Jennie – O Recipe of the Week – Turkey, Asparagus, Cranberry and Brie Wrap

November 26, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Recipe of the Week is a Turkey, Asparagus, Cranberry and Brie Wrap. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Cranberry Jelly, Whole Wheat Tortillas, Asparagus Spears, shredded leftover JENNIE-O® OVEN READY™ Turkey, leftover Stuffing, Brie Cheese, and Leftover Stuffing. Great recipe to use some leftovers! You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Stay Safe and Make the SWITCH in 2021! https://www.jennieo.com/

Turkey, Asparagus, Cranberry and Brie Wrap
This holiday-themed Turkey, Asparagus, Cranberry & Brie Wrap is a total game changer in the sandwich/wrap world. Shredded turkey, asparagus, leftover stuffing, brie cheese, and cranberry jelly— try for yourself and witness this tortilla wrapped miracle.

Total Time: 30 Minutes
Serving Size: 2 Servings

Ingredients
3 – tablespoons cranberry jelly
2 – whole wheat flour tortillas
12 – asparagus spears or green beans, cooked until just tender
1 – cup shredded leftover JENNIE-O® OVEN READY™ Turkey
1/2 – cup leftover stuffing
2 – ounces brie cheese, thinly sliced
Leftover gravy to serve, if desired

Directions
1 – Spread jelly over one side of each tortilla. Place asparagus, turkey, stuffing and brie cheese down the center of both tortillas. Roll-up to enclose filling.

2 – Spray grill with cooking spray.

3 – Cook 5 minutes on each side or until crisp.

4 – Serve with gravy, if desired.

Nutrition
Calories – 420
Protein – 33g
Carbohydrates – 45g
Fiber – 5g
Sugars – 11g
Fat – 12g
Cholesterol – 60mg
Sodium – 870mg
Saturated Fat – 5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/turkey-asparagus-cranberry-brie-wrap/

Happy Thanksgiving……

November 25, 2021 at 5:41 PM | Posted in Aunt Millie's Live Carb Smart, Bob Evan's, Ham, Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Full Thanksgiving Dinner

I would like to wish each and everyone of you a Happy Thanksgiving! Just a short Dinner Post tonight as we are enjoying Thanksgiving Dinner at our house with a few family members. Me and Mom made a full Thanksgiving Day Menu.

 

 

We had Roasted Turkey, Baked Ham, Mashed Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes Casserole, Green Beans, Baked Amish Beans, Sweet Corn Kernels, Stuffing, and Baked Rolls. Then Mom baked a Pumpkin Pie, Pecan Pie, Chocolate Pie, and Apple Pie. The Pies were made using Splenda Sugar Substitute. Time to take a nap! Hope all of you are having a Happy Thanksgiving. Stay Safe and Take Care!

One of America’s Favorites – Stuffing

November 15, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Stuffing a turkey

Stuffing, filling, or dressing is an edible mixture, often composed of herbs and a starch such as bread, used to fill a cavity in the preparation of another food item. Many foods may be stuffed, including poultry, seafood, and vegetables. As a cooking technique stuffing helps retain moisture, while the mixture itself serves to augment and absorb flavors during its preparation.

Poultry stuffing often consists of breadcrumbs, onion, celery, spices, and herbs such as sage, combined with the giblets. Additions in the United Kingdom include dried fruits and nuts (such as apricots and flaked almonds), and chestnuts.

It is not known when stuffings were first used. The earliest documentary evidence is the Roman cookbook, Apicius De Re Coquinaria, which contains recipes for stuffed chicken, dormouse, hare, and pig. Most of the stuffings described consist of vegetables, herbs and spices, nuts, and spelt (an old cereal), and frequently contain chopped liver, brains, and other organ meat.

Names for stuffing include “farce” (~1390), “stuffing” (1538), “forcemeat” (1688), and relatively more recently in the United States; “dressing” (1850).

In addition to stuffing the body cavity of animals, including birds, fish, and mammals, various cuts of meat may be stuffed after they have been deboned or a pouch has been cut into them. Recipes include stuffed chicken legs, stuffed pork chops, stuffed breast of veal, as well as the traditional holiday stuffed turkey or goose.

Stuffed turkey

Many types of vegetables are also suitable for stuffing, after their seeds or flesh has been removed. Tomatoes, capsicums (sweet or hot peppers), vegetable marrows (e.g., zucchini) may be prepared in this way. Cabbages and similar vegetables can also be stuffed or wrapped around a filling. They are usually blanched first, in order to make their leaves more pliable. Then, the interior may be replaced by stuffing, or small amounts of stuffing may be inserted between the individual leaves.

Purportedly ancient Roman, or else Medieval, cooks developed engastration recipes, stuffing animals with other animals. An anonymous Andalusian cookbook from the 13th century includes a recipe for a ram stuffed with small birds. A similar recipe for a camel stuffed with sheep stuffed with bustards stuffed with carp stuffed with eggs is mentioned in T.C. Boyle’s book Water Music. Multi-bird-stuffed dishes such as the turducken or gooducken are contemporary variations.

Almost anything can serve as a stuffing. Many Anglo-American stuffings contain bread or cereals, usually together with vegetables, herbs and spices, and eggs. Middle Eastern

Stuffed orange pepper

vegetable stuffings may be based on seasoned rice, on minced meat, or a combination thereof. Other stuffings may contain only vegetables and herbs. Some types of stuffing contain sausage meat, or forcemeat, while vegetarian stuffings sometimes contain tofu. Roast pork is often accompanied by sage and onion stuffing in England; roast poultry in a Christmas dinner may be stuffed with sweet chestnuts. Oysters are used in one traditional stuffing for Thanksgiving. These may also be combined with mashed potatoes, for a heavy stuffing. Fruits and dried fruits can be added to stuffing including apples, apricots, dried prunes, and raisins. In England, a stuffing is sometimes made of minced pork shoulder seasoned with various ingredients, sage, onion, bread, chestnuts, dried apricots, dried cranberries etc. The stuffing mixture may be cooked separately and served as a side dish. This may still be called stuffing or it may be called dressing.

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that cooking animals with a body cavity filled with stuffing can present potential food safety issues. These can occur because when the meat reaches a safe temperature, the stuffing inside can still harbor bacteria (and if the meat is cooked until the stuffing reaches a safe temperature, the meat may be overcooked). For turkeys, for instance, the USDA recommends cooking stuffing separately from the bird and not buying pre-stuffed birds.

One of America’s Favorites – Turkey

November 8, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A roast turkey prepared for a traditional U.S. Thanksgiving meal. The white plastic object in the breast is a pop-up thermometer.

Turkey meat, commonly referred to as just turkey, is the meat from turkeys, typically domesticated turkeys but also wild turkeys. It is a popular poultry dish, especially in North America, where it is traditionally consumed as part of culturally significant events such as Thanksgiving and Christmas, as well as in standard cuisine.

Turkeys are sold sliced and ground, as well as “whole” in a manner similar to chicken with the head, feet, and feathers removed. Frozen whole turkeys remain popular. Sliced turkey is frequently used as a sandwich meat or served as cold cuts; in some cases where recipes call for chicken, it can be used as a substitute. Ground turkey is sold, and frequently marketed as a healthy alternative to ground beef. Without careful preparation, cooked turkey is usually considered to end up less moist than other poultry meats such as chicken or duck.

Wild turkeys, while technically the same species as domesticated turkeys, have a very different taste from farm-raised turkeys. Almost all of the meat is “dark” (including the breast) with a more intense flavor. The flavor can also vary seasonally with changes in available forage, often leaving wild turkey meat with a gamier flavor in late summer, due to the greater number of insects in its diet over the preceding months. Wild turkey that has fed predominantly on grass and grain has a milder flavor. Older heritage breeds also differ in flavor. Traditionally raised English turkey meat has been granted the EU and UK designation Traditional Specialty Guaranteed under the name Traditional Farm Fresh Turkey.

A large amount of turkey meat is processed. It can be smoked, and as such, is sometimes sold as turkey ham or turkey bacon, which is considered to be far healthier than pork bacon. Twisted helices of deep-fried turkey meat, sold as “turkey twizzlers”, came to prominence in the UK in 2004, when chef Jamie Oliver campaigned to have them and similar foods removed from school dinners.

Roast turkey

Unlike chicken eggs, turkey eggs are not commonly sold as food due to the high demand for whole turkeys and lower output of eggs as compared with other fowl (not only chickens, but even ducks or quail). The value of a single turkey egg is estimated to be about $3.50 on the open market, substantially more than an entire carton of one dozen chicken eggs.

Turkeys are traditionally eaten as the main course of Thanksgiving dinner feasts in the United States and Canada, and at Christmas dinner feasts in much of the rest of the world[citation needed] (often as stuffed turkey).

Turkey meat has been eaten by indigenous peoples from Mexico, Central America, and the southern tier of the United States since antiquity. In the 15th century, Spanish conquistadores took Aztec turkeys back to Europe.

Turkey was eaten in as early as the 16th century in England. Before the 20th century, pork ribs were the most common food for the North American holidays, as the animals were usually slaughtered in November. Turkeys were once so abundant in the wild that they were eaten throughout the year, the food considered commonplace, whereas pork ribs were rarely available outside of the Thanksgiving–New Year season. While the tradition of turkey at Christmas spread throughout Britain in the 17th century, among the working classes, it became common to serve goose, which remained the predominant roast until the Victorian era.

Turkey with mole is regarded as Mexico’s “national dish”.

Both fresh and frozen turkeys are used for cooking; as with most foods, fresh turkeys are generally preferred, although they cost more. Around holiday seasons, high demand for fresh turkeys often makes them difficult to purchase without ordering in advance. For the frozen variety, the large size of the turkeys typically used for consumption makes defrosting them a major endeavor: a typically sized turkey will take several days to properly defrost.

A roast turkey, a traditional American Thanksgiving meal.

Turkeys are usually baked or roasted in an oven for several hours, often while the cook prepares the remainder of the meal. Sometimes, a turkey is brined before roasting to enhance flavor and moisture content. This is done because the dark meat requires a higher temperature to denature all of the myoglobin pigment than the white meat (very low in myoglobin), so that fully cooking the dark meat tends to dry out the breast. Brining makes it possible to fully cook the dark meat without drying the breast meat. Turkeys are sometimes decorated with turkey frills, paper frills or “booties” that are placed on the end of drumsticks or bones of other cutlets.

In some areas, particularly the American South, they may also be deep fried in hot oil (often peanut oil) for 30 to 45 minutes by using a turkey fryer. Deep frying turkey has become something of a fad, with hazardous consequences for those unprepared to safely handle the large quantities of hot oil required.

Nutrition
When raw, turkey breast meat is 74% water, 25% protein, 1% fat, and contains no carbohydrates (table). In a 100-gram (3+1⁄2-ounce) reference amount, turkey breast supplies 465 kilojoules (111 kilocalories) of food energy, and contains high amounts (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of protein, niacin, vitamin B6, and phosphorus, with moderate content (10–19% DV) of pantothenic acid and zinc.

A 100 gram amount of turkey breast contains 279 mg of tryptophan, a low content compared to other amino acids in turkey breast meat. There is no scientific evidence that this amount of tryptophan from turkey causes

For Thanksgiving in the United States, turkey is traditionally served stuffed or with dressing (on the side), with cranberry sauce and gravy. Common complementary dishes include mashed potatoes, corn on the cob, green beans, squash, and sweet potatoes. Pie is the usual dessert, especially those made from pumpkins, apples, or pecans. It can also be eaten at Christmas in the United States and North America.

Roast turkey served with salad, sauces, sparkling apple juice, and Yule Log cake during a Christmas dinner feast.

For Christmas in the United Kingdom, turkey is traditionally served with winter vegetables, including roast potatoes, Brussels sprouts, and parsnips. Cranberry sauce is the traditional condiment in the northern rural areas of the United Kingdom where wild cranberries grow. In the south and in urban areas, where cranberries until recently were difficult to obtain, bread sauce was used in its place, but the availability of commercial cranberry sauce has seen a rise in its popularity in these areas, too. Sometimes, sausage meat, cocktail sausages, or liver wrapped in bacon is also served (known as bacon rolls or “pigs in blankets”).

Especially during holiday seasons around Thanksgiving and Christmas, stuffing or dressing is traditionally served with turkey. The many varieties include oatmeal, chestnut, sage and onion (flavored bread), cornbread, and sausage are the most traditional. Stuffing is used to stuff the turkey (as the name implies) or may be cooked separately and served as a side dish (dressing).

Make-Ahead Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes

November 6, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Make-Ahead Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes. Find Time Saving, Delicious, and Healthy Make-Ahead Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes with recipes including Maple-Roasted Sweet Potatoes, Creamy Make-Ahead Mashed Potatoes, and Cornbread and Oyster-Mushroom Stuffing. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Make-Ahead Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes
Find healthy Thanksgiving side dishes to make ahead including cranberry, mashed potato, squash and green bean recipes.

Maple-Roasted Sweet Potatoes
In this easy vegetable side dish recipe, sweet potatoes are tossed with maple syrup, butter and lemon juice and are roasted until tender and golden brown. The delicious glaze that forms on these maple-roasted sweet potatoes transform this ultra-simple dish into something sublime……

Creamy Make-Ahead Mashed Potatoes
These mashed potatoes can be served right away or made up to two days in advance, making your Thanksgiving or any other meal as easy as can be!…..

Cornbread and Oyster-Mushroom Stuffing
Mushrooms are a rich, meaty addition in this healthy cornbread stuffing recipe. Here we use oyster mushrooms, but you can use any variety you like. If you have time, bake the cornbread a day or two in advance so it has time to dry out a bit, which lets it absorb the flavors more readily……

* Click the link below to get all the Make-Ahead Thanksgiving Side Dish Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/21864/holidays-occasions/thanksgiving/side-dishes/make-ahead/

Thanksgiving Turkey Pie

November 20, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Still have leftover Turkey and dressing in the fridge? Put them to use with this recipe from the Jennie – O Turkey website, Thanksgiving Turkey Pie. To make this recipe you’ll need Prepared Stuffing, Leftover Jennie – O Roasted Turkey, Onion, Low Fat Swiss Cheese, Milk, Egg Substitute, Mustard, Pepper, and Parsley. You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes and Product Information at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the Switch in 2020! https://www.jennieo.com/

Thanksgiving Turkey Pie

Take Thanksgiving leftovers from blah to brilliant in less than 15 minutes of prep. Using your leftover stuffing, this fun, kid-friendly savory pie recipe will have the whole family gobble-gobbling all over again.

INGREDIENTS

2½ cups prepared stuffing
1½ cups cubed JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Oven Roasted Turkey Breast
¼ cup chopped onion
1 cup shredded low-fat Swiss cheese
¾ cup milk
1 cup egg substitute or 4 eggs
2 teaspoons mustard
¼ teaspoon pepper
garnish with chopped parsley, if desired

DIRECTIONS

1) Heat oven to 350°F. Spray 9-inch pie plate with cooking spray. Press stuffing in pie plate to form pie crust.

2) Add turkey to crust. Sprinkle with onion and cheese.

3) In small bowl, whisk milk, eggs, mustard and pepper. Pour into pie crust. Bake 35 to 40 minutes or until set.

4) Garnish with chopped parsley, if desired.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING
Calories 180
Protein 21 g
Carbohydrates 18 g
Fiber 1 g
Sugars 3 g
Fat 2.5 g
Cholesterol l35 mg
Sodium 800 mg
Saturated Fat 1 g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/thanksgiving-turkey-pie/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

November 10, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Is your stuffing drying out………………….

The key to a good stuffing is using just the right amount of liquid so you get a good contrast of soft and firm pieces. Add too much stock and you’ll find yourself with soggy stuffing. Don’t add enough stock, and you have an overly dry stuffing on your hands.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 17, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Save the Bread scraps……………………….

Put bread ends or scraps into a big bag in the freezer to save for homemade croutons, stuffing, or breadcrumbs.

One of America’s Favorites – Cornbread

February 10, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Cornbread is a generic name for any number of quick breads containing cornmeal and leavened by baking powder.

Skillet cornbread

Native Americans were using ground corn (maize) for food thousands of years before European explorers arrived in the New World. European settlers, especially those who resided in the southern English colonies, learned the original recipes and processes for corn dishes from the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek, and soon they devised recipes for using cornmeal in breads similar to those made of grains available in Europe. Cornbread has been called a “cornerstone” of Southern United States cuisine. Cornmeal is produced by grinding dry raw corn grains. A coarser meal (compare flour) made from corn is grits. Grits are produced by soaking raw corn grains in hot water containing calcium hydroxide (the alkaline salt), which loosens the grain hulls (bran) and increases the nutritional value of the product (by increasing available niacin and available amino acids). These are separated by washing and flotation in water, and the now softened slightly swelled grains are called hominy. Hominy, posole in Spanish, also is ground into masa harina for tamales and tortillas). This ancient Native American technology has been named nixtamalization. Besides cornbread, Native Americans used corn to make numerous other dishes from the familiar hominy grits to alcoholic beverages (such as Andean chicha). Cornbread was popular during the American Civil War because it was very cheap and could be made in many different forms—high-rising, fluffy loaves or simply fried (as unleavened pone, corn fritters, hoecakes, etc.)
“ To a far greater degree than anyone realizes, several of the most important food dishes that the Southeastern Indians live on today is the “soul food” eaten by both black and white Southerners. Hominy, for example, is still eaten … Sofkee live on as grits … cornbread is used by Southern cooks … Indian fritters … variously known as “hoe cake”, … or “Johnny cake“. … Indian boiled cornbread is present in Southern cuisine as “corn meal dumplings”, … and as “hush puppies”, … Southerners cook their beans and field peas by boiling them, as did the Indians … like the Indians they cure their meat and smoke it over hickory coals. ”
—- Charles Hudson, The Southeastern Indians.

Types of cornbread

Home baked cornbread made with blue cornmeal

Cornbread is a popular item in soul food enjoyed by many people for its texture and aroma. Cornbread can be baked, fried or, rarely, steamed. Steamed cornbread is mushy, chewier and more like cornmeal pudding than what most consider to be traditional cornbread. Cornbread can also be baked into corn cakes.

* Baked cornbread – Cornbread is a common bread in United States cuisine, particularly associated with the South and Southwest, as well as being a traditional staple for populations where wheat flour was more expensive. In some parts of the South it is crumbled into a glass of cold milk or buttermilk and eaten with a spoon, and it is also widely eaten with barbecue and chili con carne. In rural areas of the southern United States in the mid 20th century cornbread, accompanied by pinto beans (often called soup beans in this context) or honey, was a common lunch for poor children. It is still a common side dish, often served with homemade butter, chunks of onion or scallions. Cornbread crumbs are also used in some poultry stuffings; cornbread stuffing is particularly associated with Thanksgiving turkeys.

In the United States, Northern and Southern cornbread are different because they generally use different types of corn meal and varying degrees of sugar and eggs. A preference for sweetness and adding sugar or molasses can be found in both regions, but salty or savory tastes are sometimes more common in the South, and thus favor using buttermilk in the batter or such additions as cracklins. Cornbread is occasionally crumbled and served with cold milk similar to cold cereal. In Texas, the Mexican influence has spawned a hearty cornbread made with fresh or creamed corn kernels, jalapeño peppers and topped with shredded cheese.

* Skillet-fried or skillet-baked cornbread (often simply called skillet bread or hoecake depending on the container in which it is cooked) is a traditional staple in the rural United States, especially in the South. This involves heating bacon drippings, lard or other oil in a heavy, well-seasoned cast iron skillet in an oven, and then pouring a batter made from cornmeal, egg, and milk directly into the hot grease. The mixture is returned to the oven to bake into a large, crumbly and sometimes very moist cake with a crunchy crust. This bread tends to be dense and usually served as an accompaniment rather than as a bread served as a regular course. In addition to the skillet method, such cornbread also may be made in sticks, muffins, or loaves.
A slightly different variety, cooked in a simple baking dish, is associated with northern US cuisine; it tends to be sweeter and lighter than southern-style cornbread; the batter for northern-style cornbread is very similar to and sometimes interchangeable with that of a corn muffin. A typical contemporary northern U.S. cornbread recipe contains half wheat flour, half cornmeal, milk or buttermilk, eggs, leavening agent, salt, and usually sugar, resulting in a bread that is somewhat lighter and sweeter than the traditional southern version. In the border states and parts of the Upper South, a cross between the two traditions is known as “light cornbread.”
Unlike fried variants of cornbread, baked cornbread is a quick bread that is dependent on an egg-based protein matrix for its structure (though the addition of wheat flour adds gluten to increase its cohesiveness). The baking process gelatinizes the starch in the cornmeal, but still often leaves some hard starch to give the finished product a distinctive sandiness not typical of breads made

Cornbread, prepared as a muffin

from other grains.

* Corn pone – Corn pone (sometimes referred to as “Indian pone“) is a type of cornbread made from a thick, malleable cornmeal dough (which is usually egg-less and milk-less) and baked in a specific type of iron pan over an open fire (such as a frontiersman would use), using butter, margarine, or cooking oil. Corn pones have been a staple of Southern U.S. cuisine, and have been discussed by many American writers, including Mark Twain.
In the Appalachian Mountains, cornbread baked in a round iron skillet or in a cake pan of any shape is still referred to as a “pone” of cornbread (as opposed to “hoe cakes,” the term for cornbread fried in pancake style), and when biscuit dough (i.e., “biscuits” in the American sense of the word) is occasionally baked in one large cake rather than as separate biscuits this is called a “biscuit pone.”
The term “corn pone” is sometimes used derogatively to refer to one who possesses certain rural, unsophisticated peculiarities (“he’s a corn pone”), or as an adjective to describe particular rural, folksy or “hick” characteristics (e.g., “corn pone” humor). This pejorative term often is directed at persons from rural areas of the southern and midwestern U.S. President John F. Kennedy‘s staffers, who despised Texan Vice-President Lyndon B. Johnson, used to refer to him behind his back as ‘Uncle Cornpone’ or ‘Rufus Cornpone’.

* Hot water cornbread – Cooked on a rangetop, one frying method involves pouring a small amount of liquid batter made with boiling water and self-rising cornmeal (cornmeal with soda or some other chemical leavener added) into a skillet of hot oil, and allowing the crust to turn golden and crunchy while the center of the batter cooks into a crumbly, mushy bread. These small (3-4″ diameter) fried breads are soft and very rich. Sometimes, to ensure the consistency of the bread, a small amount of wheat flour is added to the batter. This type of cornbread is often known as “hot water” or “scald meal” cornbread and is unique to the American South.

Johnnycakes on a plate

* Johnnycakes – Pouring a batter similar to that of skillet-fried cornbread, but slightly thinner, into hot grease atop a griddle or a skillet produces a pancake-like bread called a johnnycake. This type of cornbread is prevalent in New England, particularly in Rhode Island, and also in the American Midwest and the American South. It is reminiscent of the term hoecake, used in the American South for fried cornbread pancakes, which may date back to stories about some people on the frontier making cornbread patties on the blade of a hoe.

* Hushpuppies – A thicker buttermilk-based batter which is deep-fried rather than pan-fried, forms the hushpuppy, a common accompaniment to fried fish and other seafood in the South. Hushpuppy recipes vary from state to state, some including onion seasoning, chopped onions, beer, or jalapeños. Fried properly, the hushpuppy will be moist and yellow or white on the inside, while crunchy and light to medium-dark golden brown on the outside.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 25, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Less stress Christmas Day……………………….

There is so much that can be done a day or two ahead of time: stuffing can be prepared, sprouts can be peeled, carrots can be chopped, the gravy and other sauces can be made, you can even partially roast the potatoes and other vegetables and finish them off on the day. Doing as much as you can the day before will ensure your cooking the Christmas dinner is much less stressful.

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