stuffing may be inserted between the individual leaves.

It is sometimes claimed that the ancient Roman, as well as medieval, cooks stuffed animals with other animals. An anonymous Andalusian cookbook from the 13th century includes a recipe for a ram stuffed with small birds. A similar recipe for a camel stuffed with sheep stuffed with bustards stuffed with carp stuffed with eggs is mentioned in T.C. Boyle’s book Water Music.

British celebrity chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall has championed the ten-bird roast, calling it “one of the most spectacular and delicious roasts you can lay before your loved ones at Yuletide”. A large turkey is stuffed with a goose, duck, mallard, guinea fowl, chicken, pheasant, partridge, pigeon, and woodcock. The roast feeds approximately 30 people and, as well as the ten birds, includes stuffing made from two pounds of sausage meat and half a pound of streaky bacon, along with sage, and port and red wine.

In the United States and Eastern Canada, multi-bird dishes are sometimes served on special occasions. See gooducken and turducken.

 

 

Stuffed orange pepper

Stuffed orange pepper

Almost anything can serve as a stuffing. Many popular Anglo-American stuffings contain bread or cereals, usually together with vegetables, herbs and spices, and eggs. Middle Eastern vegetable stuffings may be based on seasoned rice, on minced meat, or a combination thereof. Other stuffings may contain only vegetables and herbs. Some types of stuffing contain sausage meat, or forcemeat, while vegetarian stuffings sometimes contain tofu. Roast pork is often accompanied by sage and onion stuffing in England; roast poultry in a Christmas dinner may be stuffed with sweet chestnuts. Oysters are used in one traditional stuffing for Thanksgiving. These may also be combined with mashed potatoes, for a heavy stuffing. Fruits and dried fruits can be added to stuffing including apples, apricots, dried prunes,and raisins. In England, a stuffing is sometimes made of minced pork shoulder seasoned with various ingredients, sage, onion, bread, chestnuts, dried apricots, dried cranberries etc. The stuffing mixture may be cooked separately and served as a side dish. This may still be called stuffing or it may be called dressing.

 
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that cooking animals with a body cavity filled with stuffing can present potential food safety issues. These can occur because when the meat reaches a safe temperature, the stuffing inside can still harbor bacteria (and if the meat is cooked until the stuffing reaches a safe temperature, the meat may be overcooked). For turkeys, for instance, the USDA recommends cooking stuffing/dressing separately from the bird and not buying pre-stuffed birds. (Stuffing is never recommended for turkeys to be fried, grilled, microwaved, or smoked).

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 19, 2015 at 6:33 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Save that leftover Bread….

 
Save all kinds of leftover bread, bagels, baguettes, sandwich loaves, rolls, crackers, biscuits, and buzz to very fine crumbs in the food processor. Freeze in self-sealing plastic bags and use for stuffing and toppings.

One of America’s Favorites – Thanksgiving Dinner

November 26, 2014 at 6:28 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A traditional Thanksgiving dinner

A traditional Thanksgiving dinner

The centerpiece of contemporary Thanksgiving in the United States and Canada is a large meal, generally centered on a large roasted turkey. The majority of the dishes in the traditional American version of Thanksgiving dinner are made from foods native to the New World, as according to tradition the Pilgrims received these foods from the Native Americans. However, many of the classic traditions attributed to the first Thanksgiving are actually myths later introduced.

 

 

 

According to what traditionally is known as “The First Thanksgiving,” the 1621 feast between the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag at Plymouth Colony contained turkey, waterfowl, venison, fish, lobster, clams, berries, fruit, pumpkin, and squash. William Bradford noted that, “besides waterfowl, there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many.” Many of the foods that were included in the first feast (except, notably, the seafood) have since gone on to become staples of the modern Thanksgiving dinner.

The use of the turkey in the USA for Thanksgiving precedes Lincoln’s nationalization of the holiday in 1863. Alexander Hamilton proclaimed that no “Citizen of the United States should refrain from turkey on Thanksgiving Day,” and many of the Founding Fathers (particularly Benjamin Franklin) had high regard for the wild turkey as an American icon, but turkey was uncommon as Thanksgiving fare until after 1800. By 1857, turkey had become part of the traditional dinner in New England.

 

 

 

A Thanksgiving Day dinner served to the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935 included: pickles, green olives, celery, roast turkey, oyster stew, cranberry sauce, giblet gravy, dressing, creamed asparagus tips, snowflake potatoes, baked carrots, hot rolls, fruit salad, mince meat pie, fruit cake, candies, grapes, apples, clams, fish, and many other food harvests. French drip coffee, cigars and cigarettes.

The White House Cook Book, 1887, by Mrs. F.L. Gillette, et al., had the following menu: oysters on half shell, cream of chicken soup, fried smelts, sauce tartare, roast turkey, cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, baked squash, boiled onions, parsnip fritters, olives, chicken salad, venison pastry, pumpkin pie, mince-pie, Charlotte russe, almond ice cream, lemon jelly, hickory nut cake, cheese, fruits and coffee.

 

 

 

Turkey being the most common main dish of a Thanksgiving dinner, Thanksgiving is sometimes colloquially called “Turkey Day.” In 2006, American turkey growers were expected to raise 270 million turkeys, to be processed into five billion pounds of turkey meat valued at almost $8 billion, with one-third of all turkey consumption occurring in the Thanksgiving-Christmas season, and a per capita consumption of almost 18 pounds (8.2 kg). The Broad Breasted White turkey is particularly bred for Thanksgiving dinner and similar large feasts; its large size (specimens can grow to over 40 pounds) and meat content make it ideal for such situations, although the breed must be artificially bred and suffers from health problems due to its size.

Most Thanksgiving turkeys are stuffed with a bread-based mixture and roasted. Sage is the traditional herb added to the stuffing (also called dressing), along with chopped celery, carrots, and onions. Deep-fried turkey is rising in popularity, a deep-fried Thanksgiving turkey can be prepared using a propane deep fryer outdoors. When deep-frying a turkey it must be completely thawed and patted dry for safety. Attempting to fry frozen or partially frozen turkeys can result in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion due to the high water content of the turkey. When frying a turkey outdoors using a propane turkey fryer the following safety measures should be followed including avoiding oil spillover by not overfilling the pot, turning off the flame when lowering the turkey into oil, frying outside away from the home, garage, and other structures including wooden decks. A grease fire approved fire extinguisher should also be nearby in case of accidental fire. A Thanksgiving turkey can also be fried in an alternative infrared turkey fryer which uses no oil. Infrared turkey fryers can be purchased from many retailers including many big box stores, home improvement warehouse stores, and directly from the manufacturer online. In more recent years it is also true that as the wild population of turkeys has rebounded in most of the US, some will hunt and dress their turkey in the woods and then freeze it until meal preparation.

 

 

 

Oven roasted turkey

Oven roasted turkey

Butterball, a national turkey producer, runs a well-known hotline (the “Turkey Talk Line”) for those who need assistance cooking a turkey.

Non-traditional foods other than turkey are sometimes served as the main dish for a Thanksgiving dinner. Ham is often served alongside turkey in many households. Goose and duck, foods which were traditional European centerpieces of Christmas dinners before being displaced, are now sometimes served in place of the Thanksgiving turkey. Sometimes, fowl native to the region where the meal is taking place is used; for example, an article in Texas Monthly magazine suggested quail as the main dish for a Texan Thanksgiving feast. John Madden, who appeared on television for the NFL Thanksgiving Day game from 1981 to 2001, frequently advocated his fondness for the turducken, deboned turkey, duck and chicken nested inside each other than cooked. In a few areas of the West Coast of the United States, Dungeness crab is common as an alternate main dish, as crab season starts in early November.”Similarly, Thanksgiving falls within deer hunting season in the Northeastern United States, which encourages the use of venison as a centerpiece. Sometimes a variant recipe for cooking turkey is used; for example, a Chinese recipe for goose could be used on the similarly sized American bird. Vegetarians or vegans may have a tofu-based substitute; a Field Roast, which is a wheat-based product; or a special seasonal dish, such as stuffed squash. In Alaskan villages, whale meat is sometimes eaten. Irish immigrants have been known to have prime rib of beef as their centerpiece since beef in Ireland was once a rarity; families would save up money for this dish to signify newfound prosperity and hope.

 

 

 

In the United States, a globalist approach to Thanksgiving has become common with the impact of immigration. Basic “Thanksgiving” ingredients, or the intent of the holiday, can be transformed to a variety of dishes by using flavors, techniques, and traditions from their own cuisines. Others celebrate the holiday with a variety of dishes particularly when there is a crowd to be fed, guest’s tastes vary and considering the financial means available.

Many other foods are typically served alongside the main dish—so many that, because of the amount of food, the Thanksgiving meal is sometimes served midday or early afternoon to make time for all the eating, and preparation may begin at dawn or on days prior. Copious leftovers are also common following the meal proper.

Traditional Thanksgiving foods are sometimes specific to the day, and although some of the foods might be seen at any semi-formal meal in the United States, the meal often has something of a ritual or traditional quality. Many Americans would say it is “incomplete” without cranberry sauce; stuffing or dressing; and gravy. Other commonly served dishes include winter squash; sweet potatoes; mashed potatoes; dumplings; noodles; corn on the cob or hominy; deviled eggs; green beans or green bean casserole; sauerkraut (among those in the Mid-Atlantic; especially Baltimore); peas and carrots; bread rolls; cornbread (in the south and parts of New England); or biscuits, rutabagas or turnips; and a salad. For dessert, various pies are often served, particularly apple pie, mincemeat pie, sweet potato pie, pumpkin pie, chocolate cream pie and pecan pie.

 

 

A Thanksgiving meal in New England

A Thanksgiving meal in New England

There are also regional differences as to the stuffing or dressing traditionally served with the turkey. Southerners generally make their dressing from cornbread, while those in other parts of the country make stuffing from white, wheat or rye bread as the base. One or several of the following may be added to the dressing/stuffing: oysters, apples, chestnuts, raisins, celery and/or other vegetables, sausages or the turkey’s giblets. The traditional Canadian version has bread cubes, sage, onion and celery. Rice is also sometimes used instead of bread in some parts of Canada.

Other dishes reflect the region or cultural background of those who have come together for the meal. For example, many African-Americans and Southerners serve baked macaroni and cheese and collard greens, along with chitterlings and sweet potato pie, while some Italian-Americans often have lasagne on the table and Ashkenazi Jews may serve noodle kugel, a sweet dessert pudding. Other Jewish families may consume foods commonly associated with Hanukkah, such as latkes or a sufganiyah; the two holidays are usually in close proximity and on extremely rare occasions overlap. It is not unheard of for Mexican Americans to serve their turkey with mole and roasted corn. In Puerto Rico, the Thanksgiving meal is completed with arroz con gandules (rice with pigeon peas) or arroz con maiz (rice with corn), pasteles (root tamales) stuffed with turkey, pumpkin-coconut crème caramel, corn bread with longaniza, potato salad, roasted white sweet potatoes and Spanish sparkling hard cider. Turkey in Puerto Rico is stuffed with mofongo. Cuban-Americans traditionally serve the turkey alongside a small roasted pork and include white rice and black beans or kidney beans. Vegetarians or vegans have been known to serve alternative entree centerpieces such as a large vegetable pie or a stuffed and baked pumpkin or tofu substitutes. Many Midwesterners (such as Minnesotans) of Norwegian or Scandinavian descent set the table with lefse, (Lefse is a traditional soft, Norwegian flatbread.)

 

 

 

The beverages at Thanksgiving can vary as much as the side dishes, often depending on who is present at the table and their tastes. Spirits or cocktails sometimes may be served before the main meal. On the dinner table, unfermented apple cider (still or sparkling) and/or wine are often served. Pitchers of sweet tea can often be found on Southern tables. Beaujolais nouveau is sometimes served, as “Beaujolais day” falls before American Thanksgiving.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 
Have a Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!

 

Wild idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Wild Idea Stuffed Bison Roast with Red Wine Gravy

November 19, 2014 at 6:25 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | 1 Comment
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This week’s Wild idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is Wild Idea Stuffed Bison Roast with Red Wine Gravy. This one sounds like a perfect Holiday Entrée! Another delicious recipe from Jill O’Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo. http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

 

Wild Idea Stuffed Bison Roast with Red Wine Gravy
By: Jill O’Brien
I tested this recipe out on visiting guests, and it was a big success! prepping the roast will take a little effort, but a sharp filet knife will make it very manageable. The end result will be a very tender, medium roast, with a delicious, savory sausage stuffing and red wine gravy!

 

Wild Idea Stuffed Bison Roast with Red Wine GravyStuffed Bison Roast with Red Wine Gravy

 

Roast & Gravy Ingredients:
1 – 3 lb. Wild Idea Sirloin Tip or Top Round Roast
1 – tablespoon olive oil
½ – tablespoon black pepper
½ – tablespoon salt
1 – onion, coarse chopped and flash processed
½ recipe Savory Buffalo Sausage Stuffing (Use other half for your organic Turkey or chicken or just heat by itself.)
2 – sticks butter
¼ – cup flour
1 – quart buffalo, organic beef stock
2 – cups wine
1 – tablespoon fresh rosemary, minced
½ – tablespoon thyme
½ – tablespoon sage
Instructions: *Preheat oven to 185°
1) Rinse roast and pat dry. Remove any exterior fat. Using a filet knife butterfly roast, in a jelly roll fashion. You will make 3 major cuts lengthwise, starting about 1½ inches in from left, slicing down about 2 inches, flip roast slightly and slice again, repeat. You will encounter a piece of sinew that runs through the roast, slice through and contend with after flat.
2) Flatten out meat with hands. Using the tip of the filet knife remove visible sinew, but avoid cutting through, which will produce holes. Cut away any miss-shaped end pieces and reserve. There will still be a little sinew in roast, which can be cut away during serving time.
3) Cover roast with plastic wrap and using a mallet or rolling pin, pound out to about 1 inch thick.
4) Place stuffing down the center of the roast and wrap meat around until meat touches. Secure with heavy toothpicks.
5) Pour olive oil, salt and pepper in roasting pan and mix together. Roll roast in seasoned oil, until evenly coated. Add miss-shaped meat pieces to the roasting pan.
6) Place chopped onion in food processor and flash process, to create smaller pieces and release some of the onions juices.
7) Pour onions with juices over roast, and press lightly in to meat.
8) Place roast in pre-heated oven and roast for 5 hours.
9) Remove roast from oven, and from roasting pan and wrap in foil. Set aside. Increase oven temperature to 500°.
10) In a saucepan melt one stick of the butter over medium heat. Scrape onion bits and juices from the roasting pan, into the saucepan. Whisk in flour, and stir until well incorporated and lightly brown.
11) Slowly whisk in stock and wine, stirring constantly.
12) Add seasoning and bring to a full boil. Reduce heat and allow to simmer until reduce by a third.
13) Remove roast from foil and return roast to pan. Melt remaining stick of butter and pour over the onions on top of the roast. Return roast to lower shelf in oven, and turn oven to broil. Roast until onions are golden brown.
14) Remove roast from oven. Transfer roast to cutting board, for carving. Pass with Red Wine Gravy.

 

 

Savory Buffalo Sausage StuffingWild Idea
Ingredients:
2 – Tablespoons butter
2 – Tablespoons olive oil
1 – 1 lb. Buffalo Breakfast Sausage, Chorizo or Italian
1 – onion, diced
3 – stalks celery, sliced
2 – teaspoons dried sage
2 – teaspoons dried thyme
1 – teaspoon ground fennel
1 – teaspoon salt
1 – Tablespoon pepper
1 – 14oz. bag herbed seasoned stuffing
2½ – cups organic chicken stock

 

Instructions:
1.) In heavy skillet over medium high heat, heat butter and olive oil.
2.) Crumble in Sausage, add; onion, celery and all of the dried seasonings. Sauté for 8 minutes.
3.) Add herbed stuffing and stir to incorporate.
4.) Slowly add you stock. Mixture should be moist and hold together.
5.) Transfer stuffing to a different pan to cool, and follow instructions above.

 
http://wildideabuffalo.com/2014/wild-idea-stuffed-bison-roast-with-red-wine-gravy/

Pork Chops w/ Pork Stuffing, Au Gratin Casserole, Sugar Snap Peas

July 5, 2013 at 5:34 PM | Posted in beans, Idahoan Potato Products, pork chops | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Pork Chops w/ Pork Stuffing, Au Gratin Casserole, and Sugar Snap Peaslast stage beans cooling Pork Chop 002

 

 
Busy day of canning 14 qts. of Half Runner Green Beans! Nothing better than fresh canned beans and with 14 qts. that should last a while (Hopefully). I’ll have pictures and instructions on how we canned the beans tomorrow. Having 2 stoves on day like this would be nice as the canner took up half the stove top area, the last batch of beans weren’t done after 7:00 pm. It made dinner prep cramped but still was able to cook. Mom was real tired so her and my Dad went out to eat as for me I prepared a Fried Pork Chop w/ Pork Stuffing, Au Gratin Casserole, and Sugar Snap Peas.

 

 
To prepare my Chop I seasoned it with Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper and then dusted it with a bit of flour, to give it a slight crust. I pan fried it in Canola Oil about minutes per side. Comes out browned and moist.

 

 

 

For side dishes I prepared a box of Stove Top Dressing (Pork). I wasn’t a big fan of any stuffing until last week when I made some Stove Top Stuffing for dinner last week and I couldn’t get enough of it! That was the Chicken Stove Top so I thought I would give the Pork a try and it was just as delicious! I am a fan of Stuffing, at least Stove Top Stuffing, now. I also baked a Idahoan Au Gratin Homestyle Casserole. A breeze to prepare and always a perfect Potato dish. I also microwaved a bag of Walmart Marketside Sugar Snap Peas. A perfect meal to end a productive day! For dessert later a Healthy Choice Vanilla Bean Frozen Yogurt.

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